The Merry Wives of Windsor
mainCont width actsCont width
mainCont left actsCont left
mainCont right actsCont right
selAct left selAct right
  absolutní levá pozice
  acts cont padding (l/r) 3%

First folio
Modern text

Definitions

Key line

Enter M. Ford, M. Page, Seruants, Robin, Falstaffe, Ford, Page, Caius, Euans.Enter Mistress Ford and Mistress Page MW III.iii.1
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What Iohn, what Robert.What, John! What, Robert! MW III.iii.1
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Quickly, quickly: Is the Buck-basket ---Quickly, quickly! Is the buck-basket –buck-basket (n.)basket for dirty laundryMW III.iii.2
Mis. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I warrant. What Robin I say.I warrant. What, Robert, I say!warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmMW III.iii.3
Enter John and Robert with a great buck-basket MW III.iii.4
Mis. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Come, come, come.Come, come, come. MW III.iii.4
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Heere, set it downe.Here, set it down. MW III.iii.5
M. Pag. MISTRESS PAGE 
Giue your men the charge, we must beGive your men the charge. We must becharge (n.)command, order, injunction, instructionMW III.iii.6
briefe.brief. MW III.iii.7
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Marrie, as I told you before (Iohn & Marry, as I told you before, John andmarry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryMW III.iii.8
Robert) be ready here hard-by in the Brew-house, &Robert, be ready here hard by in the brew-house. Andbrew-house (n.)outhouse used for brewing liquorMW III.iii.9
hard (adv.)close, near
when I sodainly call you, come forth, and (without anywhen I suddenly call you, come forth, and, without any MW III.iii.10
pause, or staggering) take this basket on your shoulders: pause or staggering, take this basket on your shoulders. MW III.iii.11
yt done, trudge with it in all hast, and carry itThat done, trudge with it in all haste, and carry it MW III.iii.12
among the Whitsters in Dotchet Mead, and there emptyamong the whitsters in Datchet Mead, and there emptywhitster (n.)linen-bleacher, whitener of clothingMW III.iii.13
it in the muddie ditch, close by the Thames side.it in the muddy ditch close by the Thames side. MW III.iii.14
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
You will do it?You will do it? MW III.iii.15
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I ha told them ouer and ouer, theyI ha' told them over and over – they MW III.iii.16
lacke no direction. Be gone, and come when you arelack no direction. – Be gone, and come when you are MW III.iii.17
call'd.called. MW III.iii.18
Exeunt John and Robert MW III.iii.18
Enter Robin MW III.iii.19
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Here comes little Robin.Here comes little Robin. MW III.iii.19
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
How now my Eyas-Musket, what newes How now, my eyas-musket, what newseyas-musket (n.)young male sparrow-hawkMW III.iii.20
with you?with you? MW III.iii.21
Rob. ROBIN 
My M. Sir Iohn is come in at your backe dooreMy master, Sir John, is come in at your back-door, MW III.iii.22
Mist. Ford, and requests your company.Mistress Ford, and requests your company. MW III.iii.23
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
You litle Iack-a-lent, haue you binYou little Jack-a-Lent, have you beenJack-a-Lent (n.)
old form: Iack-a-lent
[jocular; male figure used as an Aunt Sally during Lent] puppet, poppet, doll
MW III.iii.24
true to vstrue to us? MW III.iii.25
Rob. ROBIN 
I, Ile be sworne: my Master knowes not of yourAy, I'll be sworn. My master knows not of your MW III.iii.26
being heere: and hath threatned to put me into euerlastingbeing here, and hath threatened to put me into everlasting MW III.iii.27
liberty, if I tell you of it: for he sweares he'll turneliberty if I tell you of it; for he swears he'll turnturn away (v.)
old form: turne
send away, dismiss from service
MW III.iii.28
me away.me away. MW III.iii.29
Mist. Pag. MISTRESS PAGE 
Thou'rt a good boy: this secrecy ofThou'rt a good boy. This secrecy of MW III.iii.30
thine shall be a Tailor to thee, and shal make thee a newthine shall be a tailor to thee and shall make thee a new MW III.iii.31
doublet and hose. Ile go hide me.doublet and hose. I'll go hide me.doubletman's close-fitting jacket with short skirtMW III.iii.32
hose (n.)[pair of] breeches
Mi. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Do so: go tell thy Master, IDo so. (To Robin) Go tell thy master I MW III.iii.33
am alone:am alone. MW III.iii.34
Exit Robin MW III.iii.34
Mistris Page, remember you your Qu.Mistress Page, remember you your cue. MW III.iii.35
Mist. Pag. MISTRESS PAGE 
I warrant thee, if I do not act it, hisse me.I warrant thee. If I do not act it, hiss me.warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmMW III.iii.36
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Go-too then: we'l vse this vnwholsomeGo to, then. We'll use this unwholesomeunwholesome (adj.)
old form: vnwholsome
harmful, damaging, noxious
MW III.iii.37
use (v.)
old form: vse
treat, deal with, manage
humidity, this grosse-watry Pumpion; we'll teach himhumidity, this gross watery pumpion. We'll teach himpumpion (n.)pumpkinMW III.iii.38
humidity (n.)bundle of fluids
gross (adj.)
old form: grosse
coarse, vulgar, unrefined
to know Turtles from Iayes.to know turtles from jays.jay (n.)
old form: Iayes
[bird of bright plumage] showy woman, whore
MW III.iii.39
turtle (n.)turtle-dove, lover
Exit Mistress Page MW III.iii.39
Enter Falstaff MW III.iii.40
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Haue I caught thee, my heauenly Iewell? WhyHave I caught thee, my heavenly jewel? Why, MW III.iii.40
now let me die, for I haue liu'd long enough: This isnow let me die, for I have lived long enough. This is MW III.iii.41
the period of my ambition: O this blessed houre.the period of my ambition. O this blessed hour!period (n.)point of completion, fitting conclusion, consummationMW III.iii.42
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
O sweet Sir Iohn.O sweet Sir John! MW III.iii.43
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Mistris Ford, I cannot cog, I cannot prateMistress Ford, I cannot cog, I cannot prate,cog (v.)flatter, fawn, sweet-talkMW III.iii.44
prate (v.)prattle, chatter, blather
(Mist.Ford) now shall I sin in my wish; I would thyMistress Ford. Now shall I sin in my wish: I would thy MW III.iii.45
Husband were dead, Ile speake it before the best Lord,husband were dead. I'll speak it before the best lord, MW III.iii.46
I would make thee my Lady.I would make thee my lady. MW III.iii.47
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I your Lady Sir Iohn? Alas, I should bee aI your lady, Sir John? Alas, I should be MW III.iii.48
pittifull Lady.a pitiful lady. MW III.iii.49
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Let the Court of France shew me such another:Let the court of France show me such another. MW III.iii.50
I see how thine eye would emulate the Diamond: ThouI see how thine eye would emulate the diamond. Thou MW III.iii.51
hast the right arched-beauty of the brow, that becomeshast the right arched beauty of the brow that becomesbecome (v.)bear, handle, presentMW III.iii.52
the Ship-tyre, the Tyre-valiant, or any Tire of Venetianthe ship-tire, the tire-valiant, or any tire of Venetianbrow (n.)forehead [often plural, referring to the two prominences of the forehead]MW III.iii.53
ship-tire (n.)
old form: Ship-tyre
fashionable head-dress shaped like a ship
tire-valiant (n.)
old form: Tyre-valiant,
fine head-dress
tire (n.)head-dress, ornament for the head, raiment
admittance.admittance.admittance (n.)fashion, acceptance, vogueMW III.iii.54
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
A plaine Kerchiefe, Sir Iohn: My browesA plain kerchief, Sir John. My browsbrow (n.)
old form: browes
forehead [often plural, referring to the two prominences of the forehead]
MW III.iii.55
kerchief (n.)
old form: Kerchiefe
cloth head-covering, scarf
become nothing else, nor that well neither.become nothing else, nor that well neither. MW III.iii.56
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Thou art a tyrant to say so: thou wouldst Thou art a tyrant to say so. Thou wouldst MW III.iii.57
make an absolute Courtier, and the firme fixture of thymake an absolute courtier, and the firm fixture of thyabsolute (adj.)perfect, complete, incomparableMW III.iii.58
fixture (n.)way of placing, setting down
foote, would giue an excellent motion to thy gate, in a foot would give an excellent motion to thy gait in agait (n.)
old form: gate
manner of walking, bearing, movement
MW III.iii.59
semi-circled Farthingale. I see what thou wert if Fortunesemi-circled farthingale. I see what thou wert if Fortune,Fortune (n.)Roman goddess, shown as a woman at a spinning wheel, or controlling a rudder, and as blindMW III.iii.60
farthingale (n.)long skirt extended at the back by a framework of hoops
thy foe, were not Nature thy friend: Come,thy foe, were – not Nature – thy friend. Come, MW III.iii.61
thou canst not hide it.thou canst not hide it. MW III.iii.62
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Beleeue me, ther's no such thing in me.Believe me, there's no such thing in me. MW III.iii.63
Fal. FALSTAFF 
What made me loue thee? Let that perswadeWhat made me love thee? Let that persuade MW III.iii.64
thee. Ther's something extraordinary in thee: Come, Ithee there's something extraordinary in thee. Come, I MW III.iii.65
cannot cog, and say thou art this and that, like a-manie ofcannot cog and say thou art this and that, like a many ofcog (v.)flatter, fawn, sweet-talkMW III.iii.66
these lisping-hauthorne buds, that come like women inthese lisping hawthorn-buds that come like women inhawthorn-bud (n.)
old form: hauthorne buds
young dandy, budding courtier
MW III.iii.67
mens apparrell, and smell like Bucklers-berry in simple time:men's apparel and smell like Bucklersbury in simple-time.Bucklersbury (n.)East End street with aromatic herb shops, near Mansion House, LondonMW III.iii.68
apparel (n.)
old form: apparrell
clothes, clothing, dress
simple-time (n.)
old form: simple time
summer-time [when aromatic herbs used as medicines (simples) were available]
I cannot, but I loue thee, none but thee; and thouI cannot. But I love thee, none but thee; and thou MW III.iii.69
deseru'st it.deservest it. MW III.iii.70
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Do not betray me sir, I fear you loueDo not betray me, sir. I fear you love MW III.iii.71
M. Page.Mistress Page. MW III.iii.72
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Thou mightst as well say, I loue to walke by theThou mightst as well say I love to walk by the MW III.iii.73
Counter-gate, which is as hatefull to me, as the reeke of aCounter-gate, which is as hateful to me as the reek of aCounter-gate (n.)[gate of the Counter] debtor's prisons in LondonMW III.iii.74
reek (n.)
old form: reeke
foggy vapour, steam, fume, smoke
Lime-kill.lime-kiln. MW III.iii.75
Mis Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Well, heauen knowes how I loue you, / AndWell, heaven knows how I love you, and MW III.iii.76
you shall one day finde it.you shall one day find it. MW III.iii.77
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Keepe in that minde, Ile deserue it.Keep in that mind – I'll deserve it. MW III.iii.78
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Nay, I must tell you, so you doe; / Or elseNay, I must tell you, so you do, or else MW III.iii.79
I could not be in that minde.I could not be in that mind. MW III.iii.80
Enter Robin MW III.iii.81
Rob. ROBIN 
Mistris Ford, Mistris Ford: heere's Mistris Mistress Ford, Mistress Ford! Here's Mistress MW III.iii.81
Page at the doore, sweating, and blowing, and lookingPage at the door, sweating and blowing and looking MW III.iii.82
wildely, and would needs speake with you presently.wildly, and would needs speak with you presently.presently (adv.)immediately, instantly, at onceMW III.iii.83
Fal. FALSTAFF 
She shall not see me, I will ensconce mee behindeShe shall not see me. I will ensconce me behindensconce, insconce (v.)protect, conceal, shelterMW III.iii.84
the Arras.the arras.arras (n.)tapestry hangingMW III.iii.85
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Pray you do so, she's a very tatlingPray you, do so. She's a very tattlingtattling (adj.)
old form: tatling
gossiping, tale-telling, rumour-mongering
MW III.iii.86
woman.woman. MW III.iii.87
Falstaff hides himself MW III.iii.88.1
Enter Mistress Page MW III.iii.88.2
Whats the matter? How now?What's the matter? How now? MW III.iii.88
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
O mistris Ford what haue you done?O Mistress Ford, what have you done? MW III.iii.89
You'r sham'd, y'are ouerthrowne, y'are vndone forYou're shamed, you're overthrown, you're undone foroverthrown (adj.)
old form: ouerthrowne
ruined, disgraced, brought into disrepute
MW III.iii.90
undone (adj.)
old form: vndone
ruined, destroyed, brought down
euer.ever. MW III.iii.91
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What's the matter, good mistris Page?What's the matter, good Mistress Page? MW III.iii.92
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
O weladay, mist. Ford, hauing anO well-a-day, Mistress Ford, having anwell-a-day (int.)exclamation of grief, sorrow, upset, etcMW III.iii.93
honest man to your husband, to giue him such cause of honest man to your husband, to give him such cause of MW III.iii.94
suspition.suspicion! MW III.iii.95
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What cause of suspition?What cause of suspicion? MW III.iii.96
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
What cause of suspition? Out vponWhat cause of suspicion? Out upon MW III.iii.97
you: How am I mistooke in you?you! How am I mistook in you! MW III.iii.98
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why (alas) what's the matter?Why, alas, what's the matter? MW III.iii.99
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Your husband's comming hether (Woman)Your husband's coming hither, woman, MW III.iii.100
with all the Officers in Windsor, to search for a Gentleman,with all the officers in Windsor, to search for a gentleman MW III.iii.101
that he sayes is heere now in the house; by your consentthat he says is here now in the house, by your consent, MW III.iii.102
to take an ill aduantage of his absence: you are vndone.to take an ill advantage of his absence. You are undone.advantage (n.)
old form: aduantage
benefit, gain, advancement, profit
MW III.iii.103
ill (adj.)evil, wicked, immoral
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
'Tis not so, I hope.'Tis not so, I hope. MW III.iii.104
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Pray heauen it be not so, that you haue Pray heaven it be not so that you have MW III.iii.105
such a man heere: but 'tis most certaine your husband'ssuch a man here! But 'tis most certain your husband's MW III.iii.106
comming, with halfe Windsor at his heeles, to serch for suchcoming, with half Windsor at his heels, to search for such MW III.iii.107
a one, I come before to tell you: If you know your selfea one. I come before to tell you. If you know yourself MW III.iii.108
cleere, why I am glad of it: but if you haue a friend here,clear, why, I am glad of it. But if you have a friend here,clear (adj.)
old form: cleere
innocent, blameless, free from fault, not guilty
MW III.iii.109
friend (n.)lover, sweetheart, suitor
conuey, conuey him out. Be not amaz'd, call all yourconvey, convey him out. Be not amazed, call all yourconvey (v.)
old form: conuey
conceal, hide, secrete
MW III.iii.110
amazed (adj.)
old form: amaz'd
dumbfounded, stunned, thunderstruck, overwhelmed
senses to you, defend your reputation, or bid farwell tosenses to you, defend your reputation, or bid farewell to MW III.iii.111
your good life for euer.your good life for ever.good lifecomfortable position, respectable way of lifeMW III.iii.112
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What shall I do? There is a GentlemanWhat shall I do? There is a gentleman, MW III.iii.113
my deere friend: and I feare not mine owne shame so much,my dear friend; and I fear not mine own shame so much MW III.iii.114
as his perill. I had rather then a thousand pound he wereas his peril. I had rather than a thousand pound he were MW III.iii.115
out of the house.out of the house. MW III.iii.116
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
For shame, neuer stand (you had rather,For shame, never stand ‘ you had rather ’stand (v.)dwell on, waste time with, rely uponMW III.iii.117
and you had rather:) your husband's heere at hand,and ‘ you had rather ’! Your husband's here at hand. MW III.iii.118
bethinke you of some conueyance: in the house youBethink you of some conveyance. In the house youbethink (v.), past form bethought
old form: bethinke
devise, plan, think up
MW III.iii.119
cannot hide him. Oh, how haue you deceiu'd me? Looke,cannot hide him. – O, how have you deceived me! – Look, MW III.iii.120
heere is a basket, if he be of any reasonable stature, hehere is a basket. If he be of any reasonable stature, he MW III.iii.121
may creepe in heere, and throw fowle linnen vpon him, as ifmay creep in here; and throw foul linen upon him, as iffoul (adj.)
old form: fowle
dirty, miry, muddy
MW III.iii.122
it were going to bucking: Or it is whiting time, send himit were going to bucking. Or – it is whiting-time – sendbucking (n.)washing, laundryMW III.iii.123
whiting-time (n.)
old form: whiting time
whitening time, time for clothes-bleaching
by your two men to Datchet-Meade.him by your two men to Datchet Mead. MW III.iii.124
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
He's too big to go in there: what shall IHe's too big to go in there. What shall I MW III.iii.125
do?do? MW III.iii.126
Falstaff rushes out of hiding MW III.iii.127
Fal. FALSTAFF 
Let me see't, let me see't, O let me see't: IleLet me see't, let me see't. O, let me see't! I'll MW III.iii.127
in, Ile in: Follow your friends counsell, Ile in.in, I'll in. Follow your friend's counsel. I'll in. MW III.iii.128
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
What Sir Iohn Falstaffe?What, Sir John Falstaff? (Aside to him) MW III.iii.129
Are these your Letters, Knight?Are these your letters, knight? MW III.iii.130
Fal. FALSTAFF  
(aside to Mistress Page) MW III.iii.131
I loue thee,I love thee, and none MW III.iii.131
helpe mee away: let me creepe in heere: ilebut thee. Help me away. Let me creep in here. I'll MW III.iii.132
neuer ---never – MW III.iii.133
He gets into the basket; they cover him with foul MW III.iii.134.1
linen MW III.iii.134.2
M. Page. MISTRESS PAGE  
(to Robin) MW III.iii.134
Helpe to couer your masterHelp to cover your master, MW III.iii.134
(Boy:) Call your men (Mist. Ford.)boy. Call your men, Mistress Ford. (Aside to Falstaff) MW III.iii.135
You dissembling Knight.You dissembling knight!dissembling (adj.)deceitful, hypocritical, falseMW III.iii.136
Exit Robin MW III.iii.136
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
What Iohn, Robert, Iohn;What, John! Robert! John! MW III.iii.137
Enter John and Robert MW III.iii.138
Go, take vp these cloathes heere, quickly: Wher's theGo, take up these clothes here. Quickly! Where's the MW III.iii.138
Cowle-staffe? Look how you drumble? Carry them to thecowl-staff? Look how you drumble! Carry them to thedrumble (v.)dawdle, loiter, move sluggishlyMW III.iii.139
cowl-staff (n.)
old form: Cowle-staffe
thick shoulder-pole used for carrying a heavy container
Landresse in Datchet mead: quickly, come.laundress in Datchet Mead. Quickly! Come. MW III.iii.140
Enter Ford, Page, Caius, and Evanscome near (v.)
old form: nere
enter, come in/into
MW III.iii.141
Ford. FORD  
(to his companions) MW III.iii.141
'Pray you come nere: if I suspect Pray you, come near. If I suspect MW III.iii.141
without cause, / Why then make sport at me, then let mewithout cause, why then make sport at me; then let mesport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainmentMW III.iii.142
be your iest, / I deserue it: How now?be your jest; I deserve it. (To John and Robert) How now? MW III.iii.143
Whether beare you this?Whither bear you this? MW III.iii.144
Ser. JOHN and ROBERT 
To the Landresse forsooth?To the laundress, forsooth.forsooth (adv.)in truth, certainly, truly, indeedMW III.iii.145
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Why, what haue you to doe whether theyWhy, what have you to do whither they MW III.iii.146
beare it? You were best meddle with buck-washing.bear it? You were best meddle with buck-washing.buck-washing (n.)process of washing very dirty clothing in an alkaline mix [buck]MW III.iii.147
Ford. FORD 
Buck? I would I could wash my selfe of ye Buck:Buck? I would I could wash myself of the buck!buck (n.)laundry, quantity of soiled clothesMW III.iii.148
Bucke, bucke, bucke, I bucke: I warrant you Bucke, / AndBuck, buck, buck! Ay, buck! I warrant you, buck – andwarrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmMW III.iii.149
of the season too; it shall appeare.of the season too, it shall appear.season, of the[of male deer] in the rutting season, on heatMW III.iii.150
Exeunt John and Robert with the basket MW III.iii.150
Gentlemen, I haue dream'd to night, Ile tell you myGentlemen, I have dreamed tonight. I'll tell you mytonight (adv.)
old form: to night
last night, this past night
MW III.iii.151
dreame: heere, heere, heere bee my keyes, ascend my Chambers, dream. Here, here, here be my keys. Ascend my chambers. MW III.iii.152
search, seeke, finde out: Ile warrant wee'le vnkennellSearch, seek, find out. I'll warrant we'll unkennelunkennel (v.)
old form: vnkennell
reveal, bring to light, expose
MW III.iii.153
the Fox. Let me stop this way first: the fox. Let me stop this way first. MW III.iii.154
He locks the door MW III.iii.155
so, now vncape.So; now escape. MW III.iii.155
Page. PAGE 
Good master Ford, be contented: / You wrong your selfeGood master Ford, be contented. You wrong yourselfcontented (adj.)calm, easy in mind, restrainedMW III.iii.156
wrong (v.)put in the wrong, do injustice to, injure
too much.too much. MW III.iii.157
Ford. FORD 
True (master Page) vp Gentlemen, / You shall see True, Master Page. Up, gentlemen, you shall see MW III.iii.158
sport anon: / Follow me Gentlemen.sport anon. Follow me, gentlemen.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyMW III.iii.159
sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainment
Exit MW III.iii.159
Euans. EVANS 
This is fery fantasticall humors and iealousies.This is fery fantastical humours and jealousies.humour (n.)
old form: humors
fancy, whim, inclination, caprice
MW III.iii.160
Caius. CAIUS 
By gar, 'tis no-the fashion of France: / It is notBy gar, 'tis no the fashion of France. It is notgar (n.)French pronunciation of ‘God’MW III.iii.161
iealous in France.jealous in France. MW III.iii.162
Page. PAGE 
Nay follow him (Gentlemen) see the yssue of his Nay, follow him, gentlemen. See the issue of hisissue (n.)
old form: yssue
outcome, result, consequence(s)
MW III.iii.163
search.search. MW III.iii.164
Exeunt Page, Caius, and Evans MW III.iii.164
Mist Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Is there not a double excellency in this?Is there not a double excellency in this? MW III.iii.165
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I know not which pleases me better,I know not which pleases me better – MW III.iii.166
That my husband is deceiued, or Sir Iohn.that my husband is deceived, or Sir John. MW III.iii.167
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
What a taking was hee in, when yourWhat a taking was he in when yourtaking (n.)state, fright, agitationMW III.iii.168
husband askt who was in the basket?husband asked who was in the basket! MW III.iii.169
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I am halfe affraid he will haue neede ofI am half afraid he will have need of MW III.iii.170
washing: so throwing him into the water, will doe him awashing; so throwing him into the water will do him a MW III.iii.171
benefit.benefit. MW III.iii.172
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
Hang him dishonest rascall: I would allHang him, dishonest rascal! I would alldishonest (adj.)indecent, unchaste, immodest, lewdMW III.iii.173
of the same straine, were in the same distresse.of the same strain were in the same distress.strain (n.)
old form: straine
quality, character, disposition
MW III.iii.174
Mist. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
I thinke my husband hath some speciallI think my husband hath some special MW III.iii.175
suspition of Falstaffs being heere: for I neuer saw him suspicion of Falstaff's being here, for I never saw him MW III.iii.176
so grosse in his iealousie till now.so gross in his jealousy till now.gross (adj.)
old form: grosse
plain, striking, evident, obvious
MW III.iii.177
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
I will lay a plot to try that, and wee willI will lay a plot to try that, and we willlay (v.)set up, arrange, deviseMW III.iii.178
yet haue more trickes with Falstaffe: his dissolute diseaseyet have more tricks with Falstaff. His dissolute disease MW III.iii.179
will scarse obey this medicine.will scarce obey this medicine.obey (v.)respond to, be affected byMW III.iii.180
Mis. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Shall we send that foolishion Carion,Shall we send that foolish carrioncarrion (n.)
old form: Carion
carcass, wretch, worthless beast
MW III.iii.181
Mist. Quickly to him, and excuse his throwing intoMistress Quickly to him, and excuse his throwing into MW III.iii.182
the water, and giue him another hope, to betray him tothe water, and give him another hope to betray him tobetray (v.)give up, expose, lay open [especially: to punishment]MW III.iii.183
hope (n.)likelihood, possibility
another punishment?another punishment? MW III.iii.184
Mist. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
We will do it: let him be sent forWe will do it. Let him be sent for MW III.iii.185
to morrow eight a clocke to haue amends.tomorrow eight o'clock, to have amends. MW III.iii.186
Enter Ford, Page, Caius, and Evans MW III.iii.187
Ford. FORD 
I cannot finde him: may be the knaue bragg'd of thatI cannot find him. Maybe the knave bragged of that MW III.iii.187
he could not compasse.he could not compass.compass (v.)
old form: compasse
accomplish, fulfil, achieve, bring about
MW III.iii.188
knave (n.)
old form: knaue
scoundrel, rascal, rogue
Mis. Page. MISTRESS PAGE  
(aside to Mistress Ford) MW III.iii.189
Heard you that?Heard you that? MW III.iii.189
Mis. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
You vse me well, M. Ford? Do you?You use me well, Master Ford! Do you? MW III.iii.190
Ford. FORD 
I, I do so.Ay, I do so. MW III.iii.191
M. Ford. MISTRESS FORD 
Heauen make you better then yourHeaven make you better than your MW III.iii.192
thoghtsthoughts. MW III.iii.193
Ford. FORD 
Amen.Amen. MW III.iii.194
Mi. Page. MISTRESS PAGE 
You do your selfe mighty wrong (M. You do yourself mighty wrong, Masterwrong (n.)dishonour, discredit, harmMW III.iii.195
Ford)Ford. MW III.iii.196
Ford. FORD 
I, I: I must beare it.Ay, ay, I must bear it. MW III.iii.197
Eu. EVANS 
If there be any pody in the house, & in theIf there be anypody in the house, and in the MW III.iii.198
chambers, and in the coffers, and in the presses: heauenchambers, and in the coffers, and in the presses, heavenpress (n.)clothes-press, cupboard, wardrobeMW III.iii.199
forgiue my sins at the day of iudgement.forgive my sins at the day of judgement. MW III.iii.200
Caius. CAIUS 
Be gar, nor I too: there is no-bodies.By gar, nor I too. There is nobodies. MW III.iii.201
Page. PAGE 
Fy, fy, M. Ford, are you not asham'd? What Fie, fie, Master Ford, are you not ashamed? What MW III.iii.202
spirit, what diuell suggests this imagination? I wold notspirit, what devil suggests this imagination? I would notimagination (n.)delusion, fancy, imaginingMW III.iii.203
suggest (v.)tempt, prompt, incite
ha your distemper in this kind, for ye welth of Windsor ha' your distemper in this kind for the wealth of Windsordistemper (n.)bad temper, cross moodMW III.iii.204
castle.Castle. MW III.iii.205
Ford. FORD 
'Tis my fault (M. Page) I suffer for it.'Tis my fault, Master Page. I suffer for it.fault (n.)failing, weaknessMW III.iii.206
Euans. EVANS 
You suffer for a pad conscience: your wife is asYou suffer for a pad conscience. Your wife is as MW III.iii.207
honest a o'mans, as I will desires among fiue thousand,honest a 'omans as I will desires among five thousand, MW III.iii.208
and fiue hundred too.and five hundred too. MW III.iii.209
Cai. CAIUS 
By gar, I see 'tis an honest woman.By gar, I see 'tis an honest woman. MW III.iii.210
Ford. FORD 
Well, I promisd you a dinner: come, come, walkWell, I promised you a dinner. Come, come, walk MW III.iii.211
in the Parke, I pray you pardon me: I wil hereafter makein the Park. I pray you pardon me. I will hereafter make MW III.iii.212
knowne to you why I haue done this. Come wife, comeknown to you why I have done this. Come, wife, come, MW III.iii.213
Mi. Page, I pray you pardon me. Pray hartlyMistress Page, I pray you pardon me. Pray heartily MW III.iii.214
pardon me.pardon me. MW III.iii.215
Page. PAGE 
Let's go in Gentlemen, but (trust me) we'l mockLet's go in, gentlemen; but, trust me, we'll mock MW III.iii.216
him: I doe inuite you to morrow morning to my house tohim. I do invite you tomorrow morning to my house to MW III.iii.217
breakfast: after we'll a Birding together, I haue a finebreakfast. After, we'll a-birding together. I have a finebirding (n.)hunting small birdsMW III.iii.218
Hawke for the bush. Shall it be so:hawk for the bush. Shall it be so? MW III.iii.219
Ford. FORD 
Any thing.Anything. MW III.iii.220
Eu. EVANS 
If there is one, I shall make two in the CompanieIf there is one, I shall make two in the company. MW III.iii.221
Ca. CAIUS 
If there be one, or two, I shall make-a-theturd.If there be one or two, I shall make-a the turd. MW III.iii.222
Ford. FORD 
Pray you go, M. Page.Pray you go, Master Page. MW III.iii.223
Exeunt all but Evans and Caius MW III.iii.223
Eua.EVANS 
I pray you now remembrance to morrow on theI pray you now, remembrance tomorrow on theremembrance (v.)mistake for ‘remember’MW III.iii.224
lowsie knaue, mine Host.lousy knave, mine host.knave (n.)
old form: knaue
scoundrel, rascal, rogue
MW III.iii.225
Cai. CAIUS 
Dat is good by gar, withall my heart.Dat is good. By gar, with all my heart. MW III.iii.226
Eua. EVANS 
A lowsie knaue, to haue his gibes, and his mockeries. A lousy knave, to have his gibes and his mockeries.gibe (n.)scoff, taunt, jeerMW III.iii.227
Exeunt.Exeunt MW III.iii.227
 Previous Act III, Scene III Next  
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL