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Search phrase: see

Plays

 1465 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.92To see him every hour, to sit and drawTo see him euerie houre to sit and draw
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.103Look bleak i'th' cold wind. Withal, full oft we seeLookes bleake i'th cold wind: withall, full ofte we see
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.150Let me see. Marry, ill, to like him that ne'er itLet mee see. Marry ill, to like him that ne're it
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.217That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye?That makes me see, and cannot feede mine eye?
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.ii.13Yet, for our gentlemen that mean to seeYet for our Gentlemen that meane to see
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.165My fear hath catched your fondness. Now I seeMy feare hath catcht your fondnesse! now I see
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.173See it so grossly shown in thy behavioursSee it so grosely showne in thy behauiours,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.14Of the last monarchy – see that you comeOf the last Monarchy) see that you come
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.62I'll sue thee to stand up.Ile see thee to stand vp.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.80If you will see her. Now by my faith and honour,If you will see her: now by my faith and honour,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.85Than I dare blame my weakness. Will you see her,Then I dare blame my weakenesse: will you see her?
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.ii.54sir!’ I see things may serve long, but not serve ever.sir: I see things may serue long, but not serue euer.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.71.2Make choice and see,Make choise and see,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.70'Twill be two days ere I shall see you, so'Twill be two daies ere I shall see you, so
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.10Let me see what he writes, and when heLet me see what he writes, and when he
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.92I will entreat you, when you see my son,I will intreate you when you see my sonne,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.46Here you shall see a countryman of yoursHeere you shall see a Countriman of yours
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.92But we have almost embossed him. You shall see hisbut we haue almost imbost him, you shall see his
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.98sprat you shall find him; which you shall see this verya sprat you shall finde him, which you shall see this verie
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.110.1Will you go see her?Will you go see her?
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vii.28.2Now I seeNow I see
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vii.30You see it lawful then. It is no moreYou see it lawfull then, it is no more,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.38I see that men make vows in such a flameI see that men make rope's in such a scarre,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.21common course of all treasons we still see them revealcommon course of all treasons, we still see them reueale
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.31him see his company anatomized, that he might take ahim see his company anathomiz'd, that hee might take a
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.159hour, I will tell true. Let me see: Spurio, a hundred andhoure, I will tell true. Let me see, Spurio a hundred &
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.240We'll see what may be done, so youWee'le see what may bee done, so you
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.300O Lord, sir, let me live, or let me see my death!O Lord sir let me liue, or let me see my death.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.82It rejoices me that I hope I shall see him ere IIr reioyces me, that I hope I shall see him ere I
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.99Let us go see your son, I pray you. I long to talkLet vs go see your sonne I pray you, I long to talke
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.i.30Since you are like to see the King before me,Since you are like to see the King before me,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.33For thou mayst see a sunshine and a hailFor thou maist see a sun-shine, and a haile
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.65Our own love waking cries to see what's done,Our owne loue waking, cries to see what's don,e
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.70To see our widower's second marriage-day.To see our widdowers second marriage day:
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.81Now pray you let me see it; for mine eye,Now pray you let me see it. For mine eye,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.120More than to see this ring. Take him away.More then to see this Ring. Take him away,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.304.1Is't real that I see?Is't reall that I see?
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.305'Tis but the shadow of a wife you see,'Tis but the shadow of a wife you see,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.317O my dear mother, do I see you living?O my deere mother do I see you liuing?
Antony and CleopatraAC I.i.11Take but good note, and you shall see in himTake but good note, and you shall see in him
Antony and CleopatraAC I.i.13Into a strumpet's fool. Behold and see.Into a Strumpets Foole. Behold and see.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.72For, as it is a heartbreaking to see a handsome manFor, as it is a heart-breaking to see a handsome man
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.134Why, then we kill all our women. We seeWhy then we kill all our Women. We see
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.1.2I did not see him since.I did not see him since.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.2See where he is, who's with him, what he does.See where he is, / Whose with him, what he does:
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.62.1See when and where she died.See when, and where shee died.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.64With sorrowful water? Now I see, I see,With sorrowfull water? Now I see, I see,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iv.1You may see, Lepidus, and henceforth knowYou may see Lepidus, and henceforth know,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.205O'erpicturing that Venus where we seeO're-picturing that Venns, where we see
Antony and CleopatraAC II.iii.14I see it in my motion, have it not in myI see it in my motion: haue it not in my
Antony and CleopatraAC II.iv.4Till I shall see you in your soldier's dress,Till I shall see you in your Souldiers dresse,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.120You see we have burnt our cheeks. Strong EnobarbYou see we haue burnt our cheekes. Strong Enobarbe
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xi.24Therefore I pray you. I'll see you by and by.Therefore I pray you, Ile see you by and by.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xi.30See you here, sir?See you heere, Sir?
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xi.51O, whither hast thou led me, Egypt? SeeOh whether hast thou lead me Egypt, see
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.31Against a sworder! I see men's judgements areAgainst a Sworder. I see mens Iudgements are
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.38What, no more ceremony? See, my women,What no more Ceremony? See my Women,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.100Till like a boy you see him cringe his faceTill like a Boy you see him crindge his face,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.196The dove will peck the estridge; and I see stillThe Doue will pecke the Estridge; and I see still
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.i.14Enough to fetch him in. See it done,Enough to fetch him in. See it done,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ii.26Haply you shall not see me more; or if,Haply you shall not see me more, or if,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iii.18.2Walk; let's see if other watchmenWalke, let's see if other Watchmen
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iii.26Let's see how it will give off.Let's see how it will giue off.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.16That thou couldst see my wars today, and knew'stThat thou couldst see my Warres to day, and knew'st
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.17The royal occupation; thou shouldst seeThe Royall Occupation, thou should'st see
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.18O sun, thy uprise shall I see no more.Oh Sunne, thy vprise shall I see no more,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.2Sometime we see a cloud that's dragonish,Sometime we see a clowd that's Dragonish,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.64Is come indeed, when I should see behind meIs come indeed: When I should see behinde me
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.72Wouldst thou be windowed in great Rome and seeWould'st thou be window'd in great Rome, and see
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xv.62No better than a sty? O, see, my women,No better then a Stye? Oh see my women:
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.35.1He needs must see himself.He needes must see him selfe.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.73Go with me to my tent, where you shall seeGo with me to my Tent, where you shall see
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.76In all my writings. Go with me, and seeIn all my Writings. Go with me, and see
Antony and CleopatraAC v.ii.35You see how easily she may be surprised.You see how easily she may be surpriz'd:
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.44Th' undoing of yourself. Let the world seeTh'vndoing of your selfe: Let the World see
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.77O, such another sleep, that I might seeOh such another sleepe, that I might see
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.150.2See, Caesar; O behold,See Casar: Oh behold,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.219Shall be brought drunken forth, and I shall seeShall be brought drunken forth, and I shall see
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.283Antony call. I see him rouse himselfAnthony call: I see him rowse himselfe
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.308Dost thou not see my baby at my breast,Dost thou not see my Baby at my breast,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.330To see performed the dreaded act which thouTo see perform'd the dreaded Act which thou
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.336.1I do not see them bleed.I do not see them bleede.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.363And then to Rome. Come, Dolabella, seeAnd then to Rome. Come, Dolabella, see
As You Like ItAYL I.i.153gamester. I hope I shall see an end of him, for my soul – Gamester: I hope I shall see an end of him; for my soule
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.7Herein I see thou lovest me not with the full weightHeerein I see thou lou'st mee not with the full waight
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.24Let me see – what think you of falling in love?let me see, what thinke you of falling in Loue?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.106your ladyships, you may see the end, for the best is yetyour Ladiships, you may see the end, for the best is yet
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.131But is there any else longs to see this brokenBut is there any else longs to see this broken
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.133rib-breaking? Shall we see this wrestling, cousin?rib-breaking? Shall we see this wrastling Cosin?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.138and see it.and see it.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.145hither to see the wrestling?hither to see the wrastling?
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.150entreated. Speak to him, ladies, see if you can move him.entreated. Speake to him Ladies, see if you can mooue him.
As You Like ItAYL II.ii.4I cannot hear of any that did see her.I cannot heare of any that did see her,
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.83That you will feed on. But what is, come see,That you will feed on: but what is, come see,
As You Like ItAYL II.v.6Here shall he seeHeere shall he see
As You Like ItAYL II.v.40Here shall he seeHeere shall he see.&c.
As You Like ItAYL II.v.52Here shall he seeHeere shall he see,
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.23‘ Thus we may see,’ quoth he, ‘ how the world wags:Thus we may see (quoth he) how the world wagges:
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.83There then, how then, what then? Let me see whereinThere then, how then, what then, let me see wherein
As You Like ItAYL III.i.1Not see him since? Sir, sir, that cannot be.Not see him since? Sir, sir, that cannot be:
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.8Shall see thy virtue witnessed everywhere.Shall see thy vertue witnest euery where.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.72the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and mythe greatest of my pride, is to see my Ewes graze, & my
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.80himself will have no shepherds. I cannot see else howhimselfe will haue no shepherds, I cannot see else how
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.216How parted he with thee? And when shalt thou seeHow parted he with thee ? And when shalt thou see
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.235Though it be pity to see such a sight, it wellThough it be pittie to see such a sight, it well
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.280you shall see him.you shall see him.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.281There I shall see mine own figure.There I shal see mine owne figure.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.327As the cony that you see dwell where she isAs the Conie that you see dwell where shee is
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.42 I would fain see this meeting.I would faine see this meeting.
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.69for your last company, I am very glad to see you.for your last companie, I am verie glad to see you,
As You Like ItAYL III.iv.47If you will see a pageant truly played,If you will see a pageant truely plaid
As You Like ItAYL III.v.38As, by my faith, I see no more in youAs by my faith, I see no more in you
As You Like ItAYL III.v.42I see no more in you than in the ordinaryI see no more in you then in the ordinary
As You Like ItAYL III.v.78And be not proud, though all the world could see,And be not proud, though all the world could see,
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.21see other men's; then, to have seen much and to havesee other mens; then to haue seene much, and to haue
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.70endured! Well, go your way to her – for I see love hathendur'd. Well, goe your way to her; (for I see Loue hath
As You Like ItAYL V.i.10It is meat and drink to me to see a clown.It is meat and drinke to me to see a Clowne,
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.19O my dear Orlando, how it grieves me to seeOh my deere Orlando, how it greeues me to see
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.192To see no pastime, I. What you would haveTo see no pastime, I: what you would haue,
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.196It is not the fashion to see the lady the epilogue,It is not the fashion to see the Ladie the Epilogue:
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.197but it is no more unhandsome than to see the lord thebut it is no more vnhandsome, then to see the Lord the
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.131Whom whilst I laboured of a love to see,Whom whil'st I laboured of a loue to see,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.8Time is their master, and when they see timeTime is their Master, and when they see time, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.40But if thou live to see like right bereft,But if thou liue to see like right bereft, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.109I see the jewel best enamelledI see the Iewell best enamaled 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.6I sent him from the mart. See, here he comes.I sent him from the Mart? see here he comes. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.15I did not see you since you sent me henceI did not see you since you sent me hence 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.20I am glad to see you in this merry vein.I am glad to see you in this merrie vaine, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.148I know thou canst, and therefore see thou do it!I know thou canst, and therefore see thou doe it. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.4To see the making of her carcanet,To see the making of her Carkanet, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.121I'll knock elsewhere to see if they'll disdain me.Ile knocke else-where, to see if they'll disdaine me. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.185For fear you ne'er see chain nor money more.For feare you ne're see chaine, nor mony more.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.190I see a man here needs not live by shifts,I see a man heere needs not liue by shifts,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.14That labour may you save. See where he comes.That labour may you saue: See where he comes.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.19But soft, I see the goldsmith. Get thee gone;But soft I see the Goldsmith; get thee gone,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.32I pray you see him presently discharged,I pray you see him presently discharg'd,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.58Come, where's the chain? I pray you let me see it.Come where's the Chaine, I pray you let me see it.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.46I see, sir, you have found the goldsmith now.I see sir you haue found the Gold-smith now: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.113Hast thou delight to see a wretched manHast thou delight to see a wretched man
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.120Good Master Doctor, see him safe conveyedGood Master Doctor see him safe conuey'd
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.139It may be so, but I did never see it.It may be so, but I did neuer see it.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.145I see these witches are afraid of swords.I see these Witches are affraid of swords.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.124To see a reverend Syracusian merchant,To see a reuerent Siracusian Merchant, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.128See where they come. We will behold his death.See where they come, we wil behold his death 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.181I have not breathed almost since I did see it.I haue not breath'd almost since I did see it. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.196I see my son Antipholus, and Dromio.I see my sonne Antipholus and Dromio. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.280As sure, my liege, as I do see your grace.As sure (my Liege) as I do see your Grace. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.284Haply I see a friend will save my lifeHaply I see a friend will saue my life, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.330I see thy age and dangers make thee dote.I see thy age and dangers make thee dote. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.332All gather to see themAll gather to see them.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.332I see two husbands, or mine eyes deceive me.I see two husbands, or mine eyes deceiue me. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.362I, to this fortune that you see me in.I, to this fortune that you see mee in. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.377If this be not a dream I see and hear.If this be not a dreame I see and heare. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.387I see we still did meet each other's man,I see we still did meete each others man, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.419I see by you I am a sweet-faced youth.I see by you, I am a sweet-fac'd youth, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.420Will you walk in to see their gossiping?Will you walke in to see their gossipping? 
CoriolanusCor I.i.100Did see and hear, devise, instruct, walk, feel,Did see, and heare, deuise, instruct, walke, feele,
CoriolanusCor I.i.141See what I do deliver out to each,See what I do deliuer out to each,
CoriolanusCor I.i.224Our musty superfluity. See, our best elders.Our mustie superfluity. See our best Elders.
CoriolanusCor I.i.238Shalt see me once more strike at Tullus' face.Shalt see me once more strike at Tullus face.
CoriolanusCor I.iii.31See him pluck Aufidius down by th' hair;See him plucke Auffidius downe by th' haire:
CoriolanusCor I.iii.33Methinks I see him stamp thus, and call thus:Me thinkes I see him stampe thus, and call thus,
CoriolanusCor I.iii.51I am glad to see your ladyship.I am glad to see your Ladyship.
CoriolanusCor I.iii.56He had rather see the swords and hear a drumHe had rather see the swords, and heare a Drum,
CoriolanusCor I.iv.48See, they have shut him in.See they haue shut him in.
CoriolanusCor I.v.4See here these movers that do prize their hoursSee heere these mouers, that do prize their hours
CoriolanusCor I.vi.69Wherein you see me smeared; if any fearWherein you see me smear'd, if any feare
CoriolanusCor II.i.58deadly that tell you have good faces. If you see this in thedeadly, that tell you haue good faces, if you see this in the
CoriolanusCor II.i.170That weep'st to see me triumph? Ah, my dear,That weep'st to see me triumph? Ah my deare,
CoriolanusCor II.i.179That is not glad to see thee. You are threeThat is not glad to see thee. / Yon are three,
CoriolanusCor II.i.191To see inherited my very wishesTo see inherited my very Wishes,
CoriolanusCor II.i.198Are spectacled to see him. Your prattling nurseAre spectacled to see him. Your pratling Nurse
CoriolanusCor II.i.205In earnestness to see him. Seld-shown flamensIn earnestnesse to see him: seld-showne Flamins
CoriolanusCor II.i.254I have seen the dumb men throng to see him andI haue seene the dumbe men throng to see him, / And
CoriolanusCor II.ii.77That's thousand to one good one – when you now seeThat's thousand to one good one, when you now see
CoriolanusCor II.ii.153You see how he intends to use the people.You see how he intends to vse the people.
CoriolanusCor III.i.7That we shall hardly in our ages seeThat we shall hardly in our ages see
CoriolanusCor III.iii.138Go see him out at gates, and follow himGo see him out at Gates, and follow him
CoriolanusCor III.iii.142Come, come, let's see him out at gates, come!Come, come, lets see him out at gates, come:
CoriolanusCor IV.ii.2The nobility are vexed, whom we see have sidedThe Nobility are vexed, whom we see haue sided
CoriolanusCor IV.ii.41This lady's husband here, this, do you see? – This Ladies Husband heere; this (do you see)
CoriolanusCor IV.v.118Sighed truer breath. But that I see thee here,Sigh'd truer breath. But that I see thee heere
CoriolanusCor IV.v.217But when they shall see, sir, hisBut when they shall see sir, his
CoriolanusCor IV.v.239need one another. The wars for my money. I hope to seeneede one another: / The Warres for my money. I hope to see
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.7Dissentious numbers pestering streets than seeDissentious numbers pestring streets, then see
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.48Go see this rumourer whipped. It cannot beGo see this Rumorer whipt, it cannot be,
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.84To see your wives dishonoured to your noses – To see your Wiues dishonour'd to your Noses.
CoriolanusCor V.ii.7You'll see your Rome embraced with fire beforeYou'l see your Rome embrac'd with fire, before
CoriolanusCor V.ii.92'Tis a spell, you see, of much power.'Tis a spell you see of much power:
CoriolanusCor V.iii.101Making the mother, wife, and child to seeMaking the Mother, wife, and Childe to see,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.130Requires nor child nor woman's face to see.Requires nor Childe, nor womans face to see:
CoriolanusCor V.iv.1See you yond coign o'th' Capitol, yondSee you yon'd Coin a'th Capitol, yon'd
CymbelineCym I.ii.23.1That I may see again.That I may see againe.
CymbelineCym I.ii.55.1When shall we see again?When shall we see againe?
CymbelineCym I.ii.109You shall – at least – go see my lord aboard.You shall (at least) go see my Lord aboord.
CymbelineCym I.v.133it from tainting; but I see you have some religion init from tainting; but I see you haue some Religion in
CymbelineCym I.vii.33To see this vaulted arch, and the rich cropTo see this vaulted Arch, and the rich Crop
CymbelineCym I.vii.203.1To see your grace.To see your Grace.
CymbelineCym II.i.48Come, I'll go see this Italian: what I have lost todayCome, Ile go see this Italian: what I haue lost to day
CymbelineCym II.ii.21To see th' enclosed lights, now canopiedTo see th'inclosed Lights, now Canopied
CymbelineCym II.iv.26.2See! Iachimo!See Iachimo.
CymbelineCym II.iv.96Be pale, I beg but leave to air this jewel: see!Be pale, I begge but leaue to ayre this Iewell: See,
CymbelineCym II.iv.101She stripped it from her arm: I see her yet:She stript it from her Arme: I see her yet:
CymbelineCym III.ii.54Who long'st, like me, to see thy lord; who long'st – Who long'st like me, to see thy Lord; who long'st
CymbelineCym III.ii.79I see before me, man: nor here, nor here,I see before me (Man) nor heere, not heere;
CymbelineCym III.iii.18Draws us a profit from all things we see:Drawes vs a profit from all things we see:
CymbelineCym III.iv.3To see me first, as I have now – Pisanio! Man!To see me first, as I haue now. Pisanio, Man:
CymbelineCym III.iv.168I see into thy end, and am almostI see into thy end, and am almost
CymbelineCym III.v.140eyes; there shall she see my valour, which will theneyes; there shall she see my valour, which wil then
CymbelineCym III.vi.1I see a man's life is a tedious one,I see a mans life is a tedious one,
CymbelineCym III.vii.28.2I see you're angry:I see you're angry:
CymbelineCym IV.ii.112Is oft the cause of fear. But, see, thy brother.Is oft the cause of Feare. / But see thy Brother.
CymbelineCym IV.ii.209.2Stark, as you see:Starke, as you see:
CymbelineCym IV.ii.243Great griefs, I see, medicine the less; for ClotenGreat greefes I see med'cine the lesse: For Cloten
CymbelineCym IV.ii.359.1Let's see the boy's face.Let's see the Boyes face.
CymbelineCym IV.iv.23Though Cloten then but young – you see, not wore him(Though Cloten then but young) you see, not wore him
CymbelineCym IV.iv.36Did see man die, scarce ever looked on blood,Did see man dye, scarse euer look'd on blood,
CymbelineCym V.iv.191should have the best use of eyes to see the way ofshold haue the best vse of eyes, to see the way of
CymbelineCym V.v.103There's other work in hand: I see a thingThere's other worke in hand: I see a thing
CymbelineCym V.v.124Peace, peace, see further: he eyes us not, forbear;Peace, peace, see further: he eyes vs not, forbeare
CymbelineCym V.v.126.2But we see him dead.But we see him dead.
CymbelineCym V.v.127.1Be silent: let's see further.Be silent: let's see further.
CymbelineCym V.v.209.1Methinks I see him now – Me thinkes I see him now.
CymbelineCym V.v.393Will serve our long inter'gatories. See,Will serue our long Interrogatories. See,
CymbelineCym V.v.402.1To see this gracious season.To see this gracious season.
HamletHam I.i.50.2See, it stalks away.See, it stalkes away.
HamletHam I.ii.160.2I am glad to see you well.I am glad to see you well:
HamletHam I.ii.167I am very glad to see you. (To Barnardo) Good even, sir.I am very glad to see you: good euen Sir.
HamletHam I.ii.176My lord, I came to see your father's funeral.My Lord, I came to see your Fathers Funerall.
HamletHam I.ii.178I think it was to see my mother's wedding.I thinke it was to see my Mothers Wedding.
HamletHam I.ii.184My father – methinks I see my father.My father, me thinkes I see my father.
HamletHam I.iii.59Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,See thou Character. Giue thy thoughts no tongue,
HamletHam II.i.62See you now – See you now;
HamletHam II.ii.2Moreover that we much did long to see you,Moreouer, that we much did long to see you,
HamletHam II.ii.381ear a hearer. That great baby you see there is not yeteare a hearer: that great Baby you see there, is not yet
HamletHam II.ii.421see thee well. – Welcome, good friends. – O old friend,see thee well: Welcome good Friends. O my olde Friend?
HamletHam II.ii.429at anything we see. We'll have a speech straight. Come,at any thing we see: wee'l haue a Speech straight. Come
HamletHam II.ii.447 memory, begin at this line – let me see, let me see.memory, begin at this Line, let me see, let me see:
HamletHam II.ii.481But as we often see, against some storm,But as we often see against some storme,
HamletHam II.ii.510But if the gods themselves did see her then,But if the Gods themselues did see her then,
HamletHam II.ii.520soon. – Good my lord, will you see the players wellsoone. Good my Lord, will you see the Players wel
HamletHam III.i.23To hear and see the matter.To heare, and see the matter.
HamletHam III.i.158Now see that noble and most sovereign reasonNow see that Noble, and most Soueraigne Reason,
HamletHam III.i.162T' have seen what I have seen, see what I see!T'haue seene what I haue seene: see what I see.
HamletHam III.ii.9hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion tosee a robustious Pery-wig-pated Fellow, teare a Passion to
HamletHam III.ii.249is the duke's name; his wife, Baptista. You shall seeis the Dukes name, his wife Baptista: you shall see
HamletHam III.ii.256I could see the puppets dallying.I could see the Puppets dallying.
HamletHam III.ii.272choice Italian. You shall see anon how the murdererchoyce Italian. You shall see anon how the Murtherer
HamletHam III.ii.353O, the recorders. Let me see one. – To withdraw withO the Recorder. Let me see, to withdraw with
HamletHam III.ii.383Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shapeDo you see that Clowd? that's almost in shape
HamletHam III.iv.21Where you may see the inmost part of you.Where you may see the inmost part of you?
HamletHam III.iv.56See what a grace was seated on this brow:See what a grace was seated on his Brow,
HamletHam III.iv.91And there I see such black and grained spotsAnd there I see such blacke and grained spots,
HamletHam III.iv.132.2Do you see nothing there?Do you see nothing there?
HamletHam III.iv.133Nothing at all. Yet all that is I see.Nothing at all, yet all that is I see.
HamletHam IV.iii.32In heaven. Send thither to see. If your messengerIn heauen, send thither to see. If your Messenger
HamletHam IV.iii.50I see a cherub that sees them. But come, forI see a Cherube that see's him: but come, for
HamletHam IV.iv.59And let all sleep, while to my shame I see
HamletHam IV.v.201Do you see this? O God!Do you see this, you Gods?
HamletHam IV.vii.44kingdom. Tomorrow shall I beg leave to see your kinglyKingdome. To morrow shall I begge leaue to see your Kingly
HamletHam IV.vii.111And that I see, in passages of proof,And that I see in passages of proofe,
HamletHam IV.vii.153If this should blast in proof. Soft, let me see.If this should blast in proofe: Soft, let me see
HamletHam V.i.181Let me see. Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him,Let me see. Alas poore Yorick, I knew him
HamletHam V.i.294An hour of quiet shortly shall we see.An houre of quiet shortly shall we see;
HamletHam V.ii.1So much for this, sir. Now shall you see the other.So much for this Sir; now let me see the other,
HamletHam V.ii.77For by the image of my cause I seeFor by the image of my Cause, I see
HamletHam V.ii.111gentleman would see.
HamletHam V.ii.258This is too heavy. Let me see another.This is too heauy, / Let me see another.
HamletHam V.ii.302.2She swounds to see them bleed.She sounds to see them bleede.
HamletHam V.ii.356.2What is it you would see?What is it ye would see;
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.69Balked in their own blood, did Sir Walter seeBalk'd in their owne blood did Sir Walter see
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.84See riot and dishonour stain the browSee Ryot and Dishonor staine the brow
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.10wench in flame-coloured taffeta, I see no reason whyWench in Flame-coloured Taffata; I see no reason, why
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.102I see a good amendment of life in thee, fromI see a good amendment of life in thee: From
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.175Tut, our horses they shall not see, I'll tie them inTut our horses they shall not see, Ile tye them in
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.14Worcester, get thee gone, for I do seeWorcester get thee gone: for I do see
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.53To see him shine so brisk, and smell so sweet,To see him shine so briske, and smell so sweet,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.283And see already how he doth beginAnd see already, how he doth beginne
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.35I prithee lend me thy lantern, to see myI prethee lend me thy Lanthorne to see my
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.i.41lantern, quoth he! Marry, I'll see thee hanged first.Lanthorne (quoth-a) marry Ile see thee hang'd first.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.7me see some more.me see some more.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.31You shall see now in very sincerity of fear and cold heartyou shall see now in very sincerity of Feare and Cold heart,
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.63Such as we see when men restrain their breathSuch as we see when men restraine their breath
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.103Come, wilt thou see me ride?Come, wilt thou see me ride?
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.53Let me see, about Michaelmas next I shall be – Let me see, about Michaelmas next I shalbe---
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.116Didst thou never see Titan kiss a dish ofDidst thou neuer see Titan kisse a dish of
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.141I call thee coward? I'll see thee damned ere II call thee Coward? Ile see thee damn'd ere I
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.220not see thy hand.not see thy Hand.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.228Kendal green when it was so dark thou couldst not seeKendall Greene, when it was so darke, thou could'st not see
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.312My lord, do you see these meteors? Do youMy Lord, doe you see these Meteors? doe you
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.389players as ever I see!Players, as euer I see.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.416should be lewdly given, he deceiveth me, for, Harry, I seeshould be lewdly giuen, hee deceiues mee; for Harry, I see
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.519Let's see what they be, read them.Let's see, what be they? reade them.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.22O, then the earth shook to see the heavens on fire,Oh, then the Earth shooke To see the Heauens on fire,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.94See how this river comes me cranking in,See, how this Riuer comes me cranking in,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.102Not wind? It shall, it must – you see it doth.Not winde? it shall, it must, you see it doth.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.89Save mine, which hath desired to see thee more,Saue mine, which hath desir'd to see thee more:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.31I never see thy face but I think upon hell-fire, and DivesI neuer see thy Face, but I thinke vpon Hell fire, and Diues
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.38To see how fortune is disposed to us.To see how Fortune is dispos'd to vs:
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.ii.62I did never see such pitiful rascals.I did neuer see such pittifull Rascals.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.121Hal, if thou see me down in the battle andHal, if thou see me downe in the battell, / And
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.60.2Why, then I seeWhy then I see
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.108Embowelled will I see thee by and by,Imbowell'd will I see thee by and by,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.160To see what friends are living, who are dead.To see what Friends are liuing, who are dead.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.84See what a ready tongue suspicion hath!See what a ready tongue Suspition hath:
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.94I see a strange confession in thine eye.I see a strange Confession in thine Eye:
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.46cannot he see, though he have his own lanthorn to lightcannot he see, though he haue his owne Lanthorne to light
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.55Wait close; I will not see him.Wait close, I will not see him.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.94time of day. I am glad to see your lordship abroad; Itime of the day. I am glad to see your Lordship abroad: I
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.iii.39We see th' appearing buds; which to prove fruitWe see th' appearing buds, which to proue fruite,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.iii.43And when we see the figure of the house,And when we see the figure of the house,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.67him from me Christian, and look if the fat villain havehim from me Christian, and see if the fat villain
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.163How might we see Falstaff bestowHow might we see Falstaffe bestow
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iii.13Threw many a northward look to see his fatherThrew many a Northward looke, to see his Father
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.10Why then, cover, and set them down, and seeWhy then couer, and set them downe: and see
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.21I'll see if I can find out Sneak.Ile see if I can finde out Sneake.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.66ever see thee again or no there is nobody cares.euer see thee againe, or no, there is no body cares.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.152I'll see her damned first! To Pluto's damnedIle see her damn'd first: to Pluto's damn'd
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.320See now whether pure fear and entireSee now whether pure Feare, and entire
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.369hostess; farewell, Doll. You see, my good wenches, howHostesse, farewell Dol. You see (my good Wenches) how
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.372wenches. If I be not sent away post, I will see you againWenches: if I be not sent away poste, I will see you againe,
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.46And see the revolution of the timesAnd see the reuolution of the Times
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.49Into the sea; and other times to seeInto the Sea: and other Times, to see
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.28The same Sir John, the very same. I see himThe same Sir Iohn, the very same: I saw him
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.33see how many of my old acquaintance are dead!see how many of mine olde Acquaintance are dead?
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.42Jesu, Jesu, dead! 'A drew a good bow, andDead? See, see: hee drew a good Bow: and
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.47that it would have done a man's heart good to see. Howthat it would haue done a mans heart good to see. How
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.85I am glad to see you well, good Master RobertI am glad to see you well, good M. Robert
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.95Let me see them, I beseech you.Let me see them, I beseech you.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.97the roll? Let me see, let me see, let me see. So, so, so,the Roll? Let me see, let me see, let me see: so, so, so, so:
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.100see – where is Mouldy?see, Where is Mouldie?
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.120where you are? For th' other, Sir John – let me see.where you are? For the other sir Iohn: Let me see:
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.170Yea, marry, let's see Bullcalf.Yea marry, let vs see Bulcalfe.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.188tarry dinner. I am glad to see you, by my troth, Mastertarry dinner. I am glad to see you in good troth, Master
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.253the spirit, Master Shallow. Here's Wart; you see whatthe spirit (Master Shallow.) Where's Wart? you see what
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.277ne'er see such a fellow.neuer see such a fellow.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.291As I return, I will fetch off these justices. I do see theAs I returne, I will fetch off these Iustices: I doe see the
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.319the young dace be a bait for the old pike, I see nothe young Dace be a Bayt for the old Pike, I see no
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.42Whose see is by a civil peace maintained,Whose Sea is by a Ciuill Peace maintain'd,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.70We see which way the stream of time doth runWee see which way the streame of Time doth runne,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.8Than now to see you here an iron man,Then now to see you heere an Iron man
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.74Blunt, lead him hence, and see you guard him sure.Blunt, leade him hence, and see you guard him sure.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.55Let me see him. He is not here.let mee see him.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.66And helps to end me. See, sons, what things you are.and helpes to end me. / See Sonnes, what things you are:
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.8Davy, Davy, Davy, Davy! Let me see, Davy;Dauy, Dauy, Dauy, let me see (Dauy)
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.9let me see, Davy; let me see – yea, marry, William cook,let me see: William Cooke,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.50I am glad to see your worship.I am glad to see your Worship.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.58It is a wonderful thing to see the semblableIt is a wonderfull thing to see the semblable
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.77in his shoulders! O, you shall see him laugh till his facein his shoulders. O you shall see him laugh, till his Face
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.37And never shall you see that I will begAnd neuer shall you see, that I will begge
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.94See your most dreadful laws so loosely slighted,See your most dreadfull Lawes, so loosely slighted;
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.105Till you do live to see a son of mineTill you do liue, to see a Sonne of mine
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.1Nay, you shall see my orchard, where, in anNay, you shall see mine Orchard: where, in an
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.59I hope to see London once ere I die.I hope to see London, once ere I die.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.60An I might see you there, Davy – If I might see you there, Dauie.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.14better: this doth infer the zeal I had to see him.better: this doth inferre the zeale I had to see him.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.25with desire to see him, thinking of nothing else, puttingwith desire to see him, thinking of nothing else, putting
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.27to be done but to see him.to bee done, but to see him.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.74To see performed the tenor of my word.To see perform'd the tenure of our word.
Henry VH5 I.chorus.26Think, when we talk of horses, that you see themThinke when we talke of Horses, that you see them
Henry VH5 II.chorus.20But see, thy fault France hath in thee found out,But see, thy fault France hath in thee found out,
Henry VH5 II.i.35see wilful adultery and murder committed.see wilful adultery and murther committed.
Henry VH5 II.ii.72What see you in those papers, that you loseWhat see you in those papers, that you loose
Henry VH5 II.ii.84See you, my Princes, and my noble peers,See you my Princes, and my Noble Peeres,
Henry VH5 II.ii.104As black and white, my eye will scarcely see it.As black and white, my eye will scarsely see it.
Henry VH5 II.iv.59Saw his heroical seed, and smiled to see him,Saw his Heroicall Seed, and smil'd to see him
Henry VH5 II.iv.68You see this chase is hotly followed, friends.You see this Chase is hotly followed, friends.
Henry VH5 III.chorus.25Work, work your thoughts, and therein see a siege:Worke, worke your Thoughts, and therein see a Siege:
Henry VH5 III.i.31I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,I see you stand like Grey-hounds in the slips,
Henry VH5 III.iii.33If not, why, in a moment look to seeIf not: why in a moment looke to see
Henry VH5 III.v.58For I am sure, when he shall see our army,For I am sure, when he shall see our Army,
Henry VH5 III.vi.15world, but I did see him do as gallant service.World, but I did see him doe as gallant seruice.
Henry VH5 III.vi.63the pridge as you shall see in a summer's day. But it isthe Pridge, as you shall see in a Summers day: but it is
Henry VH5 III.vi.122imperial: England shall repent his folly, see his weakness,imperiall: England shall repent his folly, see his weakenesse,
Henry VH5 III.vii.152It is now two o'clock: but, let me see – by tenIt is now two a Clock: but let me see, by ten
Henry VH5 IV.chorus.52The name of Agincourt. Yet sit and see,The Name of Agincourt: Yet sit and see,
Henry VH5 IV.i.88We see yonder the beginning of the day, but IWee see yonder the beginning of the day, but I
Henry VH5 IV.i.89think we shall never see the end of it. Who goes there?thinke wee shall neuer see the end of it. Who goes there?
Henry VH5 IV.i.179outlive that day to see His greatness, and to teach othersout-liue that day, to see his Greatnesse, and to teach others
Henry VH5 IV.i.190If I live to see it, I will never trust his wordIf I liue to see it, I will neuer trust his word
Henry VH5 IV.i.211If ever I live to see it, I will challenge it.If euer I liue to see it, I will challenge it.
Henry VH5 IV.iii.44He that shall see this day, and live old age,He that shall see this day, and liue old age,
Henry VH5 IV.vii.125box o'th' ear: or if I can see my glove in his cap, which heboxe a'th ere: or if I can see my Gloue in his cappe, which he
Henry VH5 IV.vii.137he be perjured, see you now, his reputation is as arranthee bee periur'd (see you now) his reputation is as arrant
Henry VH5 IV.vii.156be desired in the hearts of his subjects. I would fain seebe desir'd in the hearts of his Subiects: I would faine see
Henry VH5 IV.vii.158aggriefed at this glove, that is all: but I would fain see itagreefd at this Gloue; that is all: but I would faine see it
Henry VH5 IV.vii.159once, an please God of His grace that I might see.once, and please God of his grace that I might see.
Henry VH5 IV.vii.177Follow, and see there be no harm between them.Follow, and see there be no harme betweene them.
Henry VH5 V.chorus.14And solemnly see him set on to London.And solemnly see him set on to London.
Henry VH5 V.i.11but I will be so bold as to wear it in my cap till I seebut I will be so bold as to weare it in my Cap till I see
Henry VH5 V.i.49Quiet thy cudgel, thou dost see I eat.Quiet thy Cudgell, thou dost see I eate.
Henry VH5 V.i.52your broken coxcomb. When you take occasions to seeyour broken Coxcombe; when you take occasions to see
Henry VH5 V.ii.88Shall see advantageable for our dignity,Shall see aduantageable for our Dignitie,
Henry VH5 V.ii.181le possession de moi, – let me see, what then? Saint Denisle possession de moy. (Let mee see, what then? Saint Dennis
Henry VH5 V.ii.298see not what they do.see not what they doe.
Henry VH5 V.ii.312love for my blindness, who cannot see many a fairLoue for my blindnesse, who cannot see many a faire
Henry VH5 V.ii.315Yes, my lord, you see them perspectively,Yes my Lord, you see them perspectiuely:
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.ii.86That beauty am I blessed with which you may see.That beautie am I blest with, which you may see.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.iii.89See the coast cleared, and then we will depart.See the Coast clear'd, and then we will depart.
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.iv.17If I could see them. Now do thou watch,If I could see them. Now doe thou watch,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.iv.68For aught I see, this city must be famishedFor ought I see, this Citie must be famisht,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.ii.44Is it even so? Nay, then I see our warsIs it euen so? Nay, then I see our Warres
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.17I see report is fabulous and false.I see Report is fabulous and false.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.44I laugh to see your ladyship so fondI laugh to see your Ladyship so fond,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.51For what you see is but the smallest partFor what you see, is but the smallest part,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.78Taste of your wine and see what cates you have;Taste of your Wine, and see what Cates you haue,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.121Will see his burial better than his life.Will see his Buryall better then his Life.
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.53Ay, see the Bishop be not overborne.I, see the Bishop be not ouer-borne:
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.61Plantagenet, I see, must hold his tongue,Plantagenet I see must hold his tongue,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.116You see what mischief, and what murder too,You see what Mischiefe, and what Murther too,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.121Or I would see his heart out ere the priestOr I would see his heart out, ere the Priest
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.138(to them) See here, my friends and loving countrymen:See here my Friends and louing Countreymen,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.149And I will see what physic theAnd I will see what Physick the
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.29See, noble Charles, the beacon of our friend;See Noble Charles the Beacon of our friend,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.ii.133But see his exequies fulfilled in Rouen.But see his Exequies fulfill'd in Roan.
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iii.45And see the cities and the towns defacedAnd see the Cities and the Townes defac't,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iii.49See, see the pining malady of France;See, see the pining Maladie of France:
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iii.74See then, thou fightest against thy countrymen,See then, thou fight'st against thy Countreymen,
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iv.43When thou shalt see I'll meet thee to thy cost.When thou shalt see, Ile meet thee to thy cost.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.152I see no reason, if I wear this rose,I see no reason if I weare this Rose,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.37These eyes that see thee now well coloured,These eyes that see thee now well coloured,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.38Shall see thee withered, bloody, pale, and dead.Shall see thee withered, bloody, pale, and dead.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iii.37This seven years did not Talbot see his son,This seuen yeeres did not Talbot see his sonne,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.vii.45See where he lies inhearsed in the armsSee where he lyes inherced in the armes
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.i.48And so, my Lord Protector, see them guardedAnd so my Lord Protector see them guarded,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.24See, they forsake me! Now the time is comeSee, they forsake me. Now the time is come,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.34See how the ugly witch doth bend her browsSee how the vgly Witch doth bend her browes,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.131See, Reignier, see thy daughter prisoner.See Reignier see, thy daughter prisoner.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.72To see her coronation be performed.To see her Coronation be perform'd.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.141I see thy fury. If I longer stay,I see thy furie: If I longer stay,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.84We'll see these things effected to the full.Wee'le see these things effected to the full.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.14to his lordship? Let me see them. What is thine?to his Lordship? Let me see them: what is thine?
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.218we'll see thee sent away!wee'le see thee sent away.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iv.45See you well guerdoned for these good deserts.See you well guerdon'd for these good deserts.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iv.52We'll see your trinkets here all forthcoming.Wee'le see your Trinkets here all forth-comming.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iv.56Now pray, my lord, let's see the devil's writ.Now pray my Lord, let's see the Deuils Writ.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.7To see how God in all his creatures works!To see how God in all his Creatures workes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.52Protector, see to't well; protect yourself.Protector see to't well, protect your selfe.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.104Let me see thine eyes; wink now; now open them.Let me see thine Eyes; winck now, now open them,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.113And yet, I think, jet did he never see.And yet I thinke, Iet did he neuer see.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.151It made me laugh to see the villain run.It made me laugh, to see the Villaine runne.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.i.183Gloucester, see here the tainture of thy nest,Gloster, see here the Taincture of thy Nest,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.28I see no reason why a king of yearsI see no reason, why a King of yeeres
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.53Left I the court to see this quarrel tried.Left I the Court, to see this Quarrell try'de.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.54A God's name, see the lists and all things fit;A Gods Name see the Lysts and all things fit,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.84Thump? Then see thou thump thy master well.Thumpe? Then see thou thumpe thy Master well.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.16My tear-stained eyes to see her miseries.My teare-stayn'd eyes, to see her Miseries.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.19Come you, my lord, to see my open shame?Come you, my Lord, to see my open shame?
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.21See how the giddy multitude do pointSee how the giddy multitude doe point,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.33To see my tears and hear my deep-fet groans.To see my teares, and heare my deepe-set groanes.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.110Go, lead the way; I long to see my prison.Goe, leade the way, I long to see my Prison.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.4Can you not see? Or will ye not observeCan you not see? or will ye not obserue
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.98Well, Suffolk, thou shalt not see me blush,Well Suffolke, thou shalt not see me blush,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.202Ah, uncle Humphrey, in thy face I seeAh Vnckle Humfrey, in thy face I see
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.321A charge, Lord York, that I will see performed.A charge, Lord Yorke, that I will see perform'd.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.330I'll see it truly done, my lord of York.Ile see it truly done, my Lord of Yorke.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.150That is to see how deep my grave is made;That is to see how deepe my graue is made,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.152For, seeing him, I see my life in death.For seeing him, I see my life in death.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.160See how the blood is settled in his face.See how the blood is setled in his face.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.168But see, his face is black and full of blood,But see, his face is blacke, and full of blood:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.174Look, on the sheets his hair, you see, is sticking;Looke on the sheets his haire (you see) is sticking,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.iii.24See how the pangs of death do make him grin!See how the pangs of death do make him grin.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.21I see them, I see them! There's Best's son,I see them, I see them: There's Bests Sonne,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.vii.88with you'; I'll see if his head will stand steadier on awith you. Ile see if his head will stand steddier on a
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.viii.44I see them lording it in London streets,I see them Lording it in London streets,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.viii.57desolate. I see them lay their heads together to surprisedesolate. I see them lay their heades together to surprize
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.7I climbed into this garden, to see if I can eat grass, or pickI climb'd into this Garden, to see if I can eate Grasse, or picke
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.44See if thou canst outface me with thy looks;See if thou canst out-face me with thy lookes:
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.83See, Buckingham, Somerset comes with th' Queen;See Buckingham, Somerset comes with th' Queene,
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.122See where they come; I'll warrant they'll make it good.See where they come, Ile warrant they'l make it good.
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.78If you be ta'en, we then should see the bottomIf you be tane, we then should see the bottome
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.89To see their day and them our fortune give.To see their day, and them our Fortune giue.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.22Before I see thee seated in that throneBefore I see thee seated in that Throne,
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.252Will follow mine, if once they see them spread;Will follow mine, if once they see them spread:
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.262I'll see your grace; till then I'll follow her.Ile see your Grace: till then, Ile follow her.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.92Thou wouldst be fee'd, I see, to make me sport;Thou would'st be fee'd, I see, to make me sport:
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.156See, ruthless Queen, a hapless father's tears;See, ruthlesse Queene, a haplesse Fathers Teares:
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.171To see how inly sorrow gripes his soul.To see how inly Sorrow gripes his Soule.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.21See how the morning opes her golden gates,See how the Morning opes her golden Gates,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.25Dazzle mine eyes, or do I see three suns?Dazle mine eyes, or doe I see three Sunnes?
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.29See, see! They join, embrace, and seem to kiss,See, see, they ioyne, embrace, and seeme to kisse,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.78Never, O never, shall I see more joy!Neuer, oh neuer shall I see more ioy.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.186Ne'er may he live to see a sunshine dayNe're may he liue to see a Sun-shine day,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.6To see this sight, it irks my very soul.To see this sight, it irkes my very soule:
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.25Thereby to see the minutes how they run:Thereby to see the Minutes how they runne:
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.82But let me see: is this our foeman's face?But let me see: Is this our Foe-mans face?
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.85Throw up thine eye! See, see what showers arise,Throw vp thine eye: see, see, what showres arise,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.vi.44See who it is; and, now the battle's ended,See who it is. / And now the Battailes ended,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.vi.96First will I see the coronation,First, will I see the Coronation,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.vi.110To see these honours in possession.To see these Honors in possession.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.41To hear and see her plaints, her brinish tears.To heare and see her plaints, her Brinish Teares.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.12I see the lady hath a thing to grantI see the Lady hath a thing to graunt,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.120See that he be conveyed unto the Tower;See that he be conuey'd vnto the Tower:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.43And see where comes the breeder of my sorrow!And see where comes the breeder of my sorrow.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.185But most himself, if he could see his shame.But most himselfe, if he could see his shame.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.ii.3But see where Somerset and Clarence comes!But see where Somerset and Clarence comes:
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.23This is his tent; and see where stand his guard.This is his Tent, and see where stand his Guard:
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.43Nay, then I see that Edward needs must down.Nay then I see, that Edward needs must downe.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.53See that forthwith Duke Edward be conveyedSee that forthwith Duke Edward be conuey'd
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.iii.65And see him seated in the regal throne.And see him seated in the Regall Throne.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.v.15Nay, this way, man; see where the huntsmen stand.Nay this way man, / See where the Huntsmen stand.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.vi.62For, till I see them here, by doubtful fearFor till I see them here, by doubtfull feare,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.i.17See how the surly Warwick mans the wall!See how the surly Warwicke mans the Wall.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.i.58O, cheerful colours! See where Oxford comes!Oh chearefull Colours, see where Oxford comes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iv.65This cheers my heart, to see your forwardness.This cheares my heart, to see your forwardnesse.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iv.75Ye see I drink the water of my eye.Ye see I drinke the water of my eye.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.89And see our gentle Queen how well she fares;And see our gentle Queene how well she fares,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.vi.63See how my sword weeps for the poor King's death!See how my sword weepes for the poore Kings death.
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.9May here find truth too. Those that come to seeMay heere finde Truth too. Those that come to see
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.12I'll undertake may see away their shillingIle vndertake may see away their shilling
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.15A noise of targets, or to see a fellowA noyse of Targets: Or to see a Fellow
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.25Be sad, as we would make ye. Think ye seeBe sad, as we would make ye. Thinke ye see
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.27As they were living; think you see them great,As they were Liuing: Thinke you see them Great,
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.29Of thousand friends: then, in a moment, seeOf thousand Friends: Then, in a moment, see
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.68Pierce into that; but I can see his pridePierce into that, but I can see his Pride
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.155We see each grain of gravel, I do knowWee see each graine of grauell; I doe know
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.177Under pretence to see the Queen his aunt – Vnder pretence to see the Queene his Aunt,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.205To see you ta'en from liberty, to look onTo see you tane from liberty, to looke on
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.114And never seek for aid out of himself. Yet see,And neuer seeke for ayd out of himselfe: yet see,
Henry VIIIH8 I.iii.5As far as I see, all the good our EnglishAs farre as I see, all the good our English
Henry VIIIH8 I.iii.12That never saw 'em pace before, the spavinThat neuer see 'em pace before, the Spauen
Henry VIIIH8 I.iii.23.1And never see the Louvre.And neuer see the Louure.
Henry VIIIH8 I.iv.84.2Let me see then.Let me see then,
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.54And see the noble ruined man you speak of.And see the noble ruin'd man you speake of.
Henry VIIIH8 II.i.98The Duke is coming. See the barge be ready,The Duke is comming: See the Barge be ready;
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.39Look into these affairs see this main end,Looke into these affaires, see this maine end,
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.139My Wolsey, see it furnished. O, my lord,My Wolsey, see it furnish'd, O my Lord,
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.81Why, this it is: see, see!Why this it is: See, see,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.73.2He has, and we shall see himHe ha's, and we shall see him
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.227And no man see me more.And no man see me more.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.308It is to see a nobleman want manners.It is to see a Nobleman want manners.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.335Not you, correct him. My heart weeps to see him(Not you) correct him. My heart weepes to see him
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.106A gentleman sent from the King, to see you.A Gentleman sent from the King, to see you.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.108.1Let me ne'er see again.Let me ne're see againe.
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.144Keep comfort to you, and this morning seeKeepe comfort to you, and this Morning see
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.61You are so merciful. I see your end:You are so mercifull. I see your end,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.97.1And see him safe i'th' Tower.And see him safe i'th'Tower.
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.130Good man, sit down. Now let me see the proudest,Good man sit downe: Now let me see the proudest
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.144Not as a groom. There's some of ye, I see,Not as a Groome: There's some of ye, I see,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.175The common voice, I see, is verifiedThe common voyce I see is verified
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.20You see the poor remainder – could distribute,(You see the poore remainder) could distribute,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.26Let me ne'er hope to see a chine again – Let me ne're hope to see a Chine againe,
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.51see from far some forty truncheoners draw to hersee from farre, some forty Truncheoners draw to her
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.55.1Shall see this, and bless heaven.Shall see this, and blesse Heauen.
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.57An aged princess; many days shall see her,An aged Princesse; many dayes shall see her,
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.68To see what this child does, and praise my Maker.To see what this Child does, and praise my Maker.
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.73Ye must all see the Queen, and she must thank ye;Ye must all see the Queene, and she must thanke ye,
Julius CaesarJC I.i.30into more work. But indeed, sir, we make holiday to seeinto more worke. But indeede sir, we make Holy-day to see
Julius CaesarJC I.i.42To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome:To see great Pompey passe the streets of Rome:
Julius CaesarJC I.i.61See where their basest mettle be not moved:See where their basest mettle be not mou'd,
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.20Set him before me; let me see his face.Set him before me, let me see his face.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.25Will you go see the order of the course?Will you go see the order of the course?
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.51Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face?Tell me good Brutus, Can you see your face?
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.58That you might see your shadow. I have heard,That you might see your shadow: / I haue heard,
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.67And since you know you cannot see yourselfAnd since you know, you cannot see your selfe
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.305Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet I seeWell Brutus, thou art Noble: yet I see,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.48And, thus unbraced, Casca, as you see,And thus vnbraced, Caska, as you see,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.61To see the strange impatience of the heavens;To see the strange impatience of the Heauens:
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.154See Brutus at his house: three parts of himSee Brutus at his house: three parts of him
Julius CaesarJC II.i.46Brutus, thou sleep'st: awake, and see thyself.Brutus thou sleep'st; awake, and see thy selfe:
Julius CaesarJC II.i.71.1Who doth desire to see you.Who doth desire to see you.
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.11Ne'er looked but on my back; when they shall seeNe're look'd but on my backe: When they shall see
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.116See! Antony, that revels long a-nights,See, Antony that Reuels long a-nights
Julius CaesarJC II.iv.26To see him pass on to the Capitol.To see him passe on to the Capitoll.
Julius CaesarJC III.i.167You see we do, yet see you but our handsYou see we do: Yet see you but our hands,
Julius CaesarJC III.i.169Our hearts you see not; they are pitiful;Our hearts you see not, they are pittifull:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.197To see thy Antony making his peace,To see thy Antony making his peace,
Julius CaesarJC III.i.283Passion, I see, is catching, for mine eyes,Passion I see is catching from mine eyes,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.96You all did see that on the LupercalYou all did see, that on the Lupercall,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.176See what a rent the envious Casca made;See what a rent the enuious Caska made:
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.198Here is himself, marred, as you see, with traitors.Heere is Himselfe, marr'd as you see with Traitors.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.89A friendly eye could never see such faults.A friendly eye could neuer see such faults.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.123Let me go in to see the Generals.Let me go in to see the Generals,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.271Let me see, let me see; is not the leaf turned downLet me see, let me see; is not the Leafe turn'd downe
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.281To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi.To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.282Well; then I shall see thee again?Well: then I shall see thee againe?
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.284Why, I will see thee at Philippi then.Why I will see thee at Philippi then:
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.295Yes, that thou didst. Didst thou see anything?Yes that thou did'st: Did'st thou see any thing?
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.35To see my best friend ta'en before my face!To see my best Friend tane before my face.
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.88And see how I regarded Caius Cassius.And see how I regarded Caius Cassius:
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.102To this dead man than you shall see me pay.To this dead man, then you shall see me pay.
Julius CaesarJC V.iv.30And see whether Brutus be alive or dead;And see where Brutus be aliue or dead,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.67See how occasion laughs me in the face!See how occasion laughes me in the face,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.81O summer's day! See where my cousin comes!O Sommers day, see where my Cosin comes:
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.133For here two day-stars that mine eyes would seeFor here to day stars that myne eies would see,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.57Through which the queen of beauty's queen shall seeThrough which the Queene of beauties Queene shall see,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.167Let's see what follows that same moonlight line.Lets see what followes that same moonelight line,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.192That comes to see my sovereign how he fares.That comes to see my soueraigne how he fares,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.195Sorry I am to see my liege so sad.Sorry I am to see my liege so sad,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.368See where she comes; was never father hadSee where she comes, was neuer father had,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.75(aside) I see the boy. Oh, how his mother's face,I see the boy, oh how his mothers face,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.86(aside) Still do I see in him delineateStill do I see in him deliniate,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.128But sith I see your majesty so bent,But fith I see your maiestie so bent,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.170And see how I will yield me to thy hands.And see how I will yeeld me to thy hands:
King Edward IIIE3 III.i.169Then might ye see the reeling vessels split,Then might ye see the reeling vessels split,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.52Ah, but he shall not live to see those days.Ah but he shall not liue to see those dayes,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.ii.30Go, Derby, go, and see they be relieved.Go Derby go, and see they be relieud,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.46For when we see a horse laid down to die,For when we see a horse laid downe to die,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.7Your grace should see a glorious day of this.Your grace should see a glorious day of this,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.34Pluck out your eyes and see not this day's shame!Plucke out your eies, and see not this daies shame,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vii.12See, see, Artois doth bring with him alongSee, see, Artoys doth bring with him along,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vii.40Till I did see my liege thy royal father,Till I did see my liege thy loyall father,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vii.60Come, gentlemen, I will see my friend bestowedCome gentlemen, I will see my friend bestowed,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.38This is your doom. Go, soldiers, see it done.This is your dome, go souldiets see it done.
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.129Yet now, to see the occasion with our eyesYet now to see the occasion with our eies,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.199So, John of France, I see you keep your word:So Iohn of France, I see you keepe your word
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.211To see what entertainment it affords.To see what intertainment it affords,
King JohnKJ II.i.474I see a yielding in the looks of France;I see a yeelding in the lookes of France:
King JohnKJ II.i.511If he see aught in you that makes him like,If he see ought in you that makes him like,
King JohnKJ II.i.517That all I see in you is worthy love,That all I see in you is worthie loue,
King JohnKJ II.i.518Than this: that nothing do I see in you,Then this, that nothing do I see in you,
King JohnKJ III.i.82Shall never see it but a holiday.Shall neuer see it, but a holy day.
King JohnKJ III.i.144Of Canterbury, from that holy see.Of Canterbury from that holy Sea:
King JohnKJ III.i.313Now shall I see thy love! What motive mayNow shall I see thy loue, what motiue may
King JohnKJ III.iii.7And ere our coming see thou shake the bagsAnd ere our comming see thou shake the bags
King JohnKJ III.iii.48Or if that thou couldst see me without eyes,Or if that thou couldst see me without eyes,
King JohnKJ III.iv.21Lo! Now – now see the issue of your peace!Lo; now: now see the issue of your peace.
King JohnKJ III.iv.77That we shall see and know our friends in heaven.That we shall see and know our friends in heauen:
King JohnKJ III.iv.78If that be true, I shall see my boy again;If that be true, I shall see my boy againe;
King JohnKJ III.iv.169Methinks I see this hurly all on foot;Me thinkes I see this hurley all on foot;
King JohnKJ IV.i.107In undeserved extremes. See else yourself.In vndeserued extreames: See else your selfe,
King JohnKJ IV.i.121Well, see to live. I will not touch thine eyeWell, see to liue: I will not touch thine eye,
King JohnKJ IV.ii.242Out of my sight, and never see me more!Out of my sight, and neuer see me more:
King JohnKJ IV.iii.43Or do you almost think, although you see,Or do you almost thinke, although you see,
King JohnKJ IV.iii.44That you do see? Could thought, without this object,That you do see? Could thought, without this obiect
King JohnKJ V.i.46Let not the world see fear and sad distrustLet not the world see feare and sad distrust
King JohnKJ V.ii.26Were born to see so sad an hour as this;Was borne to see so sad an houre as this,
King JohnKJ V.ii.72The great metropolis and see of Rome.The great Metropolis and Sea of Rome:
King JohnKJ V.iv.59For I do see the cruel pangs of deathFor I do see the cruell pangs of death
King JohnKJ V.vii.50And spleen of speed to see your majesty!And spleene of speede, to see your Maiesty.
King LearKL I.i.158See better, Lear, and let me still remainSee better Lear, and let me still remaine
King LearKL I.i.263Have no such daughter, nor shall ever seeHaue no such Daughter, nor shall euer see
King LearKL I.i.288You see how full of changes his age is. TheYou see how full of changes his age is, the
King LearKL I.ii.35hath not such need to hide itself. Let's see! Come! If ithath not such neede to hide it selfe. Let's see: come, if it
King LearKL I.ii.43Let's see, let's see!Let's see, let's see.
King LearKL I.ii.178My practices ride easy – I see the business:My practises ride easie: I see the businesse.
King LearKL I.v.14Shalt see thy other daughter will use thee kindly;Shalt see thy other Daughter will vse thee kindly,
King LearKL II.i.107This hurt you see, striving to apprehend him.This hurt you see, striuing to apprehend him.
King LearKL II.ii.92Than stands on any shoulder that I seeThen stands on any shoulder that I see
King LearKL II.iv.49Shall see their children kind.shall see their children kind.
King LearKL II.iv.123I am glad to see your highness.I am glad to see your Highnesse.
King LearKL II.iv.215We'll no more meet, no more see one another.Wee'l no more meete, no more see one another.
King LearKL II.iv.267You see me here, you gods, a poor old man,You see me heere (you Gods) a poore old man,
King LearKL III.i.46What it contains. If you shall see Cordelia – What it containes. If you shall see Cordelia,
King LearKL III.vi.35I'll see their trial first; bring in their evidence.
King LearKL III.vi.62 Trey, Blanch, and Sweetheart – see, they bark at me.Trey, Blanch, and Sweet-heart: see, they barke at me.
King LearKL III.vi.75Then let them anatomize Regan, see what breedsThen let them Anatomize Regan: See what breeds
King LearKL III.vi.100When we our betters see bearing our woes,
King LearKL III.vii.55Because I would not see thy cruel nailsBecause I would not see thy cruell Nailes
King LearKL III.vii.64All cruels else subscribe.’ But I shall seeAll Cruels else subscribe: but I shall see
King LearKL III.vii.71.1If you see Vengeance – If you see vengeance.
King LearKL III.vii.81To see some mischief on him. O!To see some mischefe on him. Oh.
King LearKL III.vii.82Lest it see more, prevent it. Out, vile jelly!Lest it see more, preuent it; Out vilde gelly:
King LearKL IV.i.17.2You cannot see your way.You cannot see your way.
King LearKL IV.i.23Might I but live to see thee in my touchMight I but liue to see thee in my touch,
King LearKL IV.i.67That slaves your ordinance, that will not seeThat slaues your ordinance, that will not see
King LearKL IV.ii.59.2See thyself, devil!See thy selfe diuell:
King LearKL IV.iii.41.1Will yield to see his daughter.
King LearKL IV.iv.29Soon may I hear and see him!Soone may I heare, and see him.
King LearKL IV.vi.108When I do stare see how the subject quakes.When I do stare, see how the Subiect quakes.
King LearKL IV.vi.141Were all the letters suns, I could not see.Were all thy Letters Sunnes, I could not see.
King LearKL IV.vi.148case, your purse in a light; yet you see how this worldcase, your purse in a light, yet you see how this world
King LearKL IV.vi.150I see it feelingly.I see it feelingly.
King LearKL IV.vi.151What, art mad? A man may see how this world goesWhat, art mad? A man may see how this world goes,
King LearKL IV.vi.152with no eyes. Look with thine ears. See how yon justicewith no eyes. Looke with thine eares: See how yond Iustice
King LearKL IV.vi.173To see the things thou dost not. Now, now, now, now!to see the things thou dost not. Now, now, now, now.
King LearKL IV.vi.256Let's see these pockets. The letters that he speaks ofLet's see these Pockets; the Letters that he speakes of
King LearKL IV.vi.258He had no other deathsman. Let us see.He had no other Deathsman. Let vs see:
King LearKL IV.vii.54To see another thus. I know not what to say.To see another thus. I know not what to say:
King LearKL IV.vii.55I will not swear these are my hands. Let's see.I will not sweare these are my hands: let's see,
King LearKL IV.vii.79You see, is killed in him; and yet it is dangerYou see is kill'd in him:
King LearKL V.i.68Shall never see his pardon; for my stateShall neuer see his pardon: for my state,
King LearKL V.iii.7Shall we not see these daughters and these sisters?Shall we not see these Daughters, and these Sisters?
King LearKL V.iii.25Ere they shall make us weep. We'll see 'em starved first.Ere they shall make vs weepe? / Weele seee'm staru'd first:
King LearKL V.iii.285I'll see that straight.Ile see that straight.
King LearKL V.iii.302The cup of their deservings. – O, see, see!The cup of their deseruings: O see, see.
King LearKL V.iii.308Do you see this? Look on her! Look, her lips!,Do you see this? Looke on her? Looke her lips,
King LearKL V.iii.324Shall never see so much nor live so long.Shall neuer see so much, nor liue so long.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.37As not to see a woman in that term –As not to see a woman in that terme,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.48Not to see ladies, study, fast, not sleep.Not to see Ladies, study, fast, not sleepe.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.122Let's see the penalty – on pain of losing herLet's see the penaltie. On paine of loosing her
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.182grace's farborough. But I would see his own person ingraces Tharborough: But I would see his own person in
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.241There did I see that low-spirited swain, that base minnowThere did I see that low spirited Swaine, that base Minow
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.292My lord Berowne, see him delivered o'er;My Lord Berowne, see him deliuer'd ore,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.153Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolationWell, if euer I do see the merry dayes of desolation
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.154that I have seen, some shall seethat I haue seene, some shall see.
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.155What shall some see?What shall some see?
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.117glad to see it.glad to see it.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.224His tongue, all impatient to speak and not see,His tongue all impatient to speake and not see,
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.243.3What then, do you see?What then, do you see?
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.102Let me see: a fat l'envoy – ay, that's a fat goose.Let me see a fat Lenuoy, I that's a fat Goose.
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.164And to her white hand see thou do commendAnd to her white hand see thou do commend
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.21See, see, my beauty will be saved by merit!See, see, my beautie will be sau'd by merit.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.71base and obscure vulgar! – videlicet, he came, see, andbase and obscure vulgar; videliset, He came, See, and
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.72overcame. He came, one; see two; overcame, three. Whoouercame: hee came one; see, two; ouercame three:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.73came? The king. Why did he come? To see. Why did heWho came? the King. Why did he come? to see. Why
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.74see? To overcome. To whom came he? To the beggar.did he see? to ouercome. To whom came he? to the Begger.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.146To see him walk before a lady, and to bear her fan!To see him walke before a Lady, and to beare her Fan.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.147To see him kiss his hand, and how most sweetly 'a will swear!To see him kisse his hand, and how most sweetly a will sweare:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.ii.31So were there a patch set on learning, to see him in a school.So were there a patch set on Learning, to see him in a Schoole.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.147For all the wealth that ever I did see,For all the wealth that euer I did see,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.159You found his mote; the King your mote did see;You found his Moth, the King your Moth did see:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.164To see a king transformed to a gnat!To see a King transformed to a Gnat?
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.165To see great Hercules whipping a gig,To see great Hercules whipping a Gigge,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.179When shall you see me write a thing in rhyme?When shall you see me write a thing in rime?
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.275Look, here's thy love (showing his shoe); my foot and her face see.Looke, heer's thy loue, my foot and her face see.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.279The street should see as she walked overhead.The street should see as she walk'd ouer head.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.290To fast, to study, and to see no woman –To fast, to study, and to see no woman:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.293And abstinence engenders maladies.And abstinence ingenders maladies. / And where that you haue vow'd to studie (Lords) / In that each of you haue forsworne his Booke. / Can you still dreame and pore, and thereon looke. / For when would you my Lord, or you, or you, / Haue found the ground of studies excellence, / Without the beauty of a womans face; / From womens eyes this doctrine I deriue, / They are the Ground, the Bookes, the Achadems, / From whence doth spring the true Promethean fire. / Why, vniuersall plodding poysons vp / The nimble spirits in the arteries, / As motion and long during action tyres / The sinnowy vigour of the trauailer. / Now for not looking on a womans face, / You haue in that forsworne the vse of eyes: / And studie too, the causer of your vow. / For where is any Author in the world, / Teaches such beauty as a womans eye: / Learning is but an adiunct to our selfe, / And where we are, our Learning likewise is. / Then when our selues we see in Ladies eyes, / With our selues. / Doe we not likewise see our learning there?
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.103‘ For,’ quoth the King, ‘ an angel shalt thou see;For quoth the King, an Angell shalt thou see:
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.129Despite of suit, to see a lady's face.Despight of sute, to see a Ladies face.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.337See where it comes! Behaviour, what wert thouSee where it comes. Behauiour what wer't thou,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.418I'll leave it by degrees. Soft, let us see:Ile leaue it by degrees: soft, let vs see,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.423For the Lord's tokens on you do I see.For the Lords tokens on you do I see.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.460I see the trick on't. Here was a consent,I see the tricke on't: Heere was a consent,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.580but for Alisander, alas, you see how 'tis – a littlebut for Alisander, alas you see, how 'tis a little
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.698not see, Pompey is uncasing for the combat. Whatnot see Pompey is vncasing for the combat: what
MacbethMac I.ii.69I'll see it done.Ile see it done.
MacbethMac I.iv.52Let not light see my black and deep desires.Let not Light see my black and deepe desires:
MacbethMac I.iv.54Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.Which the Eye feares, when it is done to see.
MacbethMac I.v.50That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,That my keene Knife see not the Wound it makes,
MacbethMac I.v.59Shall sun that morrow see!Shall Sunne that Morrow see.
MacbethMac I.vi.10.2See, see, our honoured hostess –See, see our honor'd Hostesse:
MacbethMac II.i.33Is this a dagger which I see before me,Is this a Dagger, which I see before me,
MacbethMac II.i.35I have thee not and yet I see thee still!I haue thee not, and yet I see thee still.
MacbethMac II.i.40I see thee yet, in form as palpableI see thee yet, in forme as palpable,
MacbethMac II.i.45Or else worth all the rest. – I see thee still;Or else worth all the rest: I see thee still;
MacbethMac II.iii.70.1See, and then speak yourselves.See, and then speake your selues:,
MacbethMac II.iii.74And look on death itself! Up, up, and seeAnd looke on Death it selfe: vp, vp, and see
MacbethMac II.iv.21.2Why, see you not?Why see you not?
MacbethMac II.iv.37Well, may you see things well done there – Adieu! –Well may you see things wel done there: Adieu
MacbethMac III.iv.9See, they encounter thee with their hearts' thanks;See they encounter thee with their harts thanks
MacbethMac III.iv.67.2Prithee, see there!Prythee see there:
MacbethMac III.v.34Hark! I am called. My little spirit, see,Hearke, I am call'd: my little Spirit see
MacbethMac IV.i.62.2Call 'em. Let me see 'em.Call 'em: let me see 'em.
MacbethMac IV.i.117Another yet? A seventh? I'll see no more!Another yet? A seauenth? Ile see no more:
MacbethMac IV.i.119Which shows me many more. And some I seeWhich shewes me many more: and some I see,
MacbethMac IV.i.121Horrible sight! Now I see 'tis true,Horrible sight: Now I see 'tis true,
MacbethMac IV.iii.105When shalt thou see thy wholesome days again,When shalt thou see thy wholsome dayes againe?
MacbethMac IV.iii.159.2See who comes here.See who comes heere.
MacbethMac V.i.24You see her eyes are open.You see her eyes are open.
MacbethMac V.v.37Within this three mile may you see it coming.Within this three Mile may you see it comming.
MacbethMac V.vi.41On mine own sword? Whiles I see lives, the gashesOn mine owne sword? whiles I see liues, the gashes
MacbethMac V.vi.66.1‘ Here may you see the tyrant.’Heere may you see the Tyrant.
MacbethMac V.vi.75Some must go off; and yet, by these I seeSome must go off: and yet by these I see,
MacbethMac V.vi.95I see thee compassed with thy kingdom's pearlI see thee compast with thy Kingdomes Pearle,
MacbethMac V.vi.114Whom we invite to see us crowned at Scone.Whom we inuite, to see vs Crown'd at Scone.
Measure for MeasureMM I.iii.53Is more to bread than stone. Hence shall we see,Is more to bread then stone: hence shall we see
Measure for MeasureMM I.iv.84.1I'll see what I can do.Ile see what I can doe.
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.25Because we see it; but what we do not seeBecause we see it; but what we doe not see,
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.33.2See that ClaudioSee that Claudio
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.146Doth your honour see any harm in his face?Doth your honor see any harme in his face?
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.231a bay. If you live to see this come to pass, say Pompeya Bay: if you liue to see this come to passe, say Pompey
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.23See you the fornicatress be removed;See you the Fornicatresse be remou'd,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iii.6To let me see them and to make me knowTo let me see them: and to make me know
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.193Philip and Jacob. I have kept it myself, and see how hePhilip and Iacob: I haue kept it my selfe; and see how hee
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.209Of gracious order, late come from the See,Of gracious Order, late come from the Sea,
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.225Rather rejoicing to see another merry thanRather reioycing to see another merry, then
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.182Not a resemblance, but a certainty. Yet since I seeNot a resemblance, but a certainty; yet since I see
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.77Prefixed by Angelo. See this be done,Prefixt by Angelo: See this be done,
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.150O pretty Isabella, I am pale at mine heart to seeOh prettie Isabella, I am pale at mine heart, to see
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.2Our old and faithful friend, we are glad to see you.Our old, and faithfull friend, we are glad to see you.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.14And let the subject see, to make them knowAnd let the Subiect see, to make them know
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.203This is a strange abuse. Let's see thy face.This is a strange abuse: Let's see thy face.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.271see how I'll handle her.see how Ile handle her.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.492Methinks I see a quickening in his eye.Methinkes I see a quickning in his eye:
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.518And see our pleasure herein executed.And see our pleasure herein executed.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.25I should not see the sandy hour-glass runI should not see the sandie houre-glasse runne,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.27And see my wealthy Andrew docked in sand,And see my wealthy Andrew docks in sand,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.30And see the holy edifice of stoneAnd see the holy edifice of stone,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.ii.5and yet for aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit withand yet for ought I see, they are as sicke that surfet with
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.65Well then, your bond. And let me see; but hear you,Well then, your bond: and let me see, but heare you,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.101Three months from twelve, then, let me see, the rate –Three months from twelue, then let me see the rate.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.172See to my house, left in the fearful guardSee to my house left in the fearefull gard
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.106be ready at the farthest by five of the clock. See thesebe readie at the farthest by fiue of the clocke: see these
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.144More guarded than his fellows'. See it done.More garded then his fellowes: see it done.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.185Well, we shall see your bearing.Well, we shall see your bearing.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iii.5And, Launcelot, soon at supper shalt thou seeAnd Lancelet, soone at supper shalt thou see
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.iii.9See me in talk with thee.See me talke with thee.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.v.1Well, thou shalt see, thy eyes shall be thy judge,Well, thou shall see, thy eyes shall be thy iudge,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.v.23say you shall see a masque, but if you do, then it was notyou shall see a Maske, but if you doe, then it was not
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.36But love is blind, and lovers cannot seeBut loue is blinde, and louers cannot see
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.39To see me thus transformed to a boy.To see me thus transformed to a boy.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vii.13Some god direct my judgement! Let me see:Some God direct my iudgement, let me see,
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vii.36Let's see once more this saying graved in gold:Let's see once more this saying grau'd in gold.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vii.47As o'er a brook to see fair Portia.As ore a brooke to see faire Portia.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ix.23What says the golden chest? Ha, let me see.What saies the golden chest, ha, let me see:
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ix.99Come, come, Nerissa, for I long to seeCome, come Nerryssa, for I long to see
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.100Thou stick'st a dagger in me. I shall never seeThou stick'st a dagger in me, I shall neuer see
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.116fee me an officer; bespeak him a fortnight before. I willsee me an Officer, bespeake him a fortnight before, I will
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.89And you shall see 'tis purchased by the weight,And you shall see 'tis purchast by the weight,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.124How could he see to do them? Having made one,How could he see to doe them? hauing made one,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.147As doubtful whether what I see be true,As doubtfull whether what I see be true,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.149You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand,You see my Lord Bassiano where I stand,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.257Rating myself at nothing, you shall seeRating my selfe at nothing, you shall see
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.319might but see you at my death. Notwithstanding, use yourmight see you at my death: notwithstanding, vse your
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iii.36To see me pay his debt, and then I care not.To see me pay his debt, and then I care not.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.49In speed to Padua. See thou render thisIn speed to Mantua, see thou render this
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.58That you yet know not of. We'll see our husbandsThat you yet know not of; wee'll see our husbands
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.59.2Shall they see us?Shall they see vs?
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.197Should see salvation. We do pray for mercy,Should see saluation: we do pray for mercie,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.311.2Thyself shalt see the act,Thy selfe shalt see the Act:
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.365That thou shalt see the difference of our spirit,That thou shalt see the difference of our spirit,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.435I see, sir, you are liberal in offers.I see sir you are liberall in offers,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.ii.13(aside to Portia) I'll see if I can get my husband's ring,Ile see if I can get my husbands ring
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.41Sola! Did you see Master Lorenzo? MasterSola, did you see M. Lorenzo, & M.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.89That light we see is burning in my hall;That light we see is burning in my hall:
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.92When the moon shone we did not see the candle.When the moone shone we did not see the candle?
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.99Nothing is good, I see, without respect;Nothing is good I see without respect,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.187I would deny it, but you see my fingerI would deny it: but you see my finger
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.191.1Until I see the ring.Vntil I see the Ring.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.192.1Till I again see mine!til I againe see mine.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.243.1Wherein I see myself ...Wherein I see my selfe.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.61Well, let us see honest Master Page. IsWel, let vs see honest Mr Page: is
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.74I am glad to see your worships well. I thank youI am glad to see your Worships well: I thanke you
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.76Master Page, I am glad to see you. Much goodMaster Page, I am glad to see you: much good
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.82I am glad to see you, good Master Slender.I am glad to see you, good Master Slender.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.271at it as any man in England. You are afraid if you see theat it, as any man in England: you are afraid if you see the
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.14see thee froth and lime. I am at a word. Follow.see thee froth, and liue: I am at a word: follow.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.2I pray thee, go to the casement and see if you can seeI pray thee goe to the Casement, and see if you can see
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.150Well, I shall see her today. Hold, there's moneyWell: I shall see her to day: hold, there's money
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.3them? Let me see.them? let me see?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.152You are come to see my daughter Anne?You are come to see my daughter Anne?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.155Go in with us and see. We have anGo in with vs and see: we haue an
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.84come and see the picture, she says, that you wot of.come and see the picture (she sayes) that you wot of:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.277thought this? See the hell of having a false woman! Mythought this? see the hell of hauing a false woman: my
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.21To see thee fight, to see thee foin, to see theeTo see thee fight, to see thee foigne, to see thee
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.22traverse, to see thee here, to see thee there, to see theetrauerse, to see thee heere, to see thee there, to see thee
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.41and of the peace, if I see a sword out, my finger itchesand of the peace; if I see a sword out, my finger itches
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.iii.70He is there. See what humour he is in; and I willHe is there, see what humor he is in: and I will
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.7O, you are a flattering boy. Now I seeO you are a flattering boy, now I see
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.10Truly, sir, to see your wife. Is she atTruly Sir, to see your wife, is she at
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.26By your leave, sir. I am sick till I see her.By your leaue sir, I am sicke till I see her.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.83Have with you to see this monster.Haue with you, to see this Monster.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.51I see how thine eye would emulate the diamond. ThouI see how thine eye would emulate the Diamond: Thou
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.60semicircled farthingale. I see what thou wert if Fortune,semi-circled Farthingale. I see what thou wert if Fortune
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.84She shall not see me. I will ensconce me behindShe shall not see me, I will ensconce mee behinde
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.158True, Master Page. Up, gentlemen, you shall seeTrue (master Page) vp Gentlemen, / You shall see
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.163Nay, follow him, gentlemen. See the issue of hisNay follow him (Gentlemen) see the yssue of his
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.210By gar, I see 'tis an honest woman.By gar, I see 'tis an honest woman.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.1I see I cannot get thy father's love;I see I cannot get thy Fathers loue,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.41it would yearn your heart to see it. Her husband goesit would yern your heart to see it: her husband goes
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.i.10'Tis a playing day, I see. How now, Sir Hugh, no school'tis a playing day I see: how now Sir Hugh, no Schoole
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.2sufferance. I see you are obsequious in your love, and Isufferance; I see you are obsequious in your loue, and I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.33I am glad the knight is not here. Now he shall see hisI am glad the Knight is not heere; now he shall see his
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.185See but the issue of my jealousy. If I cry out thus uponsee but the issue of my iealousie: If I cry out thus vpon
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.103heart, is beaten black and blue, that you cannot see aheart) is beaten blacke and blew, that you cannot see a
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.11midnight, at Herne's Oak, and you shall see wonders.midnight, at Hernes-Oake, and you shall see wonders.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.i.14I went to her, Master Brook, as you see, likeI went to her (Master Broome) as you see, like
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.ii.2see the light of our fairies. Remember, son Slender, mysee the light of our Fairies. Remember son Slender, my
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.iii.2When you see your time, take her by the hand, awayyou see your time, take her by the hand, away
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.68More fertile-fresh than all the field to see;Mote fertile-fresh then all the Field to see:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.107See you these, husband? Do not these fair yokesSee you these husband? Do not these faire yoakes
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.126reason, that they were fairies. See now how wit may bereason, that they were Fairies. See now how wit may be
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.202Take comfort. He no more shall see my face.Take comfort: he no more shall see my face,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.204Before the time I did Lysander seeBefore the time I did Lysander see,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.80is a sweet-faced man; a proper man as one shall see in ais a sweet-fac'd man, a proper man as one shall see in a
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.11In their gold coats spots you seeIn their gold coats, spots you see,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.106And thorough this distemperature we seeAnd through this distemperature, we see
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.128When we have laughed to see the sails conceiveWhen we haue laught to see the sailes conceiue,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.141And see our moonlight revels, go with us.And see our Moone-light reuels, goe with vs;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.161But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaftBut I might see young Cupids fiery shaft
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.221It is not night when I do see your face,It is not night when I doe see your face.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.107Dead? – or asleep? I see no blood, no wound.Deade or asleepe? I see no bloud, no wound,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.111That through thy bosom makes me see thy heart.That through thy bosome makes me see thy heart.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.73An actor too, perhaps, if I see cause.An Actor too perhaps, if I see cause.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.84goes but to see a noise that he heard, and is to comegoes but to see a noyse that he heard, and is to come
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.108O Bottom, thou art changed. What do I see onO Bottom, thou art chang'd; What doe I see on
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.110What do you see? You see an ass head of yourWhat do you see? You see an Asse-head of your
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.114I see their knavery! This is to make an ass of me,I see their knauery; this is to make an asse of me,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.79A privilege never to see me more;A priuiledge, neuer to see me more;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.81See me no more, whether he be dead or no.see me no more / Whether he be dead or no.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.98By some illusion see thou bring her here.By some illusion see thou bring her heere,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.114Shall we their fond pageant see?Shall we their fond Pageant see?
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.145O spite! O hell! I see you all are bentO spight! O hell! I see you are all bent
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.278And never did desire to see thee more.And neuer did desire to see thee more.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.317You see how simple and how fond I am.You see how simple, and how fond I am.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.427If ever I thy face by daylight see.If euer I thy face by day-light see.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.71See as thou wast wont to see.See as thou wast wont to see.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.171Was I betrothed ere I saw Hermia;Was I betroth'd, ere I see Hermia,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.188Methinks I see these things with parted eye,Me-thinks I see these things with parted eye,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.43Make choice of which your highness will see first.Make choise of which your Highnesse will see first.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.85I love not to see wretchedness o'ercharged,I loue not to see wretchednesse orecharged;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.87Why, gentle sweet, you shall see no such thing.Why gentle sweet, you shall see no such thing.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.176But what see I? No Thisbe do I see.But what see I? No Thisbie doe I see.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.177O wicked wall, through whom I see no bliss:O wicked wall, through whom I see no blisse,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.183through the wall. You shall see – it will fall pat as I toldthrough the wall. You shall see it will fall. / Pat as I told
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.189I see a voice. Now will I to the chinkI see a voyce; now will I to the chinke,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.243you see, it is already in snuff.you see, it is already in snuffe.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.271Eyes, do you see? – Eyes do you see!
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.343that parted their fathers. Will it please you to see thethat parted their Fathers. Will it please you to see the
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.72I see, lady, the gentleman is not in your books.I see (Lady) the Gentleman is not in your bookes.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.177I can see yet without spectacles, and I see noI can see yet without spectacles, and I see no
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.186I never see a bachelor of three score again? Go to, i'faith;I neuer see a batcheller of three score againe? goe to yfaith,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.228I shall see thee, ere I die, look pale with love.I shall see thee ere I die, looke pale with loue.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.246let them signify under my sign ‘ Here you may seelet them signifie vnder my signe, here you may see
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.271And thou shalt see how apt it is to learnAnd thou shalt see how apt it is to learne
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.3How tartly that gentleman looks! I never can seeHow tartly that Gentleman lookes, I neuer can see
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.50Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted withWell neece, I hope to see you one day fitted with
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.73I have a good eye, uncle; I can see a churchI haue a good eye vnckle, I can see a Church
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.194see him?see him?
Much Ado About NothingMA II.ii.39see me at her chamber window, hear me call Margaretsee mee at her chamber window, heare me call Margaret,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.ii.41to see this the very night before the intended wedding –to see this the very night before the intended wedding,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.16ten mile afoot to see a good armour; and now will he lieten mile afoot, to see a good armor, and now will he lie
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.21many strange dishes. May I be so converted and see withmany strange dishes: may I be so conuerted, & see with
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.38See you where Benedick hath hid himself?See you where Benedicke hath hid himselfe?
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.188of quarrels you may say he is wise, for either heof quarrels you may see hee is wise, for either hee
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.197seek Benedick, and tell him of her love?see Benedicke, and tell him of her loue.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.204I could wish he would modestly examine himself, to seeI could wish he would modestly examine himselfe, to see
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.213that's the scene that I would see, which will be merely athat's the Scene that I would see, which will be meerely a
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.26The pleasant'st angling is to see the fishThe pleasant'st angling is to see the fish
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.101warrant. Go but with me tonight, you shall see herwarrant: goe but with mee to night, you shal see her
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.107If you dare not trust that you see, confess notIf you dare not trust that you see, confesse not
Much Ado About NothingMA III.ii.111If I see any thing tonight why I should notIf I see any thing to night, why I should not
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.40watchman, for I cannot see how sleeping should offend;watchman, for I cannot see how sleeping should offend:
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.135All this I see; and I see that the fashion wearsAll this I see, and see that the fashion weares
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iv.42husband have stables enough, you'll see he shall lack nohusband haue stables enough, you'll looke he shall lacke no
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.4Brief, I pray you, for you see it is a busy timeBriefe I pray you, for you see it is a busie time
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.34a world to see! Well said, i'faith, neighbour Verges;a world to see: well said yfaith neighbour Verges,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.37All you that see her, that she were a maidAll you that see her, that she were a maide,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.88Did see her, hear her, at that hour last nightDid see her, heare her, at that howre last night,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.109See, see; here comes the man we went to seek.See, see, here comes the man we went to seeke.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.246Which is the villain? Let me see his eyes,Which is the villaine? let me see his eies,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.55Why, then she's mine. Sweet, let me see your face.Why then she's mine, sweet let me see your face.
OthelloOth I.i.164Where didst thou see her? – O unhappy girl! –Where didst thou see her? (Oh vnhappie Girle)
OthelloOth I.i.172By what you see them act. Is there not charmsBy what you see them act. Is there not Charmes,
OthelloOth I.iii.50(To Brabantio) I did not see you: welcome, gentle signor;I did not see you: welcome gentle Signior,
OthelloOth I.iii.289Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see.Looke to her (Moore) if thou hast eies to see:
OthelloOth I.iii.341and thou shalt see an answerable sequestrationand thou shalt see an answerable Sequestration,
OthelloOth I.iii.386Cassio's a proper man: let me see now;Cassio's a proper man: Let me see now,
OthelloOth I.iii.388In double knavery. How? How? Let's see.In double Knauery. How? How? Let's see.
OthelloOth II.i.37As well to see the vessel that's come in,As well to see the Vessell that's come in,
OthelloOth II.i.95.2See for the news.See for the Newes:
OthelloOth II.i.154See suitors following and not look behind:See Suitors following, and not looke behind:
OthelloOth II.i.178To see you here before me. O, my soul's joy!To see you heere before me. / Oh my Soules Ioy:
OthelloOth II.i.246loved the Moor. Blessed pudding! Didst thou not see herlou'd the Moore: Bless'd pudding. Didst thou not see her
OthelloOth II.iii.116You see this fellow that's gone before:You see this Fellow, that is gone before,
OthelloOth II.iii.118And give direction; and do but see his vice:And giue direction. And do but see his vice,
OthelloOth III.iii.188I'll see before I doubt; when I doubt, prove;Ile see before I doubt; when I doubt, proue;
OthelloOth III.iii.200In Venice they do let God see the pranksIn Venice, they do let Heauen see the prankes
OthelloOth III.iii.212I see this hath a little dashed your spirits.I see this hath a little dash'd your Spirits:
OthelloOth III.iii.215Comes from my love. But I do see you're moved.Comes from your Loue. / But I do see y'are moou'd:
OthelloOth III.iii.222.1My lord, I see you're moved.My Lord, I see y'are mou'd.
OthelloOth III.iii.229Whereto we see in all things nature tends,Whereto we see in all things, Nature tends:
OthelloOth III.iii.388I see, sir, you are eaten up with passion.I see you are eaten vp with Passion:
OthelloOth III.iii.396If ever mortal eyes do see them bolsterIf euer mortall eyes do see them boulster
OthelloOth III.iii.399It is impossible you should see this,It is impossible you should see this,
OthelloOth III.iii.429Nay, but be wise: yet we see nothing done,Nay yet be wise; yet we see nothing done,
OthelloOth III.iii.436.1See Cassio wipe his beard with.See Cassio wipe his Beard with.
OthelloOth III.iii.441Now do I see 'tis true. Look here, Iago –Now do I see 'tis true. Looke heere Iago,
OthelloOth III.iv.191.1To have him see me womaned.To haue him see me woman'd.
OthelloOth III.iv.194And say if I shall see you soon at night.And say, if I shall see you soone at night?
OthelloOth III.iv.196For I attend here: but I'll see you soon.For I attend heere: But Ile see you soone.
OthelloOth IV.i.142my chamber. O, I see that nose of yours, but not thatmy Chamber: oh, I see that nose of yours, but not that
OthelloOth IV.i.165Well, I may chance to see you: for I would very fainWell, I may chance to see you: for I would very faine
OthelloOth IV.i.172And did you see the handkerchief?And did you see the Handkerchiefe?
OthelloOth IV.i.174Yours, by this hand! And to see how he prizes theYours by this hand: and to see how he prizes the
OthelloOth IV.i.214Come from the Duke; and see your wife is with him.comes from the Duke. / See, your wife's with him.
OthelloOth IV.i.219I am very glad to see you, signor:I am very glad to see you Signior:
OthelloOth IV.i.239.1I am glad to see you mad.I am glad to see you mad.
OthelloOth IV.ii.24.2Let me see your eyes.Let me see your eyes:
OthelloOth IV.ii.204Why, now I see there's mettle in thee; and even fromWhy, now I see there's mettle in thee: and euen from
OthelloOth IV.iii.93Their wives have sense like them: they see and smell,Their wiues haue sense like them: They see, and smell,
OthelloOth V.i.95.2I am glad to see you.I am glad to see you.
OthelloOth V.i.109Do you see, gentlemen? Nay, guiltiness will speakDo you see Gentlemen? Nay, guiltinesse will speake
OthelloOth V.i.124Kind gentlemen, let's see poor Cassio dressed.Kinde Gentlemen: / Let's go see poore Cassio drest.
OthelloOth V.ii.264Be not afraid, though you do see me weaponed;Be not affraid, though you do see me weapon'd:
PericlesPer I.i.13See where she comes, apparelled like the spring,See where she comes, appareled like the Spring,
PericlesPer I.i.49Who know the world, see heaven, but feeling woeWho know the World, see Heauen, but feeling woe,
PericlesPer I.i.100The breath is gone, and the sore eyes see clearThe breath is gone, and the sore eyes see cleare:
PericlesPer I.iii.6know none of his secrets. Now do I see he had someknowe none of his secrets. Now doe I see hee had some
PericlesPer I.iv.3See if 'twill teach us to forget our own?See if t'will teach vs to forget our owne?
PericlesPer I.iv.33But see what heaven can do by this our change.But see what heauen can doe by this our change,
PericlesPer I.iv.48Here many sink, yet those which see them fallHeere manie sincke, yet those which see them fall,
PericlesPer II.i.56May see the sea hath cast upon your coast –May see the Sea hath cast vpon your coast:
PericlesPer II.i.77For that I am a man, pray see me buried.For that I am a man, pray you see me buried.
PericlesPer II.i.121An armour, friends? I pray you let me see it.An Armour friends; I pray you let me see it?
PericlesPer II.i.160Shall make the gazer joy to see him tread.Shall make the gazer ioy to see him tread;
PericlesPer II.ii.7For men to see and, seeing, wonder at.For men to see; and seeing, woonder at.
PericlesPer II.iii.45Whereby I see that Time's the king of men;Whereby I see that Time's the King of men,
PericlesPer II.iv.17See, not a man in private conferenceSee, not a man in priuate conference,
PericlesPer II.v.94It pleaseth me so well that I will see you wed;It pleaseth me so well, that I will see you wed,
PericlesPer III.ii.94See how she 'gins to blow into life's flower again.See how she ginnes to blow into lifes flower againe.
PericlesPer III.iv.9My wedded lord, I ne'er shall see again,my wedded Lord, I nere shall see againe,
PericlesPer IV.i.100And thrown into the sea. But I'll see further.and throwne into the Sea, but ile see further:
PericlesPer IV.ii.41Master, I have gone through for this piece you see.Master, I haue gone through for this peece you see,
PericlesPer IV.ii.103but he made a groan at it, and swore he would seebut he made a groane at it, and swore he would see
PericlesPer IV.iv.12To see his daughter, all his life's delight.To see his daughter all his liues delight.
PericlesPer IV.iv.21Like motes and shadows see them move awhile;Like moats and shadowes, see them / Moue a while,
PericlesPer IV.iv.23See how belief may suffer by foul show!See how beleefe may suffer by fowle showe,
PericlesPer IV.vi.20I am glad to see your honour in good health.I am glad to see your Honour in good health.
PericlesPer IV.vi.32see a rose. And she were a rose indeed, if she had but –see a rose, and she were a rose indeed, if shee had but.
PericlesPer IV.vi.85my authority shall not see thee, or else look friendlymy authoritie shall not see thee, or else looke friendly
PericlesPer IV.vi.191Well, I will see what I can do for thee. If I canWell I will see what I can doe for thee: if I can
PericlesPer V.i.29.1May we not see him?May wee not see him?
PericlesPer V.i.30But bootless is your sight; he will not speakbut bootlesse. Is your sight, see will not speake
PericlesPer V.i.61Sit, sir, I will recount it to you. But see,Sit sir, I will recount it to you, but see
PericlesPer V.i.80See, she will speak to him.See she will speake to him.
PericlesPer V.i.222.1Did come to see you.did come to see you.
PericlesPer V.ii.17At Ephesus the temple see,At Ephesus the Temple see,
PericlesPer V.iii.25.2May we see them?May we see them?
Richard IIR2 I.i.202Since we cannot atone you, we shall seeSince we cannot attone you, you shall see
Richard IIR2 I.ii.7Who, when they see the hours ripe on earth,Who when they see the houres ripe on earth,
Richard IIR2 I.ii.67Alack, and what shall good old York there seeAlacke, and what shall good old Yorke there see
Richard IIR2 I.iii.209I see thy grieved heart. Thy sad aspectI see thy greeued heart: thy sad aspect,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.224And blindfold death not let me see my son.And blindfold death, not let me see my sonne.
Richard IIR2 I.iv.22Whether our kinsman come to see his friends.Whether our kinsman come to see his friends,
Richard IIR2 II.i.92I am in health. I breathe, and see thee ill.I am in health, I breath, I see thee ill.
Richard IIR2 II.i.93Now he that made me knows I see thee ill;Now he that made me, knowes I see thee ill:
Richard IIR2 II.i.94Ill in myself to see, and in thee seeing ill.Ill in my selfe to see, and in thee, seeing ill,
Richard IIR2 II.i.217To see this business. Tomorrow nextTo see this businesse: to morrow next
Richard IIR2 II.i.264Yet see no shelter to avoid the storm.Yet seeke no shelter to auoid the storme:
Richard IIR2 II.i.265We see the wind sit sore upon our sailsWe see the winde sit sore vpon our salles,
Richard IIR2 II.i.267We see the very wrack that we must suffer,We see the very wracke that we must suffer,
Richard IIR2 II.iii.117I see old Gaunt alive. O then, my father,I see old Gaunt aliue. Oh then my Father,
Richard IIR2 II.iii.150And let him never see joy that breaks that oath.And let him neu'r see Ioy, that breakes that Oath.
Richard IIR2 II.iii.151Well, well, I see the issue of these arms.Well, well, I see the issue of these Armes,
Richard IIR2 II.iv.19I see thy glory like a shooting starI see thy Glory, like a shooting Starre,
Richard IIR2 III.i.29Condemns you to the death. See them delivered overCondemnes you to the death: see them deliuered ouer
Richard IIR2 III.i.35My Lord Northumberland, see them dispatched.My Lord Northumberland, see them dispatch'd:
Richard IIR2 III.ii.50Shall see us rising in our throne, the east,Shall see vs rising in our Throne, the East,
Richard IIR2 III.ii.135Sweet love, I see, changing his property,Sweet Loue (I see) changing his propertie,
Richard IIR2 III.iii.62See, see, King Richard doth himself appear,See, see, King Richard doth himselfe appeare
Richard IIR2 III.iii.170Would not this ill do well? Well, well, I seeWould not this ill, doe well? Well, well, I see
Richard IIR2 III.iii.193Than my unpleased eye see your courtesy.Then my vnpleas'd Eye see your Courtesie.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.41Thou darest not, coward, live to see that day.Thou dar'st not (Coward) liue to see the day.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.243Mine eyes are full of tears. I cannot see.Mine Eyes are full of Teares, I cannot see:
Richard IIR2 IV.i.245But they can see a sort of traitors here.But they can see a sort of Traytors here.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.273When I do see the very book indeedWhen I doe see the very Booke indeede,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.293‘ The shadow of my sorrow ’ – ha, let's see.The shadow of my Sorrow: ha, let's see,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.330I see your brows are full of discontent,I see your Browes are full of Discontent,
Richard IIR2 V.i.7But soft, but see, or rather do not see,But soft, but see, or rather doe not see,
Richard IIR2 V.ii.57Yea, lookest thou pale? Let me see the writing.Yea, look'st thou pale? Let me see the Writing.
Richard IIR2 V.ii.58.2No matter, then, who see it.No matter then who sees it,
Richard IIR2 V.ii.59I will be satisfied. Let me see the writing.I will be satisfied, let me see the Writing.
Richard IIR2 V.ii.63Which for some reasons, sir, I mean to see.Which for some reasons sir, I meane to see:
Richard IIR2 V.ii.69Boy, let me see the writing.Boy, let me see the Writing.
Richard IIR2 V.ii.71I will be satisfied. Let me see it, I say.I will be satisfied: let me see it I say.
Richard IIR2 V.iii.2'Tis full three months since I did see him last.'Tis full three monthes since I did see him last.
Richard IIR2 V.iii.21I see some sparks of better hope, which elder yearsI see some sparkes of better hope: which elder dayes
Richard IIR2 V.iii.93And never see day that the happy seesAnd neuer see day, that the happy sees,
Richard IIIR3 I.i.26Unless to spy my shadow in the sunVnlesse to see my Shadow in the Sunne,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.55O gentlemen, see, see! Dead Henry's woundsOh Gentlemen, see, see dead Henries wounds,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.216I will with all expedient duty see you.I will with all expedient duty see you,
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.220To see you are become so penitent.To see you are become so penitent.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.263That I may see my shadow as I pass.That I may see my Shadow as I passe.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.186Northumberland, then present, wept to see it.Northumberland, then present, wept to see it.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.204And see another, as I see thee now,And see another, as I see thee now,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.68For Edward's sake, and see how he requits me!For Edwards sake, and see how he requits mee.
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.91Let him see our commission, and talk no more.Let him see our Commission, and talke no more.
Richard IIIR3 II.i.92That came too lag to see him buried.That came too lagge to see him buried.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.54That grieves me when I see my shame in him.That greeues me, when I see my shame in him.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.105I did not see your grace. Humbly on my kneeI did not see your Grace. Humbly on my knee,
Richard IIIR3 II.iii.9Then, masters, look to see a troublous world.Then Masters looke to see a troublous world.
Richard IIIR3 II.iii.43Ensuing danger; as by proof we seePursuing danger: as by proofe we see
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.4I long with all my heart to see the Prince.I long with all my heart to see the Prince:
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.49Ay me! I see the ruin of my house.Aye me! I see the ruine of my House:
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.54I see, as in a map, the end of all.I see (as in a Map) the end of all.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.118O, then I see you will part but with light gifts!O then I see, you will part but with light gifts,
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.33Where he shall see the boar will use us kindly.Where he shall see the Bore will vse vs kindly.
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.44Before I'll see the crown so foul misplaced.Before Ile see the Crowne so foule mis-plac'd:
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.85But yet you see how soon the day o'ercast.But yet you see, how soone the Day o're-cast.
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.107Well met, my lord. I am glad to see your honour.Well met, my Lord, I am glad to see your Honor.
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.68See how I am bewitched: behold, mine armLooke how I am bewitch'd: behold, mine Arme
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.77I will not dine until I see the same!I will not dine, vntill I see the same.
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.95Make a short shrift; he longs to see your head.Make a short Shrift, he longs to see your Head.
Richard IIIR3 III.v.13He is; and see, he brings the Mayor along.He is, and see he brings the Maior along.
Richard IIIR3 III.v.52Until your lordship came to see his end,Vntill your Lordship came to see his end,
Richard IIIR3 III.vi.11That cannot see this palpable device?that cannot see this palpable deuice?
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.94See where his grace stands, 'tween two clergymen.See where his Grace stands, tweene two Clergie men.
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.97And see, a book of prayer in his hand – And see a Booke of Prayer in his hand,
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.234For God doth know, and you may partly see,For God doth know, and you may partly see,
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.236God bless your grace! We see it, and will say it.God blesse your Grace, wee see it, and will say it.
Richard IIIR3 IV.i.22I am their father's mother; I will see them.I am their Fathers Mother, I will see them.
Richard IIIR3 IV.ii.27The King is angry. See, he gnaws his lip.The King is angry, see he gnawes his Lippe.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iii.27.2But didst thou see them dead?But did'st thou see them dead.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.97Decline all this, and see what now thou art:Decline all this, and see what now thou art.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.320What! We have many goodly days to see:What? we haue many goodly dayes to see:
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.32Desire the Earl to see me in my tent.Desire the Earle to see me in my Tent:
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.223To see if any mean to shrink from me.To heare if any meane to shrinke from me.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.123So early walking did I see your son.So earely walking did I see your Sonne:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.156See, where he comes. So please you step aside.See where he comes, so please you step aside,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.172Should without eyes see pathways to his will!Should without eyes, see path-wayes to his will:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.30Inherit at my house. Hear all; all see;Inherit at my house: heare all, all see:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.60I pray, can you read anything you see?But I pray can you read any thing you see?
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.33To see it tetchy and fall out wi' th' dug!to see it teachie, and fall out with the Dugge,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.46To see now how a jest shall come about!to see now how a Iest shall come about.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.62An I might live to see thee married once,and I might liue to see thee married once,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.85And see how one another lends content.And see how one another lends content:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iv.53O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you.O then I see Queene Mab hath beene with you:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.23See how she leans her cheek upon her hand!See how she leanes her cheeke vpon her hand.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.70If they do see thee, they will murder thee.If they do see thee, they will murther thee.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.156I dare draw as soon as another man, if I see occasion inI dare draw assoone as another man, if I see occasion in
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.198aboard. But she, good soul, had as lief see a toad, a veryaboard: but she good soule had as leeue a see Toade, a very
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.199toad, as see him. I anger her sometimes, and tell her thatToade as see him: I anger her sometimes, and tell her that
Romeo and JulietRJ II.v.30Do you not see that I am out of breath?Do you not see that I am out of breath?
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.64Therefore farewell, I see thou knowest me not.Therefore farewell, I see thou know'st me not.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.8Lovers can see to do their amorous ritesLouers can see to doe their Amorous rights,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.63That ever I should live to see thee dead!That euer I should liue to see thee dead.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.62O, then I see that madmen have no ears.O then I see, that Mad men haue no eares.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.55Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low,Me thinkes I see thee now, thou art so lowe,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.125And see how he will take it at your hands.And see how he will take it at your hands.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.166But now I see this one is one too much,But now I see this one is one too much,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.ii.15See where she comes from shrift with merry look.See where she comes from shrift / With merrie looke.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.ii.29This is as't should be. Let me see, the County.This is as't should be, let me see the County:
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.iii.55O, look! Methinks I see my cousin's ghostO looke, me thinks I see my Cozins Ghost,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.25Ha! let me see her. Out alas! she's cold,Ha? Let me see her: out alas shee's cold,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.41Have I thought long to see this morning's face,Haue I thought long to see this mornings face,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.35Let's see for means. O mischief, thou art swiftLets see for meanes: O mischiefe thou art swift,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.58Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor.Come hither man, I see that thou art poore,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.24See thou deliver it to my lord and father.See thou deliuer it to my Lord and Father,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.162Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.Poyson I see hath bin his timelesse end
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.179We see the ground whereon these woes do lie,We see the ground whereon these woes do lye,
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.209To see thy son and heir now early down.To see thy Sonne and Heire, now early downe.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.213Look, and thou shalt see.Looke: and thou shalt see.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.292See what a scourge is laid upon your hate,See what a scourge is laide vpon your hate,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.29What's here? One dead, or drunk? See, doth he breathe?What's heere? One dead, or drunke? See doth he breath?
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.72Sirrah, go see what trumpet 'tis that sounds – Sirrah, go see what Trumpet 'tis that sounds,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.104And see him dressed in all suits like a lady.And see him drest in all suites like a Ladie:
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.119To see her noble lord restored to health,To see her noble Lord restor'd to health,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.127See this dispatched with all the haste thou canst,See this dispatch'd with all the hast thou canst,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.69I do not sleep. I see, I hear, I speak.I do not sleepe: I see, I heare, I speake:
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.76O, how we joy to see your wit restored!Oh how we ioy to see your wit restor'd,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.140Well, well see 't. Come, madam wife, sit by my sideWell, we'l see't: Come Madam wife sit by my side,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.2To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,To see faire Padua, nurserie of Arts,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.70But in the other's silence do I seeBut in the others silence do I see,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.147But see, while idly I stood looking on,But see, while idely I stood looking on,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.2To see my friends in Padua, but of allTo see my friends in Padua; but of all
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.32master so, being perhaps, for aught I see, two and thirty,master so, being perhaps (for ought I see) two and thirty,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.57And so am come abroad to see the world.And so am come abroad to see the world.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.102I will not sleep, Hortensio, till I see her,I wil not sleepe Hortensio til I see her,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.113it that she shall have no more eyes to see withal than ait, that shee shal haue no more eies to see withall then a
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.136Here's no knavery! See, to beguile the old folks,Heere's no knauerie. See, to beguile the olde-folkes,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.144All books of love, see that at any handAll bookes of Loue, see that at any hand,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.145And see you read no other lectures to her.And see you reade no other Lectures to her:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.190And I do hope good days and long to see.And I do hope, good dayes and long, to see.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.249Did you yet ever see Baptista's daughter?Did you yet euer see Baptistas daughter?
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.9Whom thou lov'st best. See thou dissemble not.Whom thou lou'st best: see thou dissemble not.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.31What, will you not suffer me? Nay, now I seeWhat will you not suffer me: Nay now I see
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.64I see you do not mean to part with her,I see you do not meane to part with her,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.107You shall go see your pupils presently.You shall go see your Pupils presently.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.227It is my fashion when I see a crab.It is my fashion when I see a Crab.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.250O, let me see thee walk. Thou dost not halt.Oh let me see thee walke: thou dost not halt.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.266For by this light whereby I see thy beauty,For by this light, whereby I see thy beauty,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.292I'll see thee hanged on Sunday first.Ile see thee hang'd on sonday first.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.293Hark, Petruchio, she says she'll see thee hanged first.Hark Petruchio, she saies shee'll see thee hang'd first.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.304O, you are novices! 'Tis a world to seeOh you are nouices, 'tis a world to see
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.400I see no reason but supposed LucentioI see no reason but suppos'd Lucentio
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.i.40Now let me see if I can construe it. ‘ Hic ibatNow let mee see if I can conster it. Hic ibat
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.111See not your bride in these unreverent robes,See not your Bride in these vnreuerent robes,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.126I'll after him and see the event of this.Ile after him, and see the euent of this.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.219I see a woman may be made a foolI see a woman may be made a foole
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.165Peter, didst ever see the like?Peter didst euer see the like.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.27See how they kiss and court! Signor Lucentio,See how they kisse and court: Signior Lucentio,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.34Fie on her! See how beastly she doth court him.Fie on her, see how beastly she doth court him.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.61Come, tailor, let us see these ornaments.Come Tailor, let vs see these ornaments.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.93I see she's like to have neither cap nor gown.I see shees like to haue neither cap nor gowne.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.160Hortensio, say thou wilt see the tailor paid.Hortensio, say thou wilt see the Tailor paide:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.183Let's see, I think 'tis now some seven o'clock,Let's see, I thinke 'tis now some seuen a clocke,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.69And wander we to see thy honest son,And wander we to see thy honest sonne,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.75Come, go along and see the truth hereof,Come goe along and see the truth hereof,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.4Nay, faith, I'll see the church a your back,Nay faith, Ile see the Church a your backe,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.47see thy master's father, Vincentio?see thy Mistris father, Vincentio?
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.49marry, sir – see where he looks out of the window.marie sir see where he lookes out of the window.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.54Prithee, Kate, let's stand aside and see thePree the Kate let's stand aside and see the
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.84charge you see that he be forthcoming.charge you see that hee be forth comming.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.130Husband, let's follow to see the end of thisHusband let's follow, to see the end of this
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.118See where she comes, and brings your froward wivesSee where she comes, and brings your froward Wiues
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.172But now I see our lances are but straws,But now I see our Launces are but strawes:
The TempestTem I.ii.169.1But ever see that man!But euer see that man.
The TempestTem I.ii.420.2It goes on, I see,It goes on I see
The TempestTem I.ii.484.1To see a goodlier man.To see a goodlier man.
The TempestTem II.i.113I ne'er again shall see her. O thou mine heirI ne're againe shall see her: O thou mine heire
The TempestTem II.i.210And yet methinks I see it in thy face,And yet, me thinkes I see it in thy face,
The TempestTem II.ii.32they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Legged like athey will lay out ten to see a dead Indian: Leg'd like a
The TempestTem III.ii.153see this taborer! He lays it on.see this Taborer, / He layes it on.
The TempestTem V.i.309Where I have hope to see the nuptialWhere I haue hope to see the nuptiall
Timon of AthensTim I.i.5Which manifold record not matches? See,Which manifold record not matches: see
Timon of AthensTim I.i.28Let's see your piece.Let's see your peece.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.43You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors.You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors,
Timon of AthensTim I.i.54You see how all conditions, how all minds,You see how all Conditions, how all Mindes,
Timon of AthensTim I.i.265Ay, to see meat fill knaves and wine heat fools.I, to see meate fill Knaues, and Wine heat fooles.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.40see so many dip their meat in one man's blood. And allsee so many dip there meate in one mans blood, and all
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.128You see, my lord, how ample y'are beloved.You see my Lord, how ample y'are belou'd.
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.49.1See them well entertained.see them well entertain'd.
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.74you are. Would we could see you at Corinth!you are. Would we could see you at Corinth.
Timon of AthensTim III.i.49Ha! Now I see thou art a fool, and fit for thyHa? Now I see thou art a Foole, and fit for thy
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.25See, by good hap, yonder's my lord. I haveSee, by good hap yonders my Lord, I haue
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.26sweat to see his honour. My honoured lord!swet to see his Honor. My Honor'd Lord.
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.74And yet – O see the monstrousness of manAnd yet, oh see the monstrousnesse of man,
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.15That might have known my place. I see no sense for'tThat might haue knowne my place. I see no sense for't,
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.108Push! Did you see my cap?Push, did you see my Cap?
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.112has beat it out of my hat. Did you see my jewel?has beate it out of my hat. / Did you see my Iewell?
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.113Did you see my cap?Did you see my Cap.
Timon of AthensTim IV.ii.18That see I by our faces. We are fellows still,That see I by our Faces: we are Fellowes still,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.79I see them now. Then was a blessed time.I see them now, then was a blessed time.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.172If I hope well, I'll never see thee more.If I hope well, Ile neuer see thee more.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.356see thee again.see thee againe.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.370I swoon to see thee.I swoond to see thee.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.458Let us first see peace in Athens. There isLet vs first see peace in Athens, there is
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.540Ne'er see thou man, and let me ne'er see thee.Ne're see thou man, and let me ne're see thee.
Timon of AthensTim V.i.11Nothing else. You shall see him a palm inNothing else: / You shall see him a Palme in
Timon of AthensTim V.i.54Have I once lived to see two honest men?Haue I once liu'd / To see two honest men?
Timon of AthensTim V.i.93Ay, and you hear him cog, see him dissemble,I, and you heare him cogge, / See him dissemble,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.145See, lord and father, how we have performedSee Lord and Father, how we haue perform'd
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.344O Titus, see! O see what thou hast done:O Titus see! O see what thou hast done!
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.24And see his shipwreck and his commonweal's.And see his shipwracke, and his Commonweales.
Titus AndronicusTit II.ii.19And to our sport. (To Tamora) Madam, now shall ye seeAnd to our sport: Madam, now shall ye see,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.59To see the general hunting in this forest?To see the generall Hunting in this Forrest?
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.93A barren detested vale, you see it is:A barren, detested vale you see it is.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.140To see her tears, but be your heart to themTo see her teares, but be your hart to them,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.187Farewell, my sons. See that you make her sure.Farewell my Sonnes, see that you make her sure,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.213My heart suspects more than mine eye can see.My heart suspects more then mine eie can see.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.216And see a fearful sight of blood and death.And see a fearefull sight of blood and death.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.246Along with me. I'll see what hole is here,Along with me, Ile see what hole is heere,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.292If it be proved? You see it is apparent.If it be prou'd? you see it is apparant,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.299Thou shalt not bail them. See thou follow me.Thou shalt not baile them, see thou follow me:
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.5See how with signs and tokens she can scrawl.See how with signes and tokens she can scowle.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.6And for these bitter tears which now you seeAnd for these bitter teares, which now you see,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.62Will it consume me? Let me see it then.Will it consume me? Let me see it then.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.137See how my wretched sister sobs and weeps.See how my wretched sister sobs and weeps.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.253Thou dost not slumber. See thy two sons' heads,Thou dost not slumber, see thy two sons heads,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.274Come, let me see what task I have to do.Come let me see what taske I haue to doe,
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.49Doth weep to see his grandsire's heaviness.Doth weepe to see his grandsires heauinesse.
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.58I see thou art not for my company.I see thou art not for my company.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.3Good uncle Marcus, see how swift she comes.Good Vncle Marcus see how swift she comes,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.10See, Lucius, see how much she makes of thee:See Lucius see, how much she makes of thee:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.31Some book there is that she desires to see.Some booke there is that she desires to see,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.50See, brother, see: note how she quotes the leaves.See brother see, note how she quotes the leaues
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.54See, see. Ay, such a place there is where we did hunt – See, see, I such a place there is where we did hunt,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.93And see their blood, or die with this reproach.And see their blood, or die with this reproach.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.19Let's see:Let's see.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.37But me more good to see so great a lordBut me more good, to see so great a Lord
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.52O, tell me, did you see Aaron the Moor?O tell me, did you see Aaron the Moore?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.161.2you see I have given her physic,ye see I haue giuen her physicke,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.164This done, see that you take no longer days,This done, see that you take no longer daies
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.168Aaron, I see thou wilt not trust the airAaron I see thou wilt not ttust the ayre
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.2Sir boy, now let me see your archery.Sir Boy let me see your Archerie,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.26To see thy noble uncle thus distract?To see thy Noble Vnckle thus distract?
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.69See, see, thou hast shot off one of Taurus' horns.See, see, thou hast shot off one of Taurus hornes.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.112sir; see you do it bravely.sir, see you do it brauely.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iii.114Sirrah, hast thou a knife? Come, let me see it.Sirrha hast thou a knife? Come let me see it.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.iv.14See here's ‘ To Jove,’ and this ‘ To Mercury,’See, heeres to Ioue, and this to Mercury,
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.51First hang the child, that he may see it sprawl:First hang the Child that he may see it sprall,
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.60Thy child shall live, and I will see it nourished.Thy child shall liue, and I will see it Nourisht.
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.14See here in bloody lines I have set down,See heere in bloody lines I haue set downe:
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.80See, here he comes, and I must ply my theme.See heere he comes, and I must play my theame.
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.204And see them ready against their mother comes.And see them ready, gainst their Mother comes.
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.9And see the ambush of our friends be strong:And see the Ambush of our Friends be strong,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.182Some stay to see him fastened in the earth.Some stay, to see him fast'ned in the earth.
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.199And being dead, let birds on her take pity.And being so, shall haue like want of pitty. / See Iustice done on Aaron that damn'd Moore, / From whom, our heauy happes had their beginning: / Then afterwards, to Order well the State, / That like Euents, may ne're it Ruinate.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.84and so I'll tell her the next time I see her. For my part,and so Ile tell her the next time I see her: for my part,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.4To see the battle. Hector, whose patienceTo see the battell: Hector whose pacience,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.64you know a man if you see him?you know a man if you see him?
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.179we stand up here, and see them as they pass towardwe stand vp here and see them, as they passe toward
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.183we may see most bravely. I'll tell you them all by theirwe may see most brauely, Ile tel you them all by their
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.188Troilus; you shall see anon.Troylus, you shal see anon.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.194you Troilus anon; if he see me, you shall see him nod atyou Troylus anon, if hee see me, you shall see him him nod at
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.197You shall see.You shall see.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.206you see? Look you there, there's no jesting; there'syou see? Looke you there? There's no iesting,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.216heart good now, ha? Would I could see Troilus now.heart good now, ha? Would I could see Troylus now,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.217You shall see Troilus anon.you shall Troylus anon.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.284But more in Troilus thousandfold I seeBut more in Troylus thousand fold I see,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.366I see them not with my old eyes: what are they?I see them not with my old eies: what are they?
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.9him; I see none now.him: I see none now.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.56You see him there, do you?You see him there, do you?
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.116I will see you hanged like clotpolls ere II will see you hang'd like Clotpoles ere I
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.6conjure and raise devils, but I'll see some issue of myconiure and raise Diuels, but Ile see some issue of my
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.96No. You see, he is his argument that has hisNo, you see he is his argument that has his
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.45Cressida) Come, draw this curtain, and let's see yourCome draw this curtaine, & let's see your
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.67Fears make devils of cherubins; they never seeFeares make diuels of Cherubins, they neuer see
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.121Too headstrong for their mother – see, we fools!Too head-strong for their mother: see we fooles,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.129The thing I shall repent. See, see, your silence,The thing I shall repent: see, see, your silence
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.111Where it may see itself. This is not strange at all.Where it may see it selfe: this is not strange at all.
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.130And poor in worth! Now shall we see tomorrow – And poore in worth: now shall we see to morrow,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.138To see these Grecian lords! – Why, even alreadyTo see these Grecian Lords; why, euen already,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.227I see my reputation is at stake.I see my reputation is at stake,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.237To see us here unarmed. I have a woman's longing,To see vs here vnarm'd: I haue a womans longing,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.239To see great Hector in his weeds of peace,To see great Hector in his weedes of peace;
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.271let Patroclus make demands to me, you shall seelet Patroclus make his demands to me, you shall see
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.309And I myself see not the bottom of it.And I my selfe see not the bottome of it.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.1See, ho! Who is that there?See hoa, who is that there?
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.35Who's that at door? Good uncle, go and see. – Who's that at doore? good Vnckle goe and see.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.22We see it, we see it, – How now, lambs!we see it, we see it: how now Lambs?
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.56When shall we see again?When shall we see againe?
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.66And I will see thee.And I will see thee.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.70And you this glove. When shall I see you?And you this Gloue. / When shall I see you?
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.153Doth long to see unarmed the valiant Hector.Doth long to see vnarm'd the valiant Hector.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.158I will go eat with thee, and see your knights.I will goe eate with thee, and see your Knights.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.229To feast with me, and see me at my tent.To Feast with me, and see me at my Tent.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.266I pray you, let us see you in the field;I pray you let vs see you in the field,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.i.64.1There, where we see the lights.there where we see the light.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.i.91word. I will rather leave to see Hector than not to dogword. I will rather leaue to see Hector, then not to dogge
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.110But with my heart the other eye doth see.But with my heart, the other eye, doth see.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iv.5see them meet, that that same young Trojan ass, thatsee them meet; that, that same yong Troian asse, that
Troilus and CressidaTC V.vi.13Now do I see thee, ha? Have at thee, Hector!Now doe I see thee; haue at thee Hector.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ix.8To pray Achilles see us at our tent. – To pray Achilles see vs at our Tent.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.x.41me see:me see.
Twelfth NightTN I.i.20O, when mine eyes did see Olivia first,O when mine eyes did see Oliuia first,
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.17So long as I could see.So long as I could see.
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.64When my tongue blabs, then let mine eyes not see.When my tongue blabs, then let mine eyes not see.
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.78did I see thee so put down?did I see thee so put downe?
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.79Never in your life, I think, unless you seeNeuer in your life I thinke, vnlesse you see
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.98hope to see a huswife take thee between her legs andhope to see a huswife take thee between her legs, &
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.132No, sir, it is legs and thighs. Let me see theeNo sir, it is leggs and thighes: let me see thee
Twelfth NightTN I.v.7He shall see none to fear.He shall see none to feare.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.105Now you see, sir, how your fooling grows old and peopleNow you see sir, how your fooling growes old, & people
Twelfth NightTN I.v.220Good madam, let me see your face.Good Madam, let me see your face.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.239I see you what you are, you are too proud.I see you what you are, you are too proud:
Twelfth NightTN II.i.41Else would I very shortly see thee there – Else would I very shortly see thee there:
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.27Disguise, I see thou art a wickednessDisguise, I see thou art a wickednesse,
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.15How now, my hearts! Did you never see the pictureHow now my harts: Did you neuer see the Picture
Twelfth NightTN II.v.110let me see, let me see, let me see. . . .let me see, let me see, let me see.
Twelfth NightTN II.v.133see more detraction at your heels than fortunes beforesee more detraction at your heeles, then Fortunes before
Twelfth NightTN II.v.149to see thee ever cross-gartered. I say, remember. Go to, thouto see thee euer crosse garter'd: I say remember, goe too, thou
Twelfth NightTN II.v.150art made if thou desirest to be so. If not, let me see thee aart made if thou desir'st to be so: If not, let me see thee a
Twelfth NightTN II.v.190If you will then see the fruits of the sport, markIf you will then see the fruites of the sport, mark
Twelfth NightTN II.v.196but turn him into a notable contempt. If you will see it,but turn him into a notable contempt: if you wil see it
Twelfth NightTN III.i.11You have said, sir. To see this age! A sentence isYou haue said sir: To see this age: A sentence is
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.7Did she see thee the while, old boy, tell meDid she see the while, old boy, tell me
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.9As plain as I see you now.As plaine as I see you now.
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.6And not all love to see you – though so muchAnd not all loue to see you (though so much
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.19Shall we go see the reliques of this town?Shall we go see the reliques of this Towne?
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.20Tomorrow, sir; best first go see your lodging.To morrow sir, best first go see your Lodging?
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.50‘ – and wished to see thee cross-gartered.’And wish'd to see thee crosse garter'd.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.55‘ If not, let me see thee a servant still.’If not, ler me see thee a seruant still.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.109you not see you move him? Let me alone with him.you not see you moue him? Let me alone with him.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.140But see, but see!but see, but see.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.295Give ground if you see him furious.Giue ground if you see him furious.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.350Let me speak a little. This youth that you see hereLet me speake a little. This youth that you see heere,
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.385Come, let's see the event.Come, let's see the euent.
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.117Nay, I'll ne'er believe a madman till I see hisNay, Ile nere beleeue a madman till I see his
Twelfth NightTN V.i.1Now, as thou lov'st me, let me see his letter.Now as thou lou'st me, let me see his Letter.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.4Do not desire to see this letter.Do not desire to see this Letter.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.194end on't. (To Feste) Sot, didst see Dick Surgeon, sot?end on't: Sot, didst see Dicke Surgeon, sot?
Twelfth NightTN V.i.270And let me see thee in thy woman's weeds.And let me see thee in thy womans weedes.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.312See him delivered, Fabian, bring him hither.See him deliuer'd Fabian, bring him hither:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.6To see the wonders of the world abroadTo see the wonders of the world abroad,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.54Expects my coming, there to see me shipped.Expects my comming, there to see me ship'd.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.15Lord, lord, to see what folly reigns in us!Lord, Lord: to see what folly raignes in vs.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.46There take the paper. See it be returned,There: take the paper: see it be return'd,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.88Let's see your song. How now, minion!Let's see your Song: / How now Minion?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.137I see you have a month's mind to them.I see you haue a months minde to them.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.138Ay, madam, you may say what sights you see;I (Madam) you may say what sights you see;
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.139I see things too, although you judge I wink.I see things too, although you iudge I winke.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.iii.55Lend me the letter. Let me see what news.Lend me the Letter: Let me see what newes.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.3Ha! Let me see. Ay, give it me, it's mine.Ha? Let me see: I, giue it me, it's mine:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.64still I see her beautiful.still I see her beautifull.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.65If you love her, you cannot see her.If you loue her, you cannot see her.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.70What should I see then?What should I see then?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.72for he, being in love, could not see to garter his hose;for hee beeing in loue, could not see to garter his hose;
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.73and you, being in love, cannot see to put on your hose.and you, beeing in loue, cannot see to put on your hose.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.75morning you could not see to wipe my shoes.morning / You could not see to wipe my shooes.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iii.30speaks a word; but see how I lay the dust with my tears.speakes a word: but see how I lay the dust with my teares.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.92How could he see his way to seek out you?How could he see his way to seeke out you?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.95To see such lovers, Thurio, as yourself;To see such Louers, Thurio, as your selfe,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.132.2Then let me see thy cloak;Then let me see thy cloake,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.244Here, if thou stay, thou canst not see thy love;Here, if thou stay, thou canst not see thy loue:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.1Fellows, stand fast; I see a passenger.Fellowes, stand fast: I see a passenger.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.30you shall hear music, and see the gentleman that youyou shall heare Musique, and see the Gentleman that you
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.35do as I do? When didst thou see me heave up my legdoe as I do; when did'st thou see me heaue vp my leg,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.37Didst thou ever see me do such a trick?did'st thou euer see me doe such a tricke?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.181Here is her picture; let me see. I thinkHere is her Picture: let me see, I thinke
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.i.7See where she comes. Lady, a happy evening!See where she comes: Lady a happy euening.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.26How like a dream is this I see and hear!How like a dreame is this? I see, and heare:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.93How? Let me see. Why, this is the ring I gaveHow? let me see. / Why this is the ring I gaue
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.i.120Who cannot feel nor see the rain, being in't,Who cannot feele, nor see the raine being in't,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.i.218For I will see you gone.For I will see you gone.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.23You stay to see of us such spinsters, weYou stay to see of us such Spincsters, we
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.63Must we behold those comforts, never seeMust we behold those comforts, never see
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.87No figures of ourselves shall we e'er seeNo figures of our selves shall we ev'r see,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.93Till she for shame see what a wrong she has doneTill shee for shame see what a wrong she has done
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.97The vine shall grow, but we shall never see it;The Vine shall grow, but we shall never see it:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.112I see two comforts rising, two mere blessings,I see two comforts rysing, two meere blessings,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.156I see through now, and am sufficientI see through now, and am sufficient
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.204We'll see how near art can come near their colours.Weele see how neere Art can come neere their colours;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.272And leap the garden, when I see her next,And leape the garden, when I see her next
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.288I would but see this fair one; blessed garden,I would but see this faire One: Blessed Garden,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.304He shall see Thebes again, and call to armsHe shall see Thebs againe, and call to Armes
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.324.2May I see the garden?May I see the garden?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.8Thou hast the start now; thou shalt stay and seeThou ha'st the Start now, thou shalt stay and see
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.23I'll see her and be near her, or no more.Ile see her, and be neere her, or no more.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.34A fescue in her fist, and you shall see her a feskue in her fist, and you shall see her
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.45And she must see the Duke, and she must dance too.and she must see the Duke, and she must daunce too.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.55We'll see the sports, then every man to's tackle;Weele see the sports, then every man to's Tackle:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.57Before the ladies see us, and do sweetly,before / The Ladies see us, and doe sweetly,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iii.28And me as much to see his misery.And me as much to see his misery.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iv.45I'll see you furnished, and because you sayIle see you furnish'd, and because you say
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.25.1Your hunger needs no sauce, I see.your hunger needs no sawce I see,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.33And see what's wanting. Where's the bavian?And see what's wanting; wher's the Bavian?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.150Schoolmaster, I thank you. – One see 'em all rewarded.Schoolemaster, I thanke yon, One see'em all rewarded.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.154Say ‘ Fight again,’ and thou shalt see me, Theseus,Say, Fight againe, and thou shalt see me Theseus
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.33.1O sir, when did you see her?O Sir when did you see her?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.79And see the house made handsome. Then she sungAnd see the house made handsome, then she sung
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.124For if she see him once, she's gone, she's done,For if she see him once, she's gone, she's done,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.65Quickly, by any means; I long to see 'em. – quickly, / By any meanes, I long to see 'em.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.142Now, as I have a soul, I long to see 'em!Now as I have a soule I long to see 'em,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.143.1Lady, you shall see men fight now.Lady you shall see men fight now.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.15Dido see Palamon, and then will she be out of love withDido see Palamon, and Then will she be out of love with
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.163See what our general of ebbs and flowsSee what our Generall of Ebbs and Flowes
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.23Pray bring her in and let's see how she is.Pray bring her in / And let's see how shee is.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.43.1Did you ne'er see the horse he gave me?Did you nev'r see the horse he gave me?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.2.1I had rather see a wren hawk at a flyI had rather see a wren hawke at a fly
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.12She shall see deeds of honour in their kindShe shall see deeds of honour in their kinde,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.137I see one eye of yours conceives a tear,I see one eye of yours conceives a teare
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK epilogue.5Then it goes hard, I see. He that hasThen it goes hard I see; He that has
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK epilogue.9Our market. 'Tis in vain, I see, to stay ye.Our Market: Tis in vaine, I see to stay yee,
The Winter's TaleWT I.i.3on foot, you shall see, as I have said, great differenceon-foot, you shall see (as I haue said) great difference
The Winter's TaleWT I.i.39he was born desire yet their life to see him a man.he was borne, desire yet their life, to see him a Man.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.34To tell he longs to see his son were strong.To tell, he longs to see his Sonne, were strong:
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.303Canst with thine eyes at once see good and evil,Canst with thine eyes at once see good and euill,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.310To see alike mine honour as their profits,To see alike mine Honor, as their Profits,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.314Have benched and reared to worship; who mayst seeHaue Bench'd, and rear'd to Worship, who may'st see
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.117My women may be with me, for you seeMy Women may be with me, for you see
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.123I never wished to see you sorry: nowI neuer wish'd to see you sorry, now
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.136Than when I feel and see her no farther trust her:Then when I feele, and see her, no farther trust her:
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.147I'll geld 'em all! Fourteen they shall not seeIle gell'd em all: fourteene they shall not see
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.153As you feel doing thus and see withalAs you feele doing thus: and see withall
The Winter's TaleWT II.ii.12To see her women? Any of them? Emilia?To see her Women? Any of them? Emilia?
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.12To see his nobleness!To see his Noblenesse,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.18.1See how he fares.See how he fares:
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.133And see it instantly consumed with fire:And see it instantly consum'd with fire.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.154Shall I live on to see this bastard kneelShall I liue on, to see this Bastard kneele,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.120His daughter's trial! That he did but seeHis Daughters Tryall: that he did but see
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.147.1And see what death is doing.And see what Death is doing.
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.202Prevail not, go and see. If you can bringPreuaile not, go and see: if you can bring
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.34Put on thee by my lord, thou ne'er shalt seePut on thee, by my Lord, thou ne're shalt see
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.78What! Art so near? If thou'lt see a thing toWhat? art so neere? If thou'lt see a thing to
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.86I would you did but see how it chafes, how itI would you did but see how it chafes, how it
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.89to see 'em, and not to see 'em: now the ship boringto see 'em, and not to see 'em: Now the Shippe boaring
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.92And then for the land-service: to see how the bear toreAnd then for the Land-seruice, to see how the Beare tore
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.95an end of the ship: to see how the sea flap-dragoned it;an end of the Ship, to see how the Sea flap-dragon'd it:
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.113Take up, take up, boy; open it. So, let's see. It was toldtake vp, take vp (Boy:) open't: so, let's see, it was told
The Winter's TaleWT III.iii.125see if the bear be gone from the gentleman, and howsee if the Beare bee gone from the Gentleman, and how
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.31Let me see: every 'leven wether tods, every todLet me see, euery Leauen-weather toddes, euery tod
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.35I cannot do't without counters. Let me see: whatI cannot do't without Compters. Let mee see, what
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.13To see you so attired, swoon, I think,To see you so attyr'd: sworne I thinke,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.21How would he look to see his work, so noble,How would he looke, to see his worke, so noble,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.52.2See, your guests approach.See, your Guests approach,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.92That Nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marryThat Nature makes: you see (sweet Maid) we marry
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.271Come on, lay it by, and let's first see more ballads;Come-on, lay it by: and let's first see moe Ballads:
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.333see these four threes of herdsmen.see these foure-threes of Heardsmen.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.425That thou no more shalt see this knack – as neverThat thou no more shalt neuer see this knacke (as neuer
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.492To see him any more – cast your good counselsTo see him any more) cast your good counsailes
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.510.1I so much thirst to see.I so much thirst to see.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.525Enjoy your mistress, from the whom, I see,Enioy your Mistris; from the whom, I see
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.542For so I see she must be – 'fore Leontes.(For so I see she must be) 'fore Leontes;
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.544The partner of your bed. Methinks I seeThe partner of your Bed. Me thinkes I see
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.651.2I see the play so liesI see the Play so lyes,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.669work for th' other senses. I see this is the time that theworke for th' other Sences. I see this is the time that the
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.682See, see, what a man you are now! There is noSee, see: what a man you are now? there is no
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.825If I had a mind to be honest, I see FortuneIf I had a mind to be honest, I see Fortune
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.81.1To see her in your arms.To see her in your armes.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.120When I shall see this gentleman thy speechesWhen I shall see this Gentleman, thy speeches
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.205The stars, I see, will kiss the valleys first:The Starres (I see) will kisse the Valleyes first:
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.209That ‘ once,’ I see by your good father's speed,That once (I see) by your good Fathers speed,
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.32you see, there is such unity in the proofs: the mantle ofyou see, there is such vnitie in the proofes. The Mantle of
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.39daughter. Did you see the meeting of the two kings?Daughter. Did you see the meeting of the two Kings?
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.128See you these clothes? Say you see them not and thinkSee you these Clothes? say you see them not, and thinke
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.168princes, our kindred, are going to see the Queen'sPrinces (our Kindred) are going to see the Queenes
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.10To see the statue of our queen: your galleryTo see the Statue of our Queene. Your Gallerie
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.19To see the life as lively mocked as everTo see the Life as liuely mock'd, as euer
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.63What was he that did make it? See, my lord:(What was he that did make it?) See (my Lord)
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.106Until you see her die again, for thenVntill you see her dye againe; for then
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.128.1Myself to see the issue.My selfe, to see the yssue.

Poems

 73 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.102 As oft twixt May and April is to see, As oft twixt May and Aprill is to see,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.183 ‘ All my offences that abroad you see All my offences that abroad you see
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.9 ‘ Once,’ quoth she, ‘ did I see a fair sweet youth Once (quoth she) did I see a faire sweet youth
The Passionate PilgrimPP.9.12 See, in my thigh,’ quoth she, ‘ here was the sore.’ Soe in my thigh (quoth she) here was the sore,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.15.3 Till looking on an Englishman, the fairest that eye could see, Till looking on an Englishman, the fairest that eie could see,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.17.11 Or now I see inconstancy For now I see, inconstancy,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.17.22 In howling wise, to see my doleful plight. In howling wise, to see my dolefull plight,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.17.36 Other help for him I see that there is none. Other helpe for him I see that there is none.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.19.6 And see the shepherds feed their flocks, And see the Shepheards feed their flocks,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.307 Night-wandering weasels shriek to see him there; Night-wandring weezels shreek to see him there,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.414 What could he see but mightily he noted? What could he see but mightily he noted?
The Rape of LucreceLuc.491 ‘ I see what crosses my attempt will bring; I see what crosses my attempt will bring,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.644 That thou shalt see thy state, and pity mine.’ That thou shalt see thy state, and pittie mine.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.704 Ere he can see his own abomination. Ere he can see his owne abhomination.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.750 ‘ They think not but that every eye can see They thinke not but that euerie eye can see,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.986 And time to see one that by alms doth live And time to see one that by almes doth liue,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.988 ‘ Let him have time to see his friends his foes, Let him haue time to see his friends his foes,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1084 But cloudy Lucrece shames herself to see, But cloudie LVCRECE shames her selfe to see,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1116 To see the salve doth make the wound ache more; "To see the salue doth make the wound ake more:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1206 How was I overseen that thou shalt see it! How was I ouerseene that thou shalt see it?
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1306 If ever, love, thy Lucrece thou wilt see(If euer loue, thy LVCRECE thou wilt see,)
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1324 To see sad sights moves more than hear them told, To see sad sights, moues more then heare them told,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1344 For Lucrece thought he blushed to see her shame: For LVCRECE thought, he blusht to see her shame.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1380 There might you see the labouring pioneer There might you see the labouring Pyoner
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1386 That one might see those far-off eyes look sad. That one might see those farre of eyes looke sad.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1401 There pleading might you see grave Nestor stand, There pleading might you see graue NESTOR stand,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1432 To see their youthful sons bright weapons wield; To see their youthfull sons bright weapons wield,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1549 To see those borrowed tears that Sinon sheeds. To see those borrowed teares that SINON sheeds,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1575 And they that watch see time how slow it creeps. And they that watch, see time, how slow it creeps.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1764 That I no more can see what once I was! That I no more can see what once I was.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1770 Then live, sweet Lucrece, live again and see Then liue sweet LVCRECE, liue againe and see
SonnetsSonn.2.14 And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold. And see thy blood warme when thou feel'st it could,
SonnetsSonn.3.11 So thou through windows of thine age shalt see So thou through windowes of thine age shalt see,
SonnetsSonn.12.2 And see the brave day sunk in hideous night; And see the braue day sunck in hidious night,
SonnetsSonn.12.5 When lofty trees I see barren of leaves, When lofty trees I see barren of leaues,
SonnetsSonn.12.12 And die as fast as they see others grow; And die as fast as they see others grow,
SonnetsSonn.18.13 So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long as men can breath or eyes can see,
SonnetsSonn.24.5 For through the painter must you see his skill, For through the Painter must you see his skill,
SonnetsSonn.24.9 Now see what good turns eyes for eyes have done: Now see what good-turnes eyes for eies haue done,
SonnetsSonn.24.14 They draw but what they see, know not the heart. They draw but what they see, know not the hart.
SonnetsSonn.27.8 Looking on darkness which the blind do see, Looking on darknes which the blind doe see.
SonnetsSonn.37.2 To see his active child do deeds of youth, To see his actiue childe do deeds of youth,
SonnetsSonn.43.1 When most I wink then do mine eyes best see, WHen most I winke then doe mine eyes best see.
SonnetsSonn.43.13 All days are nights to see till I see thee, All dayes are nights to see till I see thee,
SonnetsSonn.49.2 When I shall see thee frown on my defects, When I shall see thee frowne on my defects,
SonnetsSonn.56.7 Tomorrow see again, and do not kill Too morrow see againe, and doe not kill
SonnetsSonn.56.11 Come daily to the banks, that when they see Come daily to the banckes, that when they see:
SonnetsSonn.59.9 That I might see what the old world could say That I might see what the old world could say,
SonnetsSonn.64.3 When sometime lofty towers I see down rased, When sometime loftie towers I see downe rased,
SonnetsSonn.75.8 Then bettered that the world may see my pleasure. Then betterd that the world may see my pleasure.
SonnetsSonn.92.7 I see a better state to me belongs I see, a better state to me belongs
SonnetsSonn.95.12 And all things turn to fair that eyes can see! And all things turnes to faire, that eies can see!
SonnetsSonn.99.14 More flowers I noted, yet I none could see More flowers I noted, yet I none could see,
SonnetsSonn.106.2 I see descriptions of the fairest wights, I see discriptions of the fairest wights,
SonnetsSonn.106.7 I see their antique pen would have expressed I see their antique Pen would haue exprest,
SonnetsSonn.113.9 For if it see the rud'st or gentlest sight, For if it see the rud'st or gentlest sight,
SonnetsSonn.123.11 For thy records, and what we see doth lie, For thy records, and what we see doth lye,
SonnetsSonn.130.6 But no such roses see I in her cheeks; But no such Roses see I in her cheekes,
SonnetsSonn.137.2 That they behold and see not what they see? That they behold and see not what they see:
SonnetsSonn.137.3 They know what beauty is, see where it lies, They know what beautie is, see where it lyes,
SonnetsSonn.148.4 That censures falsely what they see aright? That censures falsely what they see aright?
SonnetsSonn.149.14 Those that can see thou lov'st, and I am blind. Those that can see thou lou'st, and I am blind.
SonnetsSonn.150.10 The more I hear and see just cause of hate? The more I heare and see iust cause of hate,
SonnetsSonn.152.12 Or made them swear against the thing they see; Or made them swere against the thing they see.
Venus and AdonisVen.139 ‘ Thou canst not see one wrinkle in my brow; Thou canst not see one wrinckle in my brow,
Venus and AdonisVen.309 Being proud, as females are, to see him woo her, Being proud as females are, to see him woo her,
Venus and AdonisVen.437 Though neither eyes nor ears, to hear nor see, Though neither eyes, nor eares, to heare nor see,
Venus and AdonisVen.440 And that I could not see, nor hear, nor touch, And that I could not see, nor heare, nor touch,
Venus and AdonisVen.703 ‘ Then shalt thou see the dew-bedabbled wretch Then shalt thou see the deaw-bedabbled wretch,
Venus and AdonisVen.939 O yes, it may; thou hast no eyes to see, Oh yes, it may, thou hast no eyes to see,
Venus and AdonisVen.952 Those eyes that taught all other eyes to see? Those eyes that taught all other eyes to see?
Venus and AdonisVen.1093 ‘ To see his face the lion walked along To see his face the Lion walkt along,
Venus and AdonisVen.1109 If he did see his face, why then I know If he did see his face, why then I know,

Glossary

 34 result(s).
apprehendview, see, look
attendsee to, look after, apply oneself to
button[unclear meaning] very plain, easy to see
collectsee, perceive, pick up
conclusions, tryexperiment, see what happens
confusions, trymalapropism for ‘try conclusions’ [= see what happens]
dazzlegrow dim, become unable to see properly
distance[fencing: see sense 1] enmity, discord, dissension
espycatch sight of, discern, see
findfind out, see through
havelet's face, let's see
hoodwinkedblindfolded, made unable to see
kensee, make out, espy
knowsee through, find out about
la yousee, look now
lightability to see clearly, power of vision
looktake care, see, be sure
look youcan't you see?
magnimaster of the great heavens, do you so calmly hear crimes, so calmly see them
mountconspicuously, for all to see
observeperceive, see through, be aware of
piercesee, reach, penetrate
reviewsee again, observe once more
seesee to, manage, attend to
seemeet, see each other
seelook out for
sight-holehole to see through
singanticipate trouble, see storm-clouds brewing
skippass over, fail to see, ignore
stationplace to stand in, spot to see from
surveysee, note, perceive
throughbe in agreement, see eye to eye
videoI see and I rejoice
videsnedo you see who is coming?

Thesaurus

 29 result(s).
ability to see clearlylight
easy to seebutton
eye to eye, seethrough
fail to seeskip
hole to see throughsight-hole
seeapprehend
seelook
seeken
seeespy
seesurvey
seecollect
seepierce
see againreview
see clearly, ability tolight
see each othersee
see from, spot tostation
see properly, become unable todazzle
see throughfind
see throughknow
see throughobserve
see through, hole tosight-hole
see toattend
see tosee
see what happensconclusions, try
see, easy tobutton
see, fail toskip
see, for all tomount
see, made unable tohoodwinked
spot to see fromstation

Themes and Topics

 15 result(s).
Attention signals...ious ways to do with ‘paying attention’ see glossary at mark  (v ) ...
Discourse markers...pped and scourged with rods can’t you see prithee i ce ii i 55 but...
Elision... you > y’ tim i ii 128 you see how ample y’are beloved deter...
... with > wi’ rj i iii 33 to see it tetchy and fall out wi’th’ dug ...
Exclamations... push tim iii vi 108 push did you see my cap contempt impatience [cf pis...
...y e3 i ii 81 o summer&rsquo s day see where my cousin comes relief delight...
Here, there, and where... ts ii i 266 by this light whereby i see your beauty by which +fore ...
... hereof ts iv v 75 go along and see the truth hereof of this concerning ...
Hither, thither, and whither...am iv iii 32 in heaven send thither to see there to that place thither ayl...
Humours... as 'phlegmatic' (she means 'choleric') see also blood (n ) 1--5 choler (n ) chole...
Money...ue aw iv iii 270 for a cardecue he will see the fee-simple of his salvation [= quar...
... half a farthing drachma cor i v 5 see here these movers that do prize their ho...
Past tenses...weated) and in shakespearian english we see several distinctive forms as with all p...
...ated mm ii ii 154 delineate see delineated e3 ii ii 86 ex...
Classical mythology...e timon lll iv iii 168 to see critic timon laugh at idle toys ...
Non-classical legend, romance, and folklore...amazons character in two noble kinsman see also amazon amazonian john ...
...d mab queen rj i iv 53 i see queen mab hath been with you midwife ...
Latin... do you so calmly hear crimes so calmly see them manu cita (lll v i 65) with a re...
...quered video et gaudeo (lll v i 31) i see and i rejoice videsne quis venit (lll ...
... videsne quis venit (lll v i 30) do you see who is coming vir sapit qui pauca loqu...
...s (n m ) tnk iii v 89 jovis of jove see jupiter ipse (pron ) ayl v i 42  ...
...vem (n m ) tit iv iii 54 jovis jove see jupiter labras [= labra] (n nt ) ...
...r i i 250 [f only]   they remain see stage directions manes (n plural) ...
...mely video (v ) lll v i 31   [i] see vides (v ) tit iv i 81 video [yo...
... vides (v ) tit iv i 81 video [you] see videsne [= vides + ne] (v ) lll v ...
...es + ne] (v ) lll v i 30 video do you see vidi (v ) lll iv i 70 video [i] ...
Italian and Spanish...ii 24 all vede (v ) lll iv ii 97 see venetia (n f ) lll iv ii 96 veni...
Frequently Encountered Words (FEW)...iii ii 272 [hamlet to ophelia] you shall see anon how the murderer gets the love of g...
...luck ce v i 184 [egeon to duke] haply i see a friend will save my life ham iv i 40 ...
...erdita] i have preserved / myself to see the issue issue (n ) 3--4 (v ) knave...
...ind to orlando] love is merely a madness see also merely (adv ) 2--3 methinks(t) me...
... antonio] this is the man do thy office see also office (n ) 2--8 (v ) oft (adv ) ...
...ard to all] that power i have discharge see also power (n ) 2--9 prate (v ) prattle...
...dinand] i prattle / something too wildly see also something (adv ) 2 sport (n ) recr...
... night 1h6 ii ii 45 [burgundy to all] i see our wars / will turn unto a peaceful com...
...s] our suit / is that you reconcile them see also suit (n ) 2--4 (v ) sup (v ) have...
...omeo] give me a case to put my visage in see also visage (n ) 2 voice (n ) vote off...
Abbreviations...panels] becomes develops into >>  see ...
... see also [in panels] unclear meaning...
...aw d day ay say f fee ee see g go er sir h hay i hit ...

Words Families

 14 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
FORESEEBASICsee SEE
OVERSEEBASICsee SEE
SEEBASICsee v, seeing adj, seeing n
SEEACTIONoversee v
SEEGODAll-seer n
SEEINTENSITYall-seeing adj
SEESTATEoverseen adj
SEETIMEforesee v
SEENOTunseeing adj, unseen adj
UNSEEINGBASICsee SEE
UNSEENBASICsee SEE
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL