All's Well That Ends Well
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Enter one of the Frenchmen, with fiue or sixe otherEnter the First French Lord, with five or six other AW IV.i.1
souldiers in ambush.Soldiers in ambush AW IV.i.2.1
1. Lord E. FIRST LORD 
He can come no other way but by this hedge corner:He can come no other way but by this hedge-corner. AW IV.i.1
when you sallie vpon him, speake what terribleWhen you sally upon him speak what terriblesally (v.)
old form: sallie
burst out, make a sudden attack
AW IV.i.2
Language you will: though you vnderstand it not your selues,language you will; though you understand it not yourselves, AW IV.i.3
no matter: for we must not seeme to vnderstandno matter; for we must not seem to understand AW IV.i.4
him, vnlesse some one among vs, whom wee must producehim, unless some one among us, whom we must produce AW IV.i.5
for an Interpreter.for an interpreter. AW IV.i.6
1. Sol.FIRST SOLDIER 
Good Captaine, let me be th' Interpreter.Good captain, let me be th' interpreter. AW IV.i.7
Lor.E.FIRST LORD 
Art not acquainted with him? knowes heArt not acquainted with him? Knows he AW IV.i.8
not thy voice?not thy voice? AW IV.i.9
1. Sol.FIRST SOLDIER 
No sir I warrant you.No, sir, I warrant you.warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmAW IV.i.10
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
But what linsie wolsy hast thou to speakeBut what linsey-woolsey hast thou to speaklinsey-woolsey (n.)
old form: linsie wolsy
[mix of flax and wool] verbal mish-mash, nonsense
AW IV.i.11
to vs againe.to us again? AW IV.i.12
1. Sol FIRST SOLDIER 
E'n such as you speake to me.E'en such as you speak to me. AW IV.i.13
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
He must thinke vs some band of strangers,He must think us some band of strangersstranger (n.)foreigner, alien, outsiderAW IV.i.14
i'th aduersaries entertainment. Now he hath a smacke ofi'th' adversary's entertainment. Now he hath a smack ofentertainment (n.)payroll, service, employmentAW IV.i.15
smack (n.)
old form: smacke
smattering, superficial knowledge
all neighbouring Languages: therefore we must euery oneall neighbouring languages, therefore we must every one AW IV.i.16
be a man of his owne fancie, not to know what we speakbe a man of his own fancy, not to know what we speakfancy (n.)
old form: fancie
whim, inclination, caprice
AW IV.i.17
one to another: so we seeme to know, is to know straightone to another; so we seem to know is to know straightstraight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at onceAW IV.i.18
our purpose: Choughs language, gabble enough, andour purpose – choughs' language, gabble enough andchough (n.)jackdawAW IV.i.19
purpose (n.)intention, aim, plan
good enough. As for you interpreter, you must seemegood enough. As for you, interpreter, you must seem AW IV.i.20
very politicke. But couch hoa, heere hee comes, to beguilevery politic. But couch, ho! Here he comes to beguilepolitic (adj.)
old form: politicke
cunning, full of intrigue, wily
AW IV.i.21
beguile (v.)charm away, while away, pass pleasantly
couch (v.)crouch, lie in ambush, lurk
two houres in a sleepe, and then to returne & swear thetwo hours in a sleep, and then to return and swear the AW IV.i.22
lies he forges.lies he forges. AW IV.i.23
Enter Parrolles.Enter Parolles AW IV.i.24
Par.PAROLLES 
Ten a clocke: Within these three houres 'twill beTen o'clock. Within these three hours 'twill be AW IV.i.24
time enough to goe home. What shall I say I haue done?time enough to go home. What shall I say I have done? AW IV.i.25
It must bee a very plausiue inuention that carries it. TheyIt must be a very plausive invention that carries it. Theyinvention (n.)
old form: inuention
fiction, fabrication, contrivance
AW IV.i.26
plausive (adj.)
old form: plausiue
plausible, convincing, believable
carry (v.)carry off, get away with
beginne to smoake mee, and disgraces haue of late, knock'dbegin to smoke me, and disgraces have of late knockedsmoke (v.)
old form: smoake
expose, smoke out; suspect, scent
AW IV.i.27
too often at my doore: I finde my tongue is too foole-hardie,too often at my door. I find my tongue is too foolhardy, AW IV.i.28
but my heart hath the feare of Mars before it, and of hisbut my heart hath the fear of Mars before it and of hisMars (n.)Roman god of warAW IV.i.29
creatures, not daring the reports of my tongue.creatures, not daring the reports of my tongue. AW IV.i.30
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
This is the first truth that ere thine ownThis is the first truth that e'er thine own AW IV.i.31
tongue was guiltie of.tongue was guilty of. AW IV.i.32
Par PAROLLES 
What the diuell should moue mee to vndertakeWhat the devil should move me to undertake AW IV.i.33
the recouerie of this drumme, being not ignorant of thethe recovery of this drum, being not ignorant of the AW IV.i.34
impossibility, and knowing I had no such purpose? Iimpossibility, and knowing I had no such purpose? Ipurpose (n.)intention, aim, planAW IV.i.35
must giue my selfe some hurts, and say I got them inmust give myself some hurts, and say I got them in AW IV.i.36
exploit: yet slight ones will not carrie it. They will say,exploit. Yet slight ones will not carry it: they will sayexploit (n.)military action, martial undertakingAW IV.i.37
came you off with so little? And great ones I dare not‘ Came you off with so little? ’ And great ones I dare not AW IV.i.38
giue, wherefore what's the instance. Tongue, I must give. Wherefore, what's the instance? Tongue, I mustinstance (n.)sign, evidence, proofAW IV.i.39
put you into a Butter-womans mouth, and buy my selfeput you into a butter-woman's mouth, and buy myselfbutter-woman (n.)[woman who deals in butter, dairymaid] chatterer, gabblerAW IV.i.40
another of Baiazeths Mule, if you prattle mee into theseanother of Bajazeth's mule, if you prattle me into theseBajazeth (n.)[pron: 'bajazet] Ottoman sultan in 14th-cAW IV.i.41
perilles.perils. AW IV.i.42
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
Is it possible he should know what hee is, andIs it possible he should know what he is, and AW IV.i.43
be that he is.be that he is? AW IV.i.44
Par PAROLLES 
I would the cutting of my garments wold I would the cutting of my garments would AW IV.i.45
serue the turne, or the breaking of my Spanish sword.serve the turn, or the breaking of my Spanish sword. AW IV.i.46
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
We cannot affoord you so.We cannot afford you so.afford (v.)
old form: affoord
grant, permit, allow
AW IV.i.47
Par PAROLLES 
Or the baring of my beard, and to say it was inOr the baring of my beard, and to say it was inbaring (n.)removal, shaving offAW IV.i.48
stratagem.stratagem.stratagem (n.)deed of violence, bloody actAW IV.i.49
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
'Twould not do.'Twould not do. AW IV.i.50
Par PAROLLES 
Or to drowne my cloathes, and say I was stript.Or to drown my clothes and say I was stripped. AW IV.i.51
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
Hardly serue.Hardly serve. AW IV.i.52
Par PAROLLES 
Though I swore I leapt from the window ofThough I swore I leaped from the window of AW IV.i.53
the Citadell.the citadel –  AW IV.i.54
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
How deepe?How deep? AW IV.i.55
Par PAROLLES 
Thirty fadome.Thirty fathom. AW IV.i.56
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
Three great oathes would scarse make that beThree great oaths would scarce make that be AW IV.i.57
beleeued.believed. AW IV.i.58
Par PAROLLES 
I would I had any drumme of the enemies, II would I had any drum of the enemy's; I AW IV.i.59
would sweare I recouer'd it.would swear I recovered it. AW IV.i.60
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
You shall heare one anon.You shall hear one anon.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyAW IV.i.61
Par PAROLLES 
A drumme now of the enemies.A drum now of the enemy's –  AW IV.i.62
Alarum within.Alarum within AW IV.i.63
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
Throca movousus, cargo, cargo, cargo.Throca movousus, cargo, cargo, cargo. AW IV.i.63
All. ALL 
Cargo, cargo, cargo, villianda par corbo, cargo.Cargo, cargo, cargo, villianda par corbo, cargo. AW IV.i.64
They seize him AW IV.i.65
Par.PAROLLES 
O ransome, ransome,O, ransom, ransom! AW IV.i.65.1
They blindfold him AW IV.i.65
Do not hide mine eyes.Do not hide mine eyes. AW IV.i.65.2
Inter.FIRST SOLDIER 
Boskos thromuldo boskos.Boskos thromuldo boskos. AW IV.i.66
Par.PAROLLES 
I know you are the Muskos Regiment,I know you are the Muskos' regiment, AW IV.i.67
And I shall loose my life for want of language.And I shall lose my life for want of language.want (n.)lack, shortage, dearthAW IV.i.68
If there be heere German or Dane, Low Dutch,If there be here German, or Dane, Low Dutch, AW IV.i.69
Italian, or French, let him speake to me,Italian, or French, let him speak to me, AW IV.i.70
Ile discouer that, which shal vndo the Florentine.I'll discover that which shall undo the Florentine.undo (v.)
old form: vndo
ruin, destroy, wipe out
AW IV.i.71
Florentine (n.)someone from Florence, Italy
discover (v.)
old form: discouer
reveal, show, make known
Int.FIRST SOLDIER 
Boskos vauvado, I vnderstand thee, &Boskos vauvado. I understand thee, and AW IV.i.72
can speake thy tongue: Kerelybonto sir, betake thee tocan speak thy tongue. Kerelybonto. Sir, betake thee tobetake (v.)entrust, commit, give in chargeAW IV.i.73
thy faith, for seuenteene ponyards are at thy bosome.thy faith, for seventeen poniards are at thy bosom.poniard (n.)
old form: ponyards
dagger
AW IV.i.74
Par PAROLLES 
Oh.O! AW IV.i.75
Inter.FIRST SOLDIER 
Oh pray, pray, pray, Manka reuania O, pray, pray, pray! Manka revania AW IV.i.76
dulche.dulche. AW IV.i.77
Lo.E. FIRST LORD 
Oscorbidulchos voliuorco.Oscorbidulchos volivorco. AW IV.i.78
Int. FIRST SOLDIER 
The Generall is content to spare thee yet,The General is content to spare thee yet,content (adj.)agreeable, willing, readyAW IV.i.79
And hoodwinkt as thou art, will leade thee onAnd, hoodwinked as thou art, will lead thee onhoodwinked (adj.)
old form: hoodwinkt
blindfolded, made unable to see
AW IV.i.80
To gather from thee. Haply thou mayst informeTo gather from thee. Haply thou mayst informhaply (adv.)perhaps, maybe, by chance, with luckAW IV.i.81
gather (v.)gain information, collect knowledge
Something to saue thy life.Something to save thy life. AW IV.i.82.1
Par. PAROLLES 
O let me liue,O, let me live, AW IV.i.82.2
And all the secrets of our campe Ile shew,And all the secrets of our camp I'll show, AW IV.i.83
Their force, their purposes: Nay, Ile speake that,Their force, their purposes; nay, I'll speak thatpurpose (n.)intention, aim, planAW IV.i.84
Which you will wonder at.Which you will wonder at. AW IV.i.85.1
Inter.FIRST SOLDIER 
But wilt thou faithfully?But wilt thou faithfully? AW IV.i.85.2
Par.PAROLLES 
If I do not, damne me.If I do not, damn me. AW IV.i.86.1
Inter.FIRST SOLDIER 
Acordo linta.Acordo linta. AW IV.i.86.2
Come on, thou are granted space. Come on, thou art granted space.space (n.)space of time, whileAW IV.i.87
ExitExit, with Parolles guarded AW IV.i.87
A short Alarum within.A short alarum within AW IV.i.88
L.E. FIRST LORD 
Go tell the Count Rossillion and my brother,Go tell the Count Rossillion and my brother AW IV.i.88
We haue caught the woodcocke, and will keepe him mufledWe have caught the woodcock and will keep him muffledwoodcock (n.)
old form: woodcocke
type of game bird, thought to be easily tricked or snared; simpleton
AW IV.i.89
Till we do heare from them.Till we do hear from them. AW IV.i.90.1
Sol.SECOND SOLDIER 
Captaine I will.Captain, I will. AW IV.i.90.2
L.E. FIRST LORD 
A will betray vs all vnto our selues,'A will betray us all unto ourselves: AW IV.i.91
Informe on that.Inform on that. AW IV.i.92
Sol. SECOND SOLDIER 
So I will sir.So I will, sir. AW IV.i.93
L.E. FIRST LORD 
Till then Ile keepe him darke and safely lockt.Till then I'll keep him dark and safely locked. AW IV.i.94
ExitExeunt AW IV.i.94
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