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PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.39education promises her dispositions she inherits – whicheducation promises her dispositions shee inherits, which
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.43better for their simpleness. She derives her honesty andbetter for their simplenesse; she deriues her honestie, and
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.68Was this fair face the cause, quoth she,Was this faire face the cause, quoth she,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.72With that she sighed as she stood,With that she sighed as she stood, bis
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.73With that she sighed as she stood,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.98and she herself, without other advantage, may lawfullyand she her selfe without other aduantage, may lawfullie
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.99make title to as much love as she finds. There is moremake title to as much loue as shee findes, there is more
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.103think she wished me. Alone she was, and did communicatethinke shee wisht mee, alone shee was, and did communicate
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.104to herself her own words to her own ears; sheto her selfe her owne words to her owne eares, shee
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.106stranger sense. Her matter was, she loved your son.stranger sence, her matter was, shee loued your Sonne;
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.107Fortune, she said, was no goddess, that had put suchFortune shee said was no goddesse, that had put such
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.112or ransom afterward. This she delivered in the mostor ransome afterward: This shee deliuer'd in the most
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.210But lend and give where she is sure to lose;But lend and giue where she is sure to loose;
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.212But riddle-like lives sweetly where she dies.But riddle like, liues sweetely where she dies.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.79Why, Doctor She! My lord, there's one arrived,Why doctor she: my Lord, there's one arriu'd,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.62Helena addresses the LordsShe addresses her to a Lord.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.108.1What she has done for me?done for mee?
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.110Thou knowest she has raised me from my sickly bed.Thou know'st shee ha's rais'd me from my sickly bed.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.113She had her breeding at my father's charge.Shee had her breeding at my fathers charge:
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.120In differences so mighty. If she beIn differences so mightie. If she bee
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.130Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair;Not by the title. Shee is young, wise, faire,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.142I can create the rest. Virtue and sheI can create the rest: Vertue, and shee
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.169Flies where you bid it, I find that she, which lateFlies where you bid it: I finde that she which late
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.173And tell her she is thine: to whom I promiseAnd tell her she is thine: to whom I promise
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.294I'll to the wars, she to her single sorrow.Ile to the warres, she to her single sorrow.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.1My mother greets me kindly. Is she well?My mother greets me kindly, is she well?
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.2She is not well, but yet she has her health; she'sShe is not well, but yet she has her health, she's
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.3very merry, but yet she is not well. But thanks be givenvery merrie, but yet she is not well: but thankes be giuen
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.4she's very well and wants nothing i'th' world; but yet sheshe's very well, and wants nothing i'th world: but yet she
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.6If she be very well, what does she ail that she'sIf she be verie wel, what do's she ayle, that she's
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.20would she did as you say.would she did as you say.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.19 Is she gone to the King?Is shee gone to the king?
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.20She is.Shee is.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.21Will she away tonight?Will shee away to night?
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.12She opens the letter
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.20daughter-in-law; she hath recovered the King and undonedaughter-in-Law, shee hath recouered the King, and vndone
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.56(She reads the letter aloud)
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.80But only she, and she deserves a lordBut onely she, and she deserues a Lord
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.2Might you not know she would do as she has doneMight you not know she would do, as she has done,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.22.1Which thus she hath prevented.Which thus she hath preuented.
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.24She might have been o'erta'en; and yet she writesShe might haue beene ore-tane: and yet she writes
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.35When haply he shall hear that she is gone,When haply he shall heare that she is gone,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.36He will return; and hope I may that she,He will returne, and hope I may that shee
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.30she will lie at my house; thither they send one another.she will lye at my house, thither they send one another,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.59Of the great Count himself, she is too meanOf the great Count himselfe, she is too meane
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.65I warrant, good creature, wheresoe'er she is,I write good creature, wheresoere she is,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.67.1A shrewd turn, if she pleased.A shrewd turne if she pleas'd.
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.72But she is armed for him and keeps her guardBut she is arm'd for him, and keepes her guard
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.108Tokens and letters which she did re-send,Tokens and Letters, which she did resend,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vii.1If you misdoubt me that I am not she,If you misdoubt me that I am not shee,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vii.31But that your daughter, ere she seems as won,But that your daughter ere she seemes as wonne,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vii.37Instruct my daughter how she shall perseverInstruct my daughter how she shall perseuer,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.11.1She then was honest.She then was honest.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.70As if she sat in's heart. She says all menAs if she sate in's heart. She sayes, all men
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.49austere sanctimony she accomplished; and there residing,austere sanctimonie she accomplisht: and there residing,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.52she sings in heaven.she sings in heauen.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.9nature had praise for creating. If she had partaken of myNature had praise for creating. If she had pertaken of my
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.14Indeed, sir, she was the sweet marjoram of theIndeed sir she was the sweete Margerom of the
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.ii.30knave with Fortune that she should scratch you, who ofknaue with fortune that she should scratch you, who of
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.53That she whom all men praised, and whom myself,That she whom all men prais'd, and whom my selfe,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.76.1That she may quickly come.That she may quickly come.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.90I have seen her wear it, and she reckoned itI haue seene her weare it, and she reckon'd it
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.92You are deceived, my lord, she never saw it.You are deceiu'd my Lord, she neuer saw it:
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.95Of her that threw it. Noble she was, and thoughtOf her that threw it: Noble she was, and thought
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.99As she had made the overture, she ceasedAs she had made the ouerture, she ceast
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.108You got it from her. She called the saints to suretyYou got it from her. She call'd the Saints to suretie,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.109That she would never put it from her fingerThat she would neuer put it from her finger,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.110Unless she gave it to yourself in bed,Vnlesse she gaue it to your selfe in bed,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.112.2She never saw it.She neuer saw it.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.118And she is dead; which nothing but to closeAnd she is dead, which nothing but to close
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.127Where yet she never was.Where yet she neuer was.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.136With an importing visage, and she told me,With an importing visage, and she told me
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.174That she which marries you must marry me – That she which marries you, must marrie me,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.209.2She hath that ring of yours.She hath that Ring of yours.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.210I think she has. Certain it is I liked herI thinke she has; certaine it is I lyk'd her,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.212She knew her distance and did angle for me,She knew her distance, and did angle for mee,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.217Subdued me to her rate. She got the ring,Subdu'd me to her rate, she got the Ring,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.275This woman's an easy glove, my lord; she goes offThis womans an easie gloue my Lord, she goes off
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.292She does abuse our ears. To prison with her.She does abuse our eares, to prison with her.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.300Dead though she be she feels her young one kick.Dead though she be, she feeles her yong one kicke:
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.313If she, my liege, can make me know this clearlyIf she my Liege can make me know this clearly,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.59Am I not an inch of fortune better than she?Am I not an inch of Fortune better then she?
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.107Name Cleopatra as she is called in Rome.name / Cleopatra as she is call'd in Rome:
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.119.2 Where died she?Where dyed she.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.144which commits some loving act upon her, she hath suchwhich commits some louing acte vpon her, she hath such
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.146She is cunning past man's thought.She is cunning past mans thought.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.151cannot be cunning in her; if it be, she makes a showercannot be cunning in her; if it be, she makes a showre
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.172The business she hath broached in the stateThe businesse she hath broached in the State,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.21Would she had never given you leave to come!Would she had neuer giuen you leaue to come.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.61The garboils she awaked. At the last, best,The Garboyles she awak'd: at the last, best,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.62.1See when and where she died.See when, and where shee died.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.191When she first met Mark Antony, sheWhen she first met Marke Anthony, she
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.193There she appeared indeed! Or my reporterThere she appear'd indeed: or my reporter
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.196The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne,The Barge she sat in, like a burnisht Throne
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.203It beggared all description. She did lieIt beggerd all discription, she did lye
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.225Invited her to supper. She repliedInuited her to Supper: she replyed,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.227Which she entreated. Our courteous Antony,Which she entreated, our Courteous Anthony,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.232She made great Caesar lay his sword to bed.She made great Casar lay his Sword to bed,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.233.1He ploughed her, and she cropped.He ploughed her, and she cropt.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.235And, having lost her breath, she spoke, and panted,And hauing lost her breath, she spoke, and panted,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.236That she did make defect perfection,That she did make defect, perfection,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.242The appetites they feed, but she makes hungryThe appetites they feede, but she makes hungry,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.243Where most she satisfies; for vilest thingsWhere most she satisfies. For vildest things
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.245Bless her when she is riggish.Blesse her, when she is Riggish.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.62She strikes him downStrikes him downe.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.62She strikes himStrikes him.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.65She hales him up and downShe hales him vp and downe.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.73She draws a knifeDraw a knife.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.118Bring me word how tall she is. – Pity me, Charmian,Bring me word, how tall she is: pitty me Charmian,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.55But in my bosom shall she never comeBut in my bosome shall she neuer come,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.109True, sir; she was the wife of Caius Marcellus.True Sir, she was the wife of Caius Marcellus.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.110But she is now the wife of Marcus Antonius.But she is now the wife of Marcus Anthonius.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.11.1Is she as tall as me?Is she as tall as me?
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.11.2She is not, madam.She is not Madam.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.12Didst hear her speak? Is she shrill-tongued or low?Didst heare her speake? Is she shrill tongu'd or low?
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.13Madam, I heard her speak; she is low-voiced.Madam, I heard her speake, she is low voic'd.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.18.2She creeps;She creepes:
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.20She shows a body rather than a life,She shewes a body, rather then a life,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.27.1She was a widow – she was a widdow.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.33.1As low as she would wish it.As low as she would wish it.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vi.16Syria, Cilicia, and Phoenicia. SheSyria, Silicia, and Phonetia: she
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vi.46Long ere she did appear. The trees by th' wayLong ere she did appeare. The trees by'th'way
Antony and CleopatraAC III.x.17.2She once being loofed,She once being looft,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xi.74We scorn her most when most she offers blows.We scorne her most, when most she offers blowes.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xii.21Of audience nor desire shall fail, so sheOf Audience, nor Desire shall faile, so shee
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xii.23Or take his life there. This if she perform,Or take his life there. This if shee performe,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xii.24She shall not sue unheard. So to them both.She shall not sue vnheard. So to them both.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xii.28And in our name, what she requires; add more,And in our Name, what she requires, adde more
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.15The Queen shall then have courtesy, so sheThe Queene shall then haue courtesie, / So she
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.82She gives him her hand
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.98So saucy with the hand of she here – what's her name,So sawcy with the hand of she heere, what's her name
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.99Since she was Cleopatra? Whip him, fellows,Since she was Cleopatra? Whip him Fellowes,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.48To the young Roman boy she hath sold me, and I fallTo the young Roman Boy she hath sold me, and I fall
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.49Under this plot; she dies for't. Eros, ho!Vnder this plot: She dyes for't. Eros hoa?
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.16Whose heart I thought I had, for she had mine,Whose heart I thought I had, for she had mine:
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.18A million more, now lost – she, Eros, hasA Million moe, (now lost:) shee Eros has
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.23.1She has robbed me of my sword.Oh thy vilde Lady, she has rob'd me of my Sword.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.26She hath betrayed me and shall die the death.she hath betraid me, / And shall dye the death.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.28And that she has discharged. What thou wouldst doAnd that she ha's discharg'd. What thou would'st do
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.29Is done unto thy hand. The last she spakeIs done vnto thy hand: the last she spake
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.33Between her heart and lips. She rendered life,Betweene her heart, and lips: she rendred life
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.61Than she which by her death our Caesar tellsThen she which by her death, our Casar telles
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.119.1When did she send thee?When did shee send thee?
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.119.3Where is she?Where is she?
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.120Locked in her monument. She had a prophesying fearLockt in her Monument: she had a Prophesying (feare
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.121Of what hath come to pass; for when she saw – Of what hath come to passe: for when she saw
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.123She had disposed with Caesar, and that your rageShe had dispos'd with Casar, and that your rage
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.124Would not be purged, she sent you word she was dead;Would not be purg'd, she sent you word she was dead:
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xv.68She faints
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.53Confined in all she has, her monument,Confin'd in all, she has her Monument
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.55That she preparedly may frame herselfThat she preparedly may frame her selfe
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.57She soon shall know of us, by some of ours,She soone shall know of vs, by some of ours,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.65She do defeat us. For her life in RomeShe do defeate vs. For her life in Rome,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.67And with your speediest bring us what she saysAnd with your speediest bring vs what she sayes,
Antony and CleopatraAC v.ii.35You see how easily she may be surprised.You see how easily she may be surpriz'd:
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.39She draws a dagger
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.137She gives him a paper
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.193She whispers to Charmian
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.253not do but in the way of honesty; how she died of thenot do, but in the way of honesty, how she dyed of the
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.254biting of it, what pain she felt; truly, she makes a verybyting of it, what paine she felt: Truely, she makes averie
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.292.1She kisses them. Iras falls and dies
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.300If she first meet the curled Antony,If she first meete the Curled Anthony,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.312She applies another asp to her arm
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.312 She dies
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.312What should I stay – She diesWhat should I stay----- .
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.321.1She applies an asp to herself
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.334She levelled at our purposes and, being royal,She leuell'd at our purposes, and being Royall
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.339This Charmian lived but now; she stood and spake.This Charmian liu'd but now, she stood and spake:
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.341On her dead mistress. Tremblingly she stood,On her dead Mistris tremblingly she stood,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.344By external swelling: but she looks like sleep,By externall swelling: but she lookes like sleepe,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.345As she would catch another AntonyAs she would catch another Anthony
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.352That so she died; for her physician tells meThat so she dyed: for her Physitian tels mee
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.353She hath pursued conclusions infiniteShe hath pursu'de Conclusions infinite
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.356She shall be buried by her Antony.She shall be buried by her Anthony.
As You Like ItAYL I.i.103that she would have followed her exile, or have died tothat hee would haue followed her exile, or haue died to
As You Like ItAYL I.i.104stay behind her; she is at the court, and no less belovedstay behind her; she is at the Court, and no lesse beloued
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.36'Tis true, for those that she makes fair she scarce'Tis true, for those that she makes faire, she scarce
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.37makes honest, and those that she makes honest shemakes honest, & those that she makes honest, she
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.43she not by Fortune fall into the fire? Though Natureshe not by Fortune fall into the fire? though nature
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.247I cannot speak to her, yet she urged conference.I cannot speake to her, yet she vrg'd conference.
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.66Else had she with her father ranged along.Else had she with her Father rang'd along.
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.70But now I know her. If she be a traitor,But now I know her: if she be a Traitor,
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.75She is too subtle for thee, and her smoothness,She is too subtile for thee, and her smoothnes;
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.78Thou art a fool; she robs thee of thy name,Thou art a foole, she robs thee of thy name,
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.80When she is gone. Then open not thy lips:When she is gone: then open not thy lips
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.82Which I have passed upon her; she is banished.Which I haue past vpon her, she is banish'd.
As You Like ItAYL II.ii.11Confesses that she secretly o'erheardConfesses that she secretly ore-heard
As You Like ItAYL II.ii.15And she believes wherever they are goneAnd she beleeues where euer they are gone
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.78When such a one as she, such is her neighbour?When such a one as shee, such is her neighbor?
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.10The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she.The faire, the chaste, and vnexpressiue shee.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.149Heaven would that she these gifts should have,Heauen would that shee these gifts should haue,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.260she was christened.she was christen'd.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.261What stature is she of?What stature is she of?
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.327As the cony that you see dwell where she isAs the Conie that you see dwell where shee is
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.372you love believe it, which I warrant she is apter to doyou Loue beleeue it, which I warrant she is apter to do,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.373than to confess she does: that is one of the points in thethen to confesse she do's: that is one of the points, in the
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.64Truly, she must be given, or the marriage isTruly she must be giuen, or the marriage is
As You Like ItAYL III.v.44I think she means to tangle my eyes too!I thinke she meanes to tangle my eies too:
As You Like ItAYL III.v.52Than she a woman. 'Tis such fools as youThen she a woman. 'Tis such fooles as you
As You Like ItAYL III.v.55And out of you she sees herself more properAnd out of you she sees her selfe more proper
As You Like ItAYL III.v.68be so, as fast as she answers thee with frowning looks,be so, as fast / As she answeres thee with frowning lookes,
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.72Then she puts you to entreaty, and thereThen she puts you to entreatie, and there
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.123Why, now, as fast as she can marry us.Why now, as fast as she can marrie vs.
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.147By my life, she will do as I do.By my life, she will doe as I doe.
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.148O, but she is wise.O but she is wise.
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.149Or else she could not have the wit to do this.Or else shee could not haue the wit to doe this:
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.159Marry, to say she came to seek you there. YouMarry to say, she came to seeke you there: you
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.163child herself, for she will breed it like a fool.childe her selfe, for she will breed it like a foole.
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.9He gives Rosalind a letter, which she reads
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.11Which she did use as she was writing of it,Which she did vse, as she was writing of it,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.16She says I am not fair, that I lack manners,Shee saies I am not faire, that I lacke manners,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.17She calls me proud, and that she could not love meShe calls me proud, and that she could not loue me
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.20Why writes she so to me? Well, shepherd, well,Why writes she so to me? well Shepheard, well,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.25I saw her hand: she has a leathern hand,I saw her hand, she has a leatherne hand,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.28She has a housewife's hand – but that's no matter.She has a huswiues hand, but that's no matter:
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.29I say she never did invent this letter;I say she neuer did inuent this letter,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.33A style for challengers. Why, she defies me,A stile for challengers: why, she defies me,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.40She Phebes me; mark how the tyrant writes:She Phebes me: marke how the tyrant writes.
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.72she love me, I charge her to love thee; if she will not,she loue me, I charge her to loue thee: if she will not,
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.3And loving woo? And, wooing, she should grant? AndAnd louing woo? and wooing, she should graunt? And
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.8‘ I love Aliena;’ say with her that she loves me; consentI loue Aliena: say with her, that she loues mee; consent
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.62I know into what straits of fortune she is driven, and itI know into what straights of Fortune she is driuen, and it
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.65she is, and without any danger.she is, and without any danger.
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.16You say that you'll have Phebe, if she will?You say that you'l haue Phebe if she will.
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.24If she refuse me – and from hence I go,If she refuse me, and from hence I go
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.121Nor ne'er wed woman, if you be not she.Nor ne're wed woman, if you be not shee.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.50There had she not been long but she becameThere had she not beene long, but she became
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.72Weeping before for what she saw must come,Weeping before for what she saw must come,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.47She is so hot because the meat is cold.She is so hot because the meate is colde:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.65For she will score your fault upon my pate.For she will scoure your fault vpon my pate:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.89She that doth fast till you come home to dinner,She that doth fast till you come home to dinner:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.32Patience unmoved! No marvel though she pause.Patience vnmou'd, no maruel though she pause, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.81She beats Dromio
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.163She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner.She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.175How can she thus then call us by our names? – How can she thus then call vs by our names? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.190To me she speaks; she moves me for her theme.To mee shee speakes, shee moues mee for her theame; 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.210'Tis true, she rides me, and I long for grass.'Tis true she rides me, and I long for grasse. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.212But I should know her as well as she knows me.But I should know her as well as she knowes me. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.92And doubt not, sir, but she will well excuseAnd doubt not sir, but she will well excuse 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.15Be secret-false – what need she be acquainted?Be secret false: what need she be acquainted?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.52Let love, being light, be drowned if she sink.Let Loue, being light, be drowned if she sinke.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.84What claim lays she toWhat claime laies she to
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.87would lay to your horse; and she would have me as awould lay to your horse, and she would haue me as a
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.88beast – not that, I being a beast, she would have me,beast, not that I beeing a beast she would haue me,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.89but that she, being a very beastly creature, lays claimbut that she being a verie beastly creature layes claime
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.91What is she?What is she?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.95is she a wondrous fat marriage.is she a wondrous fat marriage.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.102them will burn a Poland winter. If she lives till doomsdaythem, will burne a Poland Winter: If she liues till doomesday,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.104What complexion is sheWhat complexion is she
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.107nothing like so clean kept. For why? She sweats a mannothing like so cleane kept: for why? she sweats a man
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.117Then she bears someThen she beares some
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.120than from hip to hip. She is spherical, like a globe. Ithen from hippe o hippe: she is sphericall, like a globe: I
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.154She had transformed me to a curtal dog, and made me turn i'the wheel.she had transform'd me to a Curtull dog, & made me turne i'th wheele.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.166She that doth call me husband, even my soulShe that doth call me husband, euen my soule
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.88And then she bears away. Our fraughtage, sir,And then sir she beares away. Our fraughtage sir,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.112She is too big, I hope, for me to compass.She is too bigge I hope for me to compasse,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.51Nay, she is worse, she is theNay, she is worse, she is the 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.52devil's dam; and here she comes in the habit of a lightdiuels dam: And here she comes in the habit of a light 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.74But she, more covetous, would have a chain.but she more couetous, wold haue a chaine: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.70And did not she herself revile me there?And did not she her selfe reuile me there?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.71Sans fable, she herself reviled you there.Sans Fable, she her selfe reuil'd you there.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.73Certes she did. The kitchen vestal scorned you.Certis she did, the kitchin vestall scorn'd you.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.87And I am witness with her that she did.And I am witnesse with her that she did:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.146She that would be your wife now ran from you.She that would be your wife, now ran from you.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.87She never reprehended him but mildly,She neuer reprehended him but mildely, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.90She did betray me to my own reproof.She did betray me to my owne reproofe, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.134She is a virtuous and a reverend lady.She is a vertuous and a reuerend Lady, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.135It cannot be that she hath done thee wrong.It cannot be that she hath done thee wrong. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.198She whom thou gavest to me to be my wife;She whom thou gau'st to me to be my wife; 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.202That she this day hath shameless thrown on me.That she this day hath shamelesse throwne on me. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.204This day, great Duke, she shut the doors upon meThis day (great Duke) she shut the doores vpon me, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.205While she with harlots feasted in my house.While she with Harlots feasted in my house. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.211But she tells to your highness simple truth.But she tels to your Highnesse simple truth. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.354If thou art she, tell me, where is that sonIf thou art she, tell me, where is that sonne 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.373And so do I. Yet did she call me so,And so do I, yet did she call me so: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.417She now shall be my sister, not my wife!She now shall be my sister, not my wife, 
CoriolanusCor I.iii.42When she did suckle Hector, looked not lovelierWhen she did suckle Hector, look'd not louelier
CoriolanusCor I.iii.74She shall, she shall.She shall, she shall.
CoriolanusCor I.iii.84all the yarn she spun in Ulysses' absence did but fillall the yearne she spun in Vlisses absence, did but fill
CoriolanusCor I.iii.105Let her alone, lady. As she is now, she willLet her alone Ladie, as she is now: / She will
CoriolanusCor I.iii.107In troth, I think she would. Fare you well, then.In troth I thinke she would: / Fare you well then.
CoriolanusCor I.v.24Than those she placeth highest. So farewell.Then those she placeth highest: So farewell.
CoriolanusCor I.ix.15When she does praise me grieves me. I have doneWhen she do's prayse me, grieues me: / I haue done
CoriolanusCor II.i.93were she earthly, no nobler – whither do you follow yourwere shee Earthly, no Nobler; whither doe you follow your
CoriolanusCor II.i.200While she chats him. The kitchen malkin pinsWhile she chats him: the Kitchin Malkin pinnes
CoriolanusCor III.ii.87Even as she speaks, why, their hearts were yours.Euen as she speakes, why their hearts were yours:
CoriolanusCor V.iii.56She kneels
CoriolanusCor V.iii.162When she, poor hen, fond of no second brood,When she (poore Hen) fond of no second brood,
CymbelineCym I.i.8Her husband banished; she imprisoned, allHer Husband banish'd; she imprison'd, all
CymbelineCym I.i.52Proclaims how she esteemed him; and his virtueProclaimes how she esteem'd him; and his Vertue
CymbelineCym I.i.56.1Is she sole child to th' king?is she sole childe to'th'King?
CymbelineCym I.ii.16Can tickle where she wounds! My dearest husband,Can tickle where she wounds? My deerest Husband,
CymbelineCym I.iii.24And that she should love this fellow, and refuse me!And that shee should loue this Fellow, and refuse mee.
CymbelineCym I.iii.25If it be a sin to make a true election, sheIf it be a sin to make a true election, she
CymbelineCym I.iii.30She shines not upon fools, lest the reflectionShe shines not vpon Fooles, least the reflection
CymbelineCym I.v.62She holds her virtue still, and I my mind.She holds her Vertue still, and I my mind.
CymbelineCym I.v.69for any lady in Britany. If she went before others Ifor any Lady in Britanie; if she went before others. I
CymbelineCym I.v.71I have beheld, I could not believe she excelled many:I haue beheld, I could not beleeue she excelled many:
CymbelineCym I.v.149leave her in such honour as you have trust in, sheleaue her in such honour as you haue trust in; Shee
CymbelineCym I.v.157your enemy; she is not worth our debate. If sheyour Enemy, shee is not worth our debate. If shee
CymbelineCym I.vi.33I do not like her. She doth think she hasI do not like her. She doth thinke she ha's
CymbelineCym I.vi.36A drug of such damned nature. Those she hasA drugge of such damn'd Nature. Those she ha's,
CymbelineCym I.vi.42To be more fresh, reviving. She is fooledTo be more fresh, reuiuing. She is fool'd
CymbelineCym I.vi.46Weeps she still, say'st thou? Dost thou think in timeWeepes she still (saist thou?) / Dost thou thinke in time
CymbelineCym I.vi.47She will not quench, and let instructions enterShe will not quench, and let instructions enter
CymbelineCym I.vi.49When thou shalt bring me word she loves my son,When thou shalt bring me word she loues my Sonne,
CymbelineCym I.vi.80Of liegers for her sweet: and which she after,Of Leidgers for her Sweete: and which, she after
CymbelineCym I.vi.81Except she bend her humour, shall be assuredExcept she bend her humor, shall be assur'd
CymbelineCym I.vii.16If she be furnished with a mind so rare,If she be furnish'd with a mind so rare
CymbelineCym I.vii.17She is alone th' Arabian bird; and IShe is alone th'Arabian-Bird; and I
CymbelineCym I.vii.71What woman is, yea what she cannot chooseWhat woman is, yea what she cannot choose
CymbelineCym I.vii.127Or she that bore you was no queen, and youOr she that bore you, was no Queene, and you
CymbelineCym II.ii.44Screwed to my memory? She hath been reading late,Screw'd to my memorie. She hath bin reading late,
CymbelineCym II.iii.37Will she not forth?Will she not forth?
CymbelineCym II.iii.38I have assailed her with musics, but she vouchsafesI haue assayl'd her with Musickes, but she vouchsafes
CymbelineCym II.iii.41She hath not yet forgot him, some more timeShe hath not yet forgot him, some more time
CymbelineCym II.iii.63If she be up, I'll speak with her: if not,If she be vp, Ile speake with her: if not
CymbelineCym II.iii.80.1Your lady's person, is she ready?Your Ladies person, is she ready?
CymbelineCym II.iv.70Proud Cleopatra, when she met her Roman,Proud Cleopatra, when she met her Roman,
CymbelineCym II.iv.101She stripped it from her arm: I see her yet:She stript it from her Arme: I see her yet:
CymbelineCym II.iv.103And yet enriched it too: she gave it me,And yet enrich'd it too: she gaue it me,
CymbelineCym II.iv.104.1And said she prized it once.And said, she priz'd it once.
CymbelineCym II.iv.104.2May be she plucked it offMay be, she pluck'd it off
CymbelineCym II.iv.105.2She writes so to you? Doth she?She writes so to you? doth shee?
CymbelineCym II.iv.115It may be probable she lost it: orIt may be probable she lost it: or
CymbelineCym II.iv.124She would not lose it: her attendants areShe would not loose it: her Attendants are
CymbelineCym II.iv.128Is this: she hath bought the name of whore, thus dearly.Is this: she hath bought the name of Whore, thus deerly
CymbelineCym II.iv.133.1She hath been colted by him.She hath bin colted by him.
CymbelineCym II.iv.161Me of my lawful pleasure she restrainedMe of my lawfull pleasure she restrain'd,
CymbelineCym II.iv.170But what he looked for should oppose and sheBut what he look'd for, should oppose, and she
CymbelineCym III.ii.22So virgin-like without? Lo, here she comes.So Virgin-like without? Loe here she comes.
CymbelineCym III.iv.29she hath my letter for the purpose: where,She hath my Letter for the purpose; where,
CymbelineCym III.v.30Where is our daughter? She hath not appearedWhere is our Daughter? She hath not appear'd
CymbelineCym III.v.32The duty of the day. She looks us likeThe duty of the day. She looke vs like
CymbelineCym III.v.41.2Where is she, sir? HowWhere is she Sir? How
CymbelineCym III.v.46She prayed me to excuse her keeping close,She pray'd me to excuse her keeping close,
CymbelineCym III.v.48She should that duty leave unpaid to youShe should that dutie leaue vnpaide to you
CymbelineCym III.v.49Which daily she was bound to proffer: thisWhich dayly she was bound to proffer: this
CymbelineCym III.v.50She wished me to make known: but our great courtShe wish'd me to make knowne: but our great Court
CymbelineCym III.v.61Where is she gone? Haply, despair hath seized her:Where is she gone? Haply dispaire hath seiz'd her:
CymbelineCym III.v.63To her desired Posthumus: gone she is,To her desir'd Posthumus: gone she is,
CymbelineCym III.v.65Can make good use of either. She being down,Can make good vse of either. Shee being downe,
CymbelineCym III.v.67.2'Tis certain she is fled:'Tis certaine she is fled:
CymbelineCym III.v.72And that she hath all courtly parts more exquisiteAnd that she hath all courtly parts more exquisite
CymbelineCym III.v.74The best she hath, and she of all compoundedThe best she hath, and she of all compounded
CymbelineCym III.v.88Thy heart to find it. Is she with Posthumus?Thy heart to finde it. Is she with Posthumus?
CymbelineCym III.v.91How can she be with him? When was she missed?How can she be with him? When was she miss'd?
CymbelineCym III.v.92.2Where is she, sir? Come nearer:Where is she Sir? Come neerer:
CymbelineCym III.v.134garments were come. She said upon a time – the bitternessGarments were come. She saide vpon a time (the bitternesse
CymbelineCym III.v.135of it I now belch from my heart – that sheof it, I now belch from my heart) that shee
CymbelineCym III.v.140eyes; there shall she see my valour, which will theneyes; there shall she see my valour, which wil then
CymbelineCym III.v.144vex her I will execute in the clothes that she sovex her, I will execute in the Cloathes that she so
CymbelineCym III.v.146home again. She hath despised me rejoicingly, andhome againe. She hath despis'd mee reioycingly, and
CymbelineCym III.v.150How long is't since she went to Milford-Haven?How long is't since she went to Milford-Hauen?
CymbelineCym III.v.151She can scarce be there yet.She can scarse be there yet.
CymbelineCym IV.iii.14I nothing know where she remains: why gone,I nothing know where she remaines: why gone,
CymbelineCym IV.iii.15Nor when she purposes return. Beseech your highness,Nor when she purposes returne. Beseech your Highnes,
CymbelineCym IV.iii.17The day that she was missing, he was here:The day that she was missing, he was heere;
CymbelineCym V.v.15By whom – I grantshe lives. 'Tis now the timeBy whom (I grant) she liues. 'Tis now the time
CymbelineCym V.v.30Will seize the doctor too. How ended she?Will seize the Doctor too. How ended she?
CymbelineCym V.v.33Most cruel to herself. What she confessedMost cruell to her selfe. What she confest,
CymbelineCym V.v.36.1Were present when she finished.Were present when she finish'd.
CymbelineCym V.v.37First, she confessed she never loved you: onlyFirst, she confest she neuer lou'd you: onely
CymbelineCym V.v.40.2She alone knew this:She alone knew this:
CymbelineCym V.v.41And but she spoke it dying, I would notAnd but she spoke it dying, I would not
CymbelineCym V.v.43Your daughter, whom she bore in hand to loveYour daughter, whom she bore in hand to loue
CymbelineCym V.v.44With such integrity, she did confessWith such integrity, she did confesse
CymbelineCym V.v.46But that her flight prevented it – she had(But that her flight preuented it) she had
CymbelineCym V.v.49More, sir, and worse. She did confess she hadMore Sir, and worse. She did confesse she had
CymbelineCym V.v.52By inches waste you. In which time, she purposedBy inches waste you. In which time, she purpos'd
CymbelineCym V.v.55When she had fitted you with her craft – to work(When she had fitted you with her craft, to worke
CymbelineCym V.v.60The evils she hatched were not effected: soThe euils she hatch'd, were not effected: so
CymbelineCym V.v.63Were not in fault, for she was beautiful;Were not in fault, for she was beautifull:
CymbelineCym V.v.127.2It is my mistress:Since she is liuing, let the time run on,
CymbelineCym V.v.128Since she is living, let the time run on,To good, or bad.
CymbelineCym V.v.181And she alone were cold: whereat I, wretch,And she alone, were cold: Whereat, I wretch
CymbelineCym V.v.221Of Virtue was she; yea, and she herself.Of Vertue was she; yea, and she her selfe.
CymbelineCym V.v.229 (striking her: she falls)
CymbelineCym V.v.246Have,’ said she, ‘ given his mistress that confectionHaue (said she) giuen his Mistris that Confection
CymbelineCym V.v.247Which I gave him for cordial, she is servedWhich I gaue him for Cordiall, she is seru'd,
CymbelineCym V.v.271O, she was naught; and long of her it wasOh, she was naught; and long of her it was
CymbelineCym V.v.277If I discovered not which way she was gone,If I discouer'd not which way she was gone,
CymbelineCym V.v.382.1By the queen's dram she swallowed.By the Queenes Dramme she swallow'd.
CymbelineCym V.v.395And she – like harmless lightning – throws her eyeAnd she (like harmlesse Lightning) throwes her eye
HamletHam I.ii.143Must I remember? Why, she would hang on himMust I remember: why she would hang on him,
HamletHam I.ii.148With which she followed my poor father's bodyWith which she followed my poore Fathers body
HamletHam I.ii.149Like Niobe, all tears, why she, even sheLike Niobe, all teares. Why she, euen she.
HamletHam I.ii.156She married. O, most wicked speed, to postShe married. O most wicked speed, to post
HamletHam I.iii.37If she unmask her beauty to the moon.If she vnmaske her beauty to the Moone:
HamletHam II.ii.106I have a daughter – have while she is mine – I haue a daughter: haue, whil'st she is mine,
HamletHam II.ii.128.2But how hath sheBut how hath she
HamletHam II.ii.143That she should lock herself from his resort,That she should locke her selfe from his Resort,
HamletHam II.ii.145Which done, she took the fruits of my advice,Which done, she tooke the Fruites of my Aduice,
HamletHam II.ii.235She is a strumpet. What news?she is a Strumpet. What's the newes?
HamletHam II.ii.241that she sends you to prison hither?that she sends you to Prison hither?
HamletHam II.ii.511When she saw Pyrrhus make malicious sportWhen she saw Pyrrhus make malicious sport
HamletHam II.ii.513The instant burst of clamour that she made,The instant Burst of Clamour that she made
HamletHam III.i.186Of all their conference. If she find him not,Of all their Conference. If she finde him not,
HamletHam III.ii.81To sound what stop she please. Give me that manTo sound what stop she please. Giue me that man,
HamletHam III.ii.145.3lovingly, the Queen embracing him, and he her. Shelouingly; the Queene embracing him. She
HamletHam III.ii.145.6lies him down upon a bank of flowers. She, seeing himLayes him downe vpon a Banke of Flowers. She seeing him
HamletHam III.ii.145.13poisoner woos the Queen with gifts. She seems harshPoysoner Wooes the Queene with Gifts, she seemes loath and vnwilling
HamletHam III.ii.234If she should break it now!If she should breake it now.
HamletHam III.ii.333Then thus she says: your behaviour hathThen thus she sayes: your behauior hath
HamletHam III.ii.338She desires to speak with you in herShe desires to speake with you in her
HamletHam III.ii.340We shall obey, were she ten times our mother.We shall obey, were she ten times our Mother.
HamletHam III.ii.405How in my words somever she be shent,How in my words someuer she be shent,
HamletHam IV.v.2She is importunate, indeed distract.She is importunate, indeed distract,
HamletHam IV.v.3.2What would she have?What would she haue?
HamletHam IV.v.4She speaks much of her father; says she hearsShe speakes much of her Father; saies she heares
HamletHam IV.v.14'Twere good she were spoken with, for she may strew'Twere good she were spoken with, / For she may strew
HamletHam IV.v.63Quoth she, ‘ Before you tumbled me,Quoth she before you tumbled me,
HamletHam IV.v.68How long hath she been thus?How long hath she bin this?
HamletHam IV.v.189She turns to favour and to prettiness.She turnes to Fauour, and to prettinesse.
HamletHam IV.vii.14She is so conjunctive to my life and soulShe's so coniunctiue to my life and soule;
HamletHam IV.vii.168Therewith fantastic garlands did she makeThere with fantasticke Garlands did she come,
HamletHam IV.vii.177Which time she chanted snatches of old tunes,Which time she chaunted snatches of old tunes,
HamletHam IV.vii.183.2Alas, then she is drowned?Alas then, is she drown'd?
HamletHam V.i.1Is she to be buried in Christian burialIs she to bee buried in Christian buriall,
HamletHam V.i.2when she wilfully seeks her own salvation?that wilfully seekes her owne saluation?
HamletHam V.i.3I tell thee she is. Therefore make herI tell thee she is, and therefore make her
HamletHam V.i.6How can that be, unless she drownedHow can that be, vnlesse she drowned
HamletHam V.i.12act, to do, and to perform. Argal, she drowned herselfAct to doe and to performe; argall she drown'd her selfe
HamletHam V.i.24not been a gentlewoman, she should have been buriednot beene a Gentlewoman, shee should haue beene buried
HamletHam V.i.191thick, to this favour she must come. Make her laugh atthicke, to this fauour she must come. Make her laugh at
HamletHam V.i.225She should in ground unsanctified have lodgedShe should in ground vnsanctified haue lodg'd,
HamletHam V.i.228Yet here she is allowed her virgin crants,Yet heere she is allowed her Virgin Rites,
HamletHam V.i.240She scatters flowers
HamletHam V.ii.202She well instructs me.
HamletHam V.ii.286She drinks
HamletHam V.ii.302.2She swounds to see them bleed.She sounds to see them bleede.
HamletHam V.ii.305She dies
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.85Will she hold out water in foul way?Will she hold out water in foule way?
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.86She will, she will, justice hath liquored her.She will, she will; Iustice hath liquor'd her.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.104my sweet Harry,’ says she, ‘ how many hast thou killedmy sweet Harry sayes she, how many hast thou kill'd
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.140So much she doteth on her Mortimer.So much she doteth on her Mortimer.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.190Good father, tell her that she and my aunt PercyGood Father tell her, that she and my Aunt Percy
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.192.1Glendower speaks to her in Welsh, and she answers himGlendower speakes to her in Welsh, and she answeres him
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.192She is desperate here, a peevish self-willedShee is desperate heere: / A peeuish selfe-will'd
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.205Nay, if you melt, then will she run mad.Nay, if thou melt, then will she runne madde.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.207She bids you on the wanton rushes lay you down,She bids you,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.209And she will sing the song that pleaseth you,And rest your gentle Head vpon her Lappe,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.210And on your eyelids crown the god of sleep,And she will sing the Song that pleaseth you, And on your Eye-lids Crowne the God of Sleepe,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.238Peace, she sings.Peace, shee sings.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.93in to borrow a mess of vinegar, telling us she had a goodin to borrow a messe of Vinegar: telling vs, she had a good
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.96And didst thou not, when she was gone downstairs,And didst not thou (when she was gone downe staires)
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.102My lord, this is a poor mad soul, and she saysMy Lord, this is a poore mad soule: and she sayes
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.104She hath been in good case, and the truth is, povertyShe hath bin in good case, & the truth is, pouerty
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.84Marry, my lord, Althaea dreamt she was deliveredMarry (my Lord) Althea dream'd, she was deliuer'd
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.112She is pistol-proof, sir; you shall not hardlyShe is Pistoll-proofe (Sir) you shall hardly
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.298God's blessing of your good heart, and so she'Blessing on your good heart, and so shee
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.322gentlewoman to close with us. Is she of the wicked? IsGentle-woman, to close with vs? Is shee of the Wicked? Is
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.335whether she be damned for that I know not.whether shee bee damn'd for that, I know not.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.384She comes blubbered. – Yea, will you come, Doll?
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.195She lives, Master Shallow.She liues, M. Shallow.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.196She never could away with me.She neuer could away with me.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.197Never, never. She would always say she couldNeuer, neuer: she would alwayes say shee could
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.199By the mass, I could anger her to th' heart. SheI could anger her to the heart: shee
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.200was then a bona-roba. Doth she hold her own well? was then a Bona-Roba. Doth she hold her owne well.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.202Nay, she must be old, she cannot choose butNay, she must be old, she cannot choose but
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.224dame's sake stand my friend. She has nobody to doDames sake, stand my friend: shee hath no body to doe
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.225anything about her when I am gone, and she is old andany thing about her, when I am gone: and she is old, and
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iv.105She either gives a stomach and no food – Shee eyther giues a Stomack, and no Foode,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.5to me, and she shall have whipping-cheer, I warrantto mee: and shee shall haue Whipping cheere enough, I warrant
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.22Come, come, you she knight-errant,Come, come, you shee-Knight-arrant,
Henry VH5 I.ii.155She hath been then more feared than harmed, my liege;She hath bin thẽ more fear'd thẽ harm'd, my Liege:
Henry VH5 I.ii.158And she a mourning widow of her nobles,And shee a mourning Widdow of her Nobles,
Henry VH5 I.ii.159She hath herself not only well defendedShee hath her selfe not onely well defended,
Henry VH5 I.ii.161The King of Scots, whom she did send to FranceThe King of Scots: whom shee did send to France,
Henry VH5 I.ii.173To tame and havoc more than she can eat.To tame and hauocke more then she can eate.
Henry VH5 II.i.17Nell Quickly, and certainly she did you wrong, for youNell Quickly, and certainly she did you wrong, for you
Henry VH5 II.i.22it may – though patience be a tired mare, yet she willit may, though patience be a tyred name, yet shee will
Henry VH5 II.i.74Doll Tearsheet she by name, and her espouse.Doll Teare-sheete, she by name, and her espouse.
Henry VH5 II.i.76For the only she; and – pauca, there's enough.for the onely shee: and Pauca, there's enough
Henry VH5 II.iv.26For, my good liege, she is so idly kinged,For, my good Liege, shee is so idly King'd,
Henry VH5 III.iii.9Till in her ashes she lie buried.Till in her ashes she lye buryed.
Henry VH5 III.vi.31to you that Fortune is blind; and she is painted alsoto you, that Fortune is blinde; and shee is painted also
Henry VH5 III.vi.33that she is turning, and inconstant, and mutability, andthat shee is turning and inconstant, and mutabilitie, and
Henry VH5 III.vii.50O, then belike she was old and gentle, and youO then belike she was old and gentle, and you
Henry VH5 III.vii.92Swear by her foot, that she may tread outSweare by her Foot, that she may tread out
Henry VH5 V.ii.38Alas, she hath from France too long been chased,Alas, shee hath from France too long been chas'd,
Henry VH5 V.ii.96She is our capital demand, comprisedShe is our capitall Demand, compris'd
Henry VH5 V.ii.98.1She hath good leave.She hath good leaue.
Henry VH5 V.ii.117What says she, fair one? that the tongues ofWhat sayes she, faire one? that the tongues of
Henry VH5 V.ii.257Madam my interpreter, what says she?Madame, my Interpreter, what sayes shee?
Henry VH5 V.ii.263kiss before they are married, would she say?kisse before they are marryed, would she say?
Henry VH5 V.ii.281Is she not apt?Is shee not apt?
Henry VH5 V.ii.292crimson of modesty, if she deny the appearance of aCrimson of Modestie, if shee deny the apparance of a
Henry VH5 V.ii.309latter end, and she must be blind too.latter end, and she must be blinde to.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.39Thy wife is proud; she holdeth thee in aweThy Wife is prowd, she holdeth thee in awe,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.55The spirit of deep prophecy she hath,The spirit of deepe Prophecie she hath,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.57What's past and what's to come she can descry.What's past, and what's to come, she can descry.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.63By this means shall we sound what skill she hath.By this meanes shall we sound what skill she hath.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.71She takes upon her bravely at first dash.She takes vpon her brauely at first dash.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.82Her aid she promised and assured success.Her ayde she promis'd, and assur'd successe.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.83In complete glory she revealed herself;In compleat Glory shee reueal'd her selfe:
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.85With those clear rays which she infused on meWith those cleare Rayes, which shee infus'd on me,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.128What she says, I'll confirm; we'll fight it out.What shee sayes, Ile confirme: wee'le fight it out.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.150No prophet will I trust if she prove false.No Prophet will I trust, if shee proue false.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.v.4Here, here she comes. (To Pucelle) I'll have a bout with thee.Here, here shee comes. Ile haue a bowt with thee:
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.v.15.1A short alarum. Then she enters the town withA short Alarum: then enter the Towne with
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.v.22Drives back our troops and conquers as she lists.Driues back our troupes, and conquers as she lists:
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.vi.23In memory of her, when she is dead,In memorie of her, when she is dead,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.22Pray God she prove not masculine ere long,Pray God she proue not masculine ere long:
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.24She carry armour as she hath begun.She carry Armour, as she hath begun.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.ii.41To visit her poor castle where she lies,To visit her poore Castle where she lyes,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.ii.42That she may boast she hath beheld the manThat she may boast she hath beheld the man,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.21Now she is there, how will she specifyNow she is there, how will she specifie?
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.25No way to that, for weakness, which she entered.No way to that (for weaknesse) which she entred.
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iii.58Either she hath bewitched me with her words,Either she hath bewitcht me with her words,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.i.45He doth intend she shall be England's Queen.He doth intend she shall be Englands Queene.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.35As if, with Circe, she would change my shape!As if with Circe, she would change my shape.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.60She is goingShe is going
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.68Hast not a tongue? Is she not here?Hast not a Tongue? Is she not heere?
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.75How canst thou tell she will deny thy suitHow canst thou tell she will deny thy suite,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.79She is a woman, therefore to be won.She is a Woman; therefore to be Wonne.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.175She is goingShee is going.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.13She was the first fruit of my bachelorship.She was the first fruite of my Bach'ler-ship.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.34Take her away; for she hath lived too long,Take her away, for she hath liu'd too long,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.55And hark ye, sirs; because she is a maid,And hearke ye sirs: because she is a Maide,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.68She and the Dauphin have been juggling.She and the Dolphin haue bin iugling,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.80Why, here's a girl! I think she knows not well,Why here's a Gyrle: I think she knowes not wel
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.81There were so many, whom she may accuse.(There were so many) whom she may accuse.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.82It's sign she hath been liberal and free.It's signe she hath beene liberall and free.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.83And yet, forsooth, she is a virgin pure!And yet forsooth she is a Virgin pure.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.v.16And, which is more, she is not so divine,And which is more, she is not so Diuine,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.v.19She is content to be at your command – She is content to be at your command:
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.v.61In our opinions she should be preferred.In our opinions she should be preferr'd.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.v.78That Margaret shall be Queen, and none but she.That Margaret shall be Queene, and none but shee.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.59and she sent over of the King of England's own properand shee sent ouer of the King of Englands owne proper
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.133She should have stayed in France, and starved in France,She should haue staid in France, and steru'd in France
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.92Gold cannot come amiss, were she a devil.Gold cannot come amisse, were she a Deuill.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.38.1She tears the supplicationsTeare the Supplication.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.75She sweeps it through the court with troops of ladies,She sweepes it through the Court with troups of Ladies,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.78She bears a duke's revenues on her back,She beares a Dukes Reuenewes on her backe,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.79And in her heart she scorns our poverty.And in her heart she scornes our Pouertie:
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.81Contemptuous base-born callet as she is,Contemptuous base-borne Callot as she is,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.82She vaunted 'mongst her minions t' other dayShe vaunted 'mongst her Minions t'other day,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.88That she will light to listen to the lays,That she will light to listen to the Layes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.137She gives the Duchess of Gloucester a box on the earShe giues the Duchesse a box on the eare.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.145She shall not strike Dame Eleanor unrevenged.She shall not strike Dame Elianor vnreueng'd.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.6And what a pitch she flew above the rest!And what a pytch she flew aboue the rest:
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.189Noble she is; but if she have forgotNoble shee is: but if shee haue forgot
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.ii.25Sent his poor queen to France, from whence she came,Sent his poore Queene to France, from whence she came,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.ii.47By her I claim the kingdom; she was heirBy her I clayme the Kingdome: / She was Heire
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.8Uneath may she endure the flinty streets,Vnneath may shee endure the Flintie Streets,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.15But soft, I think she comes; and I'll prepareBut soft, I thinke she comes, and Ile prepare
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.180As if she had suborned some to swearAs if she had suborned some to sweare
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.409.1She kisseth him
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.40I knew her well; she was a midwife.I knew her well, she was a Midwife.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.42She was indeed a pedlar's daughter, andShe was indeed a Pedlers daughter, &
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.45furred pack, she washes bucks here at home.furr'd Packe, she washes buckes here at home.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.vii.114not a maid be married, but she shall pay to me hernot a maid be married, but she shall pay to me her
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.71Kent from me she hath lost her best man, and exhortKent from me, she hath lost her best man, and exhort
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.266Revenged may she be on that hateful Duke,Reueng'd may she be on that hatefull Duke,
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.51She is hard by with twenty thousand men;She is hard by, with twentie thousand men:
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.65She shall not need; we'll meet her in the field.Shee shall not neede, wee'le meete her in the field.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.95She puts a paper crown on York's head
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.177She stabs York
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.75Ah, would she break from hence, that this my bodyAh, would she breake from hence, that this my body
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.116That she was coming with a full intentThat she was comming with a full intent
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.39The tiger will be mild whiles she doth mourn;The Tyger will be milde, whiles she doth mourne;
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.43She, on his left side, craving aid for Henry,Shee on his left side, crauing ayde for Henrie;
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.45She weeps, and says her Henry is deposed;Shee Weepes, and sayes, her Henry is depos'd:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.47That she, poor wretch, for grief can speak no more;That she (poore Wretch) for greefe can speake no more:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.24I fear her not unless she chance to fall.I feare her not, vnlesse she chance to fall.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.57The match is made; she seals it with a curtsy.The Match is made, shee seales it with a Cursie.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.82The widow likes him not; she knits her brows.The Widow likes him not, shee knits her Browes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.87One way or other, she is for a king;One way, or other, shee is for a King,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.88And she shall be my love or else my queen.And shee shall be my Loue, or else my Queene.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.110The widow likes it not, for she looks very sad.The Widow likes it not, for shee lookes very sad.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.155She did corrupt frail nature with some bribeShee did corrupt frayle Nature with some Bribe,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.47He descends. She arisethHee descends. Shee ariseth.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.80And thou no more art prince than she is queen.And thou no more art Prince, then shee is Queene.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.245Son Edward, she is fair and virtuous;Sonne Edward, she is Faire and Vertuous,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.249Yes, I accept her, for she well deserves it;Yes, I accept her, for she well deserues it,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.54She better would have fitted me or Clarence;Shee better would haue fitted me, or Clarence:
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.101I blame not her, she could say little less;I blame not her; she could say little lesse:
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.102She had the wrong. But what said Henry's queen?She had the wrong. But what said Henries Queene?
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.103For I have heard that she was there in place.For I haue heard, that she was there in place.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.104‘ Tell him,’ quoth she, ‘ my mourning weeds are done,Tell him (quoth she) / My mourning Weedes are done,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.106Belike she minds to play the Amazon.Belike she minds to play the Amazon.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iii.16If she have time to breathe, be well assuredIf she haue time to breathe, be well assur'd
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.44Why should she live to fill the world with words?Why should shee liue, to fill the World with words.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.45What! Doth she swoon? Use means for her recovery.What? doth shee swowne? vse meanes for her recouerie.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.89And see our gentle Queen how well she fares;And see our gentle Queene how well she fares,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.90By this, I hope, she hath a son for me.By this (I hope) she hath a Sonne for me.
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.9.3and Suffolk. She kneels. The King riseth from hisand Suffolke: she kneels. King riseth from his
Henry VIIIH8 I.iv.94By heaven, she is a dainty one. Sweetheart,By Heauen she is a dainty one. Sweet heart,
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.166That she should feel the smart of this? The CardinalThat she should feele the smart of this: the Cardinall
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.167.1Will have his will, and she must fall.Will haue his will, and she must fall.
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.112Ay, and the best she shall have, and my favourI, and the best she shall haue; and my fauour
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.2His highness having lived so long with her, and sheHis Highnesse, hauing liu'd so long with her, and she
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.5She never knew harm-doing – O, now, afterShe neuer knew harme-doing: Oh, now after
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.13She ne'er had known pomp; though't be temporal,She ne're had knowne pompe; though't be temporall,
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.91That would not be a queen, that would she not,That would not be a Queene, that would she not
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.121She curtsies to the King, and offers to departShe Curtsies to the King, and offers to depart.
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.142And like her true nobility she hasAnd like her true Nobility, she ha's
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.235.1She intends unto his holiness.She intends vnto his Holinesse.
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.48Believe me, she has had much wrong. Lord Cardinal,Beleeue me she ha's had much wrong. Lord Cardinall,
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.136And to that woman, when she has done most,And to that Woman (when she has done most)
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.182Bestow your counsels on me. She now begsBestow your Councels on me. She now begges
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.183That little thought, when she set footing here,That little thought when she set footing heere,
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.184She should have bought her dignities so dear.She should haue bought her Dignities so deere.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.49She is a gallant creature, and completeShe is a gallant Creature, and compleate
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.100Our cause, that she should lie i'th' bosom ofOur cause, that she should lye i'th'bosome of
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.29She was often cited by them, but appeared not.She was often cyted by them, but appear'd not:
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.32Of all these learned men, she was divorced,Of all these Learned men, she was diuorc'd,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.34Since which she was removed to Kimbolton,Since which, she was remou'd to Kymmalton,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.35.1Where she remains now sick.Where she remaines now sicke.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.44Sir, as I have a soul, she is an angel;Sir, as I haue a Soule, she is an Angell;
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.51I take it, she that carries up the trainI take it, she that carries vp the Traine,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.69Believe me, sir, she is the goodliest womanBeleeue me Sir, she is the goodliest Woman
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.83Came to the altar, where she kneeled, and saint-likeCame to the Altar, where she kneel'd, and Saint-like
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.87She had all the royal makings of a queen,She had all the Royall makings of a Queene;
Henry VIIIH8 IV.i.92Together sung Te Deum. So she parted,Together sung Te Deum. So she parted,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.81She is asleep. Good wench, let's sit down quiet,She is asleep: Good wench, let's sit down quiet,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.83.14by inspiration, she makes in her sleep signs of rejoicing,by inspiration) she makes (in her sleepe) signes of reioycing,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.97How long her face is drawn? How pale she looks?How long her face is drawne? How pale she lookes,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.99.1She is going, wench. Pray, pray.She is going Wench. Pray, pray.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.102Knowing she will not lose her wonted greatness,Knowing she will not loose her wonted Greatnesse
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.129She gives it to Katherine
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.135She is young, and of a noble modest nature;She is yong, and of a Noble modest Nature,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.136I hope she will deserve well – and a littleI hope she will deserue well; and a little
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.20.2The fruit she goes withThe fruite she goes with
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.31Till Cranmer, Cromwell – her two hands – and sheTill Cranmer, Cromwel, her two hands, and shee
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.67To pray for her? What, is she crying out?To pray for her? What, is she crying out?
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.25He or she, cuckold or cuckold-maker,He or shee, Cuckold or Cuckold-maker:
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.52succour, which were the hope o'th' Strand, where shesuccour, which were the hope o'th'Strond where she
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.14.1When she has so much English.When she ha's so much English.
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.20Which time shall bring to ripeness. She shall be – Which Time shall bring to ripenesse: She shall be,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.30She shall be loved and feared. Her own shall bless her;She shall be lou'd and fear'd. Her owne shall blesse her;
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.43So shall she leave her blessedness to one – So shall she leaue her Blessednesse to One,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.46Shall star-like rise, as great in fame as she was,Shall Star-like rise, as great in fame as she was,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.56She shall be, to the happiness of England,She shall be to the happinesse of England,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.59Would I had known no more! But she must die – Would I had knowne no more: But she must dye,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.60She must, the saints must have her – yet a virgin;She must, the Saints must haue her; yet a Virgin,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.61A most unspotted lily shall she passA most vnspotted Lilly shall she passe
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.73Ye must all see the Queen, and she must thank ye;Ye must all see the Queene, and she must thanke ye,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.74She will be sick else. This day, no man thinkShe will be sicke els. This day, no man thinke
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.76She dreamt tonight she saw my statue,She dreampt to night, she saw my Statue,
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.80And these does she apply for warnings and portentsAnd these does she apply, for warnings and portents,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.147She is dead.She is dead.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.153That tidings came. With this she fell distract,That tydings came. With this she fell distract,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.187For certain she is dead, and by strange manner.For certaine she is dead, and by strange manner.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.189With meditating that she must die once,With meditating that she must dye once,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.11She was, my lord, and only IsabelShee was my Lord, and onely Issabel,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.20And, though she were the next of blood, proclaimedAnd though she were the next of blood, proclaymed
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.61She mocks at us, Douglas; I cannot endure it.She mocks at vs Duglas, I cannot endure it.
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.65She heard the messenger, and heard our talk,Shee heard the messenger, and heard our talke.
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.71She heard that too; intolerable grief!He heard that to, intollerable griefe:
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.95Even she, my liege; whose beauty tyrants fear, Euen shee liege, whose beauty tyrants feare,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.98Hath she been fairer, Warwick, than she is?Hath she been fairer Warwike then she is?
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.99My gracious King, fair is she not at all,My gratious King, faire is she not at all,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.101As I have seen her when she was herself.As I haue seene her when she was her selfe.
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.6Lo, when she blushed, even then did he look pale,Loe when shee blusht, euen then did he looke pale,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.9Anon, with reverent fear when she grew pale,Anone with reuerent feare, when she grewpale,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.14If she did blush, 'twas tender modest shame,If she did blush twas tender modest shame,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.18If she looked pale, 'twas silly woman's fear,If she lookt pale, twas silly womans feare,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.25She is grown more fairer far since I came hither,Shee is growne more fairer far since I came thither,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.28Unfolded she of David and his Scots!Vnfolded she of Dauid and his Scots:
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.29‘ Even thus,’ quoth she, ‘ he spake,’ and then spoke broad,Euen thus quoth she, he spake, and then spoke broad,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.32‘ And thus ’ quoth she, and answered then herself,And thus quoth she, and answered then herselfe,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.33For who could speak like her? – But she herselfFor who could speake like her but she herselfe:
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.36When she would talk of peace, methinks her tongueWhen she would talke of peace me thinkes her tong,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.45For she is all the treasure of our land;For she is all the Treasure of our land:
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.99Of what condition or estate she isOf what condicion or estate she is,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.102And my estate the footstool where she treads;And my estate the footstoole where shee treads,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.109Compares his sunburnt lover when she speaks.Compares his sunburnt louer when shee speakes,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.146What is she, when the sun lifts up his head,What is she, when the sunne lifts vp his head,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.157Say she hath thrice more splendour than the sun,Say shee hath thrice more splendour then the sun,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.159That she breeds sweets as plenteous as the sun,That shee breeds sweets as plenteous as the sunne,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.160That she doth thaw cold winter like the sun,That shee doth thaw cold winter like the sunne,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.161That she doth cheer fresh summer like the sun,That she doth cheere fresh sommer like the sunne,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.162That she doth dazzle gazers like the sun;That shee doth dazle gazers like the sunne,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.241And she an angel, pure, divine, unspotted:And shee an Angell pure deuine vnspotted,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.275Whither she will hear a wanton's tale or no.Whither shee will heare a wantons tale or no,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.289O, that she were as is the air to me!O that shee were as is the aire to mee,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.290Why, so she is; for when I would embrace her,Why so she is, for when I would embrace her,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.358I'll say she must forget her husband Salisbury,Ile say she must forget her husband Salisbury,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.359If she remember to embrace the King;If she remember to embrace the king,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.368See where she comes; was never father hadSee where she comes, was neuer father had,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.27Thou liest, she hath not; but I would she had.Thou lyest she hath not, but I would she had,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.40She is as imperator over me, and I to herShe is as imperator ouer me, and I to her
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.45She will resolve your majesty.She will resolue your maiestie.
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.67Ah, but alas, she wins the sun of me,Ah but alas she winnes the sunne of me,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.68For that is she herself, and thence it comesFor that is she her selfe, and thence it comes,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.108Dost put it in my mind how foul she is. – Dost put it in my minde how foule she is,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.111For she gives beauty both to heaven and earth.For shee giues beautie both to heauen and earth,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.166What says my fair love? Is she resolved?What saies my faire loue, is she resolute?
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.173And learn by me to find her where she lies;And learne by me to finde her where she lies
King Edward IIIE3 IV.ii.60She shall be welcome; and to wait her comingShe shall be welcome, and to wait her comming,
King JohnKJ I.i.33Till she had kindled France and all the worldTill she had kindled France and all the world,
King JohnKJ I.i.118And if she did play false, the fault was hers – And if she did play false, the fault was hers,
King JohnKJ I.i.218What woman-post is this? Hath she no husbandWhat woman post is this? hath she no husband
King JohnKJ II.i.167Now shame upon you, whe'er she does or no!Now shame vpon you where she does or no,
King JohnKJ II.i.393To whom in favour she shall give the day,To whom in fauour she shall giue the day,
King JohnKJ II.i.432Such as she is, in beauty, virtue, birth,Such as she is, in beautie, vertue, birth,
King JohnKJ II.i.434If not complete of, say he is not she;If not compleat of, say he is not shee,
King JohnKJ II.i.435And she again wants nothing, to name want,And she againe wants nothing, to name want,
King JohnKJ II.i.436If want it be not that she is not he.If want it be not, that she is not hee:
King JohnKJ II.i.438Left to be finished by such as she;Left to be finished by such as shee,
King JohnKJ II.i.439And she a fair divided excellence,And she a faire diuided excellence,
King JohnKJ II.i.493As she in beauty, education, blood,As she in beautie, education, blood,
King JohnKJ II.i.522That she is bound in honour still to doThat she is bound in honor still to do
King JohnKJ II.i.541I know she is not, for this match made upI know she is not for this match made vp,
King JohnKJ II.i.543Where is she and her son? Tell me, who knows.Where is she and her sonne, tell me, who knowes?
King JohnKJ II.i.544She is sad and passionate at your highness' tent.She is sad and passionate at your highnes Tent.
King JohnKJ III.i.55She is corrupted, changed, and won from thee;She is corrupted, chang'd, and wonne from thee,
King JohnKJ III.i.56She adulterates hourly with thine uncle John,Sh'adulterates hourely with thine Vnckle Iohn,
King JohnKJ III.i.70.1She seats herself on the ground
King JohnKJ III.iii.19.1She takes Arthur aside
King JohnKJ III.iv.120She looks upon them with a threatening eye.Shee lookes vpon them with a threatning eye:
King JohnKJ IV.ii.119.1And she not hear of it?And she not heare of it?
King LearKL I.i.13whereupon she grew round-wombed, and had indeed,wherevpon she grew round womb'd, and had indeede
King LearKL I.i.14sir, a son for her cradle ere she had a husband for her(Sir) a Sonne for her Cradle, ere she had husband for her
King LearKL I.i.71I find she names my very deed of love;I finde she names my very deede of loue:
King LearKL I.i.72Only she comes too short, that I professOnely she comes too short, that I professe
King LearKL I.i.129Let pride, which she calls plainness, marry her.Let pride, which she cals plainnesse, marry her:
King LearKL I.i.196When she was dear to us we did hold her so;When she was deare to vs, we did hold her so,
King LearKL I.i.197But now her price is fallen. Sir, there she stands;But now her price is fallen: Sir, there she stands,
King LearKL I.i.201.1She's there and she is yours.Shee's there, and she is yours.
King LearKL I.i.202Will you with those infirmities she owes,Will you with those infirmities she owes,
King LearKL I.i.214That she whom even but now was your best object,That she whom euen but now, was your obiect,
King LearKL I.i.241.1She is herself a dowry.She is herselfe a Dowrie.
King LearKL I.iv.244By her that else will take the thing she begs,By her, that else will take the thing she begges,
King LearKL I.iv.278A babe to honour her. If she must teem,A Babe to honor her. If she must teeme,
King LearKL I.iv.284To laughter and contempt, that she may feelTo laughter, and contempt: That she may feele,
King LearKL I.iv.304When she shall hear this of thee, with her nailsWhen she shall heare this of thee, with her nailes
King LearKL I.iv.329If she sustain him and his hundred knightsIf she sustaine him, and his hundred Knights
King LearKL I.v.18She will taste as like this as a crab does to a crab.She will taste as like this as, a Crabbe do's to a Crab:
King LearKL I.v.48She that's a maid now, and laughs at my departure,She that's a Maid now,& laughs at my departure,
King LearKL II.iv.12.2It is both he and she;It is both he and she,
King LearKL II.iv.118when she put 'em i'the paste alive. She knapped 'emwhen she put 'em i'th'Paste aliue, she knapt 'em
King LearKL II.iv.129Thy sister's naught. O Regan, she hath tiedThy Sisters naught: oh Regan, she hath tied
King LearKL II.iv.135.1Than she to scant her duty.Then she to scant her dutie.
King LearKL II.iv.138She have restrained the riots of your followers,She haue restrained the Riots of your Followres,
King LearKL II.iv.154She hath abated me of half my train,She hath abated me of halfe my Traine;
King LearKL II.iv.179.1That she would soon be here.That she would soone be heere.
King LearKL II.iv.231.1But she knows what she does.But she knowes what she doe's.
King LearKL II.iv.239From those that she calls servants, or from mine?From those that she cals Seruants, or from mine?
King LearKL III.i.48And she will tell you who that fellow isAnd she will tell you who that Fellow is
King LearKL III.ii.35For there was never yet fair woman but she made mouthsFor there was neuer yet faire woman, but shee made mouthes
King LearKL III.vi.27And she must not speak
King LearKL III.vi.28Why she dares not come over to thee.
King LearKL III.vi.47before this honourable assembly she kicked the poor
King LearKL III.vi.50She cannot deny it.
King LearKL III.vii.80She takes a sword and runs at him behindKilles him.
King LearKL III.vii.99.2If she live long,
King LearKL IV.ii.34She that herself will sliver and disbranch
King LearKL IV.iii.11Ay, sir; she took them, read them in my presence,
King LearKL IV.iii.13Her delicate cheek. It seemed she was a queen
King LearKL IV.iii.24.2Made she no verbal question?
King LearKL IV.iii.25Faith, once or twice she heaved the name of father
King LearKL IV.iii.29Let pity not be believed!’ There she shook
King LearKL IV.iii.31And clamour moistened; then away she started
King LearKL IV.v.19Why should she write to Edmund? Might not youWhy should she write to Edmund?
King LearKL IV.v.25She gave strange oeillades and most speaking looksShe gaue strange Eliads, and most speaking lookes
King LearKL V.i.17She and the Duke her husband!she and the Duke her husband.
King LearKL V.iii.87'Tis she is sub-contracted to this lord,'Tis she is sub-contracted to this Lord,
King LearKL V.iii.106She is not well. Convey her to my tent.She is not well, conuey her to my Tent.
King LearKL V.iii.225By her is poisoned; she confesses it.By her is poyson'd: she confesses it.
King LearKL V.iii.253That she fordid herself.That she for-did her selfe.
King LearKL V.iii.261.1Why, then she lives.Why then she liues.
King LearKL V.iii.263This feather stirs – she lives! If it be so,This feather stirs, she liues: if it be so,
King LearKL V.iii.278If Fortune brag of two she loved and hatedIf Fortune brag of two, she lou'd and hated,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.146She must lie here on mere necessity.She must lye here on meere necessitie.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.280This was no damsel neither, sir; she was aThis was no Damosell neyther sir, shee was a
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.86It was so, sir, for she had a green wit.It was so sir, for she had a greene wit.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.94If she be made of white and red,If shee be made of white and red,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.98Then if she fear or be to blame,Then if she feare, or be to blame,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.101Which native she doth owe.Which natiue she doth owe:
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.113with the rational hind Costard. She deserves well.with the rationall hinde Costard: she deserues well.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.124this damsel, I must keep her at the park; she is allowedthis Damsell, I must keepe her at the Parke, shee is alowd
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.11When she did starve the general world beside,When she did starue the generall world beside,
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.60And shape to win grace though he had no wit.And shape to win grace though she had no wit.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.111She offers the King a paper
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.183I beseech you a word. What is she in the white?I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.186She hath but one for herself – to desire that were a shame.Shee hath but one for her selfe, / To desire that were a shame.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.191She is an heir of Falconbridge.Shee is an heyre of Faulconbridge.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.193She is a most sweet lady.Shee is a most sweet Lady. Exit. Long.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.197Is she wedded or no?Is she wedded, or no.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.19(She gives him money)
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.58.1She takes the letter
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.110.2Why, she that bears the bow.Why she that beares the Bow.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.118You still wrangle with her, Boyet, and she strikes at the brow.You still wrangle with her Boyet, and shee strikes at the brow.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.119But she herself is hit lower. Have I hit her now?But she her selfe is hit lower: / Haue I hit her now.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.137Then will she get the upshoot by cleaving the pin.Then will shee get the vpshoot by cleauing the is in.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.15Well, she hath one o' my sonnets already. The clownWell, she hath one a'my Sonnets already, the Clowne
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.40How shall she know my griefs? I'll drop the paper.How shall she know my griefes? Ile drop the paper.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.84By earth, she is not, corporal. There you lie.By earth she is not, corporall, there you lye.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.93I would forget her, but a fever sheI would forget her, but a Feuer she
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.229She, an attending star, scarce seen a light.Shee (an attending Starre) scarce seene a light.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.237Fie, painted rhetoric! O, she needs it not!Fie painted Rethoricke, O she needs it not,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.239She passes praise; then praise too short doth blot.She passes prayse, then prayse too short doth blot.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.250If that she learn not of her eye to look.If that she learne not of her eye to looke:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.259And therefore is she born to make black fair.And therfore is she borne to make blacke, faire.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.273No devil will fright thee then so much as she.No Diuell will fright thee then so much as shee.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.278O, vile! Then, as she goes, what upward liesO vile, then as she goes what vpward lyes?
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.279The street should see as she walked overhead.The street should see as she walk'd ouer head.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.15And so she died. Had she been light, like you,and so she died: had she beene Light like you,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.17She might ha' been a grandam ere she died.she might a bin a Grandam ere she died.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.106I should have feared her had she been a devil.’I should haue fear'd her, had she beene a deuill.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.183She says you have it and you may be gone.She saies you haue it, and you may be gon.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.195.1She hears herself.She heares her selfe.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.215Yet still she is the moon, and I the man.Yet still she is the Moone, and I the Man.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.313That she vouchsafe me audience for one word.That she vouchsafe me audience for one word.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.314I will; and so will she, I know, my lord.I will, and so will she, I know my Lord.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.438When she shall challenge this, you will reject her.When shee shall challenge this, you will reiect her.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.456Pardon me, sir, this jewel did she wear,Pardon me sir, this Iewell did she weare,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.469Following the signs, wooed but the sign of she.Following the signes, woo'd but the signe of she.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.542The ship is under sail, and here she comes amain.The ship is vnder saile, and here she coms amain.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.669Fellow Hector, she is gone! She is two monthsFellow Hector, she is gone; she is two moneths
MacbethMac II.i.3.1And she goes down at twelve.And she goes downe at Twelue.
MacbethMac II.i.32She strike upon the bell. Get thee to bed.She strike vpon the Bell. Get thee to bed.
MacbethMac IV.iii.111Died every day she lived. Fare thee well!Dy'de euery day she liu'd. Fare thee well,
MacbethMac V.i.2perceive no truth in your report. When was it she lastperceiue no truth in your report. When was it shee last
MacbethMac V.i.19Lo you! Here she comes. This is her very guise; and,Lo you, heere she comes: This is her very guise, and
MacbethMac V.i.21How came she by that light?How came she by that light?
MacbethMac V.i.22Why, it stood by her. She has light byWhy it stood by her: she ha's light by
MacbethMac V.i.26What is it she does now? Look how she rubs herWhat is it she do's now? Looke how she rubbes her
MacbethMac V.i.32Hark! She speaks. I will set down what comesHeark, she speaks, I will set downe what comes
MacbethMac V.i.41The Thane of Fife had a wife; where is she now? –The Thane of Fife, had a wife: where is she now?
MacbethMac V.i.46She has spoke what she should not, I amShe ha's spoke what shee should not, I am
MacbethMac V.i.47sure of that. Heaven knows what she has known.sure of that: Heauen knowes what she ha's knowne.
MacbethMac V.i.65Will she go now to bed?Will she go now to bed?
MacbethMac V.i.70More needs she the divine than the physician.More needs she the Diuine, then the Physitian:
MacbethMac V.i.74My mind she has mated, and amazed my sight.My minde she ha's mated, and amaz'd my sight.
MacbethMac V.iii.38As she is troubled with thick-coming fanciesAs she is troubled with thicke-comming Fancies
MacbethMac V.v.17She should have died hereafter.She should haue dy'de heereafter;
Measure for MeasureMM I.i.38But, like a thrifty goddess, she determinesBut like a thrifty goddesse, she determines
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.146You know the lady. She is fast my wifeYou know the Lady, she is fast my wife,
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.172shoulders that a milkmaid, if she be in love, may sigh itshoulders, that a milke-maid, if she be in loue, may sigh it
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.179Implore her, in my voice, that she make friendsImplore her, in my voice, that she make friends
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.183Such as move men; beside, she hath prosperous artSuch as moue men: beside, she hath prosperous Art
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.184When she will play with reason and discourse,When she will play with reason, and discourse,
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.185And well she can persuade.And well she can perswade.
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.186I pray she may, as well for the encouragement of theI pray shee may; aswell for the encouragement of the
Measure for MeasureMM I.iv.46Is she your cousin?Is she your cosen?
Measure for MeasureMM I.iv.48.2She it is.She it is.
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.63plucked down in the suburbs, and now she professes apluckt downe in the Suborbs: and now shee professes a
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.72I say, sir, I will detest myself also, as well as she,I say sir, I will detest my selfe also, as well as she,
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.76Marry, sir, by my wife, who, if she had been aMarry sir, by my wife, who, if she had bin a
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.81she spit in his face, so she defied him.she spit in his face, so she defide him.
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.86Sir, she came in great with child, and longing – Sir, she came in great with childe: and longing
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.160time is yet to come that she was ever respected with man,time is yet to come that shee was euer respected with man,
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.162Sir, she was respected with him before heSir, she was respected with him, before he
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.168to her? If ever I was respected with her, or she withto her? If euer I was respected with her, or she with
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.191Hath she had any more than one husband?Hath she had any more then one husband?
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.125.2Pray heaven she win him.Pray heauen she win him.
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.141.2She speaks, and 'tisShee speakes, and 'tis such sence
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.165Not she, nor doth she tempt; but it is INot she: nor doth she tempt: but it is I,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iii.12Hath blistered her report. She is with child,Hath blisterd her report: She is with childe,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.55.1As she that he hath stained?As she that he hath staind?
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.166of natures. She, having the truth of honour in her, hathof natures. She (hauing the truth of honour in her) hath
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.215She should this Angelo have married, was affiancedShee should this Angelo haue married: was affianced
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.220heavily this befell to the poor gentlewoman. There sheheauily this befell to the poore Gentlewoman, there she
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.230on her own lamentation, which she yet wears for his sake,on her owne lamentation, which she yet weares for his sake:
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.235it will let this man live! But how out of this can she avail?it will let this man liue? But how out of this can shee auaile?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.52she still, ha?she still? Ha?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.53Troth, sir, she hath eaten up all her beef, andTroth sir, shee hath eaten vp all her beefe, and
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.54she is herself in the tub.she is her selfe in the tub.
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.173though she smelt brown bread and garlic. Say that Ithough she smelt browne-bread and Garlicke: say that I
Measure for MeasureMM IV.i.51.1She comes to do you good.She comes to doe you good.
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iv.23How might she tongue me? Yet reason dares her no,How might she tongue me? yet reason dares her no,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.34She hath been a suitor to me for her brother,She hath bin a suitor to me, for her Brother
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.36And she will speak most bitterly and strange.And she will speake most bitterly, and strange.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.47She speaks this in th' infirmity of sense.She speakes this, in th' infirmity of sence.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.60If she be mad, as I believe no other,If she be mad, as I beleeue no other,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.134But yesternight, my lord, she and that friar,But yesternight my Lord, she and that Fryer
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.142.1As she from one ungot.As she from one vngot.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.143Know you that Friar Lodowick that she speaks of?Know you that Frier Lodowick that she speakes of?
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.162.1Till she herself confess it.Till she her selfe confesse it.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.179My lord, she may be a punk. For many of them areMy Lord, she may be a Puncke: for many of them, are
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.193She that accuses him of fornicationShee that accuses him of Fornication,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.198.1Charges she more than me?Charges she moe then me?
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.205She unveils
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.212.1Carnally, she says.Carnallie she saies.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.275she would sooner confess. Perchance publicly she'll beShe would sooner confesse, perchance publikely she'll be
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.431Should she kneel down in mercy of this fact,Should she kneele downe, in mercie of this fact,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.522She, Claudio, that you wronged, look you restore.She Claudio that you wrong'd, looke you restore.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.162And she is fair, and, fairer than that word,And she is faire, and fairer then that word,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.i.29Pluck the young sucking cubs from the she-bear,Plucke the yong sucking Cubs from the she Beare,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.29I must needs tell thee all. She hath directedI must needes tell thee all, she hath directed
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.31What gold and jewels she is furnished with,What gold and iewels she is furnisht with,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.32What page's suit she hath in readiness.What Pages suite she hath in readinesse:
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.36Unless she do it under this excuse,Vnlesse she doe it vnder this excuse,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iv.37That she is issue to a faithless Jew.That she is issue to a faithlesse Iew:
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.17How like the prodigal doth she return,How like a prodigall doth she returne
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.53For she is wise, if I can judge of her,For she is wise, if I can iudge of her,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.54And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,And faire she is, if that mine eyes be true,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.55And true she is, as she hath proved herself;And true she is, as she hath prou'd her selfe:
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.57Shall she be placed in my constant soul.Shall she be placed in my constant soule.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.viii.22She hath the stones upon her, and the ducats.’She hath the stones vpon her, and the ducats.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.8I would she were as lying a gossip in that asI would she were as lying a gossip in that, as
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.9ever knapped ginger or made her neighbours believe sheeuer knapt Ginger, or made her neighbours beleeue she
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.25that made the wings she flew withal.that made the wings she flew withall.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.29She is damned for it.She is damn'd for it.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.81foot, and the jewels in her ear! Would she were hearsedfoot, and the iewels in her eare: would she were hearst
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.160Happy in this, she is not yet so oldHappy in this, she is not yet so old
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.161But she may learn; happier than this,But she may learne: happier then this,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.162She is not bred so dull but she can learn;Shee is not bred so dull but she can learne;
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.v.38than reason; but if she be less than an honest woman,then reason: but if she be lesse then an honest woman,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.v.39she is indeed more than I took her for.shee is indeed more then I tooke her for.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.v.79Hast thou of me as she is for a wife.Hast thou of me, as she is for a wife.
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.121She presents a letter
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.269Of such misery doth she cut me off.Of such miserie, doth she cut me off:
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.286If she were by to hear you make the offer.If she were by to heare you make the offer.
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.288I would she were in heaven, so she couldI would she were in heauen, so she could
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.439And when she put it on she made me vowAnd when she put it on, she made me vow
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.444She would not hold out enemy for everShee would not hold out enemy for euer
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.30Be here at Belmont. She doth stray aboutBe heere at Belmont, she doth stray about
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.31By holy crosses, where she kneels and praysBy holy crosses where she kneeles and prayes
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.104The nightingale, if she should sing by day,The Nightingale if she should sing by day
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.148That she did give me, whose posy wasThat she did giue me, whose Poesie was
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.302Whether till the next night she had rather stay,Whether till the next night she had rather stay,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.44Mistress Anne Page? She has brown hair, andMistris Anne Page? she has browne haire, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.49Got deliver to a joyful resurrections! – give, when she is(Got deliuer to a ioyfull resurrections) giue, when she is
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.57I know the young gentlewoman. She has goodI know the young Gentlewoman, she has good
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.40Ford's wife. I spy entertainment in her. She discourses,Fords wife: I spie entertainment in her: shee discourses:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.41she carves, she gives the leer of invitation. I can construeshee carues: she giues the leere of inuitation: I can construe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.48Now, the report goes she has all the rule of Now, the report goes, she has all the rule of
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.60O, she did so course o'er my exteriors withO she did so course o're my exteriors with
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.63another letter to her. She bears the purse too. She is aanother letter to her: She beares the Purse too: She is a
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.39She shuts Simple in the closet
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.42.1She sings
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.134In truth, sir, and she is pretty, andIn truth Sir, and shee is pretty, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.141book she loves you. Have not your worship a wartbooke shee loues you: haue not your Worship a wart
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.148But, indeed, she is given too much to allicholy andbut (indeed) shee is giuen too much to Allicholy and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.4(She reads)
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.77She gives her letter to Mistress Ford
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.148(Aside to Mistress Ford) Look who comes yonder. SheLooke who comes yonder: shee
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.217easily. She was in his company at Page's house, and whateasily: she was in his company at Pages house: and what
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.220her honest, I lose not my labour. If she be otherwise,her honest, I loose not my labor: if she be otherwise,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.76But what says she to me? Be brief, my goodBut what saies shee to mee? be briefe my good
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.78Marry, she hath received yourMarry, she hath receiu'd your
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.79letter, for the which she thanks you a thousand times,Letter: for the which she thankes you a thousand times;
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.80and she gives you to notify that her husband will beand she giues you to notifie, that her husband will be
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.84come and see the picture, she says, that you wot of.come and see the picture (she sayes) that you wot of:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.87jealousy man – she leads a very frampold life with him,iealousie-man; she leads a very frampold life with him,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.97the other. And she bade me tell your worship that herthe other: and shee bade me tell your worship, that her
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.98husband is seldom from home, but she hopes there willhusband is seldome from home, but she hopes there will
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.114life than she does. Do what she will, say what she will,life then she do's: doe what shee will, say what she will,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.115take all, pay all, go to bed when she list, rise when shetake all, pay all, goe to bed when she list, rise when she
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.116list, all is as she will. And, truly, she deserves it; for iflist, all is as she will: and truly she deserues it; for if
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.117there be a kind woman in Windsor, she is one. You mustthere be a kinde woman in Windsor, she is one: you must
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.133Give fire! She is my prize, or ocean whelm them all!Giue fire: she is my prize, or Ocean whelme them all.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.193but have given largely to many to know what she wouldbut haue giuen largely to many, to know what shee would
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.214Some say that though she appear honest to me, yetSome say, that though she appeare honest to mee, yet
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.215in other places she enlargeth her mirth so far that therein other places shee enlargeth her mirth so farre, that there
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.232O, understand my drift. She dwells so securely onO, vnderstand my drift: she dwells so securely on
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.234dares not present itself. She is too bright to be lookeddares not present it selfe: shee is too bright to be look'd
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.290than my wife with herself. Then she plots, then shethen my wife with her selfe. Then she plots, then shee
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.291ruminates, then she devises. And what they think inruminates, then shee deuises: and what they thinke in
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.10Truly, sir, to see your wife. Is she atTruly Sir, to see your wife, is she at
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.12Ay; and as idle as she may hang together, for wantI, and as idle as she may hang together for want
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.25Indeed she is.Indeed she is.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.84She shall not see me. I will ensconce me behindShe shall not see me, I will ensconce mee behinde
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.27No, she shall not dismay me. I care not forNo, she shall not dismay me: / I care not for
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.52good comfort. She calls you, coz. I'll leave you.good comfort: she cals you (Coz) Ile leaue you.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.71She is no match for you.She is no match for you.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.88My daughter will I question how she loves you,My daughter will I question how she loues you,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.90Till then, farewell, sir. She must needs go in;Till then, farewell Sir, she must needs go in,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.36not her fault. She does so take on with her men; theynot her fault: she do's so take on with her men; they
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.40Well, she laments, sir, for it, thatWell, she laments Sir for it, that
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.42this morning a-birding. She desires you once more tothis morning a birding; she desires you once more to
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.61house the hour she appointed me.house the houre she appointed me.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.64How so, sir? Did she change her determination?How so sir, did she change her determination?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.i.58her! Never name her, child, if she be a whore.her; neuer name her (childe) if she be a whore.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.162forbid her my house? She comes of errands, does she?forbid her my house. She comes of errands do's she?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.164pass under the profession of fortune-telling. She workspasse vnder the profession of Fortune-telling. She workes
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.iv.51As Falstaff, she, and I are newly met,As Falstaffe, she, and I, are newly met,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.11his chamber. I'll be so bold as stay, sir, till she comehis chamber: Ile be so bold as stay Sir till she come
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.32And what says she, I pray, sir?And what sayes she, I pray Sir?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.33Marry, she says that the very same man thatMarry shee sayes, that the very same man that
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.25Immediately to marry. she hath consented.Immediately to Marry: She hath consented:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.33She, seemingly obedient, likewise hathShe seemingly obedient) likewise hath
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.35Her father means she shall be all in white,Her Father meanes she shall be all in white;
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.38She shall go with him. Her mother hath intended,She shall goe with him: her Mother hath intended
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.41That quaint in green she shall be loose enrobed,That quaint in greene, she shall be loose en-roab'd,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.46Which means she to deceive, father or mother?Which meanes she to deceiue? Father, or Mother.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.ii.6white, and cry ‘ mum ’; she cries ‘ budget ’; and by thatwhite, and cry Mum; she cries Budget, and by that
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.50That, ere she sleep, has thrice her prayers said,That ere she sleepe has thrice her prayers said,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.52Sleep she as sound as careless infancy.Sleepe she as sound as carelesse infancie,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.107.1She points to the horns
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.173be my daughter, she is, by this, Doctor Caius's wife.be my daughter, she is (by this) Doctour Caius wife.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.193she cried ‘ budget,’ as Anne and I had appointed. Andshe cride budget, as Anne and I had appointed, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.197indeed she is now with the Doctor at the deanery, andindeede she is now with the Doctor at the Deanrie, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.215The truth is, she and I, long since contracted,The truth is, she and I (long since contracted)
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.217Th' offence is holy that she hath committed,Th'offence is holy, that she hath committed,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.220Since therein she doth evitate and shunSince therein she doth euitate and shun
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.4This old moon wanes! She lingers my desires,This old Moon wanes; She lingers my desires
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.39Be it so she will not here before your graceBe it so she will not heere before your Grace,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.42As she is mine, I may dispose of her;As she is mine, I may dispose of her;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.97And she is mine, and all my right of herAnd she is mine, and all my right of her,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.108And won her soul; and she, sweet lady, dotes,And won her soule: and she (sweet Ladie) dotes,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.158Of great revenue; and she hath no child.Of great reuennew, and she hath no childe,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.160And she respects me as her only son.And she respects me, as her onely sonne:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.227Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.Through Athens I am thought as faire as she.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.21Because that she as her attendant hathBecause that she, as her attendant, hath
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.23She never had so sweet a changeling,She neuer had so sweet a changeling,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.26But she perforce withholds the loved boy,But she (perforce) with-holds the loued boy,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.49And when she drinks, against her lips I bob,And when she drinkes, against her lips I bob,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.53Then slip I from her bum. Down topples she,Then slip I from her bum, downe topples she,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.125Full often hath she gossiped by my side,Full often hath she gossipt by my side,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.130Which she with pretty and with swimming gaitWhich she with pretty and with swimming gate,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.135But she, being mortal, of that boy did die,But she being mortall, of that boy did die,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.177I'll watch Titania when she is asleep,Ile watch Titania, when she is asleepe,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.179The next thing then she, waking, looks upon – The next thing when she waking lookes vpon,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.182She shall pursue it with the soul of love.Shee shall pursue it, with the soule of loue.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.266More fond on her than she upon her love.More fond on her, then she vpon her loue;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.82Pretty soul, she durst not liePretty soule, she durst not lye
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.96Happy is Hermia, wheresoe'er she lies,Happy is Hermia, wheresoere she lies;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.97For she hath blessed and attractive eyes.For she hath blessed and attractiue eyes.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.141She sees not Hermia. Hermia, sleep thou there,She sees not Hermia: Hermia sleepe thou there,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.194And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,And when she weepes, weepe euerie little flower,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.3Which she must dote on, in extremity.Which she must dote on, in extremitie.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.8While she was in her dull and sleeping hour,While she was in her dull and sleeping hower,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.40That when he waked of force she must be eyed.That when he wak't, of force she must be eyde.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.96All fancy-sick she is and pale of cheerAll fancy sicke she is, and pale of cheere,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.99I'll charm his eyes against she do appear.Ile charme his eyes against she doth appeare.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.108When thou wakest, if she be by,When thou wak'st if she be by,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.192Lo, she is one of this confederacy.Loe, she is one of this confederacy,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.248If she cannot entreat, I can compel.If she cannot entreate, I can compell.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.249Thou canst compel no more than she entreat.Thou canst compell, no more then she entreate.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.290Now I perceive that she hath made compareNow I perceiue that she hath made compare
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.291Between our statures. She hath urged her height,Betweene our statures, she hath vrg'd her height,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.293Her height, forsooth, she hath prevailed with him.Her height (forsooth) she hath preuail'd with him.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.304Because she is something lower than myselfBecause she is something lower then my selfe,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.321Be not afraid; she shall not harm thee, Helena.Be not afraid, she shall not harme thee Helena.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.322No, sir, She shall not, though you take her part.No sir, she shall not, though you take her part.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.323O, when she is angry she is keen and shrewd.O when she's angry, she is keene and shrewd,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.324She was a vixen when she went to school,She was a vixen when she went to schoole,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.325And though she be but little, she is fierce.And though she be but little, she is fierce.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.335.2Now she holds me not.Now she holds me not,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.437She lies down and sleepsSleepe.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.439Here she comes, curst and sad.Here she comes, curst and sad,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.448She lies down and sleeps
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.50For she his hairy temples then had roundedFor she his hairy temples then had rounded,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.57And she in mild terms begged my patience,And she in milde termes beg'd my patience,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.59Which straight she gave me, and her fairy sentWhich straight she gaue me, and her Fairy sent
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.158Of my consent that she should be your wife.Of my consent, that she should be your wife.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.141And as she fled, her mantle she did fall,And as she fled, her mantle she did fall;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.182Thisbe's cue. She is to enter now, and I am to spy herThisbies cue; she is to enter, and I am to spy / Her
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.184you. Yonder she comes.you; yonder she comes.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.306She will find him by starlight. Here she comes;She wil finde him by starre-light. / Heere she comes,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.308Methinks she should not use a long one forMe thinkes shee should not vse a long one for
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.309such a Pyramus. I hope she will be brief.such a Piramus: I hope she will be breefe.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.312us; she for a woman, God bless us.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.313She hath spied him already, with those sweetShe hath spyed him already, with those sweete
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.315And thus she means, videlicet:And thus she meanes, videlicit.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.337She stabs herself
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.339She dies
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.105If Signor Leonato be her father, she would notIf Signior Leonato be her father, she would not
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.107him as she is.him as she is.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.112Is it possible disdain should die while she hathIs it possible Disdaine should die, while shee hath
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.155Is she not a modest young lady?Is she not a modest yong Ladie?
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.164that were she other than she is, she were unhandsome;that were shee other then she is, she were vnhandsome,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.165and being no other but as she is, I do not like her.and being no other, but as she is, I doe not like her.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.175In mine eye she is the sweetest lady that ever IIn mine eie, she is the sweetest Ladie that euer I
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.178such matter; there's her cousin, an she were not possessedsuch matter: there's her cosin, and she were not possest
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.212That she is worthy, I know.That she is worthie, I know.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.213That I neither feel how she should be loved,That I neither feele how shee should be loued,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.214nor know how she should be worthy, is the opinion thatnor know how shee should be worthie, is the opinion that
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.221she brought me up, I likewise give her most humbleshe brought mee vp, I likewise giue her most humble
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.306And the conclusion is, she shall be thine.And the conclusion is, shee shall be thine,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.19itself; but I will acquaint my daughter withal, that sheit selfe: but I will acquaint my daughter withall, that she
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.150him from her; she is no equal for his birth. You mayhim from her, she is no equall for his birth: you may
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.217gentleman that danced with her told her she is muchGentleman that daunst with her, told her shee is much
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.219O, she misused me past the endurance of a O she misusde me past the indurance of a
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.222scold with her. She told me, not thinking I had beenscold with her: shee told mee, not thinking I had beene
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.226at a mark, with a whole army shooting at me. Sheat a marke, with a whole army shooting at me: shee
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.229near her; she would infect to the north star. I would notneere her, she would infect to the north starre: I would not
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.230marry her, though she were endowed with all thatmarry her, though she were indowed with all that
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.231Adam had left him before he transgressed. She wouldAdam had left him before he transgrest, she would
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.236she is here, a man may live as quiet in hell as in a sanctuary,she is heere, a man may liue as quiet in hell, as in a sanctuary,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.240Look, here she comes.Looke heere she comes.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.292And so she doth, cousin.And so she doth coosin.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.318my lord; she is never sad but when she sleeps, and notmy Lord, she is neuer sad, but when she sleepes, and not
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.319ever sad then; for I have heard my daughter say, she hatheuer sad then: for I haue heard my daughter say, she hath
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.322She cannot endure to hear tell of a husband.Shee cannot indure to heare tell of a husband.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.323O, by no means; she mocks all her wooers outO, by no meanes, she mocks all her wooers out
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.325She were an excellent wife for Benedick.She were an excellent wife for Benedick.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.352I will teach you how to humour your cousin, that sheI will teach you how to humour your cosin, that shee
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.28one woman shall not come in my grace. Rich she shallone woman shall not come in my grace: rich shee shall
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.97she should so dote on Signor Benedick, whom she hathshe should so dote on Signior Benedicke, whom shee hath
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.102think of it; but that she loves him with an enraged affection,thinke of it, but that she loues him with an inraged affection,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.104May be she doth but counterfeit.May be she doth but counterfeit.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.107of passion came so near the life of passion as sheof passion, came so neere the life of passion as she
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.109Why, what effects of passion shows she?Why what effects of passion shewes she?
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.112What effects, my lord? She will sit you – youWhat effects my Lord? shee will sit you, you
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.114She did, indeed.She did indeed.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.125Hath she made her affection known toHath shee made her affection known to
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.127No, and swears she never will; that's herNo, and sweares she neuer will, that's her
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.130I,’ says she, ‘ that have so oft encountered him withI, saies she, that haue so oft encountred him with
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.132This says she now when she is beginning toThis saies shee now when shee is beginning to
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.134there will she sit in her smock till she have writ a sheetthere will she sit in her smocke, till she haue writ a sheet
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.138O, when she had writ it and was reading itO when she had writ it, & was reading it
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.139over, she found Benedick and Beatrice between theouer, she found Benedicke and Beatrice betweene the
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.142O, she tore the letter into a thousand halfpence;O she tore the letter into a thousand halfpence,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.143railed at herself, that she should be so immodestraild at her self, that she should be so immodest
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.144to write to one that she knew would flout her.to write, to one that shee knew would flout her:
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.145‘ I measure him,’ says she, ‘ by my own spirit; for II measure him, saies she, by my owne spirit, for I
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.148Then down upon her knees she falls, weeps,Then downe vpon her knees she falls, weepes,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.151She doth indeed, my daughter says so; and theShe doth indeed, my daughter saies so, and the
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.153is sometime afeard she will do a desperate outrage tois somtime afeard she will doe a desperate out-rage to
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.156some other, if she will not discover it.some other, if she will not discouer it.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.161she is virtuous.she is vertuous.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.162And she is exceeding wise.And she is exceeding wise.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.168I would she had bestowed this dotage on me;I would shee had bestowed this dotage on mee,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.173Hero thinks surely she will die; for she says sheHero thinkes surely she wil die, for she saies she
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.174will die, if he love her not; and she will die, ere she makewill die, if hee loue her not, and shee will die ere shee make
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.175her love known; and she will die if he woo her, ratherher loue knowne, and she will die if hee wooe her, rather
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.176than she will bate one breath of her accustomedthan shee will bate one breath of her accustomed
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.178She doth well. If she should make tender ofShe doth well, if she should make tender of
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.200Nay, that's impossible; she may wear her heartNay that's impossible, she may weare her heart
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.221her; they say, too, that she will rather die than give anyher: they say too, that she will rather die than giue any
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.11Against that power that bred it. There will she hide her,Against that power that bred it, there will she hide her,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.23Enter Beatrice secretively. She slips into the bowerEnter Beatrice.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.34No, truly, Ursula, she is too disdainful;No truely Vrsula, she is too disdainfull,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.54All matter else seems weak. She cannot love,All matter else seemes weake: she cannot loue,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.56.1She is so self-endeared.Shee is so selfe indeared.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.58She knew his love, lest she make sport at it.She knew his loue, lest she make sport at it.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.61But she would spell him backward. If fair-faced,But she would spell him backward: if faire fac'd,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.62She would swear the gentleman should be her sister;She would sweare the gentleman should be her sister:
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.68So turns she every man the wrong side out,So turnes she euery man the wrong side out,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.75She would mock me into air; O, she would laugh meShe would mocke me into ayre, O she would laugh me
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.81Yet tell her of it; hear what she will say.Yet tell her of it, heare what shee will say.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.88She cannot be so much without true judgement –She cannot be so much without true iudgement,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.90As she is prized to have – as to refuseAs she is prisde to haue, as to refuse
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.63She shall be buried with her face upwards.Shee shall be buried with her face vpwards.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.92shortened, for she has been too long a talking of, theshortned, (for she hath beene too long a talking of) the
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.95Even she – Leonato's Hero, your Hero, everyEuen shee, Leonatoes Hero, your Hero, euery
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.99I could say she were worse; think you of a worseI could say she were worse, thinke you of a worse
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.141name of Hero; she leans me out at her mistress'name of Hero, she leanes me out at her mistris
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.149the devil my master knew she was Margaret; and partlythe diuell my Master knew she was Margaret and partly
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iv.34Beatrice else, here she comes.Beatrice else, here she comes.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.32Behold how like a maid she blushes here!Behold how like a maid she blushes heere!
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.37All you that see her, that she were a maidAll you that see her, that she were a maide,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.38By these exterior shows? But she is none;By these exterior shewes? But she is none:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.39She knows the heat of a luxurious bed.She knowes the heat of a luxurious bed:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.47You will say she did embrace me as a husband,You will say, she did imbrace me as a husband,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.117.2Yea, wherefore should she not?Yea, wherefore should she not?
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.119Cry shame upon her? Could she here denyCry shame vpon her? Could she heere denie
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.137Valuing of her – why, she, O, she is fallenValewing of her, why she, O she is falne
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.169Thou seest that all the grace that she hath leftThou seest that all the Grace that she hath left,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.170Is that she will not add to her damnationIs, that she wil not adde to her damnation,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.171A sin of perjury; she not denies it:A sinne of periury, she not denies it:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.202And publish it that she is dead indeed.And publish it, that she is dead indeed:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.212She dying, as it must be so maintained,She dying, as it must be so maintain'd,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.213Upon the instant that she was accused,Vpon the instant that she was accus'd,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.221When he shall hear she died upon his words,When he shal heare she dyed vpon his words,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.228Than when she lived indeed. Then shall he mourn,Then when she liu'd indeed: then shal he mourne,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.307Sweet Hero! She is wronged, she is slandered,Sweet Hero, she is wrong'd, shee is slandered,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.308she is undone.she is vndone.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.330she is dead; and so, farewell.she is dead, and so farewell.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.69And she lies buried with her ancestors –And she lies buried with her ancestors:
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.88And she is dead, slandered to death by villains,And she is dead, slander'd to death by villaines,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.104But, on my honour, she was charged with nothingBut on my honour she was charg'd with nothing
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.155other day. I said, thou hadst a fine wit. ‘ True,’ said she,other day: I said thou hadst a fine wit: true saies she,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.157she, ‘ a great gross one.’ ‘ Nay,’ said I, ‘ a good wit.’ ‘ Just,’shee, a great grosse one: nay said I, a good wit: iust
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.158said she, ‘ it hurts nobody.’ ‘ Nay,’ said I, ‘ the gentlemansaid she, it hurts no body: nay said I, the gentleman
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.159is wise:’ ‘ Certain,’ said she, ‘ a wise gentleman.’ ‘ Nay,’is wise: certain said she, a wise gentleman: nay
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.160said I, ‘ he hath the tongues.’ ‘ That I believe,’ said she,said I, he hath the tongues: that I beleeue said shee,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.163tongue: there's two tongues.’ Thus did she, an hourtongue, there's two tongues: thus did shee an howre
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.165she concluded with a sigh, thou wast the properest manshe concluded with a sigh, thou wast the proprest man
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.167For the which she wept heartily, and said sheFor the which she wept heartily, and said shee
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.169Yea, that she did; but yet, for all that, an ifYea that she did, but yet for all that, and if
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.170she did not hate him deadly, she would love him dearly.shee did not hate him deadlie, shee would loue him dearely,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.198Come, you, sir; if justice cannot tame you, sheCome you sir, if iustice cannot tame you, shee
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.269How innocent she died; and if your loveHow innocent she died, and if your loue
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.277And she alone is heir to both of us.And she alone is heire to both of vs,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.287.2No, by my soul, she was not,No by my soule she was not,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.288Nor knew not what she did when she spoke to me,Nor knew not what she did when she spoke to me,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.1Did I not tell you she was innocent?Did I not tell you she was innocent?
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.38I'll hold my mind, were she an Ethiope.Ile hold my minde were she an Ethiope.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.54This same is she, and I do give you her.This same is she, and I doe giue you her.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.66She died, my lord, but whiles her slander lived.Shee died my Lord, but whiles her slander liu'd.
OthelloOth I.i.139If she be in her chamber or your house,If she be in her Chamber, or your house,
OthelloOth I.i.161It is too true an evil. Gone she is,It is too true an euill. Gone she is,
OthelloOth I.i.166How didst thou know 'twas she? – O, she deceives meHow didst thou know 'twas she? (Oh she deceaues me
OthelloOth I.i.167Past thought! – What said she to you? – Get more tapers.Past thought:) what said she to you? Get moe Tapers:
OthelloOth I.i.170O heaven! How got she out? O treason of the blood!Oh Heauen: how got she out? / Oh treason of the blood.
OthelloOth I.ii.65If she in chains of magic were not bound,(If she in Chaines of Magick were not bound)
OthelloOth I.ii.67So opposite to marriage that she shunnedSo opposite to Marriage, that she shun'd
OthelloOth I.iii.60She is abused, stolen from me, and corruptedShe is abus'd, stolne from me, and corrupted
OthelloOth I.iii.96Blushed at herself: and she, in spite of nature,Blush'd at her selfe, and she, in spight of Nature,
OthelloOth I.iii.98To fall in love with what she feared to look on!To fall in Loue, with what she fear'd to looke on;
OthelloOth I.iii.122And till she come, as truly as to heavenAnd tell she come, as truely as to heauen,
OthelloOth I.iii.126.1And she in mine.And she in mine.
OthelloOth I.iii.147Which ever as she could with haste dispatchWhich euer as she could with haste dispatch,
OthelloOth I.iii.153Whereof by parcels she had something heard,Whereof by parcels she had something heard,
OthelloOth I.iii.158She gave me for my pains a world of sighs:She gaue me for my paines a world of kisses:
OthelloOth I.iii.159She swore, in faith 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange,She swore in faith 'twas strange: 'twas passing strange,
OthelloOth I.iii.161She wished she had not heard it, yet she wishedShe wish'd she had not heard it, yet she wish'd
OthelloOth I.iii.162That heaven had made her such a man. She thanked me,That Heauen had made her such a man. She thank'd me,
OthelloOth I.iii.166She loved me for the dangers I had passed,She lou'd me for the dangers I had past,
OthelloOth I.iii.167And I loved her, that she did pity them.And I lou'd her, that she did pitty them.
OthelloOth I.iii.174If she confess that she was half the wooer,If she confesse that she was halfe the wooer,
OthelloOth I.iii.265For she is with me. No, when light-winged toysWhen she is with me. No, when light wing'd Toyes
OthelloOth I.iii.290She has deceived her father, and may thee.She ha's deceiu'd her Father, and may thee. Exit.
OthelloOth I.iii.345shortly as acerbe as the coloquintida. She must changeshortly, as bitter as Coloquintida. She must change
OthelloOth I.iii.346for youth: when she is sated with his body she will findfor youth: when she is sated with his body she will find
OthelloOth I.iii.382He's done my office. I know not if't be trueShe ha's done my Office. I know not if't be true,
OthelloOth II.i.73.2What is she?What is she?
OthelloOth II.i.74She that I spake of, our great Captain's Captain,She that I spake of: / Our great Captains Captaine,
OthelloOth II.i.100Sir, would she give you so much of her lipsSir, would she giue you somuch of her lippes,
OthelloOth II.i.101As of her tongue she oft bestows on me,As of her tongue she oft bestowes on me,
OthelloOth II.i.103.1Alas, she has no speech.Alas: she ha's no speech.
OthelloOth II.i.106She puts her tongue a little in her heartShe puts het tongue a little in her heart,
OthelloOth II.i.127And thus she is delivered.and thus she is deliuer'd.
OthelloOth II.i.128If she be fair and wise, fairness and wit,If she be faire, and wise: fairenesse, and wit,
OthelloOth II.i.130Well praised! How if she be black and witty?Well prais'd: How if she be Blacke and Witty?
OthelloOth II.i.131If she be black, and thereto have a wit,If she be blacke, and thereto haue a wit,
OthelloOth II.i.134She never yet was foolish that was fair,She neuer yet was foolish that was faire,
OthelloOth II.i.145She that was ever fair and never proud,She that was euer faire, and neuer proud,
OthelloOth II.i.149She that being angered, her revenge being nigh,She that being angred, her reuenge being nie,
OthelloOth II.i.151She that in wisdom never was so frailShe that in wisedome neuer was so fraile,
OthelloOth II.i.153She that could think and ne'er disclose her mind:She that could thinke, and neu'r disclose her mind,
OthelloOth II.i.155She was a wight, if ever such wight were –She was a wight, (if euer such wightes were)
OthelloOth II.i.216Mark me with what violence she first loved the Moor,Marke me with what violence she first lou'd the Moore,
OthelloOth II.i.218will she love him still for prating? Let not thy discreetTo loue him still for prating, let not thy discreet
OthelloOth II.i.220shall she have to look on the devil? When the blood isshall she haue to looke on the diuell? When the Blood is
OthelloOth II.i.244Blessed fig's-end! The wine she drinks is made ofBless'd figges-end. The Wine she drinkes is made of
OthelloOth II.i.245grapes. If she had been blessed, she would never havegrapes. If shee had beene bless'd, shee would neuer haue
OthelloOth II.i.278That she loves him, 'tis apt and of great credit.That she loues him, 'tis apt, and of great Credite.
OthelloOth II.iii.16not yet made wanton the night with her; and she isnot yet made wanton the night with her: and she is
OthelloOth II.iii.18She is a most exquisite lady.She's a most exquisite Lady.
OthelloOth II.iii.20Indeed, she is a most fresh and delicate creature.Indeed shes a most fresh and delicate creature.
OthelloOth II.iii.21What an eye she has! Methinks it sounds a parley toWhat an eye she ha's? / Methinkes it sounds a parley to
OthelloOth II.iii.24And when she speaks, is it not an alarum to love?And when she speakes, / Is it not an Alarum to Loue?
OthelloOth II.iii.25She is indeed perfection.She is indeed perfection.
OthelloOth II.iii.310put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, soput you in your place againe. She is of so free, so kinde, so
OthelloOth II.iii.311apt, so blessed a disposition, that she holds it a vice in herapt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her
OthelloOth II.iii.312goodness not to do more than she is requested. Thisgoodnesse, not to do more then she is requested. This
OthelloOth II.iii.336That she may make, unmake, do what she list,That she may make, vnmake, do what she list,
OthelloOth II.iii.345And she for him pleads strongly to the Moor,And she for him, pleades strongly to the Moore,
OthelloOth II.iii.347That she repeals him for her body's lust,That she repeales him, for her bodies Lust'
OthelloOth II.iii.348And by how much she strives to do him good,And by how much she striues to do him good,
OthelloOth II.iii.349She shall undo her credit with the Moor.She shall vndo her Credite with the Moore.
OthelloOth III.i.27She is stirring, sir. If she will stir hither, I shallShe is stirring sir: if she will stirre hither, I shall
OthelloOth III.i.34Is that she will to virtuous Desdemonais, that she will to vertuous Desdemona
OthelloOth III.i.43And she speaks for you stoutly. The Moor repliesAnd she speakes for you stoutly. The Moore replies,
OthelloOth III.iii.187For she had eyes and chose me. No, Iago,For she had eyes, and chose me. No Iago,
OthelloOth III.iii.204She did deceive her father, marrying you,She did deceiue her Father, marrying you,
OthelloOth III.iii.205And when she seemed to shake, and fear your looks,And when she seem'd to shake, and feare your lookes,
OthelloOth III.iii.206.1She loved them most.She lou'd them most.
OthelloOth III.iii.206.2And so she did.And so she did.
OthelloOth III.iii.207She that so young could give out such a seeming,Shee that so young could giue out such a Seeming
OthelloOth III.iii.224Long live she so! And long live you to think so!Long liue she so; / And long liue you to thinke so.
OthelloOth III.iii.274When we do quicken. Desdemona comes:When we do quicken. Looke where she comes:
OthelloOth III.iii.275If she be false, O, then heaven mocks itself!If she be false, Heauen mock'd it selfe:
OthelloOth III.iii.285He puts the handkerchief from him, and she drops it
OthelloOth III.iii.290Wooed me to steal it; but she so loves the token –Woo'd me to steale it. But she so loues the Token,
OthelloOth III.iii.291For he conjured her she should ever keep it –(For he coniur'd her, she should euer keepe it)
OthelloOth III.iii.292That she reserves it evermore about herThat she reserues it euermore about her,
OthelloOth III.iii.308No, faith, she let it drop by negligence,No: but she let it drop by negligence,
OthelloOth III.iii.315When she shall lack it.When she shall lacke it.
OthelloOth III.iii.381I think my wife be honest, and think she is not;I thinke my Wife be honest, and thinke she is not:
OthelloOth III.iii.430She may be honest yet. Tell me but this:She may be honest yet: Tell me but this,
OthelloOth III.iv.57She was a charmer and could almost readShe was a Charmer, and could almost read
OthelloOth III.iv.58The thoughts of people. She told her, while she kept it,The thoughts of people. She told her, while she kept it,
OthelloOth III.iv.60Entirely to her love; but, if she lost itIntirely to her loue: But if she lost it,
OthelloOth III.iv.63After new fancies. She, dying, gave it me,After new Fancies. She dying, gaue it me,
OthelloOth III.iv.103There is no other way: 'tis she must do't.There is no other way: 'tis she must doo't:
OthelloOth IV.i.13She may, I think, bestow't on any man.She may (I thinke) bestow't on any man.
OthelloOth IV.i.14She is protectress of her honour too.She is Protectresse of her honor too:
OthelloOth IV.i.15May she give that?May she giue that?
OthelloOth IV.i.73And knowing what I am, I know what shall be.And knowing what I am, I know what she shallbe.
OthelloOth IV.i.111Alas, poor rogue! I think i'faith she loves me.Alas poore Rogue, I thinke indeed she loues me.
OthelloOth IV.i.116She gives it out that you shall marry her.She giues it out, that you shall marry her.
OthelloOth IV.i.128This is the monkey's own giving out. She isThis is the Monkeys owne giuing out: / She is
OthelloOth IV.i.133She was here even now. She haunts me in everyShe was heere euen now: she haunts me in euery
OthelloOth IV.i.136this hand, she falls me thus about my neck.falls me thus about my neck.
OthelloOth IV.i.141(aside) Now he tells how she plucked him toNow he tells how she pluckt him to
OthelloOth IV.i.145Before me! Look where she comes.Before me: looke where she comes.
OthelloOth IV.i.175foolish woman your wife: she gave it him, and he hathfoolish woman your wife: she gaue it him, and he hath
OthelloOth IV.i.181tonight, for she shall not live! No, my heart is turned toto night, for she shall not liue. No, my heart is turn'd to
OthelloOth IV.i.183hath not a sweeter creature! She might lie by anhath not a sweeter Creature: she might lye by an
OthelloOth IV.i.186Hang her! I do but say what she is: so delicateHang her, I do but say what she is: so delicate
OthelloOth IV.i.187with her needle, an admirable musician! O, she will singwith her Needle: an admirable Musitian. Oh she will sing
OthelloOth IV.i.207the bed she hath contaminated.the bed she hath contaminated.
OthelloOth IV.i.244.1Make her amends; she weeps.Make her amends: she weepes.
OthelloOth IV.i.246Each drop she falls would prove a crocodile.Each drop she falls, would proue a Crocodile:
OthelloOth IV.i.255Sir, she can turn, and turn, and yet go on,Sir, she can turne, and turne: and yet go on
OthelloOth IV.i.256And turn again. And she can weep, sir, weep.And turne againe. And she can weepe, Sir, weepe.
OthelloOth IV.ii.3Yes, you have seen Cassio and she together.Yes, you haue seene Cassio, and she together.
OthelloOth IV.ii.11I durst, my lord, to wager she is honest,I durst (my Lord) to wager, she is honest:
OthelloOth IV.ii.16For if she be not honest, chaste, and true,For if she be not honest, chaste, and true,
OthelloOth IV.ii.19She says enough; yet she's a simple bawdShe saies enough: yet she's a simple Baud
OthelloOth IV.ii.118Such as she said my lord did say I was.Such as she said my Lord did say I was.
OthelloOth IV.ii.124Hath she forsook so many noble matches,Hath she forsooke so many Noble Matches?
OthelloOth IV.ii.188votarist. You have told me she hath received themVotarist. You haue told me she hath receiu'd them,
OthelloOth IV.ii.197known to Desdemona. If she will return me my jewels,knowne to Desdemona. If she will returne me my Iewels,
OthelloOth IV.iii.26She was in love: and he she loved proved madShe was in loue: and he she lou'd prou'd mad,
OthelloOth IV.iii.27And did forsake her. She had a song of willow;And did forsake her. She had a Song of Willough,
OthelloOth IV.iii.29And she died singing it. That song tonightAnd she dy'd singing it. That Song to night,
OthelloOth IV.iii.45(She speaks)Sing Willough, &c.
OthelloOth IV.iii.46(She sings)
OthelloOth IV.iii.47(She speaks)
OthelloOth IV.iii.48(She sings)
OthelloOth IV.iii.50(She speaks)
OthelloOth IV.iii.52(She sings)
OthelloOth IV.iii.55(She speaks)
OthelloOth V.ii.6Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men.Yet she must dye, else shee'l betray more men:
OthelloOth V.ii.22It strikes where it doth love. She wakes.It strikes, where it doth loue. She wakes.
OthelloOth V.ii.93'Tis like she comes to speak of Cassio's death:'Tis like she comes to speake of Cassio's death:
OthelloOth V.ii.95Still as the grave. Shall she come in? Were't good?Still as the Graue. Shall she come in? Wer't good?
OthelloOth V.ii.96I think she stirs again. No. What's best to do?I thinke she stirres againe. No, what's best to do?
OthelloOth V.ii.97If she come in, she'll sure speak to my wife –If she come in, shee'l sure speake to my wife:
OthelloOth V.ii.111She comes more nearer earth than she was wont,She comes more neerer Earth then she was wont,
OthelloOth V.ii.121She draws back the curtains
OthelloOth V.ii.127She dies
OthelloOth V.ii.127.1Why, how should she be murdered?Why, how should she be murdred?
OthelloOth V.ii.129She said so: I must needs report the truth.She said so: I must needs report the truth.
OthelloOth V.ii.131.2O, the more angel she,Oh the more Angell she,
OthelloOth V.ii.133She turned to folly; and she was a whore.She turn'd to folly: and she was a whore.
OthelloOth V.ii.135.1She was false as water.She was false as water.
OthelloOth V.ii.136That she was false. O, she was heavenly true!That she was false. Oh she was heauenly true.
OthelloOth V.ii.141.3That she was false to wedlock?That she was false to Wedlocke?
OthelloOth V.ii.142Ay, with Cassio. Nay, had she been true,I, with Cassio: had she bin true,
OthelloOth V.ii.151.1My husband say that she was false?My Husband say she was false?
OthelloOth V.ii.156She was too fond of her most filthy bargain.She was too fond of her most filthy Bargaine.
OthelloOth V.ii.177But did you ever tell him she was false?But did you euer tell him, / She was false?
OthelloOth V.ii.181She false with Cassio! Did you say with Cassio?Shee false with Cassio? / Did you say with Cassio?
OthelloOth V.ii.199.2O, she was foul!Oh she was fowle!
OthelloOth V.ii.210That she with Cassio hath the act of shameThat she with Cassio, hath the Act of shame
OthelloOth V.ii.212And she did gratify his amorous worksAnd she did gratifie his amorous workes
OthelloOth V.ii.228She give it Cassio? No, alas, I found itShe giue it Cassio? No, alas I found it,
OthelloOth V.ii.247Moor, she was chaste; she loved thee, cruel Moor,Moore, she was chaste: She lou'd thee, cruell Moore,
OthelloOth V.ii.249She dies
PericlesPer I.i.13See where she comes, apparelled like the spring,See where she comes, appareled like the Spring,
PericlesPer I.i.131And she an eater of her mother's fleshAnd shee an eater of her Mothers flesh,
PericlesPer II.v.8Faith, by no means. She hath so strictlyFayth, by no meanes, she hath so strictly
PericlesPer II.v.11This by the eye of Cynthia hath she vowedThis by the eye of Cinthya hath she vowed,
PericlesPer II.v.16She tells me here she'll wed the stranger knight,she telles me heere, / Shee'le wedde the stranger Knight,
PericlesPer II.v.34And she is fair too, is she not?And she is faire too, is she not?
PericlesPer II.v.38And she will be your scholar. Therefore, look to it.And she will be your Scholler; therefore looke to it.
PericlesPer II.v.40She thinks not so; peruse this writing else.She thinkes not so: peruse this writing else.
PericlesPer II.v.42A letter that she loves the knight of Tyre!a letter that she loues the knight of Tyre?
PericlesPer II.v.67Here comes my daughter. She can witness it.heere comes my Daughter, she can witnesse it.
PericlesPer Chorus.III.15.7she rejoices. She and Pericles take leave of her fathershe reioyces: she and Pericles take leaue of her father,
PericlesPer Chorus.III.43Lychorida her nurse she takes,Lichorida her Nurse she takes,
PericlesPer III.i.53briefly yield 'er, for she must overboard straight.briefly yeeld'er,
PericlesPer III.i.54As you think meet. Most wretched queen!As you thinke meet; for she must ouer board straight: / Most wretched Queene.
PericlesPer III.i.55Here she lies, sir.Heere she lyes sir.
PericlesPer III.i.56She reveals the body of Thaisa
PericlesPer III.ii.71She was the daughter of a king.She was the Daughter of a King:
PericlesPer III.ii.77For look how fresh she looks. They were too roughfor looke how fresh she looks. / They were too rough,
PericlesPer III.ii.93She hath not been entranced above five hours.She hath not been entranc'st aboue fiue howers:
PericlesPer III.ii.94See how she 'gins to blow into life's flower again.See how she ginnes to blow into lifes flower againe.
PericlesPer III.ii.96.2She is alive. Behold,She is aliue, behold
PericlesPer III.ii.103She movesShee moues.
PericlesPer III.iii.11As doth the sea she lies in, yet the endas doth the sea she lies in, / Yet the end
PericlesPer III.iii.13Whom, for she was born at sea, I have named so,Whom, for she was borne at sea, I haue named so,
PericlesPer III.iii.16To give her princely training, that she mayto giue her / Princely training, that she may
PericlesPer III.iii.17.1Be mannered as she is born.be manere'd as she is borne.
PericlesPer III.iii.27Without your vows. Till she be married, madam,without your vowes, till she be maried, / Madame,
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.19For certain in our story sheFor certaine in our storie, shee
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.21Be't when she weaved the sleded silkBeet when they weaude the sleded silke,
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.23Or when she would with sharp needle woundOr when she would with sharpe needle wound,
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.24The cambric, which she made more soundThe Cambricke which she made more sound
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.26She sung, and made the night-bird mute,She sung, and made the night bed mute,
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.28She would with rich and constant penShe would with rich and constant pen,
PericlesPer IV.i.9But yet she is a goodly creature.but yet she is a goodly creature.
PericlesPer IV.i.11Here she comes weeping for her only mistress' death.Here she comes weeping for her onely Mistresse death,
PericlesPer IV.i.73Why would she have me killed?Why would shee haue mee kild
PericlesPer IV.i.99There's no hope she will return. I'll swear she's dead,ther's no hope shee will returne, Ile sweare shees dead,
PericlesPer IV.i.102Not carry her aboard. If she remain,not carrie her aboord, if shee remaine
PericlesPer IV.ii.22Ay, she quickly pooped him; she made him roastI, shee quickly poupt him, she made him roast-
PericlesPer IV.ii.43Boult, has she any qualities?Boult, has shee anie qualities?
PericlesPer IV.ii.44She has a good face, speaks well, and has excellentShee has a good face, speakes well, and has excellent
PericlesPer IV.ii.51what she has to do, that she may not be raw in herwhat she has to doe, that she may not be rawe in her
PericlesPer IV.ii.133When nature framed this piece, she meant thee a goodWhen Nature framde this peece, shee meant thee a good
PericlesPer IV.ii.134turn. Therefore say what a paragon she is, and thou hastturne, therefore say what a parragon she is, and thou hast
PericlesPer IV.iii.14That she is dead. Nurses are not the Fates.That shee is dead. Nurses are not the fates
PericlesPer IV.iii.16She died at night. I'll say so. Who can cross it?she dide at night, Ile say so, who can crosse it
PericlesPer IV.iii.19.1‘ She died by foul play.’shee dyde by foule play.
PericlesPer IV.iii.29Yet none does know but you how she came dead,yet none does knowe but you how shee came dead,
PericlesPer IV.iii.31She did disdain my child, and stood betweenShee did disdaine my childe, and stoode betweene
PericlesPer IV.iv.36She was of Tyrus the King's daughterShe was of Tyrus the Kings daughter,
PericlesPer IV.iv.38Marina was she called, and at her birth,Marina was shee call'd, and at her byrth,
PericlesPer IV.iv.42Wherefore she does, and swears she'll never stint,Wherefore she does and sweares sheele neuer stint,
PericlesPer IV.v.3place as this, she being once gone.place as this, shee beeing once gone.
PericlesPer IV.vi.2she had ne'er come here.shee had nere come heere.
PericlesPer IV.vi.5get her ravished or be rid of her. When she shouldget her rauished, or be rid of her, when she should
PericlesPer IV.vi.7profession, she has me her quirks, her reasons, herprofession, shee has me her quirks, her reasons, her
PericlesPer IV.vi.8master reasons, her prayers, her knees, that she wouldmaster reasons, her prayers, her knees, that shee would
PericlesPer IV.vi.25We have here one, sir, if she would – but thereWee haue heere one Sir, if shee would, but there
PericlesPer IV.vi.32see a rose. And she were a rose indeed, if she had but –see a rose, and she were a rose indeed, if shee had but.
PericlesPer IV.vi.39Is she not a fair creature?Is shee not a faire creature?
PericlesPer IV.vi.40Faith she would serve after a long voyageFaith shee would serue after a long voyage
PericlesPer IV.vi.81Why, your herb-woman; she that setsWhy, your hearbe-woman, she that sets
PericlesPer IV.vi.130Worse and worse, mistress. She has here spokenWorse and worse mistris, shee has heere spoken
PericlesPer IV.vi.133She makes our profession as it were to stink aforeHe makes our profession as it were to stincke afore
PericlesPer IV.vi.137nobleman, and she sent him away as cold as a snowball,Noble man, and shee sent him away as colde as a Snoweball,
PericlesPer IV.vi.142An if she were a thornier piece of ground than sheAnd if shee were a thornyer peece of ground then shee
PericlesPer IV.vi.143is, she shall be ploughed.is, shee shall be plowed.
PericlesPer IV.vi.145She conjures! Away with her! Would she had neverShe coniures, away with her, would she had neuer
PericlesPer Chorus.V.3She sings like one immortal, and she dancesShee sings like one immortall, and shee daunces
PericlesPer Chorus.V.5Deep clerks she dumbs, and with her neele composesDeepe clearks she dumb's, and with her neele compo-ses,
PericlesPer Chorus.V.9That pupils lacks she none of noble race,That puples lackes she none of noble race,
PericlesPer Chorus.V.11She gives the cursed bawd. Here we her place,She giues the cursed Bawd, here wee her place,
PericlesPer V.i.42She questionless, with her sweet harmonyshe questionlesse with her sweet harmonie,
PericlesPer V.i.46She is all happy as the fairest of all,shee is all happie as the fairest of all,
PericlesPer V.i.80See, she will speak to him.See she will speake to him.
PericlesPer V.i.85But have been gazed on like a comet. She speaks,but haue beene gazed on like a Comet:She speaks
PericlesPer V.i.112Who starves the ears she feeds, and makes them hungryWho starues the eares shee feedes, and makes them hungrie,
PericlesPer V.i.113The more she gives them speech. Where do you live?the more she giues them speech, Where doe you liue?
PericlesPer V.i.188.2She never would tellShe neuer would tell
PericlesPer V.i.190She would sit still and weep.she would sit still and weepe.
PericlesPer V.i.216She is not dead at Tarsus, as she should have been,shee is not dead at Tharsus as shee should haue beene
PericlesPer V.i.217By savage Cleon. She shall tell thee all;by sauage Cleon, she shall tell thee all,
PericlesPer V.i.219She is thy very princess. Who is this?she is thy verie Princes, who is this?
PericlesPer V.iii.5At sea in childbed died she, but brought forthat Sea in childbed died she, but brought forth
PericlesPer V.iii.7Wears yet thy silver livery. She at Tarsuswears yet thy siluer liuerey, shee at Tharsus
PericlesPer V.iii.12Where, by her own most clear remembrance, shewhere by her owne most cleere remembrance, shee
PericlesPer V.iii.15She faints
PericlesPer V.iii.15What means the nun? She dies! Help, gentlemen!What meanes the mum? shee die's, helpe Gentlemen.
PericlesPer V.iii.46She kneels
PericlesPer V.iii.48.1For she was yielded there.for she was yeelded there.
PericlesPer V.iii.67How she came placed here in the temple;How shee came plac'ste heere in the Temple,
Richard IIR2 III.iv.73.1She comes forward
Richard IIR2 III.iv.104Here did she fall a tear. Here in this placeHeere did she drop a teare, heere in this place
Richard IIR2 V.i.79She came adorned hither like sweet May,She came adorned hither like sweet May;
Richard IIR2 V.iii.81I know she is come to pray for your foul sin.I know she's come, to pray for your foule sin.
Richard IIR2 V.iii.82Aumerle admits the Duchess. She kneelsEnter Dutchesse.
Richard IIIR3 I.i.64My Lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis sheMy Lady Grey his Wife, Clarence 'tis shee.
Richard IIIR3 I.i.66Was it not she, and that good man of worship,Was it not shee, and that good man of Worship,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.144She spits at himSpits at him.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.171She looks scornfully at himShe lookes scornfully at him.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.179He lays his breast open. She offers at it with his swordHe layes his brest open, she offers at withhis sword.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.183She falls the swordShe fals the Sword.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.203.1She puts on the ring
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.239Hath she forgot already that brave prince,Hath she forgot alreadie that braue Prince,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.246And will she yet abase her eyes on me,And will she yet abase her eyes on me,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.253Upon my life, she finds, although I cannot,Vpon my life she findes (although I cannot)
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.27Or, if she be accused on true report,Or if she be accus'd on true report,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.91She may, my lord, for – She may my Lord, for---
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.92She may, Lord Rivers! Why, who knows not so?She may Lord Riuers, why who knowes not so?
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.93She may do more, sir, than denying that;She may do more sir then denying that:
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.94She may help you to many fair preferments,She may helpe you to many faire preferments,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.97What may she not? She may, yea, marry, may sheWhat may she not, she may, I marry may she.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.98What, marry, may she?What marry may she?
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.99What, marry, may she? Marry with a king,What marrie may she? Marrie with a King,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.155For I am she, and altogether joyless.For I am shee, and altogether ioylesse:
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.157.1She comes forward
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.253Dispute not with her; she is lunatic.Dispute not with her, shee is lunaticke.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.294What doth she say, my Lord of Buckingham?What doth she say, my Lord of Buckingham.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.306She hath had too much wrong, and I repentShe hath had too much wrong, and I repent
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.82She for an Edward weeps, and so do I;She for an Edward weepes, and so do I:
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.83I for a Clarence weep, so doth not she;I for a Clarence weepes, so doth not shee:
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.33His nurse? Why, she was dead ere thou wast born.His Nurse? why she was dead, ere yu wast borne.
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.34If 'twere not she, I cannot tell who told me.If 'twere not she, I cannot tell who told me.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.35If she deny, Lord Hastings, go with himIf she denie, Lord Hastings goe with him,
Richard IIIR3 III.i.39Anon expect him here; but if she be obdurateAnon expect him here: but if she be obdurate
Richard IIIR3 III.iii.15When she exclaimed on Hastings, you, and I,When shee exclaim'd on Hastings, you, and I,
Richard IIIR3 III.iii.17Then cursed she Richard, then cursed she Buckingham,Then curs'd shee Richard, / Thencurs'd shee Buckingham,
Richard IIIR3 III.iii.18Then cursed she Hastings. O, remember, God,Then curs'd shee Hastings. Oh remember God,
Richard IIIR3 IV.ii.91Stanley, look to your wife; if she conveyStanley looke to your Wife: if she conuey
Richard IIIR3 IV.iii.19That from the prime creation e'er she framed.’That from the prime Creation ere she framed.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.102For she that scorned at me, now scorned of me;For she that scorn'd at me, now scorn'd of me:
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.103For she being feared of all, now fearing one;For she being feared of all, now fearing one:
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.104For she commanding all, obeyed of none.For she commanding all, obey'd of none.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.137O, she that might have intercepted thee,O she, that might haue intercepted thee
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.206And must she die for this? O, let her live,And must she dye for this? O let her liue,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.210So she may live unscarred of bleeding slaughter,So she may liue vnscarr'd of bleeding slaughter,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.211I will confess she was not Edward's daughter.I will confesse she was not Edwards daughter.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.212Wrong not her birth; she is a royal princess.Wrong not her Byrth, she is a Royall Princesse.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.213To save her life, I'll say she is not so.To saue her life, Ile say she is not so.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.273‘ Edward ’ and ‘ York ’; then haply she will weep.Edward and Yorke, then haply will she weepe:
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.289Nay, then indeed she cannot choose but hate thee,Nay then indeed she cannot choose but hate thee
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.336And she shall be sole victoress, Caesar's Caesar.And she shalbe sole Victoresse, Casars Casar.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.344Which she shall purchase with still-lasting war.Which she shall purchase with stil lasting warre.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.347Say she shall be a high and mighty queen.Say she shall be a High and Mighty Queene.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.356But she, your subject, loathes such sovereignty.But she your Subiect, lothes such Soueraignty.
Richard IIIR3 V.i.26‘ When he,’ quoth she, ‘ shall split thy heart with sorrow,When he (quoth she) shall split thy heart with sorrow,
Richard IIIR3 V.v.41That she may long live here, God say amen!That she may long liue heere, God say, Amen.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.209With Cupid's arrow. She hath Dian's wit,With Cupids arrow, she hath Dians wit:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.211From love's weak childish bow she lives uncharmed.From loues weake childish Bow, she liues vncharm'd.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.212She will not stay the siege of loving terms,Shee will not stay the siege of louing tearmes,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.215O, she is rich in beauty; only poorO she is rich in beautie, onely poore,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.216That, when she dies, with beauty dies her store.That when she dies, with beautie dies her store.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.217Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?Then she hath sworne, that she will still liue chast?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.218She hath; and in that sparing makes huge waste.She hath, and in that sparing make huge wast?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.221She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair,She is too faire, too wisewi: sely too faire,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.223She hath forsworn to love; and in that vowShe hath forsworne to loue, and in that vow
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.9She hath not seen the change of fourteen years,Shee hath not seene the change of fourteene yeares,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.12Younger than she are happy mothers made.Younger then she, are happy mothers made.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.14Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she;Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.18And, she agreed, within her scope of choiceAnd shee agree, within her scope of choise,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.98And she shall scant show well that now seems best.And she shew scant shell, well, that now shewes best.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.15She is not fourteen. How long is it nowshee's not fourteene. / How long is it now
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.18Come Lammas Eve at night shall she be fourteen.come Lammas Eue at night shall she be fourteene.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.19Susan and she – God rest all Christian souls! – Susan & she, God rest all Christian soules,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.21She was too good for me. But, as I said,she was too good for me. But as I said,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.22On Lammas Eve at night shall she be fourteen.on Lamas Eue at night shall she be fourteene,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.23That shall she, marry! I remember it well.that shall she marie, I remember it well.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.25And she was weaned – I never shall forget it – and she was wean'd I neuer shall forget it,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.37For then she could stand high-lone. Nay, by th' rood,for then she could stand alone, nay bi'th' roode
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.38She could have run and waddled all about.she could haue runne, & wadled all about:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.39For even the day before she broke her brow.for euen the day before she broke her brow,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.54She is the fairies' midwife, and she comesShe is the Fairies Midwife, & she comes
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.70And in this state she gallops night by night& in this state she gallops night by night,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.77Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose,Sometime she gallops ore a Courtiers nose,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.79And sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail& somtime comes she with Tith pigs tale,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.82Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck;Sometime she driueth ore a Souldiers necke,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.95.1This is sheThis is she.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.20Will now deny to dance? She that makes dainty,Will now deny to dance? She that makes dainty,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.21She, I'll swear, hath corns. Am I come near ye now?She Ile sweare hath Cornes: am I come neare ye now?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.44O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!O she doth teach the Torches to burne bright:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.45It seems she hangs upon the cheek of nightIt seemes she hangs vpon the cheeke of night,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.v.117.2Is she a Capulet?Is she a Capulet?
Romeo and JulietRJ II.chorus.8And she steal love's sweet bait from fearful hooks.And she steale Loues sweet bait from fearefull hookes:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.chorus.11And she as much in love, her means much lessAnd she as much in Loue, her meanes much lesse,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.i.26Till she had laid it and conjured it down.Till she had laid it, and coniured it downe,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.i.37O, Romeo, that she were, O that she wereO Romeo that she were, O that she were
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.6That thou her maid art far more fair than she.That thou her Maid art far more faire then she:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.7Be not her maid, since she is envious.Be not her Maid since she is enuious,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.11O that she knew she were!O that she knew she were,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.12She speaks. Yet she says nothing. What of that?She speakes, yet she sayes nothing, what of that?
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.14I am too bold. 'Tis not to me she speaks.I am too bold 'tis not to me she speakes:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.23See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!See how she leanes her cheeke vpon her hand.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.25.3She speaks.She speakes.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.83.2O, she knew wellO she knew well,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.40wench – marry, she had a better love to berhyme her – wench, marrie she had a better Loue to berime her:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.126She will endite him to some supper.She will endite him to some Supper.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.151skains-mates. (She turns to Peter her man) And thouskaines mates, and thou
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.161out. What she bid me say, I will keep to myself. Butout, what she bid me say, I will keepe to my selfe: but
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.171Lord, Lord! She will be a joyful woman.Lord, Lord she will be a ioyfull woman.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.178And there she shall at Friar Laurence' cellAnd there she shall at Frier Lawrence Cell
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.182This afternoon, sir? Well, she shall be there.This afternoone sir? well she shall be there.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.198aboard. But she, good soul, had as lief see a toad, a veryaboard: but she good soule had as leeue a see Toade, a very
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.201say so, she looks as pale as any clout in the versal world.say so, shee lookes as pale as any clout in the versall world.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.205No, I know it begins with some other letter; and she hathno, I know it begins with some other letter, and she hath
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.2In half an hour she promised to return.In halfe an houre she promised to returne,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.3Perchance she cannot meet him. That's not so.Perchance she cannot meete him: that's not so:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.4O, she is lame! Love's heralds should be thoughts,Oh she is lame, Loues Herauld should be thoughts,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.11Is three long hours, yet she is not come.I three long houres, yet she is not come.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.12Had she affections and warm youthful blood,Had she affections and warme youthfull blood,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.13She would be as swift in motion as a ball.She would be as swift in motion as a ball,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.18O God, she comes! O honey Nurse, what news?O God she comes, O hony Nurse what newes?
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.58Where is my mother? Why, she is within.Where is my Mother? / Why she is within,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.59Where should she be? How oddly thou repliest!where should she be? / How odly thou repli'st:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.vi.16Enter Juliet somewhat fast. She embraces RomeoEnter Iuliet.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.32And she brings news; and every tongue that speaksAnd she brings newes and euery tongue that speaks
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.36She throws them down
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.118Why followed not, when she said ‘ Tybalt's dead,’Why followed not when she said Tibalts dead,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.87Piteous predicament! Even so lies she,Pittious predicament, euen so lies she,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.94Doth not she think me an old murderer,Doth not she thinke me an old Murtherer,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.97Where is she? and how doth she? and what saysWhere is she? and how doth she? and what sayes
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.99O, she says nothing, sir, but weeps and weeps,Oh she sayes nothing sir, but weeps and weeps,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.163Here, sir, a ring she bid me give you, sir.Heere sir, a Ring she bid me giue you sir:
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iv.3Look you, she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly,Looke you, she Lou'd her kinsman Tybalt dearely,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iv.11Tonight she's mewed up to her heaviness.To night, she is mewed vp to her heauinesse.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iv.13Of my child's love. I think she will be ruledOf my Childes loue: I thinke she will be rul'd
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iv.21She shall be married to this noble earl.She shall be married to this Noble Earle:
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.4Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.Nightly she sings on yond Pomgranet tree,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.30This doth not so, for she divideth us.This doth not so: for she diuideth vs.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.64.1She goes down from the window
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.66Is she not down so late, or up so early?Is she not downe so late, or vp so early?
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.139Ay, sir. But she will none, she gives you thanks.I sir; / But she will none, she giues you thankes,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.142How? Will she none? Doth she not give us thanks?How, will she none? doth she not giue vs thanks?
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.143Is she not proud? Doth she not count her blest,Is she not proud? doth she not count her blest,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.144Unworthy as she is, that we have wroughtVnworthy as she is, that we haue wrought
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.239Which she hath praised him with above compareWhich she hath prais'd him with aboue compare,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.6Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt's death,Immoderately she weepes for Tybalts death,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.10That she do give her sorrow so much sway,That she doth giue her sorrow so much sway:
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.ii.15See where she comes from shrift with merry look.See where she comes from shrift / With merrie looke.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.iii.18Nurse! – What should she do here?Nurse, what should she do here?
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.iii.24She lays down a knife
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.iii.59She falls upon her bed within the curtains
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.1Mistress! What, mistress! Juliet! Fast, I warrant her, she.Mistris, what Mistris? Iuliet? Fast I warrant her she.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.8Marry, and amen! How sound is she asleep!Marrie and Amen: how sound is she a sleepe?
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.36Hath death lain with thy wife. There she lies,Hath death laine with thy wife: there she lies,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.37Flower as she was, deflowered by him.Flower as she was, deflowred by him.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.72For 'twas your heaven she should be advanced.For 'twas your heauen, she shouldst be aduan'st,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.73And weep ye now, seeing she is advancedAnd weepe ye now, seeing she is aduan'st
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.76That you run mad, seeing that she is well.That you run mad, seeing that she is well:
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.16For nothing can be ill if she be well.For nothing can be ill, if she be well.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.17Then she is well, and nothing can be ill.Then she is well, and nothing can be ill.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.ii.25She will beshrew me much that RomeoShee will beshrew me much that Romeo
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.167She kisses him
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.170She snatches Romeo's dagger
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.171She stabs herself and fallsKils herselfe.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.232And she, there dead, that Romeo's faithful wife.And she there dead, that's Romeos faithfull wife:
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.239To County Paris. Then comes she to meTo Countie Paris. Then comes she to me,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.242Or in my cell there would she kill herself.Or in my Cell there would she kill her selfe.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.260She wakes; and I entreated her come forthShee wakes, and I intreated her come foorth,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.263And she, too desperate, would not go with me,And she (too desperate) would not go with me,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.20Marian Hacket, the fat ale-wife of Wincot, if she knowMarrian Hacket the fat Alewife of Wincot, if shee know
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.21me not. If she say I am not fourteen pence on the scoreme not: if she say I am not xiiii.d. on the score
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.53We'll show thee Io as she was a maid,Wee'l shew thee Io, as she was a Maid,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.54And how she was beguiled and surprised,And how she was beguiled and surpriz'd,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.57Scratching her legs that one shall swear she bleeds,Scratching her legs, that one shal sweare she bleeds,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.63And till the tears that she hath shed for theeAnd til the teares that she hath shed for thee,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.65She was the fairest creature in the world – She was the fairest creature in the world,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.66And yet she is inferior to none.And yet shee is inferiour to none.
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.87Because she brought stone jugs and no sealed quarts.Because she brought stone-Iugs, and no seal'd quarts:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.79Put finger in the eye, an she knew why.put finger in the eye, and she knew why.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.92And for I know she taketh most delightAnd for I know she taketh most delight
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.111wherein she delights, I will wish him to her father.wherein she delights, I will wish him to her father.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.172And with her breath she did perfume the air.And with her breath she did perfume the ayre,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.181Because she will not be annoyed with suitors.Because she will not be annoy'd with suters.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.61And yet I'll promise thee she shall be rich,And yet Ile promise thee she shall be rich,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.68Be she as foul as was Florentius' love,Be she as foule as was Florentius Loue,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.71She moves me not, or not removes at leastShe moues me not, or not remoues at least
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.72Affection's edge in me, were she as roughAffections edge in me. Were she is as rough
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.79tooth in her head, though she have as many diseasestooth in her head, though she haue as manie diseases
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.88Is that she is intolerable curst,Is, that she is intollerable curst,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.94For I will board her though she chide as loudFor I will boord her, though she chide as loud
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.107O' my word, an she knew him as well as I do, she wouldA my word, and she knew him as wel as I do, she would
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.108think scolding would do little good upon him. She maythinke scolding would doe little good vpon him. Shee may
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.111I'll tell you what, sir, an she stand him but a little, heIle tell you what sir, and she stand him but a litle, he
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.113it that she shall have no more eyes to see withal than ait, that shee shal haue no more eies to see withall then a
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.150For she is sweeter than perfume itselfFor she is sweeter then perfume it selfe
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.185I know she is an irksome brawling scold.I know she is an irkesome brawling scold:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.231.2But so is not she.But so is not she.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.239And were his daughter fairer than she is,And were his daughter fairer then she is,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.240She may more suitors have and me for one.She may more sutors haue, and me for one.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.243And so she shall. Lucentio shall make one,And so she shall: Lucentio shal make one,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.24Bianca, stand aside. Poor girl, she weeps.Bianca stand aside, poore gyrle she weepes:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.28When did she cross thee with a bitter word?When did she crosse thee with a bitter word?
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.30She flies after BiancaFlies after Bianca
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.32She is your treasure, she must have a husband.She is your treasure, she must haue a husband,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.58Whereof I know she is not ignorant.Whereof I know she is not ignorant,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.63She is not for your turn, the more my grief.She is not for your turne, the more my greefe.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.124Her widowhood – be it that she survive me – Her widdow-hood, be it that she suruiue me
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.131I am as peremptory as she proud-minded;I am as peremptorie as she proud minded:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.136So I to her, and so she yields to me,So I to her, and so she yeelds to me,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.148Why no, for she hath broke the lute to me.Why no, for she hath broke the Lute to me:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.149I did but tell her she mistook her frets,I did but tell her she mistooke her frets,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.152Frets, call you these?’ quoth she, ‘ I'll fume with them.’Frets call you these? (quoth she) Ile fume with them:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.153And with that word she struck me on the head,And with that word she stroke me on the head,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.157While she did call me rascal fiddlerWhile she did call me Rascall, Fidler,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.159As had she studied to misuse me so.As had she studied to misvse me so.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.169And woo her with some spirit when she comes.And woo her with some spirit when she comes,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.170Say that she rail, why then I'll tell her plainSay that she raile, why then Ile tell her plaine,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.171She sings as sweetly as a nightingale.She sings as sweetly as a Nightinghale:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.172Say that she frown, I'll say she looks as clearSay that she frowne, Ile say she lookes as cleere
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.174Say she be mute and will not speak a word,Say she be mute, and will not speake a word,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.176And say she uttereth piercing eloquence.And say she vttereth piercing eloquence:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.177If she do bid me pack, I'll give her thanks,If she do bid me packe, Ile giue her thankes,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.178As though she bid me stay by her a week.As though she bid me stay by her a weeke:
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.179If she deny to wed, I'll crave the dayIf she denie to wed, Ile craue the day
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.181But here she comes, and now, Petruchio, speak.But heere she comes, and now Petruchio speake.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.216.1She turns to go
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.218.1She strikes himshe strikes him
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.234.1She struggles
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.285If she be curst, it is for policy,If she be curst, it is for pollicie,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.287She is not hot, but temperate as the morn.Shee is not hot, but temperate as the morne,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.288For patience she will prove a second Grissel,For patience shee will proue a second Grissell,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.293Hark, Petruchio, she says she'll see thee hanged first.Hark Petruchio, she saies shee'll see thee hang'd first.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.296If she and I be pleased, what's that to you?If she and I be pleas'd, what's that to you?
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.298That she shall still be curst in company.That she shall still be curst in company.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.300How much she loves me – O, the kindest Kate!How much she loues me: oh the kindest Kate,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.301She hung about my neck, and kiss on kissShee hung about my necke, and kisse on kisse
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.302She vied so fast, protesting oath on oath,Shee vi'd so fast, protesting oath on oath,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.303That in a twink she won me to her love.That in a twinke she won me to her loue.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.355If whilst I live she will be only mine.If whil'st I liue she will be onely mine.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.367(to them) That she shall have, besides an argosyThat she shall haue, besides an Argosie
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.375And she can have no more than all I have.And she can haue no more then all I haue,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.376If you like me, she shall have me and mine.If you like me, she shall haue me and mine.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.381She is your own. Else, you must pardon me,Shee is your owne, else you must pardon me:
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.117Could I repair what she will wear in meCould I repaire what she will weare in me,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.153Curster than she? Why, 'tis impossible.Curster then she, why 'tis impossible.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.220If she had not a spirit to resist.If she had not a spirit to resist.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.226But for my bonny Kate, she must with me.But for my bonny Kate, she must with me:
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.229She is my goods, my chattels, she is my house,Shee is my goods, my chattels, she is my house,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.232And here she stands. Touch her whoever dare!And heere she stands, touch her who euer dare,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.251She shall, Lucentio. Come, gentlemen, let's go.She shall Lucentio: come gentlemen lets goe.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.18Is she so hot a shrew as she's reported?Is she so hot a shrew as she's reported.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.19She was, good Curtis, before this frost. But thouShe was good Curtis before this frost: but thou
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.27she being now at hand – thou shalt soon feel, to thy(she being now at hand) thou shalt soone feele, to thy
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.66she under her horse; thou shouldst have heard in howshe vnder her horse: thou shouldst haue heard in how
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.67miry a place, how she was bemoiled, how he left hermiery a place, how she was bemoil'd, how hee left her
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.69horse stumbled, how she waded through the dirt tohorse stumbled, how she waded through the durt to
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.70pluck him off me, how he swore, how she prayed thatplucke him off me: how he swore, how she prai'd, that
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.76By this reckoning he is more shrew than she.By this reckning he is more shrew than she.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.89Why, she hath a face of her own.Why she hath a face of her owne.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.94Why, she comes to borrow nothing of them.Why she comes to borrow nothing of them.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.170And rails, and swears, and rates, that she, poor soul,and railes, and sweares, and rates, that shee (poore soule)
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.177And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,And til she stoope, she must not be full gorg'd,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.178For then she never looks upon her lure.For then she neuer lookes vpon her lure.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.183She eat no meat today, nor none shall eat.She eate no meate to day, nor none shall eate.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.184Last night she slept not, nor tonight she shall not.Last night she slept not, nor to night she shall not:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.191And, in conclusion, she shall watch all night,And in conclusion, she shal watch all night,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.192And if she chance to nod I'll rail and brawl,And if she chance to nod, Ile raile and brawle,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.3I tell you, sir, she bears me fair in hand.I tel you sir, she beares me faire in hand.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.33Never to marry with her though she would entreat.Neuer to marrie with her, though she would intreate,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.34Fie on her! See how beastly she doth court him.Fie on her, see how beastly she doth court him.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.32She beats himBeats him.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.105She says your worship means to make a puppet of her.She saies your Worship meanes to make a puppet of her.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.30And she to him – to stay him not too long,And she to him: to stay him not too long,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.41Doth love my daughter, and she loveth him,Doth loue my daughter, and she loueth him,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.67I pray the gods she may, with all my heart.I praie the gods she may withall my heart.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.96afternoon as she went to the garden for parsley to stuff aafternoone as shee went to the Garden for Parseley to stuffe a
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.101I may and will, if she be so contented.I may and will, if she be so contented:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.102She will be pleased, then wherefore should I doubt?She will be pleas'd, then wherefore should I doubt:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.64Nor be not grieved – she is of good esteem,Nor be not grieued, she is of good esteeme,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.78Have to my widow! And if she be froward,Haue to my Widdow, and if she froward,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.138She kisses him
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.24My widow says thus she conceives her tale.My Widdow saies, thus she conceiues her tale.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.49She hath prevented me. Here, Signor Tranio,She hath preuented me, here signior Tranio,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.80That she is busy and she cannot come.That she is busie, and she cannot come.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.81How? She's busy, and she cannot come!How? she's busie, and she cannot come:
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.87.1Nay, then she must needs come.nay then shee must needes come.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.90She says you have some goodly jest in hand.She saies you haue some goodly Iest in hand,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.91She will not come. She bids you come to her.She will not come: she bids you come to her.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.92Worse and worse, she will not come! O vile,Worse and worse, she will not come: / Oh vilde,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.96.3She will not.She will not.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.114For she is changed, as she had never been.For she is chang'd as she had neuer bin.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.118See where she comes, and brings your froward wivesSee where she comes, and brings your froward Wiues
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.122She obeys
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.133She shall not.She shall not.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.134I say she shall. And first begin with her.I say she shall, and first begin with her.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.156And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour,And when she is froward, peeuish, sullen, sowre,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.158What is she but a foul contending rebelWhat is she but a foule contending Rebell,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.188'Tis a wonder, by your leave, she will be tamed so.Tis a wonder, by your leaue, she wil be tam'd so.
The TempestTem I.ii.57She said thou wast my daughter; and thy fatherShe said thou wast my daughter; and thy father
The TempestTem I.ii.260.2Thou hast. Where was she born? Speak! Tell me!Thou hast: where was she born? speak: tell me:
The TempestTem I.ii.261.2O, was she so! I mustOh, was she so: I must
The TempestTem I.ii.266Thou know'st, was banished. For one thing she didThou know'st was banish'd: for one thing she did
The TempestTem I.ii.274Refusing her grand hests, she did confine thee,Refusing her grand hests, she did confine thee
The TempestTem I.ii.279A dozen years, within which space she died,A dozen yeeres: within which space she di'd,
The TempestTem I.ii.282Save for the son that she did litter here,(Saue for the Son, that he did littour heere,
The TempestTem II.i.84that. She was of Carthage, not of Tunis.that: She was of Carthage, not of Tunis.
The TempestTem II.i.111My son is lost, and, in my rate, she too,My sonne is lost, and (in my rate) she too,
The TempestTem II.i.128Where she, at least, is banished from your eye,Where she at least, is banish'd from your eye,
The TempestTem II.i.186lift the moon out of her sphere, if she would continue inlift the Moone out of her spheare, if she would continue in
The TempestTem II.i.250She that is Queen of Tunis; she that dwellsShe that is Queene of Tunis: she that dwels
The TempestTem II.i.251Ten leagues beyond man's life; she that from NaplesTen leagues beyond mans life: she that from Naples
The TempestTem II.i.254Be rough and razorable; she that from whomBe rough, and Razor-able: She that from whom
The TempestTem II.i.261So is she heir of Naples, 'twixt which regionsSo is she heyre of Naples, 'twixt which Regions
The TempestTem II.ii.49For she had a tongue with a tang,For she had a tongue with a tang,
The TempestTem II.ii.51She loved not the savour of tar nor of pitch,She lou'd not the sauour of Tar nor of Pitch,
The TempestTem II.ii.52Yet a tailor might scratch her where'er she did itch.Yet a Tailor might scratch her where ere she did itch.
The TempestTem III.i.7And makes my labours pleasures. O, she isAnd makes my labours, pleasures: O She is
The TempestTem III.i.12Weeps when she sees me work, and says such basenessWeepes when she sees me worke, & saies, such basenes
The TempestTem III.i.45Did quarrel with the noblest grace she owed,Did quarrell with the noblest grace she ow'd,
The TempestTem III.ii.102But only Sycorax my dam and she;But onely Sycorax my Dam, and she;
The TempestTem III.ii.103But she as far surpasseth SycoraxBut she as farre surpasseth Sycorax,
The TempestTem III.ii.105Ay, lord. She will become thy bed, I warrant,I Lord, she will become thy bed, I warrant,
The TempestTem IV.i.10For thou shalt find she will outstrip all praise,For thou shalt finde she will out-strip all praise
The TempestTem IV.i.332Sit then and talk with her: she is thine own.Sit then, and talke with her, she is thine owne;
The TempestTem V.i.187Is she the goddess that hath severed us,Is she the goddesse that hath seuer'd vs,
The TempestTem V.i.188.2Sir, she is mortal;Sir, she is mortall;
The TempestTem V.i.191For his advice, nor thought I had one. SheFor his aduise: nor thought I had one: She
Timon of AthensTim I.i.135.2Does she love him?Does she loue him?
Timon of AthensTim I.i.136She is young and apt.She is yong and apt:
Timon of AthensTim I.i.139Ay, my good lord, and she accepts of it.I my good Lord, and she accepts of it.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.143.2How shall she be endowedHow shall she be endowed,
Timon of AthensTim I.i.144If she be mated with an equal husband?If she be mated with an equall Husband?
Timon of AthensTim I.i.151Pawn me to this your honour, she is his.Pawne me to this your Honour, she is his.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.204she, if I be a dog?she, if I be a Dogge?
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.40She, whom the spital-house and ulcerous soresShee, whom the Spittle-house, and vlcerous sores,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.440And her pale fire she snatches from the sun.And her pale fire, she snatches from the Sunne.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.76From whence at first she weighed her anchorage,From whence at first she wegih'd her Anchorage:
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.334She will a handmaid be to his desires,Shee will a Hand-maid be to his desires,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.399Is she not then beholden to the manIs she not then beholding to the man,
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.71I care not, I, knew she and all the world:I care not I, knew she and all the world,
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.82She is a woman, therefore may be wooed;Shee is a woman, therefore may be woo'd,
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.83She is a woman, therefore may be won;Shee is a woman, therfore may be wonne,
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.84She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.Shee is Lauinia therefore must be lou'd.
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.123And she shall file our engines with adviceAnd she shall file our engines with aduise,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.35Even as an adder when she doth unrollEuen as an Adder when she doth vnrowle
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.127And shall she carry this unto her grave?And shall she carry this vnto her graue?
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.128And if she do, I would I were an eunuch.And if she doe, / I would I were an Eunuch,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.143O, do not learn her wrath. She taught it thee:O doe not learne her wrath, she taught it thee,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.268.1She gives Saturninus a letterShe giueth Saturnine a Letter.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.5See how with signs and tokens she can scrawl.See how with signes and tokens she can scowle.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.7She hath no tongue to call, nor hands to wash,She hath no tongue to call, nor hands to wash.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.38Fair Philomela, why she but lost her tongueFaire Philomela she but lost her tongue,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.63.2Why, Marcus, so she is.Why Marcus so she is.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.114Perchance she weeps because they killed her husband,Perchance she weepes because they kil'd her husband,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.115Perchance because she knows them innocent.Perchance because she knowes him innocent.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.144Had she a tongue to speak, now would she sayHad she a tongue to speake, now would she say
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.225She is the weeping welkin, I the earth;Shee is the weeping welkin, I the earth:
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.25What violent hands can she lay on her life?What violent hands can she lay on her life:
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.35Here is no drink? Hark, Marcus, what she says;Heere is no drinke? Harke Marcus what she saies,
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.37She says she drinks no other drink but tears,She saies, she drinkes no other drinke but teares
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.3Good uncle Marcus, see how swift she comes.Good Vncle Marcus see how swift she comes,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.6She loves thee, boy, too well to do thee harm.She loues thee boy too well to doe thee harme
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.7Ay, when my father was in Rome she did.I when my father was in Rome she did.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.9Fear her not, Lucius; somewhat doth she mean.Feare not Lucius, somewhat doth she meane:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.10See, Lucius, see how much she makes of thee:See Lucius see, how much she makes of thee:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.11Somewhither would she have thee go with her.Some whether would she haue thee goe with her.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.13Read to her sons than she hath read to theeRead to her sonnes, then she hath read to thee,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.15Canst thou not guess wherefore she plies thee thus?Canst thou not gesse wherefore she plies thee thus?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.31Some book there is that she desires to see.Some booke there is that she desires to see,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.37Why lifts she up her arms in sequence thus?What booke? / Why lifts she vp her armes in sequence thus?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.38I think she means that there were more than oneI thinke she meanes that ther was more then one
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.40Or else to heaven she heaves them for revenge.Or else to heauen she heaues them to reuenge.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.41Lucius, what book is that she tosseth so?Lucius what booke is that she tosseth so?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.44Perhaps she culled it from among the rest.Perhahs she culd it from among the rest.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.45Soft, so busily she turns the leaves.Soft, so busily she turnes the leaues,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.46 Help her! What would she find? Lavinia, shall I read?Helpe her, what would she finde? Lauinia shall I read?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.50See, brother, see: note how she quotes the leaves.See brother see, note how she quotes the leaues
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.76.1She takes the staff in her mouth, and guides it withShe takes the staffe in her mouth, and guides it with
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.76O, do ye read, my lord, what she hath writ?Oh doe ye read my Lord what she hath writs?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.96The dam will wake, and if she wind ye once.The Dam will wake, and if she winde you once,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.98And lulls him whilst she playeth on her back,And lulls him whilst she palyeth on her backe,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.99And, when he sleeps, will she do what she list.And when he sleepes will she do what she list.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.30She would applaud Andronicus' conceit.She would applaud Andronicus conceit:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.45And that would she, for twenty thousand more.And that would she for twenty thousand more.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.61She is delivered, lords, she is delivered.She is deliuered Lords, she is deliuered.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.62.2I mean she is brought abed.I meane she is brought abed?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.64.2Why then, she is the devil's dam:Why then she is the Deuils Dam:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.102Although she lave them hourly in the flood.Although she laue them hourely in the flood:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.104To keep mine own, excuse it how she can.To keepe mine owne, excuse it how she can.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.148Shall she live to betray this guilt of ours?Shall she liue to betray this guilt of our's:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.40Marry, for Justice, she is so employed,Marrie for iustice she is so imploy'd,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.74She laughed, and told the Moor he should not chooseShe laught, and told the Moore he should not choose
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.95Why, she was washed and cut and trimmed, and 'twasWhy she was washt, and cut, and trim'd, / And 'twas
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.119She sounded almost at my pleasing tale,She sounded almost at my pleasing tale,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.29She is thy enemy, and I thy friend.She is thy Enemie, and I thy Friend,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.107For up and down she doth resemble thee – For vp and downe she doth resemble thee.
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.192And this the banquet she shall surfeit on:And this the Banquet she shall surfet on,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.38Because she was enforced, stained, and deflowered?Because she was enfor'st, stain'd, and deflowr'd?
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.52What, was she ravished? Tell who did the deed.What was she rauisht? tell who did the deed,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.61Eating the flesh that she herself hath bred.Eating the flesh that she herselfe hath bred.
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.73And she whom mighty kingdoms curtsy to,And shee whom mightie kingdomes cursie too,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.29Patience herself, what goddess e'er she be,Patience her selfe, what Goddesse ere she be,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.33So, traitor! – ‘ when she comes ’? – when is she thence?So (Traitor) then she comes, when she is thence.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.34Well, she looked yesternight fairer than everWell: / She look'd yesternight fairer, then euer
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.45between the women. But, for my part, she is my kinswoman;betweene the Women. But for my part she is my
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.53In Cressid's love: thou answer'st ‘ She is fair,’In Cressids loue. Thou answer'st she is Faire,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.67Faith, I'll not meddle in't. Let her be as sheFaith, Ile not meddle in't: Let her be as shee is,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.68is: if she be fair, 'tis the better for her; an she be not,if she be faire, 'tis the better for her: and she be not, she
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.69she has the mends in her own hands.ha's the mends in her owne hands.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.77so fair as Helen; an she were not kin to me, she wouldso faire as Helen, and she were not kin to me, she would
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.79care I? I care not an she were a blackamoor; 'tis all onecare I? I care not and she were a Black-a-Moore, 'tis all one
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.81Say I she is not fair?Say I she is not faire?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.99As she is stubborn-chaste against all suit.As she is stubborne, chast, against all suite.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.102Her bed is India; there she lies, a pearl:Her bed is India, there she lies, a Pearle,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.103Between our Ilium and where she resides,Between our Ilium, and where shee recides
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.49was not up, was she?was not vp? was she?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.99She praised his complexion above Paris.She prais'd his complexion aboue Paris.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.102Then Troilus should have too much. If sheThen Troylus should haue too much, if she
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.111Nay, I am sure she does. She came to himNay I am sure she does, she came to him
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.119But to prove to you that Helen loves him, sheBut to prooue to you that Hellen loues him, she
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.136I cannot choose but laugh, to think how sheI cannot chuse but laugh to thinke how she
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.137tickled his chin – indeed, she has a marvellous whitetickled his chin, indeed shee has a maruel's white
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.140And she takes upon her to spy a white hair onAnd shee takes vpon her to spie a white haire on
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.158Quoth she: ‘ Here's but two-and-fifty hairs onQuoth shee, heere's but two and fifty haires on
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.164quoth she, ‘ which of these hairs is Paris, my husband?’quoth she, which of these haires is Paris my husband?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.288That she beloved knows naught that knows not this:That she belou'd, knowes nought, that knowes not this;
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.290That she was never yet that ever knewThat she was neuer yet, that euer knew
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.229Modest as morning when she coldly eyesModest as morning, when she coldly eyes
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.52She is not worth what she doth cost the holding.she is not worth / What she doth cost the holding.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.82Is she worth keeping? – Why, she is a pearlIs she worth keeping? Why she is a Pearle,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.185As it is known she is, these moral laws(As it is knowne she is) these Morall Lawes
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.200She is a theme of honour and renown,She is a theame of honour and renowne,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.30direction till thy death; then if she that lays thee outdirection till thy death, then if she that laies thee out
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.32upon't, she never shrouded any but lazars. Amen. – vpon't she neuer shrowded any but Lazars, Amen.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.238Praise him that got thee, she that gave thee suck.Praise him that got thee, she that gaue thee sucke:
Troilus and CressidaTC III.i.96She shall have it, my lord, if it be not my LordShe shall haue it my Lord, if it be not my Lord
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.29straight. You must be witty now. She does so blush,straight; you must be witty now, she does so blush,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.30and fetches her wind so short, as if she were frayed& fetches her winde so short, as if she were fraid
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.31with a sprite. I'll fetch her. It is the prettiest villain; shewith a sprite: Ile fetch her; it is the prettiest villaine, she
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.39a baby. (To Troilus) Here she is now: swear the oathsa babie; here she is now, sweare the oathes
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.55she'll bereave you o'th' deeds too, if she call yoursheele bereaue you 'oth' deeds too, if shee call your
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.73A Trojan hath been slain. Since she could speak,A Troian hath beene slaine. Since she could speake,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.74She hath not given so many good words breathShe hath not giuen so many good words breath,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.12Beshrew the witch! With venomous wights she staysBeshrew the witch! with venemous wights she stayes,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.100If ever she leave Troilus! Time, force, and death,If euer she leaue Troylus: time, orce and death,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iii.4Tell you the lady what she is to do,Tell you the Lady what she is to doe,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.51Bid them have patience; she shall come anon.Bid them haue patience: she shall come anon.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.111And by the way possess thee what she is.And by the way possesse thee what she is.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.123She is as far high-soaring o'er thy praisesShee is as farre high soaring o're thy praises,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.133She shall be prized; but that you say ‘ Be't so,’She shall be priz'd: but that you say, be't so;
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.17.2Even she.Euen she.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.21'Twere better she were kissed in general.'twere better she were kist in generall.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.288This Cressida in Troy? Had she no lover thereThis Cressida in Troy, had she no Louer there
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.292She was beloved, she loved, she is, and doth;She was belou'd, she lou'd; she is, and dooth;
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.5She comes to you.She comes to you.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.9She whispers to him
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.10She will sing any man at first sight.She will sing any man at first sight.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.17What should she remember?What should she remember?
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.52.2She strokes his cheek!She stroakes his cheeke.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.67She gives him the sleeve
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.72She snatches the sleeve
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.76Now she sharpens – well said, whetstone!Now she sharpens: well said Whetstone.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.115A proof of strength she could not publish more,A proofe of strength she could not publish more;
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.116Unless she said ‘ My mind is now turned whore.’Vnlesse she say, my minde is now turn'd whore.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.128She was not, sure.She was not sure.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.129Most sure she was.Most sure she was.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.137What hath she done, Prince, that can soil our mothers?What hath she done Prince, that can soyle our mothers?
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.138Nothing at all, unless that this were she.Nothing at all, vnlesse that this were she.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.140This she? No, this is Diomed's Cressida.This she? no, this is Diomids Cressida:
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.141If beauty have a soul, this is not she;If beautie haue a soule, this is not she:
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.145This is not she. O madness of discourse,This is not she: O madnesse of discourse!
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.106I cannot tell what to think on't. – What says she there?I cannot tell what to thinke on't. What sayes shee there?
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.110My love with words and errors still she feeds,My loue with words and errors still she feedes;
Twelfth NightTN I.i.21Methought she purged the air of pestilence.Me thought she purg'd the ayre of pestilence;
Twelfth NightTN I.i.29But like a cloistress she will veiled walk,But like a Cloystresse she will vailed walke,
Twelfth NightTN I.i.32A brother's dead love, which she would keep freshA brothers dead loue, which she would keepe fresh
Twelfth NightTN I.i.34O, she that hath a heart of that fine frameO she that hath a heart of that fine frame
Twelfth NightTN I.i.36How will she love, when the rich golden shaftHow will she loue, when the rich golden shaft
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.35What's she?What's shee?
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.40They say, she hath abjured the sight(They say) she hath abiur'd the sight
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.46Because she will admit no kind of suit,Because she will admit no kinde of suite,
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.101niece will not be seen, or if she be, it's four to one she'llniece wil not be seene, or if she be it's four to one, she'l
Twelfth NightTN I.iv.19If she be so abandoned to her sorrowIf she be so abandon'd to her sorrow
Twelfth NightTN I.iv.20As it is spoke, she never will admit me.As it is spoke, she neuer will admit me.
Twelfth NightTN I.iv.27She will attend it better in thy youthShe will attend it better in thy youth,
Twelfth NightTN I.v.161The honourable lady of the house, which is she?The honorable Ladie of the house, which is she?
Twelfth NightTN I.v.180Most certain, if you are she, you do usurp yourself;Most certaine, if you are she, you do vsurp your selfe:
Twelfth NightTN I.v.230Lady, you are the cruellest she alive,Lady, you are the cruell'st shee aliue,
Twelfth NightTN II.i.22A lady, sir, though it was said she much resembledA Lady sir, though it was said shee much resembled
Twelfth NightTN II.i.25believe that, yet thus far I will boldly publish her: shebeleeue that, yet thus farre I will boldly publish her, shee
Twelfth NightTN II.i.26bore a mind that envy could not but call fair. She isbore a minde that enuy could not but call faire: Shee is
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.5She returns this ring to you, sir. You mightShe returnes this Ring to you (sir) you might
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.7She adds, moreover, that you should put your lord intoShe adds moreouer, that you should put your Lord into
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.8a desperate assurance she will none of him; and onea desperate assurance, she will none of him. And one
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.12She took the ring of me, I'll none of it.She tooke the Ring of me, Ile none of it.
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.19She made good view of me, indeed so muchShe made good view of me, indeed so much,
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.21For she did speak in starts, distractedly.For she did speake in starts distractedly.
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.22She loves me, sure, the cunning of her passionShe loues me sure, the cunning of her passion
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.26Poor lady, she were better love a dream.Poore Lady, she were better loue a dreame:
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.35And she, mistaken, seems to dote on me.And she (mistaken) seemes to dote on me:
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.94bade me tell you that, though she harbours you as herbad me tell you, that though she harbors you as her
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.98take leave of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell.take leaue of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell.
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.119means for this uncivil rule. She shall know of it, by thismeanes for this vnciuill rule; she shall know of it by this
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.128youth of the Count's was today with my lady, she isyouth of the Counts was to day with my Lady, she is
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.27She is not worth thee, then. What years, i'faith?She is not worth thee then. What yeares ifaith?
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.30An elder than herself; so wears she to him;An elder then her selfe, so weares she to him;
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.31So sways she level in her husband's heart.So swayes she leuell in her husbands heart:
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.86But if she cannot love you, sir?But if she cannot loue you sir.
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.91You tell her so. Must she not then be answered?You tel her so: Must she not then be answer'd?
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.109A blank, my lord. She never told her love,A blanke my Lord: she neuer told her loue,
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.111Feed on her damask cheek. She pined in thought,Feede on her damaske cheeke: she pin'd in thought,
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.113She sat like Patience on a monument,She sate like Patience on a Monument,
Twelfth NightTN II.v.24told me she did affect me; and I have heard herselftold me she did affect me, and I haue heard her self
Twelfth NightTN II.v.25come thus near, that should she fancy, it should be onecome thus neere, that should shee fancie, it should bee one
Twelfth NightTN II.v.26of my complexion. Besides, she uses me with a moreof my complection. Besides she vses me with a more
Twelfth NightTN II.v.87her very C's, her U's and her T's; and thus makes sheher very C's, her V's, and her T's, and thus makes shee
Twelfth NightTN II.v.92impressure her Lucrece, with which she uses to seal.impressure her Lucrece, with which she vses to seale:
Twelfth NightTN II.v.111What dish o' poison has she dressed him!What dish a poyson has she drest him?
Twelfth NightTN II.v.113‘ I may command where I adore.’ Why, sheI may command, where I adore: Why shee
Twelfth NightTN II.v.114may command me. I serve her, she is my lady. Why,may command me: I serue her, she is my Ladie. Why
Twelfth NightTN II.v.147singularity. She thus advises thee that sighs for thee.singularitie. Shee thus aduises thee, that sighes for thee.
Twelfth NightTN II.v.152touch Fortune's fingers. Farewell. She that would altertouch Fortunes fingers Farewell, Shee that would alter
Twelfth NightTN II.v.159excites to this, that my lady loves me. She did commendexcites to this, that my Lady loues me. She did commend
Twelfth NightTN II.v.160my yellow stockings of late, she did praise my leg beingmy yellow stockings of late, shee did praise my legge being
Twelfth NightTN II.v.161cross-gartered; and in this she manifests herself to mycrosse-garter'd, and in this she manifests her selfe to my
Twelfth NightTN II.v.192yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhors; and cross-gartered,yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhorres, and crosse garter'd,
Twelfth NightTN II.v.193a fashion she detests; and he will smile upona fashion shee detests: and hee will smile vpon
Twelfth NightTN II.v.195being addicted to a melancholy as she is – that it cannotbeing addicted to a melancholly, as shee is, that it cannot
Twelfth NightTN III.i.31No indeed, sir, the Lady Olivia has no folly. SheNo indeed sir, the Lady Oliuia has no folly, shee
Twelfth NightTN III.i.32will keep no fool, sir, till she be married, and fools are aswill keepe no foole sir, till she be married, and fooles are as
Twelfth NightTN III.i.43.1She gives him a coin
Twelfth NightTN III.i.53She gives another coin
Twelfth NightTN III.i.74I am bound to your niece, sir. I mean, she is theI am bound to your Neece sir, I meane she is the
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.5the Count's servingman than ever she bestowed uponthe Counts Seruing-man, then euer she bestow'd vpon
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.7Did she see thee the while, old boy, tell meDid she see the while, old boy, tell me
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.17She did show favour to the youth in your sightShee did shew fauour to the youth in your sight,
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.78will strike him. If she do, he'll smile, and take it for awill strike him: if shee doe, hee'l smile, and take't for a
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.67with the letter. She sends him on purpose, that I maywith the Letter, she sends him on purpose, that I may
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.68appear stubborn to him; for she incites me to that inappeare stubborne to him: for she incites me to that in
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.69the letter. ‘ Cast thy humble slough,’ says she. ‘ Bethe Letter. Cast thy humble slough sayes she: be
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.76thankful! And when she went away now – ‘ let this fellowthankefull. And when she went away now, let this Fellow
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.94Ah ha! Does she so!Ah ha, does she so?
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.154my sight she uses thee kindly. But thou liest in thy throat;my sight she vses thee kindly: but thou lyest in thy throat,
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.303She draws
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.76Alas, why is she so?Alas why is she so?
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.78She loves another – She loues another.
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.2This pearl she gave me, I do feel't and see't;This pearle she gaue me, I do feel't, and see't,
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.17She could not sway her house, command her followers,She could not sway her house, command her followers,
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.20As I perceive she does. There's something in'tAs I perceiue she do's: there's something in't
Twelfth NightTN V.i.323.2A sister, you are she.A sister, you are she.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.346And now I do bethink me, it was sheAnd now I do bethinke me, it was shee
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.97a laced mutton; and she, a laced mutton, gave me, a lost(a lac'd-Mutton) and she (a lac'd-Mutton) gaue mee (a lost-
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.110But what said she?But what said she?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.114You mistook, sir. I say she did nod; and you askYou mistooke Sir: I say she did nod; / And you aske
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.115me if she did nod, and I say ‘ Ay.’me if she did nod, and I say I.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.127said she?said she.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.131What said she?what said she?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.140What said she? Nothing?What said she, nothing?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.53What ' fool is she, that knows I am a maid,What 'foole is she, that knowes I am a Maid,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.70She drops and picks up the letter
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.100She tears the letter
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.102She makes it strange, but she would be best pleasedShe makes it strãge, but she would be best pleas'd
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.137.1She picks up the pieces of the letter
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.8She is not within hearing, sir.Shee is not within hearing Sir.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.15She that your worship loves?Shee that your worship loues?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.41She that you gaze on so, as she sits at supper?Shee that you gaze on so, as she sits at supper?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.42Hast thou observed that? Even she I mean.Hast thou obseru'd that? euen she I meane.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.46Is she not hard-favoured, sir?Is she not hard-fauour'd, sir?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.50That she is not so fair as, of you, well-favoured.That shee is not so faire, as (of you) well-fauourd?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.60You never saw her since she was deformed.You neuer saw her since she was deform'd.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.61How long hath she been deformed?How long hath she beene deform'd?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.82Last night she enjoined me to write someLast night she enioyn'd me, / To write some
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.83lines to one she loves.lines to one she loues.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.88here she comes.here she comes.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.96He should give her interest, and she gives itHe should giue her interest: & she giues it
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.112She offer him the letter
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.118She offers the letter again
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.130My master sues to her; and she hath taught her suitor,My Master sues to her: and she hath taught her Sutor,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.140To yourself. Why, she woos you by a figure.To your selfe: why, she woes you by a figure.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.143Why, she hath not writ to me.Why she hath not writ to me?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.144What need she, when she hath made you write toWhat need she, / When shee hath made you write to
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.149She gave me none, except an angry word.She gaue me none, except an angry word.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.150Why, she hath given you a letter.Why she hath giuen you a Letter.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.152And that letter hath she delivered, and there anAnd y letter hath she deliuer'd, & there an
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.156For often have you writ to her; and she, in modesty,For often haue you writ to her: and she in modesty,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.ii.6She gives him a ring
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.19is my sister; for, look you, she is as white as a lily, andis my sister: for, looke you, she is as white as a lilly, and
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.26O, that she could speak now like an old woman! Well,Oh that she could speake now, like a would-woman: well,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.28and down. Now come I to my sister. Mark the moan sheand downe: Now come I to my sister; marke the moane she
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.88Belike that now she hath enfranchised themBe-like that now she hath enfranchis'd them
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.90Nay, sure, I think she holds them prisoners still.Nay sure, I thinke she holds them prisoners stil.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.143Even she; and is she not a heavenly saint?Euen She; and is she not a heauenly Saint?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.144No; but she is an earthly paragon.No; But she is an earthly Paragon.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.156She shall be dignified with this high honour – Shee shall be dignified with this high honour,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.165.1She is alone.Shee is alone.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.166Not for the world! Why, man, she is mine own;Not for the world: why man, she is mine owne,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.176But she loves you?But she loues you?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.197She is fair; and so is Julia that I love – Shee is faire: and so is Iulia that I loue,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.13But shall she marry him?But shall she marry him?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.11Much less shall she that hath Love's wings to fly,Much lesse shall she that hath Loues wings to flie,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.15And should she thus be stolen away from you,And should she thus be stolne away from you,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.37And thence she cannot be conveyed away.And thence she cannot be conuay'd away.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.68No, trust me; she is peevish, sullen, froward,No, trust me, She is peeuish, sullen, froward,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.70Neither regarding that she is my child,Neither regarding that she is my childe,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.79For me and my possessions she esteems not.For me, and my possessions she esteemes not.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.82Whom I affect; but she is nice, and coy,Whom I affect: but she is nice, and coy,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.89Win her with gifts, if she respect not words;Win her with gifts, if she respect not words,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.92But she did scorn a present that I sent her.But she did scorne a present that I sent her,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.96If she do frown, 'tis not in hate of you,If she doe frowne, 'tis not in hate of you,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.98If she do chide, 'tis not to have you gone,If she doe chide, 'tis not to haue you gone,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.100Take no repulse, whatever she doth say;Take no repulse, what euer she doth say,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.101For ‘ Get you gone,’ she doth not mean ‘ Away!’For, get you gon, she doth not meane away.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.106But she I mean is promised by her friendsBut she I meane, is promis'd by her friends
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.176Unless it be to think that she is by,Vnlesse it be to thinke that she is by
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.182She is my essence, and I leave to be,Shee is my essence, and I leaue to be;
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.212Hath she forsworn me?Hath she forsworne me?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.222Ay, ay; and she hath offered to the doomI, I: and she hath offered to the doome
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.225Those at her father's churlish feet she tendered;Those at her fathers churlish feete she tenderd,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.234When she for thy repeal was suppliant,When she for thy repeale was suppliant,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.267yet 'tis a milkmaid; yet 'tis not a maid, for she hath hadyet 'tis a Milke-maid: yet 'tis not a maid: for shee hath had
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.268gossips; yet 'tis a maid, for she is her master's maid andGossips: yet 'tis a maid, for she is her Masters maid, and
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.269serves for wages. She hath more qualities than aserues for wages. Shee hath more qualities then a
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.271Here is the cate-log of her condition. Imprimis: She canHeere is the Cate-log of her Condition. Inprimis. Shee can
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.273horse cannot fetch, but only carry; therefore is she betterhorse cannot fetch, but onely carry, therefore is shee better
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.274than a jade. Item: She can milk. Look you, a sweetthen a Iade. Item. She can milke, looke you, a sweet
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.293Imprimis: She can milk.Inprimis she can milke.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.294Ay, that she can.I that she can.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.295Item: She brews good ale.Item, she brewes good Ale.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.298Item: She can sew.Item, she can sowe.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.299That's as much as to say, ‘ Can she so?’That's as much as to say (Can she so?)
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.300Item: She can knit.Item she can knit.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.302when she can knit him a stock?When she can knit him a stocke?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.303Item: She can wash and scour.Item, she can wash and scoure.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.304A special virtue; for then she need not beA speciall vertue: for then shee neede not be
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.306Item: She can spin.Item, she can spin.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.307Then may I set the world on wheels, when sheThen may I set the world on wheeles, when she
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.309Item: She hath many nameless virtues.Item, she hath many namelesse vertues.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.315Item: She is not to be kissed fasting, in respect of herItem, shee is not to be fasting in respect of her
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.319Item: She hath a sweet mouth.Item, she hath a sweet mouth.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.321Item: She doth talk in her sleep.Item, she doth talke in her sleepe.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.322It's no matter for that; so she sleep not in herIt's no matter for that; so shee sleepe not in her
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.324Item: She is slow in words.Item, she is slow in words.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.328Item: She is proud.Item, she is proud.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.331Item: She hath no teeth.Item, she hath no teeth.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.333Item: She is curst.Item, she is curst.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.334Well, the best is, she hath no teeth to bite.Well: the best is, she hath no teeth to bite.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.335Item: She will often praise her liquor.Item, she will often praise her liquor.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.336If her liquor be good, she shall; if she will not,If her liquor be good, she shall: if she will not,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.338Item: She is too liberal.Item, she is too liberall.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.339Of her tongue she cannot, for that's writ downOf her tongue she cannot; for that's writ downe
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.340she is slow of; of her purse, she shall not, for that I'llshe is slow of: of her purse, shee shall not, for that ile
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.341keep shut. Now, of another thing she may, and thatkeepe shut: Now, of another thing shee may, and that
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.343Item: She hath more hair than wit, and more faultsItem, shee hath more haire then wit, and more faults
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.345Stop there; I'll have her; she was mine and notStop there: Ile haue her: she was mine, and not
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.348Item: She hath more hair than witItem, she hath more haire then wit.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.1Sir Thurio, fear not but that she will love youSir Thurio, feare not, but that she will loue you
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.3Since his exile she hath despised me most,Since his exile she hath despis'd me most,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.26How she opposes her against my will?How she opposes her against my will?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.27She did, my lord, when Valentine was here.She did my Lord, when Valentine was here.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.28Ay, and perversely she persevers so.I, and peruersly, she perseuers so:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.37By one whom she esteemeth as his friend.By one, whom she esteemeth as his friend.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.48She shall not long continue love to him.She shall not long continue loue to him:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.50It follows not that she will love Sir Thurio.It followes not that she will loue sir Thurio.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.62For she is lumpish, heavy, melancholy,For she is lumpish, heauy, mellancholly,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.8She twits me with my falsehood to my friend;She twits me with my falsehood to my friend;
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.10She bids me think how I have been forswornShe bids me thinke how I haue bin forsworne
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.14Yet, spaniel-like, the more she spurns my loveYet (Spaniel-like) the more she spurnes my loue,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.38Who is Silvia? What is she,Who is Siluia? what is she?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.40Holy, fair, and wise is she;Holy, faire, and wise is she,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.42That she might admired be.that she might admired be.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.43Is she kind as she is fair?Is she kinde as she is faire?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.50She excels each mortal thingShe excels each mortall thing
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.103.1But she is dead.But she is dead.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.104For I am sure she is not buried.For I am sure she is not buried.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.105Say that she be; yet Valentine thy friendSay that she be: yet Valentine thy friend
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.45And what says she to my little jewel?And what saies she to my little Iewell?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.46Marry, she says your dog was a cur, and tells youMarry she saies your dog was a cur, and tels you
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.48But she received my dog?But she receiu'd my dog?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.49No, indeed, did she not; here have I broughtNo indeede did she not: / Here haue I brought
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.70She loved me well delivered it to me.She lou'd me well, deliuer'd it to me.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.72.1She is dead, belike?She is dead belike?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.72.2Not so; I think she lives.Not so: I thinke she liues.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.76Because methinks that she loved you as wellBecause, me thinkes that she lou'd you as well
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.78She dreams on him that has forgot her love;She dreames on him, that has forgot her loue,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.107What would you with her, if that I be she?What would you with her, if that I be she?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.108If you be she, I do entreat your patienceIf you be she, I doe intreat your patience
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.115.1Exit one of the Attendants. She returns with a portrait
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.121.1Julia takes back the letter she offers and gives Silvia
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.125She tears the letter
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.135She thanks you.She thankes you.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.143Belike she thinks that Proteus hath forsook her.Belike she thinks that Protheus hath forsook her?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.144I think she doth, and that's her cause of sorrow.I thinke she doth: and that's her cause of sorrow.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.145Is she not passing fair?Is she not passing faire?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.146She hath been fairer, madam, than she is.She hath bin fairer (Madam) then she is,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.147When she did think my master loved her well,When she did thinke my Master lou'd her well;
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.148She, in my judgement, was as fair as you;She, in my iudgement, was as faire as you.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.149But since she did neglect her looking-glassBut since she did neglect her looking-glasse,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.153That now she is become as black as I.That now she is become as blacke as I.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.154How tall was she?How tall was she?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.161Therefore I know she is about my height.Therefore I know she is about my height,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.170She is beholding to thee, gentle youth.She is beholding to thee (gentle youth)
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.176And she shall thank you for't, if e'er you know her.And she shall thanke you for't, if ere you know her.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.179Since she respects my mistress' love so much.Since she respects my Mistris loue so much.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.i.4She will not fail, for lovers break not hoursShe will not faile; for Louers breake not houres,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.i.7See where she comes. Lady, a happy evening!See where she comes: Lady a happy euening.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.2O, sir, I find her milder than she was;Oh Sir, I finde her milder then she was,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.3And yet she takes exceptions at your person.And yet she takes exceptions at your person.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.8What says she to my face?What saies she to my face?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.9She says it is a fair one.She saies it is a faire one.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.15How likes she my discourse?How likes she my discourse?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.19What says she to my valour?What sayes she to my valour?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.20O, sir, she makes no doubt of that.Oh Sir, she makes no doubt of that.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.21She needs not, when she knows it cowardice.She needes not, when she knowes it cowardize.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.22What says she to my birth?What saies she to my birth?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.25Considers she my possessions?Considers she my Possessions?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.39Him he knew well, and guessed that it was she,Him he knew well: and guesd that it was she,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.41Besides, she did intend confessionBesides she did intend Confession
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.ii.42At Patrick's cell this even; and there she was not.At Patricks Cell this euen, and there she was not.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.85She swoons
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.93She offers her own ring
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.97She offers another ring
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.130Verona shall not hold thee. Here she stands;Verona shall not hold thee: heere she stands,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.136I claim her not and therefore she is thine.I claime her not, and therefore she is thine.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.i.203She makes it in, from henceforth I'll not dareShee makes it in: from henceforth ile not dare
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.16What I shall be advised she likes. Our heartsWhat I shall be advised she likes; our hearts
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.51You were at wars when she the grave enrichedYou were at wars, when she the grave enrichd,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.60And she I sigh and spoke of were things innocent,And shee (I sigh and spoke of) were things innocent,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.64Did so to one another. What she likedDid so to one another; what she lik'd,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.68To swell about the blossom – she would longTo swell about the blossome) she would long
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.69Till she had such another, and commit itTill shee had such another, and commit it
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.15I have, sir. Here she comes.I have Sir; here shee comes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.93Till she for shame see what a wrong she has doneTill shee for shame see what a wrong she has done
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.188.1By heaven, she is a goddess.By heaven shee is a Goddesse.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.189.1She is a goddess, Arcite.She is a Goddesse Arcite.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.193How modestly she blows, and paints the sunHow modestly she blowes, and paints the Sun,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.196She locks her beauties in her bud again,Shee lockes her beauties in her bud againe,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.199She falls for't; a maid,She fals for't: a Mayde
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.i.200If she have any honour, would be loathIf shee have any honour, would be loth
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.202.1She is wondrous fair.She is wondrous faire.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.202.2She is all the beauty extant.She is all the beauty extant.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.218As she is heavenly and a blessed goddess.As she is heavenly, and a blessed Goddes;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.296Still as she tasted should be doubled on her,Still as she tasted should be doubled on her,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.297And if she be not heavenly, I would make herAnd if she be not heavenly I would make her
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.299.1And then I am sure she would love me.And then I am sure she would love me:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.15And if she be as gentle as she's fair,And if she be as gentle, as she's faire,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.45And she must see the Duke, and she must dance too.and she must see the Duke, and she must daunce too.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.17I may be proud. She takes strong note of me,I may be prowd. She takes strong note of me,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.118.1For note you, mine she is – For note you, mine she is.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.31.1She loved a black-haired man.She lov'd a black-haird man.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.31.2She did so; well, sir?She did so; well Sir.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.33.2She met him in an arbour.She met him in an Arbour:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.34What did she there, coz? Play o'th' virginals?What did she there Cuz? play o'th virginals?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.35.1Something she did, sir.Something she did Sir.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iv.19(She sings)Sing.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.44That gave her promise faithfully she wouldThat gave her promise faithfully, she would
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.47Nay, an she fail me once – you can tell, Arcas,Nay and she faile me once, you can tell Arcas
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.48She swore by wine and bread she would not break.She swore by wine, and bread, she would not breake.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.53.1A fire-ill take her; does she flinch now?A fire ill take her; do's she flinch now?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.69(she sings)Chaire and stooles out.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.169Why she is fair, and why her eyes command meWhy she is faire, and why her eyes command me
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.170Stay here to love her; and if she say ‘ traitor,’Stay here to love her; and if she say Traytor,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.280.2He that she refusesHe that she refuses
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.284If she refuse me, yet my grave will wed me,If she refuse me, yet my grave will wed me,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.34.2Was she well? Was she in health, sir?Was she well? was she in health? Sir,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.35.1When did she sleep?when did she sleepe?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.36I do not think she was very well, for nowI doe not thinke she was very well, for now
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.38I asked her questions, and she answered meI ask'd her questions, and she answered me
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.39So far from what she was, so childishly,So farre from what she was, so childishly.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.40So sillily, as if she were a fool,So sillily, as if she were a foole,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.45.4No, sir, not well.Tis too true, she is mad.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.46.1'Tis too true, she is mad.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.63And listened to the words she sung, for then,And listned to the words she song, for then
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.66She sung much, but no sense; only I heard herShe sung much, but no sence; onely I heard her
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.76And beg his pardon.’ Then she talked of you, sir;And beg his pardon; Then she talk'd of you Sir;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.78And she must gather flowers to bury you,And she must gather flowers to bury you,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.79And see the house made handsome. Then she sungAnd see the house made handsome, then she sung
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.83Was knee-deep where she sat; her careless tressesWas knee deepe where she sat; her careles Tresses,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.86That methought she appeared like the fair nymphThat me thought she appeard like the faire Nimph
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.88Newly dropped down from heaven. Rings she madeNewly dropt downe from heaven; Rings she made
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.92And then she wept, and sung again, and sighed,And then she wept, and sung againe, and sigh'd,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.95She saw me, and straight sought the flood. I saved her,She saw me, and straight sought the flood, I sav'd her,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.97She slipped away, and to the city madeShe slipt away, and to the Citty made,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.99She left me far behind her. Three or fourShee left me farre behinde her; three, or foure,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.101I knew to be your brother – where she stayed,I knew to be your brother, where she staid,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.114(She sings)Singes
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.119By no mean cross her; she is then distemperedBy no meane crosse her, she is then distemperd
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.120.1Far worse than now she shows.For worse then now she showes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.122But she shall never have him, tell her so,But she shall never have him, tell her so,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.124For if she see him once, she's gone, she's done,For if she see him once, she's gone, she's done,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.140.2Does she know him?Do's she know him?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.141.1No, would she did.No, would she did.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.152.1(She sings)Singes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.9She sows into the births of noble bodies,She sowes into the birthes of noble bodies,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.12She would run mad for this man. What an eye,She would run mad for this man: what an eye?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.109As if she ever meant to court his valour.As if she ever ment to corect his valour:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.3She is continually in a harmless distemper,She is continually in a harmelesse distemper,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.7Palamon lards it, that she farces every business withal,Palamon lardes it, that she farces ev'ry busines / Withall,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.9Look where she comes; you shall perceive herLooke where / Shee comes, you shall perceive her
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.15Dido see Palamon, and then will she be out of love withDido see Palamon, and Then will she be out of love with
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.47How she continues this fancy! 'Tis not anHow she continues this fancie? Tis not an
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.56(She sings)Sings.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.58I think she has a perturbed mind, which I cannotI think she has a perturbed minde, which I cannot
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.61Understand you she ever affected any man ereVnderstand you, she ever affected any man, ere
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.62she beheld Palamon?She beheld Palamon?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.63I was once, sir, in great hope she had fixed herI was once Sir, in great hope, she had fixd her
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.66great penn'orth on't, to give half my state that both shegreat / Pen-worth on't, to give halfe my state, that both / She
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.80to her such green songs of love as she says Palamonto her, such greene / Songs of Love, as she sayes Palamon
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.92she is in, which is with falsehoods to be combated. This/ She is in, which is with fasehoods to be combated. / This
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.44Must put my garland on me, where she sticks,Must put my Garland on, where she stickes
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.71Which if the goddess of it grant, she givesWhich if the goddesse of it grant, she gives
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.117Believed it was his, for she swore it was,Beleev'd it was his, for she swore it was,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.137.7aloof, she sets fire to it. Then they curtsy and kneela loofe, she sets fire to it, then they curtsey and kneele.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.4Within this half-hour she came smiling to me,within this / Halfe houre she came smiling to me,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.8.2Then she told meThen she told me
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.9She would watch with me tonight, for well she knewShe would watch with me to night, for well she knew
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.12.1She would have me sing.She would have me sing.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.16If she entreat again, do anything;If she intreate againe, doe any thing,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.17.1Lie with her if she ask you.Lye with her if she aske you.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.21Cure her first this way, then if she will be honest,Cure her first this way, then if shee will be honest,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.22.1She has the path before her.She has the path before her.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.23Pray bring her in and let's see how she is.Pray bring her in / And let's see how shee is.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.28Why, do you think she is not honest, sir?Why, doe you thinke she is not honest Sir?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.29.1How old is she?How old is she?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.29.3She may be – She may be,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.38You'll find it so. She comes; pray humour her.You'l finde it so; she comes, pray honour her.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.60She is horribly in love with him, poor beast,She is horribly in love with him, poore beast,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.62.1What dowry has she?What dowry has she?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.66What stuff she utters!What stuffe she utters?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.11.2O, she must;Oh she must.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.12She shall see deeds of honour in their kindShe shall see deeds of honour in their kinde,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.25You'll see't done now for ever. Pray, how does she?You'l see't done now for ever: pray how do'es she?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.26I heard she was not well; her kind of illI heard she was not well; her kind of ill
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.94She kisses him
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.44.1What lady she her lord. You'll stay?What Lady she her Lord. You'le stay?
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.108She gives her hand to Polixenes
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.183How she holds up the neb, the bill to him!How she holds vp the Neb? the Byll to him?
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.194That little thinks she has been sluiced in's absence,That little thinkes she ha's been sluyc'd in's absence,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.305Infected as her life, she would not liveInfected (as her life) she would not liue
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.19.2She is spread of lateShe is spread of late
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.66To say she is a goodly lady andTo say she is a goodly Lady, and
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.91What she should shame to know herselfWhat she should shame to know her selfe,
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.139.1If she be.If she be.
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.143I would lam-damn him. Be she honour-flawed,I would Land-damne him: be she honor-flaw'd,
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.194From our free person she should be confined,From our free person, she should be confinde,
The Winter's TaleWT II.ii.25She is something before her time delivered.She is, something before her time, deliuer'd.
The Winter's TaleWT II.ii.37If she dares trust me with her little babe,If she dares trust me with her little babe,
The Winter's TaleWT II.ii.51.1Lest she should be denied.Least she should be deny'd.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.4She, th' adult'ress: for the harlot-kingShe, th' Adultresse: for the harlot-King
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.6And level of my brain, plot-proof; but sheAnd leuell of my braine: plot-proofe: but shee,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.7I can hook to me – say that she were gone,I can hooke to me: say that she were gone,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.26.1Shall she within my power.Shall she, within my powre.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.43I charged thee that she should not come about me.I charg'd thee that she should not come about me,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.44.1I knew she would.I knew she would.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.46.1She should not visit you.She should not visit you.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.51When she will take the rein, I let her run;When she will take the raine, I let her run,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.65For she is good – hath brought you forth a daughter:(For she is good) hath brought you forth a daughter,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.66She lays down the child
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.106No yellow in't, lest she suspect, as he does,No Yellow in't, least she suspect, as he do's,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.115Not she which burns in't. I'll not call you tyrant;Not she which burnes in't. Ile not call you Tyrant:
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.122Where were her life? She durst not call me so,Where were her life? she durst not call me so,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.123If she did know me one. Away with her!If she did know me one. Away with her.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.202Our most disloyal lady: for as she hathOur most disloyall Lady: for as she hath
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.203Been publicly accused, so shall she haveBeen publikely accus'd, so shall she haue
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.204A just and open trial. While she livesA iust and open Triall. While she liues,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.148Her heart is but o'ercharged; she will recover.Her heart is but o're-charg'd: she will recouer.
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.22Like very sanctity, she did approachLike very sanctity she did approach
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.36She melted into air. Affrighted much,She melted into Ayre. Affrighted much,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.39mistress of the feast, and she lays it on. She hath madeMistris of the Feast, and she layes it on. Shee hath made-
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.56This day she was both pantler, butler, cook;This day, she was both Pantler, Butler, Cooke,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.61With labour, and the thing she took to quench it:With labour, and the thing she tooke to quench it
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.62She would to each one sip. You are retired,She would to each one sip. You are retyred,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.157Ran on the greensward: nothing she does or seemsRan on the greene-sord: Nothing she do's, or seemes
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.160That makes her blood look out. Good sooth, she isThat makes her blood looke on't: Good sooth she is
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.178.2She dances featly.She dances featly.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.179So she does anything – though I report it,So she do's any thing, though I report it
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.181Do light upon her, she shall bring him thatDo light vpon her, she shall bring him that
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.262at a burden, and how she longed to eat adders' headsat a burthen, and how she long'd to eate Adders heads,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.276against the hard hearts of maids. It was thought she wasagainst the hard hearts of maids: it was thought she was
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.277a woman, and was turned into a cold fish for she woulda Woman, and was turn'd into a cold fish, for she wold
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.288scarce a maid westward but she sings it; 'tis in request, Iscarse a Maide westward but she sings it: 'tis in request, I
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.346To load my she with knacks. I would have ransackedTo load my Shee with knackes: I would haue ransackt
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.354She prizes not such trifles as these are:She prizes not such trifles as these are:
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.355The gifts she looks from me are packed and lockedThe gifts she lookes from me, are packt and lockt
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.542For so I see she must be – 'fore Leontes.(For so I see she must be) 'fore Leontes;
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.543She shall be habited as it becomesShe shall be habited, as it becomes
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.577She is as forward of her breeding asShe's as forward, of her Breeding, as
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.578.1She is i'th' rear' our birth.She is i'th' reare' our Birth.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.579She lacks instructions, for she seems a mistressShe lacks Instructions, for she seemes a Mistresse
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.688She being none of your flesh and blood, yourShe being none of your flesh and blood, your
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.692all but what she has with her. This being done, let theall but what she ha's with her:) This being done, let the
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.826would not suffer me: she drops booties in my mouth. Iwould not suffer mee: shee drops Booties in my mouth. I
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.15To make a perfect woman, she you killedTo make a perfect Woman; she you kill'd,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.17She I killed! I did so; but thou strik'st meShe I kill'd? I did so: but thou strik'st me
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.60.2Had she such power,Had she such power,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.61.1She had just cause.She had iust such cause.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.61.2She had, and would incense meShe had, and would incense me
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.78To choose you a queen: she shall not be so youngTo chuse you a Queene: she shall not be so young
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.79As was your former, but she shall be suchAs was your former, but she shall be such
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.86Son of Polixenes, with his princess – sheSonne of Polixenes, with his Princesse (she
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.100Is colder than that theme – she had not been,Is colder then that Theame: she had not beene,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.105The other, when she has obtained your eyeThe other, when she ha's obtayn'd your Eye,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.107Would she begin a sect, might quench the zealWould she begin a Sect, might quench the zeale
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.109.1Of who she but bid follow.Of who she but bid follow.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.110Women will love her that she is a womanWomen will loue her, that she is a Woman
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.111More worth than any man; men that she isMore worth then any Man: Men, that she is
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.124For she did print your royal father off,For she did print your Royall Father off,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.156.1She came from Libya.She came from Libia.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.207.2She is,She is,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.208When once she is my wife.When once she is my Wife.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.217Hath she to change our loves. Beseech you, sir,Hath she to change our Loues. Beseech you (Sir)
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.225'Fore your queen died she was more worth such gazes'Fore your Queene dy'd, she was more worth such gazes,
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.72Paulina! She had one eye declined for the loss of herPaulina. Shee had one Eye declin'd for the losse of her
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.74She lifted the Princess from the earth, and so locks herShee lifted the Princesse from the Earth, and so locks her
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.75in embracing as if she would pin her to her heart, thatin embracing, as if shee would pin her to her heart, that
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.76she might no more be in danger of losing.shee might no more be in danger of loosing.
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.83Queen's death, with the manner how she came to'tQueenes death (with the manner how shee came to't,
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.86of dolour to another, she did, with an ‘ Alas!’, I wouldof dolour to another) shee did (with an Alas) I would
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.102I thought she had some greatI thought she had some great
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.103matter there in hand, for she hath privately, twice ormatter there in hand, for shee hath priuately, twice or
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.14.2As she lived peerless,As she liu'd peerelesse,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.26Thou art Hermione; or rather, thou art sheThou art Hermione; or rather, thou art she,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.27In thy not chiding, for she was as tenderIn thy not chiding: for she was as tender
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.32.1As she lived now.As she liu'd now.
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.32.2As now she might have done,As now she might haue done,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.34Now piercing to my soul. O, thus she stood,Now piercing to my Soule. Oh, thus she stood,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.103Dear life redeems you. You perceive she stirs.Deare Life redeemes you) you perceiue she stirres:
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.108When she was young you wooed her: now, in age,When she was young, you woo'd her: now, in age,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.109.1Is she become the suitor?Is she become the Suitor?
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.111.2She embraces him.She embraces him.
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.112She hangs about his neck.She hangs about his necke,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.113If she pertain to life, let her speak too.If she pertaine to life, let her speake too.
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.114Ay, and make it manifest where she has lived,I, and make it manifest where she ha's liu'd,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.115.2That she is living,That she is liuing,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.117Like an old tale: but it appears she lives,Like an old Tale: but it appeares she liues,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.118Though yet she speak not. Mark a little while.Though yet she speake not. Marke a little while:

Poems

 357 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.15 Oft did she heave her napkin to her eyne, Oft did she heaue her Napkin to her eyne,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.36 A thousand favours from a maund she drew, A thousand fauours from a maund she drew,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.38 Which one by one she in a river threw, Which one by one she in a riuer threw,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.39 Upon whose weeping margent she was set, Vpon whose weeping margent she was set,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.43 Of folded schedules had she many a one, Of folded schedulls had she many a one,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.44 Which she perused, sighed, tore and gave the flood, Which she perus'd, sighd, tore and gaue the flud,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.50 These often bathed she in her fluxive eyes, These often bath'd she in her fluxiue eies,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.55 This said, in top of rage the lines she rents, This said in top of rage the lines she rents,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.71Father,’ she says, ‘ though in me you behold Father she saies, though in mee you behold
A Lover's ComplaintLC.83 And when in his fair parts she did abide, And when in his faire parts shee didde abide,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.84 She was new lodged and newly deified. Shee was new lodg'd and newly Deified.
A Lover's ComplaintLC.156 The destined ill she must herself assay, The destin'd ill she must her selfe assay,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.236 For she was sought by spirits of richest coat, For she was sought by spirits of ritchest cote,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.243 She that her fame so to herself contrives, She that her fame so to her selfe contriues,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.249 And now she would the caged cloister fly: And now she would the caged cloister flie:
A Lover's ComplaintLC.251 Not to be tempted would she be enured, Not to be tempted would she be enur'd,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.1.1 When my love swears that she is made of truth, WHen my Loue sweares that she is made of truth,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.1.2 I do believe her, though I know she lies, I doe beleeue her (though I know she lies)
The Passionate PilgrimPP.1.3 That she might think me some untutored youth, That she might thinke me some vntutor'd youth,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.1.5 Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young, Thus vainly thinking that she thinkes me young,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.1.9 But wherefore says my love that she is young? But wherefore sayes my Loue that she is young?
The Passionate PilgrimPP.4.5 She told him stories to delight his ear; She told him stories, to delight his eares:
The Passionate PilgrimPP.4.6 She showed him favours to allure his eye; She shew'd him fauors, to allure his eie:
The Passionate PilgrimPP.4.7 To win his heart, she touched him here and there; To win his hart, she toucht him here and there,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.4.13 Then fell she on her back, fair queen, and toward: Then fell she on her backe, faire queen, & toward
The Passionate PilgrimPP.6.7 Hot was the day; she hotter that did look Hot was the day, she hotter that did looke
The Passionate PilgrimPP.6.14 ‘ O Jove,’ quoth she, ‘ why was not I a flood!’ Oh IOVE (quoth she) why was not I a flood?
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.7 Her lips to mine how often hath she joined, Her lips to mine how often hath she ioyned,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.9 How many tales to please me hath she coined, How many tales to please me hath she coyned,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.13 She burnt with love, as straw with fire flameth; She burnt with loue, as straw with fire flameth,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.14 She burnt out love, as soon as straw out-burneth; She burnt out loue, as soone as straw out burneth:
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.15 She framed the love, and yet she foiled the framing; She fram d the loue, and yet she foyld the framing,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.16 She bade love last, and yet she fell a-turning. She bad loue last, and yet she fell a turning.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.5 Her stand she takes upon a steep-up hill; Her stand she takes vpon a steepe vp hill.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.7 She, silly queen, with more than love's good will, She silly Queene, with more then loues good will,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.9 ‘ Once,’ quoth she, ‘ did I see a fair sweet youth Once (quoth she) did I see a faire sweet youth
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.12 See, in my thigh,’ quoth she, ‘ here was the sore.’ Soe in my thigh (quoth she) here was the sore,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.13 She showed hers: he saw more wounds than one, She shewed hers, he saw more wounds then one,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.3 She told the youngling how god Mars did try her, She told the youngling how god Mars did trie her,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.4 And as he fell to her, so fell she to him. And as he fell to her, she fell to him.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.5 ‘ Even thus,’ quoth she, ‘ the warlike god embraced me,’ Euen thus (quoth she) the warlike god embrac't me:
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.6 And then she clipped Adonis in her arms; And then she clipt Adonis in her armes:
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.7 ‘Even thus,' quoth she, ‘the warlike god unlaced me,' Euen thus (quoth she) the warlike god vnlac't me,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.9 ‘ Even thus,’ quoth she, ‘ he seized on my lips,’ Euen thus (quoth she) he seized on my lippes,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.11.11 And as she fetched breath, away he skips, And as she fetched breath, away he skips,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.2 She bade good night that kept my rest away; She bad good night, that kept my rest away,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.5 ‘ Farewell,’ quoth she, ‘ and come again tomorrow;’ Farewell (quoth she) and come againe to morrow
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.7 Yet at my parting sweetly did she smile, Yet at my parting sweetly did she smile,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.9 'T may be, she joyed to jest at my exile, 'T may be she ioyd to ieast at my exile,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.19 For she doth welcome daylight with her ditty, For she doth welcome daylight with her dittie,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.24 For why she sighed and bade me come tomorrow. For why, she sight, and bad me come to morrow.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.15.12 Alas, she could not help it! Alas she could not helpe it.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.9 Lest she some subtle practice smell – Least she some subtill practise smell,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.24 To proffer, though she put thee back. To proffer though she put thee back.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.27 And then too late she will repent And then too late she will repent,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.30 That which with scorn she put away. That which with scorne she put away.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.31 What though she strive to try her strength, What though she striue to try her strength,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.51 She will not stick to round me on th' ear, She will not stick to round me on th'are,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.53 Yet will she blush, here be it said, Yet will she blush, here be it said,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.20.9 She, poor bird, as all forlorn, Shee (poore Bird) as all forlorne,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.20.13 ‘ Fie, fie, fie,’ now would she cry; Fie, fie, fie, now would she cry
The Phoenix and TurtlePhoen.63 Beauty brag, but 'tis not she; Beautie bragge, but tis not she,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.a30 sorrow. She, first taking an oath of them for her revenge, sorrow. Shee first taking an oath of them for her reuenge,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.89 So, guiltless, she securely gives good cheer So guiltlesse shee securely giues good cheare,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.99 But she that never coped with stranger eyes But she that neuer cop't with straunger eies,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.103 She touched no unknown baits; nor feared no hooks; Shee toucht no vnknown baits, nor feard no hooks,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.104 Nor could she moralize his wanton sight Nor could shee moralize his wanton sight,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.111 Her joy with heaved-up hand she doth express, Her ioie with heaued-vp hand she doth expresse,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.241 I'll beg her love – but she is not her own. Ile beg her loue: but she is not her owne:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.253 Quoth he, ‘ She took me kindly by the hand, Quoth he, shee tooke me kindlie by the hand,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.263 Until her husband's welfare she did hear; Vntill her husbands welfare shee did heare.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.264 Whereat she smiled with so sweet a cheer Whereat shee smiled with so sweete a cheare,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.265 That had Narcissus seen her as she stood That had NARCISSVS seene her as shee stood,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.363 But she, sound sleeping, fearing no such thing, But shee sound sleeping fearing no such thing,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.376 Whether it is that she reflects so bright Whether it is that shee reflects so bright,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.391 Where like a virtuous monument she lies Where like a vertuous Monument shee lies,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.444 Do tell her she is dreadfully beset, Do tell her shee is dreadfullie beset,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.446 She much amazed breaks ope her locked-up eyes, Shee much amaz'd breakes ope her lockt vp eyes,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.451 That thinks she hath beheld some ghastly sprite, That thinkes shee hath beheld some gastlie sprite,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.453 What terror 'tis! but she in worser taking, What terror tis: but shee in worser taking,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.457 Like to a new-killed bird she trembling lies; Like to a new kild bird shee trembling lies:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.458 She dares not look, yet, winking, there appears Shee dares not looke, yet winking there appeares
The Rape of LucreceLuc.475 But she with vehement prayers urgeth still But shee with vehement prayers vrgeth still,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.542 While she, the picture of pure piety, While shee the picture of pure pietie,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.565 She puts the period often from his place, Shee puts the period often from his place,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.567 That twice she doth begin ere once she speaks. That twise she doth begin ere once she speakes.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.568 She conjures him by high almighty Jove, She coniures him by high Almightie loue,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.575 Quoth she, ‘ Reward not hospitality Quoth shee, reward not Hospitalitie,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.652 ‘ Thou art,’ quoth she, ‘ a sea, a sovereign king; Thou art, quoth shee, a sea, a soueraigne King,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.680 For with the nightly linen that she wears For with the nightlie linnen that shee weares,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.687 But she hath lost a dearer thing than life, But shee hath lost a dearer thing then life,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.721 To ask the spotted princess how she fares. To aske the spotted Princesse how she fares.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.722 She says her subjects with foul insurrection Shee sayes her subiects with fowle insurrection,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.727 Which in her prescience she controlled still, Which in her prescience shee controlled still,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.734 She bears the load of lust he left behind, Shee beares the lode of lust he left behinde,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.737 She like a wearied lamb lies panting there; Shee like a wearied Lambe lies panting there,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.739 She, desperate, with her nails her flesh doth tear. Shee desperat with her nailes her flesh doth teare.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.741 She stays, exclaiming on the direful night; Shee staies exclayming on the direfull night,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.744 She there remains a hopeless castaway; Shee there remaines a hopelesse cast-away,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.746 She prays she never may behold the day. Shee prayes shee neuer may behold the day.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.747 ‘ For day,’ quoth she, ‘ night's scapes doth open lay, For daie, quoth shee, nights scapes doth open lay,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.757 Here she exclaims against repose and rest, Here shee exclaimes against repose and rest,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.759 She wakes her heart by beating on her breast, Shee wakes her heart by beating on her brest,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.762 Frantic with grief thus breathes she forth her spite Franticke with griefe thus breaths shee forth her spite,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1037 This said, from her betumbled couch she starteth, This said, from her betombled couch shee starteth,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1044 ‘ In vain,’ quoth she, ‘ I live, and seek in vain In vaine (quoth shee) I liue, and seeke in vaine
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1087 And seems to point her out where she sits weeping; And seems to point her out where she sits weeping,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1088 To whom she sobbing speaks: ‘ O eye of eyes, To whom shee sobbing speakes, o eye of eyes,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1093 Thus cavils she with every thing she sees. Thus cauils shee with euerie thing shee sees,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1100 So she deep drenched in a sea of care So shee deepe drenched in a Sea of care,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1101 Holds disputation with each thing she views, Holds disputation with ech thing shee vewes,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1121 ‘ You mocking-birds,’ quoth she, ‘ your tunes entomb You mocking Birds (quoth she) your tunes intombe
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1153 So with herself is she in mutiny, So with her selfe is shee in mutinie,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1156 ‘ To kill myself,’ quoth she, ‘ alack, what were it, To kill my selfe, quoth shee, alacke what were it,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1212 This plot of death when sadly she had laid, This plot of death when sadlie shee had layd,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1214 With untuned tongue she hoarsely calls her maid, With vntun'd tongue shee hoarslie cals her mayd,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1219 Her mistress she doth give demure good-morrow Her mistresse shee doth giue demure good morrow,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1270 ‘ My girl,’ quoth she, ‘ on what occasion break My girle, quoth shee, on what occasion breake
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1275 ‘ But tell me, girl, when went ’ – and there she stayed, But tell me girle, when went (and there shee staide,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1283 She would request to know your heaviness.’ Shee would request to know your heauinesse:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1296 Her maid is gone, and she prepares to write, Her maide is gone, and shee prepares to write,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1303 At last she thus begins: ‘ Thou worthy lord At last shee thus begins: thou worthie Lord,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1310 Here folds she up the tenor of her woe, Here folds shee vp the tenure of her woe,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1314 She dares not thereof make discovery, Shee dares not thereof make discouery,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1316 Ere she with blood had stained her stained excuse. Ere she with bloud had stain'd her stain'd excuse.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1318 She hoards, to spend when he is by to hear her, Shee hoords to spend, when he is by to heare her,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1322 To shun this blot, she would not blot the letter To shun this blot, shee would not blot the letter
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1333 The post attends, and she delivers it, The Post attends, and shee deliuers it,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1336 Speed more than speed but dull and slow she deems: Speed more then speed, but dul & slow she deems,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1354 She thought he blushed as knowing Tarquin's lust, Shee thought he blusht, as knowing TARQVINS lust,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1357 The more she saw the blood his cheeks replenish, The more shee saw the bloud his cheeks replenish,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1358 The more she thought he spied in her some blemish. The more she thought he spied in her som blemish.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1359 But long she thinks till he return again, But long shee thinkes till he returne againe,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1361 The weary time she cannot entertain, The wearie time shee cannot entertaine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1364 That she her plaints a little while doth stay, That shee her plaints a little while doth stay,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1366 At last she calls to mind where hangs a piece At last shee cals to mind where hangs a peece
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1445 Many she sees where cares have carved some, Manie shee sees, where cares haue carued some,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1447 Till she despairing Hecuba beheld, Till shee dispayring HECVBA beheld,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1453 Of what she was no semblance did remain. Of what shee was, no semblance did remaine:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1464 ‘ Poor instrument,’ quoth she, ‘ without a sound, Poore Instrument (quoth shee) without a sound,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1492 Here feelingly she weeps Troy's painted woes; Here feelingly she weeps TROYES painted woes,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1498 She lends them words, and she their looks doth borrow. She lends them words, & she their looks doth bor-(row,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1499 She throws her eyes about the painting round, Shee throwes her eyes about the painting round,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1500 And who she finds forlorn she doth lament. And who shee finds forlorne, shee doth lament:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1501 At last she sees a wretched image bound, At last shee sees a wretched image bound,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1527 This picture she advisedly perused, This picture shee aduisedly perus'd,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1531 And still on him she gazed, and gazing still, And still on him shee gaz'd, and gazing still,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1532 Such signs of truth in his plain face she spied Such signes of truth in his plaine face shee spied,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1533 That she concludes the picture was belied. That shee concludes, the Picture was belied.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1534 ‘ It cannot be,’ quoth she, ‘ that so much guile ’ – It cannot be (quoth she) that so much guile,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1535 She would have said ‘ can lurk in such a look ’; (Shee would haue said) can lurke in such a looke:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1538 ‘ It cannot be ’ she in that sense forsook, It cannot be, shee in that sence forsooke,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1564 She tears the senseless Sinon with her nails, Shee tears the sencelesse SINON with her nailes,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1567 At last she smilingly with this gives o'er: At last shee smilingly with this giues ore,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1568 ‘ Fool, fool,’ quoth she, ‘ his wounds will not be sore.’ Foole fool, quoth she, his wounds wil not be sore.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1571 She looks for night, and then she longs for morrow, Shee looks for night, & then shee longs for morrow,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1572 And both she thinks too long with her remaining. And both shee thinks too long with her remayning.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1577 That she with painted images hath spent, That shee with painted Images hath spent,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1594 He hath no power to ask her how she fares; He hath no power to aske her how shee fares,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1604 Three times with sighs she gives her sorrow fire Three times with sighes shee giues her sorrow fire,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1605 Ere once she can discharge one word of woe: Ere once shee can discharge one word of woe:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1607 She modestly prepares to let them know Shee modestlie prepares, to let them know
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1613 ‘ Few words,’ quoth she, ‘ Shall fit the trespass best, Few words (quoth shee) shall fit the trespasse best,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1674 Which speechless woe of his poor she attendeth, Which speechlesse woe of his poore she attendeth,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1682 For she that was thy Lucrece, now attend me: For shee that was thy LVCRECE, now attend me,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1688 ‘ But ere I name him, you fair lords,’ quoth she, But ere I name him, you faire Lords, quoth shee,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1699 But she, that yet her sad task hath not said, But shee that yet her sad taske hath not said,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1700 The protestation stops. ‘ O, speak,’ quoth she: The protestation stops, ô speake quoth shee,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1711 While with a joyless smile she turns away While with a ioylesse smile, shee turnes awaie
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1714 ‘ No, no,’ quoth she, ‘ no dame hereafter living No no, quoth shee, no Dame hereafter liuing,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1717 She throws forth Tarquin's name: ‘ He, he,’ she says; Shee throwes forth TARQVINS name: he he, she saies,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1721 She utters this:, ‘ He, he, fair lords, 'tis he, Shee vtters this, he he faire Lords, tis he
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1723 Even here she sheathed in her harmless breast Euen here she sheathed in her harmlesse breast
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1795 The father says ‘ She's mine ’; ‘ O, mine she is,’ The father saies, shee's mine, ô mine shee is
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1798 He weeps for her, for she was only mine, He weepes for her, for shee was onely mine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1801 Which she too early and too late hath spilled.’ Which shee to earely and too late hath spil'd.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1802 ‘ Woe, woe,’ quoth Collatine, ‘ she was my wife;, Woe woe, quoth COLATINE, shee was my wife,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1803 I owed her, and 'tis mine that she hath killed.’ I owed her, and tis mine that shee hath kil d.
SonnetsSonn.3.5 For where is she so fair whose uneared womb For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe
SonnetsSonn.3.9 Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee Thou art thy mothers glasse and she in thee
SonnetsSonn.4.4 And being frank she lends to those are free. And being franck she lends to those are free:
SonnetsSonn.11.11 Look whom she best endowed, she gave the more, Looke whom she best indow'd. she gaue the more;
SonnetsSonn.11.13 She carved thee for her seal, and meant thereby She caru'd thee for her seale, and ment therby,
SonnetsSonn.20.10 Till Nature as she wrought thee fell a-doting, Till nature as she wrought thee fell a dotinge,
SonnetsSonn.20.13 But since she pricked thee out for women's pleasure, But since she prickt thee out for womens pleasure,
SonnetsSonn.42.3 That she hath thee is of my wailing chief, That she hath thee is of my wayling cheefe,
SonnetsSonn.42.7 And for my sake even so doth she abuse me, And for my sake euen so doth she abuse me,
SonnetsSonn.42.14 Sweet flattery, then she loves but me alone. Sweete flattery, then she loues but me alone.
SonnetsSonn.67.11 For she hath no exchequer now but his, For she hath no exchecker now but his,
SonnetsSonn.67.13 O him she stores, to show what wealth she had, O him she stores, to show what welth she had,
SonnetsSonn.126.7 She keeps thee to this purpose, that her skill She keepes thee to this purpose, that her skill.
SonnetsSonn.126.10 She may detain, but not still keep her treasure. She may detaine, but not still keepe her tresure!
SonnetsSonn.130.12 My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. My Mistres when shee walkes treads on the ground.
SonnetsSonn.130.14 As any she belied with false compare. As any she beli'd with false compare.
SonnetsSonn.138.1 When my love swears that she is made of truth, WHen my loue sweares that she is made of truth,
SonnetsSonn.138.2 I do believe her, though I know she lies, I do beleeue her though I know she lyes,
SonnetsSonn.138.3 That she might think me some untutored youth, That she might thinke me some vntuterd youth,
SonnetsSonn.138.5 Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young, Thus vainely thinking that she thinkes me young,
SonnetsSonn.138.6 Although she knows my days are past the best, Although she knowes my dayes are past the best,
SonnetsSonn.138.9 But wherefore says she not she is unjust? But wherefore sayes she not she is vniust?
SonnetsSonn.138.13 Therefore I lie with her, and she with me, Therefore I lye with her, and she with me,
SonnetsSonn.139.11 And therefore from my face she turns my foes, And therefore from my face she turnes my foes,
SonnetsSonn.141.14 That she that makes me sin awards me pain. That she that makes me sinne, awards me paine.
SonnetsSonn.143.4 In pursuit of the thing she would have stay; In pursuit of the thing she would haue stay:
SonnetsSonn.145.4 But when she saw my woeful state, But when she saw my wofull state,
SonnetsSonn.145.9 I hate she altered with an end, I hate she alterd with an end,
SonnetsSonn.145.13 I hate, from hate away she threw, I hate, from hate away she threw,
SonnetsSonn.154.9 This brand she quenched in a cool well by, This brand she quenched in a coole Well by,
Venus and AdonisVen.7 ‘ Thrice-fairer than myself,’ thus she began, Thrise fairer then my selfe, (thus she began)
Venus and AdonisVen.25 With this she seizeth on his sweating palm, With this she ceazeth on his sweating palme,
Venus and AdonisVen.35 She red and hot as coals of glowing fire, She red, and hot, as coles of glowing fier,
Venus and AdonisVen.38 Nimbly she fastens – O, how quick is love! Nimbly she fastens, (ô how quicke is loue!)
Venus and AdonisVen.40 To tie the rider she begins to prove. To tie the rider she begins to proue:
Venus and AdonisVen.41 Backward she pushed him, as she would be thrust, Backward she pusht him, as she would be thrust,
Venus and AdonisVen.43 So soon was she along as he was down, So soone was she along, as he was downe,
Venus and AdonisVen.45 Now doth she stroke his cheek, now doth he frown, Now doth she stroke his cheek, now doth he frown,
Venus and AdonisVen.46 And 'gins to chide, but soon she stops his lips, And gins to chide, but soone she stops his lips,
Venus and AdonisVen.49 He burns with bashful shame; she with her tears He burnes with bashfull shame, she with her teares
Venus and AdonisVen.52 To fan and blow them dry again she seeks. To fan, and blow them drie againe she seekes.
Venus and AdonisVen.53 He saith she is immodest, blames her miss; He saith, she is immodest, blames her misse,
Venus and AdonisVen.54 What follows more she murders with a kiss. What followes more, she murthers with a kisse.
Venus and AdonisVen.59 Even so she kissed his brow, his cheek, his chin, Euen so she kist his brow, his cheeke, his chin,
Venus and AdonisVen.60 And where she ends she doth anew begin. And where she ends, she doth anew begin.
Venus and AdonisVen.63 She feedeth on the steam as on a prey, She feedeth on the steame, as on a pray,
Venus and AdonisVen.73 Still she entreats, and prettily entreats, Still she intreats, and prettily intreats,
Venus and AdonisVen.74 For to a pretty ear she tunes her tale: For to a prettie eare she tunes her tale.
Venus and AdonisVen.77 Being red, she loves him best, and being white, Being red she loues him best, and being white,
Venus and AdonisVen.79 Look how he can, she cannot choose but love; Looke how he can, she cannot chuse but loue,
Venus and AdonisVen.80 And by her fair immortal hand she swears And by her faire immortall hand she sweares,
Venus and AdonisVen.88 So offers he to give what she did crave; So offers he to giue what she did craue,
Venus and AdonisVen.92 More thirst for drink than she for this good turn. More thirst for drinke, then she for this good turne,
Venus and AdonisVen.93 Her help she sees, but help she cannot get; Her helpe she sees, but helpe she cannot get,
Venus and AdonisVen.94 She bathes in water, yet her fire must burn. She bathes in water, yet her fire must burne:
Venus and AdonisVen.95 ‘ O, pity,’ 'gan she cry, ‘ flint-hearted boy! Oh pitie gan she crie, flint-hearted boy,
Venus and AdonisVen.204 She had not brought forth thee, but died unkind. She had not brought forth thee, but died vnkind.
Venus and AdonisVen.220 Being judge in love, she cannot right her cause; Being Iudge in loue, she cannot right her cause.
Venus and AdonisVen.221 And now she weeps, and now she fain would speak, And now she weeps, & now she faine would speake
Venus and AdonisVen.223 Sometime she shakes her head, and then his hand; Sometime she shakes her head, and then his hand,
Venus and AdonisVen.224 Now gazeth she on him, now on the ground; Now gazeth she on him, now on the ground;
Venus and AdonisVen.226 She would, he will not in her arms be bound; She would, he will not in her armes be bound:
Venus and AdonisVen.228 She locks her lily fingers one in one. She locks her lillie fingers one in one.
Venus and AdonisVen.229Fondling,’ she saith, ‘ since I have hemmed thee here Fondling, she saith, since I haue hemd thee here
Venus and AdonisVen.249 Being mad before, how doth she now for wits? Being mad before, how doth she now for wits?
Venus and AdonisVen.253 Now which way shall she turn? what shall she say? Now which way shall she turne? what shall she say?
Venus and AdonisVen.257 ‘ Pity,’ she cries, ‘ some favour, some remorse!’ Pitie she cries, some fauour, some remorse,
Venus and AdonisVen.262 And forth she rushes, snorts and neighs aloud. And forth she rushes, snorts, and neighs aloud.
Venus and AdonisVen.308 She answers him as if she knew his mind; She answers him, as if she knew his minde,
Venus and AdonisVen.310 She puts on outward strangeness, seems unkind, She puts on outward strangenesse, seemes vnkinde:
Venus and AdonisVen.341 Taking no notice that she is so nigh, Taking no notice that she is so nye,
Venus and AdonisVen.344 How she came stealing to the wayward boy! How she came stealing to the wayward boy,
Venus and AdonisVen.349 Now was she just before him as he sat, Now was she iust before him as he sat,
Venus and AdonisVen.350 And like a lowly lover down she kneels; And like a lowly louer downe she kneeles,
Venus and AdonisVen.351 With one fair hand she heaveth up his hat, With one faire hand she heaueth vp his hat,
Venus and AdonisVen.361 Full gently now she takes him by the hand, Full gently now she takes him by the hand,
Venus and AdonisVen.374 ‘ Give me my heart,’ saith she, ‘ and thou shalt have it; Giue me my heart (saith she,) and thou shalt haue it.
Venus and AdonisVen.385 Thus she replies: ‘ Thy palfrey, as he should, Thus she replies, thy palfrey as he should,
Venus and AdonisVen.427 ‘ What, canst thou talk?’ quoth she, ‘ hast thou a tongue What canst thou talke (quoth she) hast thou a tong?
Venus and AdonisVen.457 This ill presage advisedly she marketh: This ill presage aduisedly she marketh,
Venus and AdonisVen.463 And at his look she flatly falleth down, And at his looke she flatly falleth downe,
Venus and AdonisVen.467 The silly boy, believing she is dead, The sillie boy beleeuing she is dead,
Venus and AdonisVen.473 For on the grass she lies as she were slain, For on the grasse she lyes as she were slaine,
Venus and AdonisVen.479 He kisses her; and she, by her good will, He kisses her, and she by her good will,
Venus and AdonisVen.482 Her two blue windows faintly she upheaveth, Her two blew windowes faintly she vpheaueth,
Venus and AdonisVen.493 ‘ O, where am I?’ quoth she, ‘ in earth or heaven, O where am I (quoth she,) in earth or heauen,
Venus and AdonisVen.537 ‘ Good night,’ quoth she; and, ere he says ‘ Adieu,’ Goodnight (quoth she) and ere he sayes adue,
Venus and AdonisVen.545 He with her plenty pressed, she faint with dearth Ho with her plentie prest she faint with dearth,
Venus and AdonisVen.548 And glutton-like she feeds, yet never filleth; And gluttonlike she feeds, yet neuer filleth,
Venus and AdonisVen.552 That she will draw his lips' rich treasure dry. That she will draw his lips rich treasure drie.
Venus and AdonisVen.554 With blindfold fury she begins to forage; With blind fold furie she begins to forrage,
Venus and AdonisVen.564 While she takes all she can, not all she listeth. While she takes all she can, not all she listeth.
Venus and AdonisVen.571 When he did frown, O, had she then gave over, When he did frowne, ô had she then gaue ouer,
Venus and AdonisVen.572 Such nectar from his lips she had not sucked. Such nectar from his lips she had not suckt,
Venus and AdonisVen.577 For pity now she can no more detain him; For pittie now she can no more detaine him,
Venus and AdonisVen.579 She is resolved no longer to restrain him; She is resolu'd no longer to restraine him,
Venus and AdonisVen.581 The which by Cupid's bow she doth protest The which by Cupids bow she doth protest,
Venus and AdonisVen.583 ‘ Sweet boy,’ she says, ‘ this night I'll waste in sorrow, Sweet boy she saies, this night ile wast in sorrow
Venus and AdonisVen.589 ‘ The boar!’ quoth she; whereat a sudden pale, The boare (quoth she) whereat a suddain pale,
Venus and AdonisVen.591 Usurps her cheek; she trembles at his tale, Vsurpes her cheeke, she trembles at his tale,
Venus and AdonisVen.592 And on his neck her yoking arms she throws. And on his neck her yoaking armes she throwes.
Venus and AdonisVen.593 She sinketh down, still hanging by his neck, She sincketh downe, still hanging by his necke,
Venus and AdonisVen.594 He on her belly falls, she on her back. He on her belly fall's, she on her backe.
Venus and AdonisVen.595 Now is she in the very lists of love, Now is she in the verie lists of loue,
Venus and AdonisVen.597 All is imaginary she doth prove; All is imaginarie she doth proue,
Venus and AdonisVen.603 Even so she languisheth in her mishaps Euen so she languisheth in her mishaps,
Venus and AdonisVen.605 The warm effects which she in him finds missing The warme effects which she in him finds missing,
Venus and AdonisVen.606 She seeks to kindle with continual kissing. She seekes to kindle with continuall kissing.
Venus and AdonisVen.608 She hath assayed as much as may be proved; She hath assai'd as much as may be prou'd,
Venus and AdonisVen.610 She's Love, she loves, and yet she is not loved. She's loue; she loues, and yet she is not lou'd,
Venus and AdonisVen.613 ‘ Thou hadst been gone,’ quoth she, ‘ sweet boy, ere this, Thou hadst bin gone (quoth she) sweet boy ere this,
Venus and AdonisVen.717 The night is spent.’ ‘ Why, what of that?’ quoth she. The night is spent; why what of that (quoth she?)
Venus and AdonisVen.720 ‘ In night,’ quoth she, ‘ desire sees best of all. In night (quoth she) desire sees best of all.
Venus and AdonisVen.726 Lest she should steal a kiss, and die forsworn. Lest she should steale a kisse and die forsworne.
Venus and AdonisVen.731 Wherein she framed thee, in high heaven's despite, Wherin she fram'd thee, in hie heauens despight,
Venus and AdonisVen.733 ‘ And therefore hath she bribed the Destinies And therefore hath she brib'd the destinies,
Venus and AdonisVen.817 Which after him she darts, as one on shore Which after him she dartes, as one on shore
Venus and AdonisVen.827 Even so confounded in the dark she lay Euen so confounded in the darke she lay,
Venus and AdonisVen.829 And now she beats her heart, whereat it groans, And now she beates her heart, whereat it grones,
Venus and AdonisVen.833 ‘ Ay me!’ she cries, and twenty times, ‘ Woe, woe!’ Ay me, she cries, and twentie times, wo, wo,
Venus and AdonisVen.835 She, marking them, begins a wailing note, She marking them, begins a wailing note,
Venus and AdonisVen.847 For who hath she to spend the night withal For who hath she to spend the night withall,
Venus and AdonisVen.851 She says ‘ 'Tis so;’ they answer all ‘ 'Tis so,’ She sayes tis so, they answer all tis so,
Venus and AdonisVen.852 And would say after her, if she said ‘ No.’ And would say after her, if she said no.
Venus and AdonisVen.865 This said, she hasteth to a myrtle grove, This sayd, she hasteth to a mirtle groue,
Venus and AdonisVen.867 And yet she hears no tidings of her love; And yet she heares no tidings of her loue;
Venus and AdonisVen.868 She hearkens for his hounds and for his horn. She harkens for his hounds, and for his horne,
Venus and AdonisVen.869 Anon she hears them chant it lustily, Anon she heares them chaunt it lustily,
Venus and AdonisVen.870 And all in haste she coasteth to the cry. And all in hast she coasteth to the cry.
Venus and AdonisVen.871 And as she runs, the bushes in the way And as she runnes, the bushes in the way,
Venus and AdonisVen.874 She wildly breaketh from their strict embrace, She wildly breaketh from their strict imbrace,
Venus and AdonisVen.877By this she hears the hounds are at a bay; By this she heares the hounds are at a bay,
Venus and AdonisVen.878 Whereat she starts, like one that spies an adder Whereat she starts like one that spies an adder,
Venus and AdonisVen.883 For now she knows it is no gentle chase, For now she knowes it is no gentle chase,
Venus and AdonisVen.895 Thus stands she in a trembling ecstasy; Thus stands she in a trembling extasie,
Venus and AdonisVen.897 She tells them 'tis a causeless fantasy, She tels them tis a causlesse fantasie,
Venus and AdonisVen.900 And with that word she spied the hunted boar, And with that word, she spide the hunted boare.
Venus and AdonisVen.904 Which madly hurries her she knows not whither: Which madly hurries her, she knowes not whither,
Venus and AdonisVen.905 This way runs, and now she will no further, This way she runs, and now she will no further,
Venus and AdonisVen.908 She treads the path that she untreads again; She treads the path, that she vntreads againe;
Venus and AdonisVen.913 Here kennelled in a brake she finds a hound, Here kenneld in a brake, she finds a hound,
Venus and AdonisVen.917 And here she meets another sadly scowling, And here she meets another, sadly skowling,
Venus and AdonisVen.918 To whom she speaks, and he replies with howling. To whom she speaks, & he replies with howling.
Venus and AdonisVen.929 So she at these sad signs draws up her breath So she at these sad signes, drawes vp her breath,
Venus and AdonisVen.932 Hateful divorce of love,’ – thus chides she Death – Hatefull diuorce of loue, (thus chides she death)
Venus and AdonisVen.956 She vailed her eyelids, who, like sluices, stopped She vaild her eye-lids, who like sluces stopt
Venus and AdonisVen.973By this, far off she hears some huntsman holloa; By this farre off, she heares some huntsman hallow,
Venus and AdonisVen.975 The dire imagination she did follow The dyre imagination she did follow,
Venus and AdonisVen.984 Who is but drunken when she seemeth drowned. Who is but dronken when she seemeth drownd.
Venus and AdonisVen.991 Now she unweaves the web that she hath wrought: Now she vnweaues the web that she hath wrought,
Venus and AdonisVen.993 It was not she that called him, all to nought: It was not she that cald him all to nought;
Venus and AdonisVen.994 Now she adds honours to his hateful name; Now she ads honours to his hatefull name.
Venus and AdonisVen.995 She clepes him king of graves, and grave for kings, She clepes him king of graues, & graue for kings,
Venus and AdonisVen.997 ‘ No, no,’ quoth she, ‘ sweet Death, I did but jest; No, no, quoth she, sweet death, I did but iest,
Venus and AdonisVen.1010 Her rash suspect she doth extenuate; Her rash suspect she doth extenuate,
Venus and AdonisVen.1012 With Death she humbly doth insinuate; With death she humbly doth insinuate.
Venus and AdonisVen.1015 ‘ O Jove,’ quoth she, ‘ how much a fool was I O Ioue quoth she, how much a foole was I,
Venus and AdonisVen.1025 Even at this word she hears a merry horn, Euen at this word she heares a merry horne,
Venus and AdonisVen.1026 Whereat she leaps that was but late forlorn. Whereat she leaps, that was but late forlorne.
Venus and AdonisVen.1027 As falcon to the lure, away she flies; As Faulcons to the lure, away she flies,
Venus and AdonisVen.1028 The grass stoops not, she treads on it so light; The grasse stoops not, she treads on it so light,
Venus and AdonisVen.1058 Over one shoulder doth she hang her head; Ouer one shoulder doth she hang her head,
Venus and AdonisVen.1059 Dumbly she passions, franticly she doteth: Dumblie she passions, frantikely she doteth,
Venus and AdonisVen.1060 She thinks he could not die, he is not dead. She thinkes he could not die, he is not dead,
Venus and AdonisVen.1063 Upon his hurt she looks so steadfastly Vpon his hurt she lookes so stedfastly,
Venus and AdonisVen.1065 And then she reprehends her mangling eye And then she reprehends her mangling eye,
Venus and AdonisVen.1070 And yet,’ quoth she, ‘ behold two Adons dead! And yet (quoth she) behold two Adons dead,
Venus and AdonisVen.1121 With this, she falleth in the place she stood, With this she falleth in the place she stood,
Venus and AdonisVen.1123 She looks upon his lips, and they are pale; She lookes vpon his lips, and they are pale,
Venus and AdonisVen.1124 She takes him by the hand, and that is cold; She takes him by the hand, and that is cold,
Venus and AdonisVen.1125 She whispers in his ears a heavy tale, She whispers in his eares a heauie tale,
Venus and AdonisVen.1126 As if they heard the woeful words she told; As if they heard the wofull words she told:
Venus and AdonisVen.1127 She lifts the coffer-lids that close his eyes, She lifts the coffer-lids that close his eyes,
Venus and AdonisVen.1133 ‘ Wonder of time,’ quoth she, ‘ this is my spite, Wonder of time (quoth she) this is my spight,
Venus and AdonisVen.1171 She bows her head the new-sprung flower to smell, She bowes her head, the new-sprong floure to smel,
Venus and AdonisVen.1175 She crops the stalk, and in the breach appears She crop's the stalke, and in the breach appeares,
Venus and AdonisVen.1176 Green-dropping sap, which she compares to tears. Green-dropping sap, which she cõpares to teares.
Venus and AdonisVen.1177 ‘ Poor flower,’ quoth she, ‘ this was thy father's guisePoore floure (quoth she) this was thy fathers guise,
Venus and AdonisVen.1189 Thus weary of the world, away she hies, Thus weary of the world, away she hies,

Glossary

 13 result(s).
Actaeon[pron: ak'tayon] cuckold; hunter who saw Artemis (goddess of chastity) bathing naked; she changed him into a stag, who was killed by his own hounds
Ariadne[ari'adnee] daughter of Minos who helped Theseus find his way through the labyrinth, and then fled with him; Theseus abandoned her while she slept at Naxos
Atalantafleet-footed huntress who swore only to marry the suitor who could outrace her; those she defeated, she killed
Cressid, Cressidafickle daughter of Calchas, a priest of Troy; beloved by Troilus, a Trojan prince, she deserted him for Diomed; character in Troilus and Cressida
Daphnenymph loved by Apollo; chased by the god, she was saved by being turned into a laurel, which became Apollo's sacred tree
Dido[pron: 'diydoh] Queen of Carthage who fell in love with Aeneas when he was shipwrecked on her shores; commanded by Jupiter, Aeneas left without seeing Dido again, and she killed herself on a funeral pyre
Hecubawife of Priam, King of Troy, and mother of 18 children; after the Greeks took Troy, she saw her sons and her husband killed, and was sent into slavery.
PenelopeUlysses' wife, who waited 20 years for his return from Troy; she told suitors she had to finish weaving a shroud for Ulysses' father before she could remarry, and undid the work each night
Philomel, Philomela[pron: 'filomel] daughter of Pandion, king of Athens; Tereus raped her and cut out her tongue, but she told the tale in her embroidery; the gods turned her into a nightingale after she took her revenge
Pyramus lover of Thisbe; kept apart by their parents, they talked through a crack in their dividing wall; arriving at a rendezvous, Pyramus found Thisbe’s cloak stained with blood from a lion’s prey; thinking she had been killed by a lion
shelady, woman, girl
Sibylpriestess inspired by Apollo, her prophecies being written on leaves; Apollo granted her as many years of life as she could hold grains of sand in her hand
Virginius 5th-c BC centurion who slew his daughter, either to avoid her being raped or because she was raped

Thesaurus

 0 result(s).

Themes and Topics

 21 result(s).
Archaisms... call ven 993 [of venus and death] she clepes him king of graves eke ...
Comparison...re a thousand times a properer man than she a woman and out of you...
...a woman and out of you she sees herself more proper than any of he...
Discourse markers...nd you shut out antipholus and did not she herself revile me there dromio sans fa...
...elf revile me there dromio sans fable she herself reviled you there antipholus d...
...ail taunt and scorn me dromio certes she did the kitchen vestal scorned you ant...
...made a groan of her last breath and now she sings in heaven finally to conclude ...
...y ye ac ii vi 111 [enobarbus] but she is now the wife of marcus antonius [men...
...ii 30 [wooer] she’s eighteen [doctor] she may be - / but that's all one ’tis noth...
Exclamations... tailor mnd ii i 54 down topples she / and &lsquo tailor&rsquo cries [un...
Functional shift... ‘act as ’ and suchlike for example she phebes me = ‘she treats me as phebe’ ...
Here, there, and where...96 happy is hermia wheresoe&rsquo er she lies wherever wheresomever ...
Hither, thither, and whither...ewhither tit iv i 11 somewhither would she have thee go with her somewhere ...
Humours... if a character was hot-tempered he or she would be thought to have an excess of ch...
...ed by mistress quickly (mw i iv 73) when she describes dr caius as 'phlegmatic' (she ...
Ly
Past tenses...tricken ham iii ii 280 sung she sang tnk iv i 63 swam yo...
Politeness...e by your cor i iii 75 [volumnia] she shall [go out of doors] [virgilia] inde...
Singing
Thou and you...gly beatrice always uses you to him as she does to his face throughout the play (h...
... him as thee is at ma iii i 111-13 when she is talking to herself ) benedick ...
Verb forms... -eth for the 3rd person singular (as in she goeth) both were reducing in frequency ...
...form be entirely replaced by -s (modern she goes) in shakespearian english the ver...
Withal and withal...i will acquaint my daughter withal that she be the better prepared for an answer in...
Classical mythology...ered artemis goddess of chastity while she was bathing and therefore naked ...
...was bathing and therefore naked she changed him into a stag who was pursued...
...ed with him theseus abandoned her while she slept at naxos arion tn i ii...
... the suitor who could outrace her those she defeated ...
...defeated she killed atlas 3h6 v i 36 t...
...doth bend her brows / as if with circe she would change my shape enchantress wh...
...oy beloved by troilus a trojan prince she deserted him for diomed character in tr...
...ymph loved by apollo chased by the god she was saved by being turned into a laurel ...
...neas left without seeing dido again and she killed herself on a funeral pyre ...
...ll for thy europa daughter of agenor she was abducted by jove in the shape of a b...
...18 children after the greeks took troy she saw her sons and her husband killed and...
...re (in one version used by shakespeare) she was married to theseus h per i...
...tion 2 53 we&rsquo ll show thee io as she was a maid / and how...
...was a maid / and how she was beguiled and surprised daughter o...
...uld be another penelope all the yarn she spun in ulysses&rsquo absence did but f...
...aited 20 years for his return from troy she told her suitors...
...told her suitors she had to finish weaving a shroud for ulyss...
... shroud for ulysses&rsquo father before she could remarry and undid the work each n...
...w raped her and cut out her tongue but she told the tale in her embroidery the god...
...gods turned her into a nightingale after she took her revenge procne tereus belo...
...blood from a lion&rsquo s prey thinking she had been killed by a lion he committed ...
...ed by a lion he committed suicide when she found him thisbe killed herself with hi...
...llo granted her as many years of life as she could hold grains of sand in her hand t...
...d to bear a son greater than his father she was married to peleus and mother of ach...
...uld be another penelope all the yarn she spun in ulysses&rsquo absence did but f...
Gods and goddesses...ptune mnd ii i 126 full often hath she sat with me on neptune' s yellow ...
...the underworld hades abducted her while she was picking flowers associated with spr...
Non-classical legend, romance, and folklore... florentius ts i ii 68 be she as foul as was florentius' love knigh...
... grissel ts ii i 288 for patience she will prove a second grissel griselda ...
Historical figures...ther to avoid her being raped or because she was raped xanthippe ts i ii ...
French
Frequently Encountered Words (FEW)...ctor to gentlewoman of telling him what she has seen] &rsquo tis most meet you shoul...
...arrant good creature wheresoe&rsquo er she is / her heart weighs sadly ayl i ii 1...
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