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 451 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.135rule of nature. To speak on the part of virginity is torule of Nature. To speake on the part of virginitie, is to
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.ii.15.1To stand on either part.To stand on either part.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.132But what at full I know, thou knowest no part;But what at full I know, thou knowst no part,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.250thy lower part where thy nose stands. By mine honour,thy lower part where thy nose stands. By mine Honor,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.25to be a great part of your title, which is within a veryto be a great part of your title, which is within a verie
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.i.5Upon your grace's part, black and fearfulVpon your Graces part: blacke and fearefull
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.42come will tell you more. For my part, I only hear yourcome will tell you more. For my part I onely heare your
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.50Brings in the champion Honour on my partBrings in the Champion honor on my part,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.54The stronger part of it by her own letters,The stronger part of it by her owne Letters,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.148nothing but the finest part of pure love. We cannot callnothing but the finest part of pure Loue. We cannot cal
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.180And get her leave to part. For not aloneAnd get her loue to part. For not alone
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.87Sir, you and I must part, but that's not it.Sir, you and I must part, but that's not it:
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.38To part with unhacked edges and bear backTo part with vnhackt edges, and beare backe
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.60We'll feast each other ere we part, and let'sWeele feast each other, ere we part, and lett's
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.103For my part, I am sorry it is turned to a drinking.For my part, I am sorry it is turn'd to a Drinking.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.89'A bears the third part of the world, man; seest not?A beares the third part of the world man: seest not?
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.90The third part then is drunk. Would it were all,The third part, then he is drunk: would it were all,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.119Frowns at this levity. Gentle lords, let's part.Frownes at this leuitie. Gentle Lords let's part,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.ii.4To part from Rome; Caesar is sad, and LepidusTo part from Rome: Casar is sad, and Lepidus
Antony and CleopatraAC III.ii.24You take from me a great part of myself;You take from me a great part of my selfe:
Antony and CleopatraAC III.ii.38We will here part.We will heere part.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.31For the most part, too, they are foolish that are so.For the most part too, they are foolish that are so.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vi.26His part o'th' isle. Then does he say he lent meHis part o'th'Isle. Then does he say, he lent me
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vi.35I grant him part; but then in his Armenia,I grant him part: but then in his Armenia,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.vi.39My latter part of life.My latter part of life.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.19Fortune and Antony part here; even hereFortune, and Anthony part heere, euen heere
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.293If thou and nature can so gently part,If thou, and Nature can so gently part,
As You Like ItAYL I.i.6goldenly of his profit: for my part, he keeps me rusticallygoldenly of his profit: for my part, he keepes me rustically
As You Like ItAYL I.i.72you: you shall have some part of your will. I pray you,you: you shall haue some part of your will, I pray you
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.122his part with weeping.his part with weeping.
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.22O, they take the part of a better wrestler thanO they take the part of a better wrastler then
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.96Shall we be sundered? Shall we part, sweet girl?Shall we be sundred? shall we part sweete girle?
As You Like ItAYL II.i.51‘ 'Tis right,’ quoth he, ‘ thus misery doth part'Tis right quoth he, thus miserie doth part
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.9For my part, I had rather bear with youFor my part, I had rather beare with you,
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.158And so he plays his part; the sixth age shiftsAnd so he playes his part. The sixt age shifts
As You Like ItAYL III.i.2But were I not the better part made mercy,But were I not the better part made mercie,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.143Atalanta's better part,Attalanta's better part,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.396and women are for the most part cattle of this colour;and women are for the most part, cattle of this colour:
As You Like ItAYL III.v.126To fall in love with him: but, for my part,To fall in loue with him: but for my part
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.41part of the thousandth part of a minute in the affairs ofpart of the thousand part of a minute in the affairs of
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.45Why, thy godhead laid apart,Read. Why, thy godhead laid a part,
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.39they will together; clubs cannot part them.they will together. Clubbes cannot part them.
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.128You and you no cross shall part;You and you, no crosse shall part;
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.108Her part, poor soul, seeming as burdenedHer part, poore soule, seeming as burdened
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.132Am better than thy dear self's better part.Am better then thy deere selfes better part. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.28But though my cates be mean, take them in good part.But though my cates be meane, take them in good part, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.67In debating which was best, we shall part with neither.In debating which was best, wee shall part with neither. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.91Plead on her part some cause to you unknown.Plead on your part some cause to you vnknowne; 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.61It is thyself, mine own self's better part,it is thy selfe, mine owne selfes better part:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.122In what part of her bodyIn what part of her body
CoriolanusCor I.iii.98Cominius the general is gone with one part of ourCominius the Generall is gone, with one part of our
CoriolanusCor I.ix.39And stand upon my common part with thoseAnd stand vpon my common part with those,
CoriolanusCor I.x.7I'th' part that is at mercy? Five times, Martius,I'th' part that is at mercy? fiue times, Martius,
CoriolanusCor II.i.55I find the ass in compound with the major part of yourI finde the Asse in compound, with the Maior part of your
CoriolanusCor II.ii.142.2It is a partIt is a part that
CoriolanusCor II.iii.36But that's no matter, the greater part carries it. I say, ifBut that's no matter, the greater part carries it, I say. If
CoriolanusCor II.iii.123The one part suffered, the other will I do.The one part suffered, the other will I doe.
CoriolanusCor III.i.143Where one part does disdain with cause, the otherWhereon part do's disdaine with cause, the other
CoriolanusCor III.i.151That love the fundamental part of stateThat loue the Fundamentall part of State
CoriolanusCor III.i.209Upon the part o'th' people, in whose powerVpon the part o'th' People, in whose power
CoriolanusCor III.ii.105You have put me now to such a part which neverYou haue put me now to such a part, which neuer
CoriolanusCor III.ii.109To have my praise for this, perform a partTo haue my praise for this, performe a part
CoriolanusCor IV.iii.45You take my part from me, sir. I have the mostYou take my part from me sir, I haue the most
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.141.2For mine own part,For mine owne part,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.41I have forgot my part and I am out,I haue forgot my part, / And I am out,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.168To a mother's part belongs. He turns away.To a Mothers part belongs. He turnes away:
CoriolanusCor V.iii.198What peace you'll make, advise me. For my part,What peace you'l make, aduise me: For my part,
CoriolanusCor V.vi.78Doth more than counterpoise a full third partDoth more then counterpoize a full third part
CoriolanusCor V.vi.147Takes from Aufidius a great part of blame.Takes from Auffidius a great part of blame:
CymbelineCym I.ii.96Your son's my father's friend, he takes his partYour Son's my Fathers friend, he takes his part
CymbelineCym I.v.130hold dear as my finger, 'tis part of it.it: My Ring I holde deere as my finger, 'tis part of it.
CymbelineCym I.v.147part of your mistress, my ten thousand ducats arepart of your Mistris: my ten thousand Duckets are
CymbelineCym II.iv.172The woman's part in me – for there's no motionThe Womans part in me, for there's no motion
CymbelineCym II.iv.174It is the woman's part: be it lying, note it,It is the Womans part: be it Lying, note it,
CymbelineCym II.iv.180In part, or all: but rather all. For even to vicein part, or all: but rather all. For euen to Vice
CymbelineCym III.iv.25as I expect my revenge. That part thou, Pisanio,as I expect my Reuenge. That part, thou (Pisanio)
CymbelineCym IV.ii.305As a wren's eye, feared gods, a part of it!As a Wrens eye; fear'd Gods, a part of it.
CymbelineCym IV.ii.349From the spongy south to this part of the west,From the spungy South, to this part of the West,
CymbelineCym IV.iii.5The great part of my comfort gone: my queenThe great part of my comfort, gone: My Queene
CymbelineCym V.i.25Against the part I come with: so I'll dieAgainst the part I come with: so Ile dye
CymbelineCym V.iii.35Part shame, part spirit renewed, that some, turned cowardPart shame, part spirit renew'd, that some turn'd coward
CymbelineCym V.iii.76The part I came in. Fight I will no more,The part I came in. Fight I will no more,
CymbelineCym V.iv.16If of my freedom 'tis the mainport, takeIf of my Freedome 'tis the maine part, take
CymbelineCym V.v.229.1There lie thy part.there lye thy part.
CymbelineCym V.v.313For mine own part unfold a dangerous speech,For mine owne part, vnfold a dangerous speech,
HamletHam I.i.37Had made his course t' illume that part of heavenHad made his course t'illume that part of Heauen
HamletHam I.i.166So have I heard and do in part believe it.So haue I heard, and do in part beleeue it.
HamletHam I.v.18Thy knotted and combined locks to part,Thy knotty and combined locks to part,
HamletHam I.v.128I hold it fit that we shake hands and part:I hold it fit that we shake hands, and part:
HamletHam I.v.131Such as it is; and for my own poor partSuch as it is: and for mine owne poore part,
HamletHam II.i.15And in part him ’ – do you mark this, Reynaldo?And in part him. Doe you marke this Reynoldo?
HamletHam II.i.17‘ And in part him, but,’ you may say, ‘ not well;And in part him, but you may say not well;
HamletHam II.ii.216will not more willingly part withal – except my life,will more willingly part withall, except my life,
HamletHam II.ii.322sigh gratis; the humorous man shall end his part insigh gratis, the humorous man shall end his part in
HamletHam III.i.38And for your part, Ophelia, I do wishAnd for your part Ophelia, I do wish
HamletHam III.ii.11who for the most part are capable of nothing butwho (for the most part) are capeable of nothing, but
HamletHam III.ii.114It was a brute part of him to kill so capital a calfIt was a bruite part of him, to kill so Capitall a Calfe
HamletHam III.iv.21Where you may see the inmost part of you.Where you may see the inmost part of you?
HamletHam III.iv.81Or but a sickly part of one true sense
HamletHam III.iv.98A slave that is not twentieth part the titheA Slaue, that is not twentieth patt the tythe
HamletHam III.iv.158O, throw away the worser part of it,O throw away the worser part of it,
HamletHam IV.iv.12Against some part of Poland.
HamletHam IV.iv.42A thought which, quartered, hath but one part wisdom
HamletHam IV.vi.5I do not know from what part of the worldI do not know from what part of the world
HamletHam IV.vii.75.2What part is that, my lord?
HamletHam V.i.122not yours. For my part, I do not lie in't, and yet it is mine.not yours: for my part, I doe not lye in't; and yet it is mine.
HamletHam V.ii.110For you shall find in him the continent of what part a
HamletHam V.ii.296.2Part them. They are incensed.Part them, they are incens'd.
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.51Did I ever call for thee to pay thy part?Did I euer call for thee to pay thy part?
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.ii.165How shall we part with them in settingBut how shal we part with them in setting
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.99He did confound the best part of an hourHe did confound the best part of an houre
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.131Yea, on his part I'll empty all these veinsIn his behalfe, Ile empty all these Veines,
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.1But for mine own part, my lord, I could be wellBut for mine owne part, my Lord. I could bee well
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.71By south and east is to my part assigned.By South and East, is to my part assign'd:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.134I'll cavil on the ninth part of a hair.Ile cauill on the ninth part of a hayre.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.188My daughter weeps, she'll not part with you;My Daughter weepes, shee'le not part with you,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.74He had his part of it, let him pay.Hee had his part of it, let him pay.
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.123Meet and ne'er part till one drop down a corpse.Meete, and ne're part, till one drop downe a Coarse?
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.iii.27The better part of ours are full of rest.The better part of ours are full of rest.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.23For mine own part I could be well contentFor mine owne part, I could be well content
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.93For my part, I may speak it to my shame,For my part, I may speake it to my shame,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.105That are misled upon your cousin's part,That are misled vpon your Cousins part:
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.70I'll make it greater ere I part from thee,Ile make it greater, ere I part from thee,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.118image of life indeed. The better part of valour is discretion,image of life indeede. The better part of Valour, is Discretion;
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.119in the which better part I have saved my life.in the which better part, I haue saued my life.
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.156(aside to Falstaff) For my part, if a lie may do thee grace,For my part, if a lye may do thee grace,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.159better part burnt out.better part burnt out
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.185short, your chin double, your wit single, and every partshort? your wit single? and euery part
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.232can part young limbs and lechery; but the gout galls thecan part yong limbes and letchery: but the Gowt galles the
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.192grace, my lord: tap for tap, and so part fair.grace (my Lord) tap for tap, and so part faire.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.76and I could discern no part of his face from the window.and I could discerne no part of his face from the window:
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.98Marry, the immortal part needs a physician, butMarry, the immortall part needes a Physitian: but
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.316 – in which doing, I have done the part of a careful friendIn which doing, I haue done the part of a carefull Friend,
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.218hanged, sir, as go. And yet for mine own part, sir, I dohang'd sir, as goe: and yet, for mine owne part, sir, I do
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.220mine own part, have a desire to stay with my friends;mine owne part, haue a desire to stay with my friends:
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.221else, sir, I did not care, for mine own part, so much.else, sir, I did not care, for mine owne part, so much.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.245home till you are past service; and for your part,home, till you are past seruice: and for your part,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.97Why not to him in part, and to us allWhy not to him in part, and to vs all,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.105Yet for your part, it not appears to meYet for your part, it not appeares to me,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.70This news of peace. Let them have pay, and part.This newes of Peace: let them haue pay, and part:
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.65This part of his conjoins with my disease,this part of his conioynes / With my disease,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.96And then imagine me taking your part,And then imagine me, taking your part,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.29in every part.in euery part.
Henry VH5 I.i.51So that the art and practic part of lifeSo that the Art and Practique part of Life,
Henry VH5 I.i.73Or rather swaying more upon our partOr rather swaying more vpon our part,
Henry VH5 I.i.81Did to his predecessors part withal.Did to his Predecessors part withall.
Henry VH5 II.i.4For my part, I care not. I say little; but when timeFor my part, I care not: I say little: but when time
Henry VH5 III.ii.4and, for mine own part, I have not a case of lives. Theand for mine owne part, I haue not a Case of Liues: the
Henry VH5 III.vi.96great, reasonable great. Marry, for my part, I think thegreat, reasonnable great: marry for my part, I thinke the
Henry VH5 IV.viii.110On one part and on th' other? Take it, God,On one part and on th'other, take it God,
Henry VH5 V.i.38I say, I will make him eat some part of my leek,I say, I will make him eate some part of my leeke,
Henry VH5 V.ii.173I will not part with a village of it – I will have it all mine:I will not part with a Village of it; I will haue it all mine:
Henry VH5 V.ii.212for your French part of such a boy, and for my Englishfor your French part of such a Boy; and for my English
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.94Reignier, Duke of Anjou, doth take his part;Reynold, Duke of Aniou, doth take his part,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.67And for myself, most part of all this nightAnd for my selfe, most part of all this Night
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.51For what you see is but the smallest partFor what you see, is but the smallest part,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iv.79I'll turn my part thereof into thy throat.Ile turne my part thereof into thy throat.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.107O uncle, would some part of my young yearsO Vnckle,would some part of my young yeeres
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.iii.88Pucelle hath bravely played her part in this,Pucell hath brauely play'd her part in this,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.v.38Part of thy father may be saved in thee.Part of thy Father may be sau'd in thee.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.v.39No part of him but will be shame in me.No part of him, but will be shame in mee.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.108Have we not lost most part of all the towns,Haue we not lost most part of all the Townes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.67To play my part in Fortune's pageant.To play my part in Fortunes Pageant.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.99For my part, noble lords, I care not which;For my part, Noble Lords, I care not which,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.355Loather a hundred times to part than die.Loather a hundred times to part then dye;
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.47Ay, but these rags are no part of the Duke;I, but these ragges are no part of the Duke.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.vii.123for they loved well when they were alive. Now partFor they lou'd well / When they were aliue. Now part
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.28swallow my sword like a great pin, ere thou and I part.swallow my Sword like a great pin ere thou and I part.
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.38That is too much presumption on thy part;That is too much presumption on thy part:
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.35Throw in the frozen bosoms of our partThrow in the frozen bosomes of our part,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.66Came on the part of York, pressed by his master;Came on the part of Yorke, prest by his Master:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.160To disproportion me in every part,To dis-proportion me in euery part:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.82Which did subdue the greatest part of Spain;Which did subdue the greatest part of Spaine;
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.vi.57Ay, therein Clarence shall not want his part.I, therein Clarence shall not want his part.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.5For my part I'll not trouble thee with words.For my part, Ile not trouble thee with words.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.7So part we sadly in this troublous world,So part we sadly in this troublous World,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.69Peep through each part of him. Whence has he that?Peepe through each part of him: whence ha's he that,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.76Of all the gentry, for the most part suchOf all the Gentry; for the most part such
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.209Which makes my whit'st part black. The will of heavenWhich makes my whit'st part, black. The will of Heau'n
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.41I know but of a single part in aughtI know but of a single part in ought
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.58The sixth part of his substance, to be leviedThe sixt part of his Substance, to be leuied
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.94And stick them in our will. Sixth part of each?And sticke them in our Will. Sixt part of each?
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.96From every tree lop, bark, and part o'th' timber,From euery Tree, lop, barke, and part o'th'Timber:
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.195The part my father meant to act uponThe Part my Father meant to act vpon
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.24Your graces find me here part of a housewife – Your Graces find me heere part of a Houswife,
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.97.1You'll part away disgraced.You'l part away disgrac'd.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.145To think upon the part of business whichTo thinke vpon the part of businesse, which
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.30His blessed part to heaven, and slept in peace.His blessed part to Heauen, and slept in peace.
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.28I am not gamesome: I do lack some partI am not Gamesom: I do lacke some part
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.246swooned, and fell down at it. And for mine own part, Iswoonded, and fell downe at it: And for mine owne part, I
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.280and shook their heads; but, for mine own part, itand shooke their heads: but for mine owne part, it
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.46For my part, I have walked about the streets,For my part, I haue walk'd about the streets,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.54It is the part of men to fear and trembleIt is the part of men, to feare and tremble,
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.99That part of tyranny that I do bearThat part of Tyrannie that I doe beare,
Julius CaesarJC II.i.10It must be by his death; and for my part,It must be by his death: and for my part,
Julius CaesarJC II.i.193.1'Tis time to part.'Tis time to part.
Julius CaesarJC III.i.172Hath done this deed on Caesar. For your part,Hath done this deed on Casar. For your part,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.4And part the numbers.And part the Numbers:
Julius CaesarJC IV.ii.29The greater part, the horse in general,The greater part, the Horse in generall
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.53And it shall please me well. For mine own part,And it shall please me well. For mine owne part,
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.89By your leave, gods. This is a Roman's part;By your leaue Gods: This is a Romans part,
Julius CaesarJC V.v.81To part the glories of this happy day.To part the glories of this happy day.
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.71'Twere but a childish part to say him nay. – Twere but a childish part to say him nay,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.107Bear'st thou a part in this conspiracy?Bearest thou a part in this conspiracy?
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.169Stand where thou dost – I'll part a little from thee – Stand where thou dost, ile part a little from thee
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.190I never mean to part my lips againI neuer meane to part my lips againe,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.65To satisfy thy lust in either partTo satisfie thy lust in either parte
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.57Of whom the better part are slain and fled,Of whom the better part are slaine and fled,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.48Make up once more with me. The twentieth partMake vp once more with me the twentith part
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.50The feeble handful on the adverse part.The feeble handfull on the aduerse part.
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.223And for my part, the bloody scars I bear,and for my part, the bloudie scars I beare,
King JohnKJ I.i.234Sir Robert might have eat his part in meSir Robert might haue eat his part in me
King JohnKJ II.i.359Then let confusion of one part confirmThen let confusion of one part confirm
King JohnKJ II.i.389And part your mingled colours once again;And part your mingled colours once againe,
King JohnKJ II.i.437He is the half part of a blessed man,He is the halfe part of a blessed man,
King JohnKJ II.i.563Hath willingly departed with a part;Hath willingly departed with a part,
King JohnKJ III.i.293Upon which better part our prayers come in,Vpon which better part, our prayrs come in,
King JohnKJ III.iv.54My reasonable part produces reasonMy reasonable part produces reason
King JohnKJ IV.ii.38Since all and every part of what we wouldSince all, and euery part of what we would
King JohnKJ IV.iii.146To tug and scamble and to part by th' teethTo tug and scamble, and to part by th'teeth
King JohnKJ V.iv.47In peace, and part this body and my soulIn peace: and part this bodie and my soule
King JohnKJ V.v.18The stumbling night did part our weary powers?The stumbling night did part our wearie powres?
King JohnKJ V.vi.2.2Of the part of England.Of the part of England.
King JohnKJ V.vii.61For in a night the best part of my power,For in a night the best part of my powre,
King LearKL I.i.139.1This coronet part between you.This Coronet part betweene you.
King LearKL I.ii.42contents, as in part I understand them, are to blame.Contents, as in part I vnderstand them, / Are too blame.
King LearKL I.iv.41worse after dinner. I will not part from thee yet. Dinner,worse after dinner, I will not part from thee yet. Dinner
King LearKL I.iv.99Why? For taking one's part that's out of favour.Why? for taking ones part that's out of fauour,
King LearKL I.iv.151had a monopoly out they would have part on't; and
King LearKL II.ii.33King, and take Vanity the puppet's part against theKing, and take Vanitie the puppets part, against the
King LearKL II.ii.41How now! What's the matter? Part!How now,what's the matter? Part.
King LearKL II.ii.110part, I will not be, though I should win your displeasurepart I will not be, though I should win your displeasure
King LearKL II.iv.187Make it your cause! Send down and take my part!Make it your cause: Send downe, and take my part.
King LearKL III.ii.72Poor fool and knave, I have one part in my heartPoore Foole, and Knaue, I haue one part in my heart
King LearKL III.iii.12is part of a power already footed. We must incline to theis part of a Power already footed, we must incline to the
King LearKL III.vi.59My tears begin to take his part so muchMy teares begin to take his part so much,
King LearKL IV.vi.39My snuff and loathed part of nature shouldMy snuffe, and loathed part of Nature should
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.ii.7How canst thou part sadness and melancholy,How canst thou part sadnesse and melancholy
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.136One part of Aquitaine is bound to us,One part of Aquitaine is bound to vs,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.32When, for fame's sake, for praise, an outward part,When for Fames sake, for praise an outward part,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.86my heart on thy every part.my heart on thy euerie part.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.14here is part of my rhyme, and here my melancholy.here is part of my Rime, and heere my mallicholie.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.57Ay, or I would these hands might never part.I, or I would these hands might neuer part.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.150And quite divorce his memory from his part.And quite diuorce his memory from his part.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.220.2Only to part friends.Onelie to part friends.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.249.1Let's part the word.Let's part the word.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.336That put Armado's page out of his part!That put Armathoes Page out of his part.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.500own part, I am, as they say, but to parfect one man inowne part, I am (as they say, but to perfect one man in
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.504the Great. For mine own part, I know not the degreethe great: for mine owne part, I know not the degree
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.718For mine own part, I breathe free breath. I haveFor mine owne part, I breath free breath: I haue
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.806If this thou do deny, let our hands part,If this thou do denie, let our hands part,
MacbethMac I.iv.24In doing it, pays itself. Your highness' partIn doing it, payes it selfe. / Your Highnesse part,
MacbethMac III.v.8Was never called to bear my part,Was neuer call'd to beare my part,
MacbethMac IV.iii.198But in it shares some woe, though the main partBut in it shares some woe, though the maine part
MacbethMac IV.iii.223And would not take their part? Sinful Macduff!And would not take their part? Sinfull Macduff,
MacbethMac V.vi.57For it hath cowed my better part of man;For it hath Cow'd my better part of man:
Measure for MeasureMM I.i.41To one that can my part in him advertise.To one that can my part in him aduertise;
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.198I thank your worship. For mine own part, II thanke your worship: for mine owne part, I
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.28Quit their own part, and in obsequious fondnessQuit their owne part, and in obsequious fondnesse
Measure for MeasureMM IV.vi.3That is your part. Yet I am advised to do it,That is your part, yet I am aduis'd to doe it,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.427O my good lord! Sweet Isabel, take my part,Oh my good Lord, sweet Isabell, take my part,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.16The better part of my affections wouldThe better part of my affections, would
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.78A stage where every man must play a part,A stage, where euery man must play a part,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.148In what part of your body pleaseth me.In what part of your bodie it pleaseth me.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.95Well, well; but, for mine own part, as I haveWell, well, but for mine owne part, as I haue
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.v.47Therefore I part with him, and part with himTherefore I part with him, and part with him
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vii.77To take a tedious leave. Thus losers part.To take a tedious leaue: thus loosers part.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.viii.28Who told me, in the narrow seas that partWho told me, in the narrow seas that part
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.viii.36I saw Bassanio and Antonio part;I saw Bassanio and Anthonio part,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.24That's certain. I for my part knew the tailorThat's certaine, I for my part knew the Tailor
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.26And Shylock for his own part knew the bird wasAnd Shylocke for his own part knew the bird was
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.172Which when you part from, lose, or give away,Which when you part from, loose, or giue away,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.226I thank your honour. For my part, my lord,I thanke your honor; for my part my Lord,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.26Until my lord's return. For mine own part,Vntill my Lords returne; for mine owne part
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.86Were in six parts, and every part a ducat,Were in sixe parts, and euery part a Ducate,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.326Or the division of the twentieth partOr the deuision of the twentieth part
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.144Would he were gelt that had it for my partWould he were gelt that had it for my part,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.167To part so slightly with your wife's first gift,To part so slightly with your wiues first gift,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.171Never to part with it; and here he stands.Neuer to part with it, and heere he stands:
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.161Why, sir, for my part, I say the gentlemanWhy sir, (for my part) I say the Gentleman
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.60Truly, for mine own part, I would little orTruely, for mine owne part, I would little or
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.17Ready! – Name what part I am for, andReady; name what part I am for, and
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.26Ercles rarely, or a part to tear a cat in, to make all split:Ercles rarely, or a part to teare a Cat in, to make all split
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.60Snug, the joiner, you the lion's part; and I hope here isSnugge the Ioyner, you the Lyons part: and I hope there is
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.62Have you the lion's part written? Pray you, if it be,Haue you the Lions part written? pray you if be,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.ii.79You can play no part but Pyramus; for PyramusYou can play no part but Piramus, for Piramus
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.137And for her sake I will not part with him.And for her sake I will not part with him.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.2Then for the third part of a minute hence:Then for the third part of a minute hence,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.93your part at once, cues and all. Pyramus, enter – youryour part at once, cues and all. Piramus enter, your
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.80And from thy hated presence part I so.And from thy hated presence part I:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.165In Hermia's love I yield you up my part.In Hermias loue I yeeld you vp my part;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.322No, sir, She shall not, though you take her part.No sir, she shall not, though you take her part.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.333Take not her part; for if thou dost intendTake not her part. For if thou dost intend
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.ii.34part. For the short and the long is, our play is preferred.part: for the short and the long is, our play is preferred:
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.201Thus have I, Wall, my part discharged so;Thus haue I Wall, my part discharged so;
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.12Much deserved on his part and equally rememberedMuch deseru'd on his part, and equally remembred
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.197With who? Now that is your grace's part. Mark how shortWith who? now that is your Graces part: marke how short
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.218And never could maintain his part but in theAnd neuer could maintaine his part, but in the
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.300I will assume thy part in some disguiseI will assume thy part in some disguise,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.151do the part of an honest man in it.do the part of an honest man in it.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.195Troth, my lord, I have played the part of LadyTroth my Lord, I haue played the part of Lady
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.18When I do name him, let it be thy partWhen I doe name him, let it be thy part,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.31Fear you not my part of the dialogue.Feare you not my part of the Dialogue.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.19the poor Duke's officers; but truly, for mine own part, ifthe poore Dukes officers, but truely for mine owne part, if
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.132I might have said ‘ No part of it is mine;I might haue said, no part of it is mine:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.142For my part, I am so attired in wonder,for my part, I am so attired
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.113part almost a fray.part almost a fray.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.ii.59part to intermingle with them. But for which of my goodpart to intermingle with them: but for which of my good
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.107is my conclusion. For thy part, Claudio, I did think tois my conclusion: for thy part Claudio, I did thinke to
OthelloOth I.iii.74What in your own part can you say to this?What in yonr owne part, can you say to this?
OthelloOth II.i.24On most part of their fleet.On most part of their Fleet.
OthelloOth II.iii.101For mine own part – no offence to the General,For mine owne part, no offence to the Generall,
OthelloOth II.iii.181Those legs that brought me to a part of it.Those legges, that brought me to a part of it.
OthelloOth II.iii.233When you yourself did part them.When you your selfe did part them.
OthelloOth II.iii.256my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself,my Reputation. I haue lost the immortall part of myselfe,
OthelloOth III.iii.53That he hath left part of his grief with meThat he hath left part of his greefe with mee
OthelloOth III.iii.73Hath ta'en your part, to have so much to doHath tane your part, to haue so much to do
OthelloOth V.ii.293This wretch hath part confessed his villainy.This wretch hath part confest his Villany:
PericlesPer II.i.124And though it was mine own, part of my heritage,And though it was mine owne part of my heritage,
PericlesPer III.ii.98Which Pericles hath lost, begin to partwhich Pericles hath lost, / Begin to part
PericlesPer IV.i.95Half-part, mates, half-part. Come, let'sHalfe part mates, halfe part. Come lets
PericlesPer IV.ii.66Come, the gods have done their part in you.Come, the Gods haue done their part in you.
PericlesPer IV.iv.39Thetis being proud swallowed some part o'th' earth.Thetis being prowd, swallowed some part ath'earth:
PericlesPer V.i.135If thine considered prove the thousandth partif thine considered proue the thousand part
Richard IIR2 I.i.128The other part reserved I by consentThe other part reseru'd I by consent,
Richard IIR2 I.ii.1Alas, the part I had in Woodstock's bloodAlas, the part I had in Glousters blood,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.181Our part therein we banish with yourselves – (Our part therein we banish with your selues)
Richard IIR2 II.i.222Come on, our Queen; tomorrow must we part.Come on our Queene, to morrow must we part,
Richard IIR2 II.ii.142We three here part that ne'er shall meet again.We three here part, that neu'r shall meete againe.
Richard IIR2 III.i.3Since presently your souls must part your bodies,(Since presently your soules must part your bodies)
Richard IIR2 IV.i.193Part of your cares you give me with your crown.Part of your Cares you giue me with your Crowne.
Richard IIR2 V.i.70Take leave and part, for you must part forthwith.Take leaue, and part, for you must part forthwith.
Richard IIR2 V.i.76 – Part us, Northumberland: I towards the north,Part vs, Northumberland: I, towards the North,
Richard IIR2 V.i.81And must we be divided? Must we part?And must we be diuided? must we part?
Richard IIR2 V.i.95One kiss shall stop our mouths, and dumbly part.One Kisse shall stop our mouthes, and dumbely part;
Richard IIR2 V.i.97Give me mine own again. 'Twere no good partGiue me mine owne againe: 'twere no good part,
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.307My part thereof that I have done to her.My part thereof, that I haue done to her.
Richard IIIR3 II.i.5And more in peace my soul shall part to heaven,And more to peace my soule shall part to heauen,
Richard IIIR3 II.i.27Upon my part shall be unviolable.Vpon my part, shall be inuiolable.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.150To part the Queen's proud kindred from the Prince.To part the Queenes proud Kindred from the Prince.
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.70For my part, I'll resign unto your graceFor my part, Ile resigne vnto your Grace
Richard IIIR3 III.i.118O, then I see you will part but with light gifts!O then I see, you will part but with light gifts,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.20Which, I presume, he'll take in gentle part.Which I presume hee'le take in gentle part.
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.27William Lord Hastings had pronounced your partWilliam, Lord Hastings, had pronounc'd your part;
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.50Play the maid's part: still answer nay, and take it.Play the Maids part, still answer nay, and take it.
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.26And part in just proportion our small power.And part in iust proportion our small Power.
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.269The least of you shall share his part thereof.The least of you shall share his part thereof.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.63Part, fools!Part Fooles,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.68Or manage it to part these men with me.Or manage it to part these men with me.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.95Cankered with peace, to part your cankered hate.Cankred with peace, to part your Cankred hate,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.108I drew to part them. In the instant cameI drew to part them, in the instant came
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.114Came more and more, and fought on part and part,Came more and more, and fought on part and part,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.115Till the Prince came, who parted either part.Till the Prince came, who parted either part.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.17My will to her consent is but a part,My will to her consent, is but a part,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.41Nor arm nor face nor any other partNor arme, nor face,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.48And for thy name, which is no part of thee,And for thy name which is no part of thee,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.21For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;For this being smelt, with that part cheares each part,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.158Now, afore God, I am so vexed that every partNow afore God, I am so vext, that euery part
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.165‘ Hold, friends! Friends, part!’ and swifter than his tongueHold Friends, Friends part, and swifter then his tongue,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.173Could draw to part them, was stout Tybalt slain.Could draw to part them, was stout Tybalt slaine:
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.26Taking thy part, hath rushed aside the law,Taking thy part, hath rusht aside the Law,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.106In what vile part of this anatomyIn what vile part of this Anatomie
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.174It were a grief so brief to part with thee.It were a griefe, so briefe to part with thee:
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.102Each part, deprived of supple government,Each part depriu'd of supple gouernment,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.67Had part in this fair maid. Now heaven hath all,Had part in this faire Maid, now heauen hath all,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.69Your part in her you could not keep from death,Your part in her, you could not keepe from death,
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.v.70But heaven keeps his part in eternal life.But heauen keepes his part in eternall life:
Romeo and JulietRJ V.i.19And her immortal part with angels lives.And her immortall part with Angels liue,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.67My lord, I warrant you we will play our partMy Lord I warrant you we wil play our part
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.1.84I have forgot your name; but, sure, that partI haue forgot your name: but sure that part
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.18Virtue, and that part of philosophyVertue and that part of Philosophie
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.191Not possible. For who shall bear your partNot possible: for who shall beare your part,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.23Signor Hortensio, come you to part the fray?Signior Hortensio, come you to part the fray?
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.64I see you do not mean to part with her,I see you do not meane to part with her,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.294Is this your speeding? Nay then, good night our part.Is this your speeding? nay thẽ godnight our part.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.319Faith, gentlemen, now I play a merchant's part,Faith Gentlemen now I play a marchants part,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.106Though in some part enforced to digress,Though in some part inforced to digresse,
The TempestTem I.ii.107To have no screen between this part he playedTo haue no Schreene between this part he plaid,
The TempestTem III.ii.12 in sack. For my part, the sea cannot drown me. I swam,in sacke: for my part the Sea cannot drowne mee, I swam
The TempestTem V.i.27Do I take part. The rarer action isDoe I take part: the rarer Action is
The TempestTem V.i.303For this one night; which, part of it, I'll wasteFor this one night, which part of it, Ile waste
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.84might express some part of our zeals, we should thinkmight expresse some part of our zeales, we should thinke
Timon of AthensTim III.i.61And when he's sick to death, let not that part of natureAnd when he's sicke to death, let not that part of Nature
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.20part, I must needs confess, I have received some smallpart, I must needes confesse, I haue receyued some small
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.48should purchase the day before for a little part and undoshold Purchase the day before for a little part, and vndo
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.78.2For mine own part,For mine owne part, I neuer tasted Timon in my life
Timon of AthensTim IV.ii.21Hearing the surges threat. We must all partHearing the Surges threat: we must all part
Timon of AthensTim IV.ii.29Thus part we rich in sorrow, parting poor.Thus part we rich in sorrow, parting poore.
Timon of AthensTim IV.ii.30.1Flavius and the Servants embrace each otherEmbrace and part seuerall wayes.
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.55For thy part, I do wish thou wert a dog,For thy part, I do wish thou wert a dogge,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.105Each man apart, all single and alone,Each man a part, all single, and alone,
Timon of AthensTim V.i.118It is our part and promise to th' AtheniansIt is our part and promise to th'Athenians
Timon of AthensTim V.ii.7Whom, though in general part we were opposed,Whom though in generall part we were oppos'd,
Timon of AthensTim V.ii.13.1In part for his sake moved.In part for his sake mou'd.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.239I give thee thanks in part of thy deserts,I giue thee thankes in part of thy Deserts,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.449Upon a just survey take Titus' partVpon a iust suruey take Titus part,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.491I would not part a bachelor from the priest.I would not part a Batchellour from the Priest.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.286Let's kiss and part, for we have much to do.Let's kisse and part, for we haue much to doe.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.14part, I'll not meddle nor make no farther. He that willpart, Ile not meddle nor make no farther. Hee that will
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.45between the women. But, for my part, she is my kinswoman;betweene the Women. But for my part she is my
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.84and so I'll tell her the next time I see her. For my part,and so Ile tell her the next time I see her: for my part,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.352What heart from hence receives the conquering part,What heart from hence receyues the conqu'ring part
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.71worth the ninth part of a sparrow. This lord, Achilles – worth the ninth part of a Sparrow. This Lord (Achilles)
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.126To make it gracious. For my private part,To make it gracious. For my priuate part,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.iii.117Not virtuously of his own part beheld,Not vertuously of his owne part beheld,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.50is sweet. – Nay, you shall fight your hearts out ere I partis sweete. Nay, you shall fight your hearts out ere I part
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.85ten, and discharging less than the tenth part of one.ten; and discharging lesse then the tenth part of one.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.52I'll be sworn. For my own part, I came in late. WhatIle be sworne: For my owne part I came in late: what
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.97.2Come, kiss, and let us part.Come kisse, and let vs part.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.156To the expecters of our Trojan part;To the expecters of our Troian part:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.242Tell me, you heavens, in which part of his bodyTell me you Heauens, in which part of his body
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.285After we part from Agamemnon's tent,After we part from Agamemnons Tent,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.46.1Nay, but you part in anger.Nay, but you part in anger.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.viii.15Hark, a retire upon our Grecian part.Harke, a retreat vpon our Grecian part.
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.58An thou let part so, Sir Andrew, wouldAnd thou let part so Sir Andrew, would
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.60An you part so, mistress, I would I mightAnd you part so mistris, I would I might
Twelfth NightTN I.iv.34And all is semblative a woman's part.And all is semblatiue a womans part.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.172question's out of my part. Good gentle one, give mequestion's out of my part. Good gentle one, giue mee
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.56My part of death, no one so trueMy part of death no one so true
Twelfth NightTN II.v.173I will not give my part of this sport for a pensionI will not giue my part of this sport for a pension
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.262any part of Illyria. Will you walk towards him? I willanie part of Illyria: will you walke towards him, I will
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.333And part being prompted by your present trouble,And part being prompted by your present trouble,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.382We will not part from hence. Cesario, come;We will not part from hence. Cesario come
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.10thy master part with Madam Julia?thy Master part with Madam Iulia?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.253And, ere I part with thee, confer at largeAnd ere I part with thee, confer at large
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.157Our youth got me to play the woman's partOur youth got me to play the womans part,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.163For I did play a lamentable part.For I did play a lamentable part.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.50lower of the twain; you may perceive a part of him.Lower of the twaine; you may perceive a part / Of him.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.143A wife might part us lawfully, or business;A wife might part us lawfully, or busines,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.241Part of your blood, part of your soul? You have told mePart of you blood, part of your soule? you have told me
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.iii.43part burns and the deceiving part freezes – in trothpart burnes, and the deceaving part freezes; in troth
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.17.1I part my wishes.I part my wishes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.27Some part of a good name, and many a murderSome part of a good name, and many a murther
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.121Each part of him to th' all I have spoke, your ArciteEach part of him to'th all; I have spoke, your Arcite
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iv.102His part is played, and though it were too shortHis part is playd, and though it were too short
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.10.1And pay them when you part.And pay them when you part.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.18We'll part the time between's then; and in thatWee'le part the time betweene's then: and in that
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.188Play too – but so disgraced a part, whose issuePlay too; but so disgrac'd a part, whose issue
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.459The gracious Queen, part of his theme, but nothingThe gracious Queene, part of his Theame; but nothing
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.3The cause were not in being – part o'th' cause,The cause were not in being: part o'th cause,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.23The testimony on my part no otherThe testimonie on my part, no other
The Winter's TaleWT IV.ii.5Though I have for the most part been aired abroad, Ithough I haue (for the most part) bin ayred abroad, I
The Winter's TaleWT IV.ii.44That's likewise part of my intelligence, but, IThat's likewise part of my Intelligence: but (I
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.1These your unusual weeds to each part of youThese your vnvsuall weeds, to each part of you
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.155.1That never mean to part.That neuer meane to part.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.290We can both sing it. If thou'lt bear a part, thouWe can both sing it: if thou'lt beare a part, thou
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.293I can bear my part: you must know 'tis myI can beare my part, you must know 'tis my
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.341(To Camillo) Is it not too far gone? 'Tis time to part them.Is it not too farre gone? 'Tis time to part them,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.652.1That I must bear a part.That I must beare a part.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.64Her eye, and tell me for what dull part in'tHer eye, and tell me for what dull part in't
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.153Each one demand and answer to his partEach one demand, and answere to his part

Poems

 36 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.144 And was my own fee-simple (not in part) And was my owne fee simple (not in part)
The Passionate PilgrimPP.20.54 He with thee doth bear a part. Hee, with thee, doeth beare a part.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.d7 part in all I have, devoted yours. Were my worth part in all I haue, deuoted yours. Were my worth
The Rape of LucreceLuc.278 My part is Youth, and beats these from the stage. My part is youth and beates these from the stage.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.294 Which once corrupted takes the worser part; Which once corrupted takes the worser part.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.388 Who therefore angry seems to part in sunder, Who therefore angrie seemes to part in sunder,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1135 ‘ And whiles against a thorn thou bear'st thy part And whiles against a thorne thou bear'st thy part,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1327 When every part a part of woe doth bear. When euerie part, a part of woe doth beare.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1328 'Tis but a part of sorrow that we hear; Tis but a part of sorrow that we heare,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1830 But kneel with me and help to bear thy part But kneele with me and helpe to beare thy part,
SonnetsSonn.23.2 Who with his fear is put besides his part, Who with his feare is put besides his part,
SonnetsSonn.37.12 And by a part of all thy glory live. And by a part of all thy glory liue:
SonnetsSonn.39.2 When thou art all the better part of me? When thou art all the better part of me?
SonnetsSonn.46.12 The clear eye's moiety and the dear heart's part: The cleere eyes moyitie, and the deare hearts part.
SonnetsSonn.46.13 As thus: mine eye's due is thy outward part, As thus, mine eyes due is their outward part,
SonnetsSonn.47.8 And in his thoughts of love doth share a part. And in his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
SonnetsSonn.48.12 From whence at pleasure thou mayst come and part; From whence at pleasure thou maist come and part,
SonnetsSonn.49.12 To guard the lawful reasons on thy part: To guard the lawfull reasons on thy part,
SonnetsSonn.53.13 In all external grace you have some part, In all externall grace you haue some part,
SonnetsSonn.62.2 And all my soul, and all my every part; And all my soule, and al my euery part;
SonnetsSonn.74.6 The very part was consecrate to thee; The very part was consecrate to thee,
SonnetsSonn.74.8 My spirit is thine, the better part of me. My spirit is thine the better part of me,
SonnetsSonn.81.4 Although in me each part will be forgotten. Although in me each part will be forgotten.
SonnetsSonn.88.6 Upon thy part I can set down a story Vpon thy part I can set downe a story
SonnetsSonn.113.3 Doth part his function, and is partly blind, Doth part his function, and is partly blind,
SonnetsSonn.113.7 Of his quick objects hath the mind no part, Of his quick obiects hath the minde no part,
SonnetsSonn.122.7 Till each to rased oblivion yield his part Til each to raz'd obliuion yeeld his part
SonnetsSonn.132.12 And suit thy pity like in every part. And sute thy pitty like in euery part.
SonnetsSonn.143.12 And play the mother's part; kiss me; be kind. And play the mothers part kisse me, be kind.
SonnetsSonn.151.6 My nobler part to my gross body's treason. My nobler part to my grose bodies treason,
Venus and AdonisVen.421 ‘ You hurt my hand with wringing; let us part, You hurt my hand with wringing, let vs part,
Venus and AdonisVen.436 Each part in me that were but sensible. Ech part in me, that were but sensible,
Venus and AdonisVen.534 Do summon us to part, and bid good night. Do summon vs to part, and bid good night.
Venus and AdonisVen.630 As fearful of him, part, through whom he rushes. As fearefull of him part, through whom he rushes.
Venus and AdonisVen.892 With cold-pale weakness numbs each feeling part; With cold-pale weakenesse, nums ech feeling part,
Venus and AdonisVen.1049 This mutiny each part doth so surprise, This mutinie ech part doth so surprise,

Glossary

 100 result(s).
acquitplay one's part, discharge one's responsibility
Atlasgiant, sentenced by Zeus to carry the heavens on his shoulders for taking part in the struggle against the gods
backwardpast portion, earlier part, bygone period
belly doubletdoublet with the lower part padded
bodymain part, chief element
branhusk, inedible part of grain
branchdivision, section, part [of an argument]
brawnmuscle, fleshy part of the body
bulkprojecting part of a building, structure for displaying goods at the front of a shop
butt-endfag-end, final part, remaining piece
choir, quirepart of a church where the choir sings
climatepart of the sky
climaturesregions, locality, part of the world
coastpart of the coast, region
comma[subordinate part of a sentence] detail, jot
departpart with, give away
departseparate, part company, take leave of one another
dissolveseparate, part, break up
doperform, play one's part, act
doleshare, part, portion, lot
dowle, dowlsmall feather, tiny part of a feather
dukeact the duke, play the part of a duke
embodybecome part of the same body as, unite as
fellypiece of curved wood forming part of a wheel rim
fifteentax of a fifteenth part levied on personal property
figurerole, part, character
flourfine essence, best part
fore-endearly part, initial period
forenoonpart of the day before noon
forgolose, part with, give up
great-bellywith lower part padded
griffinfabulous beast, part lion part eagle
growbe an integral part of, become one with
half-kirtleskirt [lower part of a kirtle]
hatchlower part of a door, half-door, gate
haunchlatter end, hind part
headstallpart of a horse's bridle that goes over the head
instrumentorgan, faculty, functioning part
jackkey [in a harpsichord, virginal, etc; strictly, part of the key mechanism]
jointlimb, body part
jointuremarriage settlement, part of a husband's estate due to his widow
kindrole, part
lastlast part, end
latestlast part, final bit
leavepart with, lose, forsake
lechercopulate, play the part of a lecher
liverpart of the body thought to be the seat of the passions [especially sexual desire]
longbelong to, be part of
losepart with, let go of, give up
maincentral part, chief part
makejoin in the action, take part
masktake part in a masque
masquetake part in a masque
mayto take part in May-day festivities
mealflour, edible part of grain
meatedible part
moietyshare, portion, part
monarchizeperform the role of a monarch, play a king's part
orienteastern part of the sky [where the sun rises]
overleatherleather in the upper part of a shoe
overpartedunequal to the part, having too difficult a part to play
parcelpart, piece, portion, bit
partquality, attribute, gift, accomplishment [of mind or body]
partdivide, share, split up
partdepart [from], leave, quit
partremnant, fragment, vestige
partterritory, region, province
partcleave, break, tear
partside, camp, party
partaction, conduct, behaviour
partpartly, in some measure
partdepart, leave
partdistinguish between, differentiate
partaketake sides, take the part of
partyside, part, function
pastrypastry-making part of the kitchen
pointin every part, in all respects, completely
posterior[facetious] hind part, later part
presentact, represent, play the part of
proportionpart, portion, amount
quitacquit, do one's part, bear [oneself]
rightsupport one's cause, take one's part
schoolinstruct how to act, teach a part to
seel[falconry: sewing up a bird's eyelids, as part of taming] sew up, close up, blind
shallowshallow part
shaperole, part [to play]
skirtone of four pieces of cloth forming the lower part of a long coat
standnot take part, not be involved
studypreparation, learning, memorizing [of a part]
sunderseparate, split up, part
sweetdelightful time, pleasant part
thin-bellywith lower part unpadded
tithetenth part
tithe-pigpig given as part of a tithe
tourneytake part in a tournament
upwardcrown, top part
utensildistinctive feature, functional part
vauntbeginning, outset, first part
vawardforemost part, front line, vanguard
woundincision, most painful part

Thesaurus

 110 result(s).
body partjoint
body partquick
body partspleen
body partartere, artire
body, fleshy part of thebrawn
body, become part of the sameembody
building, projecting part of abulk
central partmain
chief partmain
coast, part of thecoast
coat, cloth forming the lower part of a longskirt
company, partdepart
difficult a part, having toooverparted
door, lower part of ahatch
doublet with the lower part paddedbelly doublet
earlier partbackward
early partfore-end
eastern part of the skyorient
edible partmeat
edible part of grainmeal
feather, tiny part of a dowle, dowl
festivities, take part in May-day may
final partbutt-end
first partvaunt
fleshy part of the bodybrawn
foremost partvaward
functioning partutensil
functioning partinstrument
grain, edible part ofmeal
grain, inedible part ofbran
hind partposterior
hind parthaunch
integral part, be angrow
king, play the part of amonarchize
kitchen, pastry-making part of thepastry
last partlatest
last partlast
later partposterior
leather in the upper part of a shoeoverleather
lecher, play the part of alecher
main partbody
masque, take part in a masque
masque, take part in a mask
May-day festivities, take part in may
memorizing [of a part]study
outlying partskirt
padded, with lower part great-belly
painful part, mostwound
partdole
partsunder
partparty
partparcel
partproportion
partmoiety
partdissolve
part [of an argument]branch
part [to play]shape
part [to play]figure
part [to play]kind
part companydepart
part of a duke, play theduke
part of a lecher, play thelecher
part of, belong
part of, play thepresent
part of, take the partake
part withforgo
part withleave
part withlose
part withdepart
part, bestflour
part, do one'squit
part, finalbutt-end
part, functioningutensil
part, having too difficult aoverparted
part, in everypoint
part, mainbody
part, play one'sdo
part, play one'sacquit
part, take one's right
part, teach a school
passions, body part of theliver
pastry-making part of the kitchenpastry
pig given as part of a tithetithe-pig
play a king's partmonarchize
play one's partacquit
play one's partdo
play the part ofpresent
play the part of a dukeduke
play the part of a lecherlecher
pleasant partsweet
projecting part of a buildingbulk
same body, become part of theembody
shallow partshallow
shoe, leather in the upper part of aoverleather
sky, eastern part of theorient
sky, part of theclimate
take partmake
take part in a masquemasque
take part in a masquemask
take part in a tournamenttourney
take part, notstand
teach a partschool
tenth parttithe
tithe, pig given as part of atithe-pig
top partupward
tournament, take part in a tourney
unequal to the partoverparted
unpadded, with lower part thin-belly
wheel, part of afelly
world, part of theclimatures

Themes and Topics

 13 result(s).
Body-armour ... gloss beaver ham i ii 230 lower part of a helmet's face-guard normally lifte...
Clothing...le 2h4 v iv 21 f lower part of a kirtle skirt jac...
Cosmos...astronomical notions several terms form part of the general ptolemaic view of the uni...
Discourse markers...erience of her wisdom / plead on her part some cause to you unknown in short ...
Functional shift...w words by changing their word class or part of speech - a process variously known as...
Here, there, and where... of priam&rsquo s daughter about that part concerning the matter thereabo...
...thereof r3 i iii 307 i repent / my part thereof that i have done to her of th...
Hither, thither, and whither...n hitherto / by south and east is to my part assigned to this place to this point ...
Plants...ning probably the ragged robin used as part of a ‘fantastic garland’ cuckoo...
... probably a type of wild orchis used as part of a ‘fantastic garland’ also called ‘d...
Swearing...good h8 ii iii 33 in good faith part of the body or clothing item exa...
Thou and you...alamon cousins have you the lion’s part written mnd i ii 62 snug to quince sn...
Classical mythology... the heavens on his shoulders for taking part in the struggle against the gods ...
Welsh...rds are frequently assigned to the wrong part of speech or given the wrong ending ...
Abbreviations...wing words act as a paraphrase of all or part of the quotation or add some additional...
... nt neuter [in latin grammar] part particle prep preposition pr...
...m hamlet 1h4 henry iv part 1 2h4 henry iv...
...1 2h4 henry iv part 2 h5 henry v 1h6 ...
... henry v 1h6 henry vi part 1 2h6 henry vi...
...1 2h6 henry vi part 2 3h6 henry vi...
...2 3h6 henry vi part 3 h8 henry viii j...

Words Families

 38 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
APARTBASICsee PART
DEPARTBASICsee PART
OVERPARTEDBASICsee PART
PARTBASICapart adv, part n, part v, parted adj, parting adj, parting n, partly adv
PARTACTIONpart-created adj, depart n, depart v, departed adj, departing adj, departing n, departure n, partake v, participate v, participation n
PARTAMOUNThalf-part n, particle n
PARTAPPEARANCEparti-coated adj, parti-coloured adj
PARTDEATHpeace-parted adj, timely-parted adj
PARTOBJECTpartition n
PARTPEOPLEpartaker n, party n
PARTRELATIONSHIPcounterpart n
PARTSPEECHparty-verdict n
PARTSTATEo'erparted adj
PARTTIMElong-parted adj, timely-parted adj
PARTAKEBASICsee PART
PARTICIPATEBASICsee PART
PARTICLEBASICsee PART
PARTYBASICsee PART
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