Richard III
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Enter old Queene Margaret.Enter old Queen Margaret R3 IV.iv.1
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET 
So now prosperity begins to mellow,So now prosperity begins to mellow R3 IV.iv.1
And drop into the rotten mouth of death:And drop into the rotten mouth of death. R3 IV.iv.2
Heere in these Confines slily haue I lurkt,Here in these confines slyly have I lurked,slyly (adv.)
old form: slily
stealthily, secretly, quietly
R3 IV.iv.3
lurk (v.)keep hidden, stay out of sight
confine (n.)territory, region, domain
To watch the waining of mine enemies.To watch the waning of mine enemies. R3 IV.iv.4
A dire induction, am I witnesse to,A dire induction am I witness to,induction (n.)opening scene [of a play], initial step, preparationR3 IV.iv.5
And will to France, hoping the consequenceAnd will to France, hoping the consequence R3 IV.iv.6
Will proue as bitter, blacke, and Tragicall.Will prove as bitter, black, and tragical. R3 IV.iv.7
Withdraw thee wretched Margaret, who comes heere?Withdraw thee, wretched Margaret! Who comes here?withdraw (v.)turn aside, stand apartR3 IV.iv.8
Queen Margaret retires R3 IV.iv.9.1
Enter Dutchesse and Queene.Enter Duchess of York and Queen Elizabeth R3 IV.iv.9.2
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Ah my poore Princes! ah my tender Babes:Ah, my poor princes! Ah, my tender babes! R3 IV.iv.9
My vnblowed Flowres, new appearing sweets:My unblown flowers, new-appearing sweets!sweet (n.)sweet-scented flower, fragrant plantR3 IV.iv.10
unblown (adj.)
old form: vnblowed
unopened, not yet blooming, immature
If yet your gentle soules flye in the Ayre,If yet your gentle souls fly in the airgentle (adj.)soft, tender, kindR3 IV.iv.11
And be not fixt in doome perpetuall,And be not fixed in doom perpetual,doom (n.)
old form: doome
final destiny, deciding fate, death and destruction
R3 IV.iv.12
Houer about me with your ayery wings,Hover about me with your airy wings R3 IV.iv.13
And heare your mothers Lamentation.And hear your mother's lamentation! R3 IV.iv.14
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET  
(aside) R3 IV.iv.15.1
Houer about her, say that right for rightHover about her. Say that right for rightright (n.)just claim, rights, titleR3 IV.iv.15
Hath dim'd your Infant morne, to Aged night.Hath dimmed your infant morn to aged night.morn (n.)
old form: morne
morning, dawn
R3 IV.iv.16
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
So many miseries haue craz'd my voyce,So many miseries have crazed my voicecraze (v.)
old form: craz'd
crack, break down, shatter
R3 IV.iv.17
That my woe-wearied tongue is still and mute.That my woe-wearied tongue is still and mute. R3 IV.iv.18
Edward Plantagenet, why art thou dead?Edward Plantagenet, why art thou dead? R3 IV.iv.19
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET  
(aside) R3 IV.iv.20.1
Plantagenet doth quit Plantagenet,Plantagenet doth quit Plantagenet;quit (v.)avenge, requite, take vengeance [on]R3 IV.iv.20
Edward for Edward, payes a dying debt.Edward for Edward pays a dying debt. R3 IV.iv.21
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Wilt thou, O God, flye from such gentle Lambs,Wilt thou, O God, fly from such gentle lambs R3 IV.iv.22
And throw them in the intrailes of the Wolfe?And throw them in the entrails of the wolf? R3 IV.iv.23
When didst thou sleepe, when such a deed was done?When didst Thou sleep when such a deed was done? R3 IV.iv.24
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET  
(aside) R3 IV.iv.25
When holy Harry dyed, and my sweet Sonne.When holy Harry died, and my sweet son. R3 IV.iv.25
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Dead life, blind sight, poore mortall liuing ghost,Dead life, blind sight, poor mortal-living ghost, R3 IV.iv.26
Woes Scene, Worlds shame, Graues due, by life vsurpt,Woe's scene, world's shame, grave's due by life usurped, R3 IV.iv.27
Breefe abstract and record of tedious dayes,Brief abstract and record of tedious days,abstract (n.)summary, digestR3 IV.iv.28
Rest thy vnrest on Englands lawfull earth,Rest thy unrest on England's lawful earth, R3 IV.iv.29
Sits down R3 IV.iv.30
Vnlawfully made drunke with innocent blood.Unlawfully made drunk with innocents' blood! R3 IV.iv.30
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Ah that thou would'st assoone affoord a Graue,Ah, that thou wouldst as soon afford a grave R3 IV.iv.31
As thou canst yeeld a melancholly seate:As thou canst yield a melancholy seat! R3 IV.iv.32
Then would I hide my bones, not rest them heere,Then would I hide my bones, not rest them here. R3 IV.iv.33
Ah who hath any cause to mourne but wee?Ah, who hath any cause to mourn but we? R3 IV.iv.34
Sits down by her R3 IV.iv.35.1
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET  
(comes forward) R3 IV.iv.35.2
If ancient sorrow be most reuerent,If ancient sorrow be most reverend, R3 IV.iv.35
Giue mine the benefit of signeurie,Give mine the benefit of senioryseigniory (n.)
old form: signeurie
lordship, domain, dominion
R3 IV.iv.36
seniory (n.)
old form: signeurie
seniority
And let my greefes frowne on the vpper handAnd let my griefs frown on the upper hand.grief (n.)
old form: greefes
grievance, complaint, hurt, injury
R3 IV.iv.37
If sorrow can admit Society.If sorrow can admit society, R3 IV.iv.38
Sits down with them R3 IV.iv.39
Tell over your woes again by viewing mine. R3 IV.iv.39
I had an Edward, till a Richard kill'd him:I had an Edward, till a Richard killed him; R3 IV.iv.40
I had a Husband, till a Richard kill'd him:I had a Harry, till a Richard killed him: R3 IV.iv.41
Thou had'st an Edward, till a Richard kill'd him:Thou hadst an Edward, till a Richard killed him; R3 IV.iv.42
Thou had'st a Richard, till a Richard kill'd him.Thou hadst a Richard, till a Richard killed him. R3 IV.iv.43
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
I had a Richard too, and thou did'st kill him;I had a Richard too, and thou didst kill him; R3 IV.iv.44
I had a Rutland too, thou hop'st to kill him.I had a Rutland too, thou holp'st to kill him. R3 IV.iv.45
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET 
Thou had'st a Clarence too, / And Richard kill'd him.Thou hadst a Clarence too, and Richard killed him. R3 IV.iv.46
From forth the kennell of thy wombe hath creptFrom forth the kennel of thy womb hath crept R3 IV.iv.47
A Hell-hound that doth hunt vs all to death:A hellhound that doth hunt us all to death. R3 IV.iv.48
That Dogge, that had his teeth before his eyes,That dog, that had his teeth before his eyes, R3 IV.iv.49
To worry Lambes, and lap their gentle blood:To worry lambs and lap their gentle blood,gentle (adj.)soft, tender, kindR3 IV.iv.50
That foule defacer of Gods handy worke:That foul defacer of God's handiwork R3 IV.iv.51
That reignes in gauled eyes of weeping soules:That reigns in galled eyes of weeping souls,galled (adj.)
old form: gauled
sore, swollen, inflamed
R3 IV.iv.52
That excellent grand Tyrant of the earth,That excellent grand tyrant of the earthexcellent (adj.)[of people] all-excelling, pre-eminent, superlativeR3 IV.iv.53
Thy wombe let loose to chase vs to our graues.Thy womb let loose to chase us to our graves. R3 IV.iv.54
O vpright, iust, and true-disposing God,O upright, just, and true-disposing God, R3 IV.iv.55
How do I thanke thee, that this carnall CurreHow do I thank Thee that this carnal curcarnal (adj.)
old form: carnall
bloody, murderous
R3 IV.iv.56
Prayes on the issue of his Mothers body,Preys on the issue of his mother's bodyissue (n.)child(ren), offspring, family, descendantR3 IV.iv.57
And makes her Pue-fellow with others mone.And makes her pew-fellow with others' moan!pew-fellow (n.)
old form: Pue-fellow
one who shares a church bench; companion, associate
R3 IV.iv.58
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Oh Harries wife, triumph not in my woes:O Harry's wife, triumph not in my woes! R3 IV.iv.59
God witnesse with me, I haue wept for thine.God witness with me I have wept for thine. R3 IV.iv.60
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET 
Beare with me: I am hungry for reuenge,Bear with me! I am hungry for revenge, R3 IV.iv.61
And now I cloy me with beholding it.And now I cloy me with beholding it.cloy (v.)satiate, gorge, satisfyR3 IV.iv.62
Thy Edward he is dead, that kill'd my Edward,Thy Edward he is dead, that killed my Edward; R3 IV.iv.63
The other Edward dead, to quit my Edward:Thy other Edward dead, to quit my Edward;quit (v.)avenge, requite, take vengeance [on]R3 IV.iv.64
Yong Yorke, he is but boote, because both theyYoung York he is but boot, because both theyboot (n.)
old form: boote
additional element, something added to the bargain
R3 IV.iv.65
Matcht not the high perfection of my losse.Matched not the high perfection of my loss. R3 IV.iv.66
Thy Clarence he is dead, that stab'd my Edward,Thy Clarence he is dead that stabbed my Edward, R3 IV.iv.67
And the beholders of this franticke play,And the beholders of this frantic play,frantic (adj.)
old form: franticke
mad, insane, frenzied, out of one's senses
R3 IV.iv.68
Th'adulterate Hastings, Riuers, Vaughan, Gray,Th' adulterate Hastings, Rivers, Vaughan, Grey,adulterate (adj.)adulterousR3 IV.iv.69
Vntimely smother'd in their dusky Graues.Untimely smothered in their dusky graves.untimely (adv.)
old form: Vntimely
prematurely, too soon, before due time
R3 IV.iv.70
Richard yet liues, Hels blacke Intelligencer,Richard yet lives, hell's black intelligencer;intelligencer (n.)secret agent, spy, operativeR3 IV.iv.71
Onely reseru'd their Factor, to buy soules,Only reserved their factor to buy soulsreserve (v.)
old form: reseru'd
preserve, retain, keep
R3 IV.iv.72
factor (n.)agent, representative, broker
And send them thither: But at hand, at handAnd send them thither. But at hand, at hand, R3 IV.iv.73
Insues his pittious and vnpittied end.Ensues his piteous and unpitied end. R3 IV.iv.74
Earth gapes, Hell burnes, Fiends roare, Saints pray,Earth gapes, hell burns, fiends roar, saints pray, R3 IV.iv.75
To haue him sodainly conuey'd from hence:To have him suddenly conveyed from hence.convey (v.)
old form: conuey'd
carry off, make away with, take by force
R3 IV.iv.76
Cancell his bond of life, deere God I pray,Cancel his bond of life, dear God, I pray, R3 IV.iv.77
That I may liue and say, The Dogge is dead.That I may live and say, ‘ The dog is dead.’ R3 IV.iv.78
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
O thou did'st prophesie, the time would come,O, thou didst prophesy the time would come R3 IV.iv.79
That I should wish for thee to helpe me curseThat I should wish for thee to help me curse R3 IV.iv.80
That bottel'd Spider, that foule bunch-back'd Toad.That bottled spider, that foul bunch-backed toad!bottled (adj.)
old form: bottel'd
bottle-shaped, hunched, swollen
R3 IV.iv.81
bunch-backed (adj.)
old form: bunch-back'd
hunch-backed
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET 
I call'd thee then, vaine flourish of my fortune:I called thee then vain flourish of my fortune;flourish (n.)ornamentation, decoration, adornmentR3 IV.iv.82
vain (adj.)
old form: vaine
worthless, idle, useless, empty
I call'd thee then, poore Shadow, painted Queen,I called thee then poor shadow, painted queen,painted (adj.)unreal, artificial, superficialR3 IV.iv.83
shadow (n.)image, likeness, portrait, semblance
The presentation of but what I was;The presentation of but what I was,presentation (n.)semblance, display, showR3 IV.iv.84
The flattering Index of a direfull Pageant;The flattering index of a direful pageant,direful (adj.)
old form: direfull
dreadful, terrible, frightful
R3 IV.iv.85
index (n.)prologue, preface, table of contents
One heau'd a high, to be hurl'd downe below:One heaved a-high to be hurled down below,a-high (adv.)
old form: a high
on high, aloft
R3 IV.iv.86
A Mother onely mockt with two faire Babes;A mother only mocked with two fair babes, R3 IV.iv.87
A dreame of what thou wast, a garish FlaggeA dream of what thou wast, a garish flag R3 IV.iv.88
To be the ayme of euery dangerous Shot;To be the aim of every dangerous shot;shot (n.)armed soldier, gunner, marksmanR3 IV.iv.89
aim (n.)
old form: ayme
target, object, goal
A signe of Dignity, a Breath, a Bubble;A sign of dignity, a breath, a bubble,sign (n.)
old form: signe
mere semblance, token symbol, show
R3 IV.iv.90
A Queene in ieast, onely to fill the Scene.A queen in jest, only to fill the scene. R3 IV.iv.91
Where is thy Husband now? Where be thy Brothers?Where is thy husband now? Where be thy brothers? R3 IV.iv.92
Where be thy two Sonnes? Wherein dost thou Ioy?Where are thy two sons? Wherein dost thou joy?joy (v.)
old form: Ioy
feel joy, be happy, rejoice
R3 IV.iv.93
Who sues, and kneeles, and sayes, God saue the Queene?Who sues and kneels and says, ‘ God save the Queen ’?sue (v.)beg, plead, beseechR3 IV.iv.94
Where be the bending Peeres that flattered thee?Where be the bending peers that flattered thee?bending (adj.)bowing, reverential, respectfulR3 IV.iv.95
Where be the thronging Troopes that followed thee?Where be the thronging troops that followed thee?troop (n.)
old form: Troopes
company, retinue, band of followers
R3 IV.iv.96
Decline all this, and see what now thou art.Decline all this, and see what now thou art:decline (v.)go systematically through, recite in orderR3 IV.iv.97
For happy Wife, a most distressed Widdow:For happy wife, a most distressed widow; R3 IV.iv.98
For ioyfull Mother, one that wailes the name:For joyful mother, one that wails the name;wail (v.)
old form: wailes
bewail, lament, grieve [for]
R3 IV.iv.99
For one being sued too, one that humbly sues:For one being sued to, one that humbly sues; R3 IV.iv.100
For Queene, a very Caytiffe, crown'd with care:For queen, a very caitiff crowned with care;caitiff (n.)
old form: Caytiffe
[sympathetic or contemptuous] miserable wretch, wretched creature
R3 IV.iv.101
For she that scorn'd at me, now scorn'd of me:For she that scorned at me, now scorned of me; R3 IV.iv.102
For she being feared of all, now fearing one:For she being feared of all, now fearing one; R3 IV.iv.103
For she commanding all, obey'd of none.For she commanding all, obeyed of none. R3 IV.iv.104
Thus hath the course of Iustice whirl'd about,Thus hath the course of justice wheeled aboutcourse (n.)habit, custom, practise, normal procedureR3 IV.iv.105
And left thee but a very prey to time,And left thee but a very prey to time, R3 IV.iv.106
Hauing no more but Thought of what thou wast.Having no more but thought of what thou wast, R3 IV.iv.107
To torture thee the more, being what thou art,To torture thee the more, being what thou art. R3 IV.iv.108
Thou didst vsurpe my place, and dost thou notThou didst usurp my place, and dost thou notplace (n.)position, post, office, rankR3 IV.iv.109
Vsurpe the iust proportion of my Sorrow?Usurp the just proportion of my sorrow? R3 IV.iv.110
Now thy proud Necke, beares halfe my burthen'd yoke,Now thy proud neck bears half my burdened yoke,burdened, burthened (adj.)
old form: burthen'd
burdensome, heavy, oppressive
R3 IV.iv.111
From which, euen heere I slip my wearied head,From which even here I slip my weary head R3 IV.iv.112
And leaue the burthen of it all, on thee.And leave the burden of it all on thee. R3 IV.iv.113
Farwell Yorkes wife, and Queene of sad mischance,Farewell, York's wife, and Queen of sad mischance!sad (adj.)downcast, distressed, mournful, gloomyR3 IV.iv.114
These English woes, shall make me smile in France.These English woes shall make me smile in France. R3 IV.iv.115
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
O thou well skill'd in Curses, stay a-while,O thou well skilled in curses, stay awhile R3 IV.iv.116
And teach me how to curse mine enemies.And teach me how to curse mine enemies! R3 IV.iv.117
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET 
Forbeare to sleepe the night, and fast the day:Forbear to sleep the nights, and fast the days;forbear (v.)
old form: Forbeare
stop, cease, desist
R3 IV.iv.118
Compare dead happinesse, with liuing woe:Compare dead happiness with living woe; R3 IV.iv.119
Thinke that thy Babes were sweeter then they were,Think that thy babes were sweeter than they were R3 IV.iv.120
And he that slew them fowler then he is:And he that slew them fouler than he is. R3 IV.iv.121
Bett'ring thy losse, makes the bad causer worse,Bettering thy loss makes the bad causer worse; R3 IV.iv.122
Reuoluing this, will teach thee how to Curse.Revolving this will teach thee how to curse.revolve (v.)
old form: Reuoluing
consider, ponder, meditate
R3 IV.iv.123
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
My words are dull, O quicken them with thine.My words are dull. O, quicken them with thine!quicken (v.)revive, rejuvenate, give life [to]R3 IV.iv.124
Mar. QUEEN MARGARET 
Thy woes will make them sharpe, And pierce like mine. Thy woes will make them sharp and pierce like mine. R3 IV.iv.125
Exit Margaret.Exit Queen Margaret R3 IV.iv.125
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Why should calamity be full of words?Why should calamity be full of words? R3 IV.iv.126
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Windy Atturnies to their Clients Woes,Windy attorneys to their client's woes, R3 IV.iv.127
Ayery succeeders of intestine ioyes,Airy succeeders of intestate joys,intestate (adj.)leaving no will, lacking inheritanceR3 IV.iv.128
Poore breathing Orators of miseries,Poor breathing orators of miseries, R3 IV.iv.129
Let them haue scope, though what they will impart,Let them have scope! Though what they will impart R3 IV.iv.130
Helpe nothing els, yet do they ease the hart.Help nothing else, yet do they ease the heart. R3 IV.iv.131
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
If so then, be not Tongue-ty'd: go with me,If so, then be not tongue-tied: go with me, R3 IV.iv.132
And in the breath of bitter words, let's smotherAnd in the breath of bitter words let's smother R3 IV.iv.133
My damned Son, that thy two sweet Sonnes smother'd.My damned son that thy two sweet sons smothered. R3 IV.iv.134
The Trumpet sounds, be copious in exclaimes.The trumpet sounds. Be copious in exclaims.exclaim (n.)
old form: exclaimes
exclamation, outcry, protest
R3 IV.iv.135
Enter King Richard, and his Traine.Enter King Richard and his train, marching, with R3 IV.iv.136.1
drums and trumpets R3 IV.iv.136.2
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Who intercepts me in my Expedition?Who intercepts my expedition?expedition (n.)warlike enterprise, setting out for warR3 IV.iv.136
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
O she, that might haue intercepted theeO, she that might have intercepted thee, R3 IV.iv.137
By strangling thee in her aceursed wombe,By strangling thee in her accursed womb, R3 IV.iv.138
From all the slaughters (Wretch) that thou hast done.From all the slaughters, wretch, that thou hast done! R3 IV.iv.139
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Hid'st thou that Forhead with a Golden CrowneHid'st thou that forehead with a golden crown R3 IV.iv.140
Where't should be branded, if that right were right?Where should be branded, if that right were right, R3 IV.iv.141
The slaughter of the Prince that ow'd that Crowne,The slaughter of the prince that owed that crownowe (v.)
old form: ow'd
own, possess, have
R3 IV.iv.142
And the dyre death of my poore Sonnes, and Brothers.And the dire death of my poor sons and brothers? R3 IV.iv.143
Tell me thou Villaine-slaue, where are my Children?Tell me, thou villain-slave, where are my children?villain-slave (n.)
old form: Villaine-slaue
villainous wretch
R3 IV.iv.144
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Thou Toad, thou Toade, / Where is thy Brother Clarence?Thou toad, thou toad, where is thy brother Clarence? R3 IV.iv.145
And little Ned Plantagenet his Sonne?And little Ned Plantagenet, his son? R3 IV.iv.146
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Where is the gentle Riuers, Vaughan, Gray?Where is the gentle Rivers, Vaughan, Grey?gentle (adj.)well-born, honourable, nobleR3 IV.iv.147
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Where is kinde Hastings?Where is kind Hastings? R3 IV.iv.148
Rich. KING RICHARD 
A flourish Trumpets, strike Alarum Drummes:A flourish, trumpets! Strike alarum, drums!trumpet (n.)trumpeter; herald, announcerR3 IV.iv.149
strike (v.)beat, sound, strike up
flourish (n.)fanfare
drum (n.)
old form: Drummes
drummer
alarm, alarum, 'larm, 'larum (n.)call to arms, call to battle, signal to begin fighting
Let not the Heauens heare these Tell-tale womenLet not the heavens hear these tell-tale women R3 IV.iv.150
Raile on the Lords Annointed. Strike I say.Rail on the Lord's anointed. Strike, I say!rail (v.)
old form: Raile
rant, rave, be abusive [about]
R3 IV.iv.151
Flourish. Alarums.Flourish. Alarums R3 IV.iv.152.1
Either be patient, and intreat me fayre,Either be patient and entreat me fair,fair (adv.)kindly, encouragingly, courteouslyR3 IV.iv.152
entreat, intreat (v.)treat, handle, deal with
Or with the clamorous report of Warre,Or with the clamorous report of war R3 IV.iv.153
Thus will I drowne your exclamations.Thus will I drown your exclamations.exclamation (n.)loud reproach, outcry, clamorous complaintR3 IV.iv.154
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Art thou my Sonne?Art thou my son? R3 IV.iv.155
Rich. KING RICHARD 
I, I thanke God, my Father, and your selfe.Ay, I thank God, my father, and yourself. R3 IV.iv.156
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Then patiently heare my impatience.Then patiently hear my impatience. R3 IV.iv.157
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Madam, I haue a touch of your condition,Madam, I have a touch of your condition R3 IV.iv.158
That cannot brooke the accent of reproofe.That cannot brook the accent of reproof.brook (v.)
old form: brooke
endure, tolerate, put up with
R3 IV.iv.159
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
O let me speake.O, let me speak! R3 IV.iv.160.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Do then, but Ile not heare.Do then, but I'll not hear. R3 IV.iv.160.2
Dut: DUCHESS OF YORK 
I will be milde, and gentle in my words.I will be mild and gentle in my words.gentle (adj.)peaceful, calm, free from violenceR3 IV.iv.161
Rich. KING RICHARD 
And breefe (good Mother) for I am in hast.And brief, good mother, for I am in haste. R3 IV.iv.162
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Art thou so hasty? I haue staid for theeArt thou so hasty? I have stayed for thee,stay for (v.)
old form: staid
wait for, await
R3 IV.iv.163
(God knowes) in torment and in agony.God knows, in torment and in agony. R3 IV.iv.164
Rich. KING RICHARD 
And came I not at last to comfort you?And came I not at last to comfort you? R3 IV.iv.165
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
No by the holy Rood, thou know'st it well,No, by the Holy Rood, thou know'st it well,rood (n.)crossR3 IV.iv.166
Thou cam'st on earth, to make the earth my Hell.Thou cam'st on earth to make the earth my hell. R3 IV.iv.167
A greeuous burthen was thy Birth to me,A grievous burden was thy birth to me; R3 IV.iv.168
Tetchy and wayward was thy Infancie.Tetchy and wayward was thy infancy;tetchy, teachy (adj.)irritable, peevish, fretfulR3 IV.iv.169
Thy School-daies frightfull, desp'rate, wilde, and furious,Thy schooldays frightful, desperate, wild, and furious;frightful (adj.)
old form: frightfull
frightening, terrifying, full of horror
R3 IV.iv.170
Thy prime of Manhood, daring, bold, and venturous:Thy prime of manhood daring, bold, and venturous;prime (n.)early years, prime of life, fullness of youthR3 IV.iv.171
Thy Age confirm'd, proud, subtle, slye, and bloody,Thy age confirmed, proud, subtle, sly, and bloody,age (n.)mature years, old ageR3 IV.iv.172
confirmed (adj.)
old form: confirm'd
resolute, determined, purposeful
More milde, but yet more harmfull; Kinde in hatred:More mild, but yet more harmful – kind in hatred. R3 IV.iv.173
What comfortable houre canst thou name,What comfortable hour canst thou namecomfortable (adj.)cheerful, cheery, light-heartedR3 IV.iv.174
That euer grac'd me with thy company?That ever graced me with thy company? R3 IV.iv.175
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Faith none, but Humfrey Hower, / That call'd your GraceFaith, none, but Humphrey Hour, that called your grace R3 IV.iv.176
To Breakefast once, forth of my company.To breakfast once, forth of my company. R3 IV.iv.177
If I be so disgracious in your eye,If I be so disgracious in your eye,disgracious (adj.)disliked, out of favour, displeasingR3 IV.iv.178
Let me march on, and not offend you Madam.Let me march on and not offend you, madam. R3 IV.iv.179
Strike vp the Drumme.Strike up the drum. R3 IV.iv.180.1
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
I prythee heare me speake.I prithee hear me speak. R3 IV.iv.180.2
Rich. KING RICHARD 
You speake too bitterly.You speak too bitterly. R3 IV.iv.181.1
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Heare me a word:Hear me a word, R3 IV.iv.181.2
For I shall neuer speake to thee againe.For I shall never speak to thee again. R3 IV.iv.182
Rich. KING RICHARD 
So.So. R3 IV.iv.183
Dut. DUCHESS OF YORK 
Either thou wilt dye, by Gods iust ordinanceEither thou wilt die by God's just ordinance R3 IV.iv.184
Ere from this warre thou turne a Conqueror:Ere from this war thou turn a conqueror,turn (v.)
old form: turne
return, come back
R3 IV.iv.185
Or I with greefe and extreame Age shall perish,Or I with grief and extreme age shall perish R3 IV.iv.186
And neuer more behold thy face againe.And never more behold thy face again. R3 IV.iv.187
Therefore take with thee my most greeuous Curse,Therefore take with thee my most grievous curse, R3 IV.iv.188
Which in the day of Battell tyre thee moreWhich in the day of battle tire thee more R3 IV.iv.189
Then all the compleat Armour that thou wear'st.Than all the complete armour that thou wearest! R3 IV.iv.190
My Prayers on the aduerse party fight,My prayers on the adverse party fight, R3 IV.iv.191
And there the little soules of Edwards Children,And there the little souls of Edward's children R3 IV.iv.192
Whisper the Spirits of thine Enemies,Whisper the spirits of thine enemies R3 IV.iv.193
And promise them Successe and Victory:And promise them success and victory! R3 IV.iv.194
Bloody thou art, bloody will be thy end:Bloody thou art, bloody will be thy end; R3 IV.iv.195
Shame serues thy life, and doth thy death attend. Shame serves thy life and doth thy death attend.attend (v.)await, wait for, expectR3 IV.iv.196
Exit.Exit R3 IV.iv.196
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Though far more cause, yet much lesse spirit to curseThough far more cause, yet much less spirit to curse R3 IV.iv.197
Abides in me, I say Amen to her.Abides in me, I say amen to her. R3 IV.iv.198
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Stay Madam, I must talke a word with you.Stay, madam; I must talk a word with you. R3 IV.iv.199
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
I haue no more sonnes of the Royall BloodI have no more sons of the royal blood R3 IV.iv.200
For thee to slaughter. For my Daughters ( Richard)For thee to slaughter. For my daughters, Richard, R3 IV.iv.201
They shall be praying Nunnes, not weeping Queenes:They shall be praying nuns, not weeping queens; R3 IV.iv.202
And therefore leuell not to hit their liues.And therefore level not to hit their lives.level (v.)
old form: leuell
aim, direct, target
R3 IV.iv.203
Rich. KING RICHARD 
You haue a daughter call'd Elizabeth,You have a daughter called Elizabeth R3 IV.iv.204
Vertuous and Faire, Royall and Gracious?Virtuous and fair, royal and gracious. R3 IV.iv.205
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
And must she dye for this? O let her liue,And must she die for this? O, let her live, R3 IV.iv.206
And Ile corrupt her Manners, staine her Beauty,And I'll corrupt her manners, stain her beauty, R3 IV.iv.207
Slander my Selfe, as false to Edwards bed:Slander myself as false to Edward's bed,false (adj.)disloyal, faithless, inconstant, unfaithfulR3 IV.iv.208
Throw ouer her the vaile of Infamy,Throw over her the veil of infamy. R3 IV.iv.209
So she may liue vnscarr'd of bleeding slaughter,So she may live unscarred of bleeding slaughter, R3 IV.iv.210
I will confesse she was not Edwards daughter.I will confess she was not Edward's daughter. R3 IV.iv.211
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Wrong not her Byrth, she is a Royall Princesse.Wrong not her birth; she is a royal princess. R3 IV.iv.212
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
To saue her life, Ile say she is not so.To save her life, I'll say she is not so. R3 IV.iv.213
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Her life is safest onely in her byrth.Her life is safest only in her birth. R3 IV.iv.214
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
And onely in that safety, dyed her Brothers.And only in that safety died her brothers. R3 IV.iv.215
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Loe at their Birth, good starres were opposite.Lo, at their births good stars were opposite.opposite (adj.)opposed, hostile, adverse, antagonistic [to]R3 IV.iv.216
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
No, to their liues, ill friends were contrary.No, to their lives ill friends were contrary.ill (adj.)evil, wicked, immoralR3 IV.iv.217
Rich! KING RICHARD 
All vnauoyded is the doome of Destiny.All unavoided is the doom of destiny.unavoided (adj.)
old form: vnauoyded
unavoidable, inevitable, inescapable
R3 IV.iv.218
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
True: when auoyded grace makes Destiny.True, when avoided grace makes destiny. R3 IV.iv.219
My Babes were destin'd to a fairer death,My babes were destined to a fairer death R3 IV.iv.220
If grace had blest thee with a fairer life.If grace had blessed thee with a fairer life. R3 IV.iv.221
Rich, KING RICHARD 
You speake as if that I had slaine my Cosins?You speak as if that I had slain my cousins! R3 IV.iv.222
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Cosins indeed, and by their Vnckle couzend,Cousins indeed, and by their uncle cozenedcozen (v.)
old form: couzend
cheat, dupe, trick, deceive
R3 IV.iv.223
Of Comfort, Kingdome, Kindred, Freedome, Life,Of comfort, kingdom, kindred, freedom, life. R3 IV.iv.224
Whose hand soeuer lanch'd their tender hearts,Whose hand soever lanched their tender hearts,lanch (v.)
old form: lanch'd
pierce, stab, wound
R3 IV.iv.225
Thy head (all indirectly) gaue direction.Thy head, all indirectly, gave direction.all (conj.)althoughR3 IV.iv.226
No doubt the murd'rous Knife was dull and blunt,No doubt the murderous knife was dull and blunt R3 IV.iv.227
Till it was whetted on thy stone-hard heart,Till it was whetted on thy stone-hard heart R3 IV.iv.228
To reuell in the Intrailes of my Lambes.To revel in the entrails of my lambs. R3 IV.iv.229
But that still vse of greefe, makes wilde greefe tame,But that still use of grief makes wild grief tame,still (adj.)constant, continual, perpetualR3 IV.iv.230
use (n.)
old form: vse
usual practice, habit, custom
My tongue should to thy eares not name my Boyes,My tongue should to thy ears not name my boys R3 IV.iv.231
Till that my Nayles were anchor'd in thine eyes:Till that my nails were anchored in thine eyes;anchor (v.)
old form: anchor'd
embed, sink, fix firmly
R3 IV.iv.232
And I in such a desp'rate Bay of death,And I, in such a desperate bay of death,bay (n.)[hunting] last stand, point of captureR3 IV.iv.233
Like a poore Barke, of sailes and tackling reft,Like a poor bark of sails and tackling reft,tackling (n.)rigging [of a ship], tackleR3 IV.iv.234
bark, barque (n.)
old form: Barke
ship, vessel
Rush all to peeces on thy Rocky bosome.Rush all to pieces on thy rocky bosom. R3 IV.iv.235
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Madam, so thriue I in my enterprizeMadam, so thrive I in my enterprise R3 IV.iv.236
And dangerous successe of bloody warres,And dangerous success of bloody warssuccess (n.)
old form: successe
result, outcome, issue
R3 IV.iv.237
As I intend more good to you and yours,As I intend more good to you and yours R3 IV.iv.238
Then euer you and yours by me were harm'd.Than ever you or yours were by me harmed! R3 IV.iv.239
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
What good is couer'd with the face of heauen,What good is covered with the face of heaven, R3 IV.iv.240
To be discouered, that can do me good.To be discovered, that can do me good?discover (v.)
old form: discouered
reveal, show, make known
R3 IV.iv.241
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Th'aduancement of your children, gentle LadyTh' advancement of your children, gentle lady.gentle (adj.)well-born, honourable, nobleR3 IV.iv.242
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Vp to some Scaffold, there to lose their heads.Up to some scaffold, there to lose their heads? R3 IV.iv.243
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Vnto the dignity and height of Fortune,Unto the dignity and height of fortune, R3 IV.iv.244
The high Imperiall Type of this earths glory.The high imperial type of this earth's glory.type (n.)emblem, symbol, insigniaR3 IV.iv.245
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Flatter my sorrow with report of it:Flatter my sorrows with report of it. R3 IV.iv.246
Tell me, what State, what Dignity, what Honor,Tell me, what state, what dignity, what honourstate (n.)status, rank, positionR3 IV.iv.247
Canst thou demise to any childe of mine.Canst thou demise to any child of mine?demise (v.)transmit, confer, conveyR3 IV.iv.248
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Euen all I haue; I, and my selfe and all,Even all I have – yea, and myself and all –  R3 IV.iv.249
Will I withall indow a childe of thine:Will I withal endow a child of thine, R3 IV.iv.250
So in the Lethe of thy angry soule,So in the Lethe of thy angry soulLethe (n.)[pron: 'leethee] a mythological river of the underworld, causing oblivion to those who drank from itR3 IV.iv.251
Thou drowne the sad remembrance of those wrongs,Thou drown the sad remembrance of those wrongssad (adj.)downcast, distressed, mournful, gloomyR3 IV.iv.252
remembrance (n.)memory, bringing to mind, recollection
Which thou supposest I haue done to thee.Which thou supposest I have done to thee. R3 IV.iv.253
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Be breefe, least that the processe of thy kindnesseBe brief, lest that the process of thy kindnessprocess (n.)
old form: processe
account, report, story
R3 IV.iv.254
Last longer telling then thy kindnesse date.Last longer telling than thy kindness' date.date (n.)duration, period of existenceR3 IV.iv.255
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Then know, That from my Soule, I loue thy Daughter.Then know that from my soul I love thy daughter. R3 IV.iv.256
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
My daughters Mother thinkes it with her soule.My daughter's mother thinks it with her soul. R3 IV.iv.257
Rich. KING RICHARD 
What do you thinke?What do you think? R3 IV.iv.258
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
That thou dost loue my daughter from thy souleThat thou dost love my daughter from thy soul. R3 IV.iv.259
So from thy Soules loue didst thou loue her Brothers,So from thy soul's love didst thou love her brothers, R3 IV.iv.260
And from my hearts loue, I do thanke thee for it.And from my heart's love I do thank thee for it. R3 IV.iv.261
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Be not so hasty to confound my meaning:Be not so hasty to confound my meaning.confound (v.)challenge, defy, overturnR3 IV.iv.262
I meane that with my Soule I loue thy daughter,I mean that with my soul I love thy daughter R3 IV.iv.263
And do intend to make her Queene of England.And mean to make her Queen of England. R3 IV.iv.264
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Well then, who dost yu meane shallbe her King.Well then, who dost thou mean shall be her king? R3 IV.iv.265
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Euen he that makes her Queene: / Who else should bee?Even he that makes her queen. Who else should be? R3 IV.iv.266
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
What, thou?What, thou? R3 IV.iv.267.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Euen so: How thinke you of it?Even so. How think you of it? R3 IV.iv.267.2
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
How canst thou woo her?How canst thou woo her? R3 IV.iv.268.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
That I would learne of you,That would I learn of you, R3 IV.iv.268.2
As one being best acquainted with her humour.As one being best acquainted with her humour.humour (n.)mood, disposition, frame of mind, temperament [as determined by bodily fluids]R3 IV.iv.269
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
And wilt thou learne of me?And wilt thou learn of me? R3 IV.iv.270.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Madam, with all my heart.Madam, with all my heart. R3 IV.iv.270.2
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Send to her by the man that slew her Brothers,Send to her by the man that slew her brothers R3 IV.iv.271
A paire of bleeding hearts: thereon ingraueA pair of bleeding hearts; thereon engrave R3 IV.iv.272
Edward and Yorke, then haply will she weepe:‘ Edward ’ and ‘ York ’; then haply she will weep.haply (adv.)perhaps, maybe, by chance, with luckR3 IV.iv.273
Therefore present to her, as sometime MargaretTherefore present to her – as sometimes Margaretsometimes (adv.)formerly, once, at one time, previouslyR3 IV.iv.274
Did to thy Father, steept in Rutlands blood,Did to thy father, steeped in Rutland's blood –  R3 IV.iv.275
A hand-kercheefe, which say to her did dreyneA handkerchief, which say to her did drain R3 IV.iv.276
The purple sappe from her sweet Brothers body,The purple sap from her sweet brother's body,purple (adj.)bright-red, blood-coloured, bloodyR3 IV.iv.277
sap (n.)
old form: sappe
vital fluid, life-blood
And bid her wipe her weeping eyes withall.And bid her wipe her weeping eyes withal. R3 IV.iv.278
If this inducement moue her not to loue,If this inducement move her not to love, R3 IV.iv.279
Send her a Letter of thy Noble deeds:Send her a letter of thy noble deeds: R3 IV.iv.280
Tell her, thou mad'st away her Vnckle Clarence,Tell her thou mad'st away her uncle Clarence, R3 IV.iv.281
Her Vnckle Riuers, I (and for her sake)Her uncle Rivers; yea, and for her sake, R3 IV.iv.282
Mad'st quicke conueyance with her good Aunt Anne.Mad'st quick conveyance with her good aunt Anne!conveyance (n.)
old form: conueyance
removal, carrying off, elimination [of]
R3 IV.iv.283
Rich. KING RICHARD 
You mocke me Madam, this not the wayYou mock me, madam; this is not the way R3 IV.iv.284
To win your daughter.To win your daughter. R3 IV.iv.285.1
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
There is no other way,There is no other way, R3 IV.iv.285.2
Vnlesse thou could'st put on some other shape,Unless thou couldst put on some other shape, R3 IV.iv.286
And not be Richard, that hath done all this.And not be Richard that hath done all this. R3 IV.iv.287
Ric. KING RICHARD 
Say that I did all this for loue of her.Say that I did all this for love of her. R3 IV.iv.288
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Nay then indeed she cannot choose but hate theeNay, then indeed she cannot choose but hate thee, R3 IV.iv.289
Hauing bought loue, with such a bloody spoyle.Having bought love with such a bloody spoil.spoil (n.)
old form: spoyle
slaughter, destruction, ruination
R3 IV.iv.290
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Looke what is done, cannot be now amended:Look what is done cannot be now amended.look what (conj.)
old form: Looke
whatever
R3 IV.iv.291
Men shall deale vnaduisedly sometimes,Men shall deal unadvisedly sometimes,deal (v.)
old form: deale
proceed, behave, conduct oneself
R3 IV.iv.292
Which after-houres giues leysure to repent.Which after-hours give leisure to repent.after-hours (n.)
old form: after-houres
subsequent time, later moments
R3 IV.iv.293
If I did take the Kingdome from your Sonnes,If I did take the kingdom from your sons, R3 IV.iv.294
To make amends, Ile giue it to your daughter:To make amends I'll give it to your daughter. R3 IV.iv.295
If I haue kill'd the issue of your wombe,If I have killed the issue of your womb,issue (n.)child(ren), offspring, family, descendantR3 IV.iv.296
To quicken your encrease, I will begetTo quicken your increase I will begetincrease (n.)
old form: encrease
offspring, descendants, procreation
R3 IV.iv.297
quicken (v.)revive, rejuvenate, give life [to]
Mine yssue of your blood, vpon your Daughter:Mine issue of your blood upon your daughter; R3 IV.iv.298
A Grandams name is little lesse in loue,A grandam's name is little less in lovegrandam (n.)grandmotherR3 IV.iv.299
Then is the doting Title of a Mother;Than is the doting title of a mother; R3 IV.iv.300
They are as Children but one steppe below,They are as children but one step below, R3 IV.iv.301
Euen of your mettall, of your very blood:Even of your metal, of your very blood,metal (n.)
old form: mettall
substance, material, fabric
R3 IV.iv.302
Of all one paine, saue for a night of groanesOf all one pain, save for a night of groanspain (n.)
old form: paine
effort, endeavour, exertion, labour
R3 IV.iv.303
Endur'd of her, for whom you bid like sorrow.Endured of her for whom you bid like sorrow.like (adj.)same, similar, alike, equalR3 IV.iv.304
bide (v.)endure, suffer, undergo
Your Children were vexation to your youth,Your children were vexation to your youth R3 IV.iv.305
But mine shall be a comfort to your Age,But mine shall be a comfort to your age. R3 IV.iv.306
The losse you haue, is but a Sonne being King,The loss you have is but a son being king, R3 IV.iv.307
And by that losse, your Daughter is made Queene.And by that loss your daughter is made queen. R3 IV.iv.308
I cannot make you what amends I would,I cannot make you what amends I would; R3 IV.iv.309
Therefore accept such kindnesse as I can.Therefore accept such kindness as I can. R3 IV.iv.310
Dorset your Sonne, that with a fearfull souleDorset your son, that with a fearful soulfearful (adj.)
old form: fearfull
timid, timorous, frightened, full of fear
R3 IV.iv.311
Leads discontented steppes in Forraine soyle,Leads discontented steps in foreign soil, R3 IV.iv.312
This faire Alliance, quickly shall call homeThis fair alliance quickly shall call home R3 IV.iv.313
To high Promotions, and great Dignity.To high promotions and great dignity. R3 IV.iv.314
The King that calles your beauteous Daughter Wife,The King, that calls your beauteous daughter wife, R3 IV.iv.315
Familiarly shall call thy Dorset, Brother:Familiarly shall call thy Dorset brother.familiarly (adv.)as a member of the same family, with intimate acquaintanceR3 IV.iv.316
Againe shall you be Mother to a King:Again shall you be mother to a king, R3 IV.iv.317
And all the Ruines of distressefull Times,And all the ruins of distressful times R3 IV.iv.318
Repayr'd with double Riches of Content.Repaired with double riches of content.content (n.)contentment, peace of mindR3 IV.iv.319
What? we haue many goodly dayes to see:What! We have many goodly days to see: R3 IV.iv.320
The liquid drops of Teares that you haue shed,The liquid drops of tears that you have shed R3 IV.iv.321
Shall come againe, transform'd to Orient Pearle,Shall come again, transformed to orient pearl,orient (adj.)lustrous, brilliant, brightR3 IV.iv.322
Aduantaging their Loue, with interestAdvantaging their love with interestadvantage (v.)
old form: Aduantaging
enrich, augment, add value to
R3 IV.iv.323
Often-times double gaine of happinesse.Of ten times double gain of happiness. R3 IV.iv.324
Go then (my Mother) to thy Daughter go,Go then, my mother; to thy daughter go; R3 IV.iv.325
Make bold her bashfull yeares, with your experience,Make bold her bashful years with your experience; R3 IV.iv.326
Prepare her eares to heare a Woers Tale.Prepare her ears to hear a wooer's tale; R3 IV.iv.327
Put in her tender heart, th'aspiring FlamePut in her tender heart th' aspiring flame R3 IV.iv.328
Of Golden Soueraignty: Acquaint the PrincesseOf golden sovereignty; acquaint the Princess R3 IV.iv.329
With the sweet silent houres of Marriage ioyes:With the sweet silent hours of marriage joys; R3 IV.iv.330
And when this Arme of mine hath chastisedAnd when this arm of mine hath chastised R3 IV.iv.331
The petty Rebell, dull-brain'd Buckingham,The petty rebel, dull-brained Buckingham, R3 IV.iv.332
Bound with Triumphant Garlands will I come,Bound with triumphant garlands will I cometriumphant (adj.)triumphal, glorious, celebrating a great victoryR3 IV.iv.333
And leade thy daughter to a Conquerors bed:And lead thy daughter to a conqueror's bed; R3 IV.iv.334
To whom I will retaile my Conquest wonne,To whom I will retail my conquest won,retail (v.)
old form: retaile
recount, relate in detail, retell
R3 IV.iv.335
And she shalbe sole Victoresse, Casars Casar.And she shall be sole victoress, Caesar's Caesar. R3 IV.iv.336
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
What were I best to say, her Fathers BrotherWhat were I best to say? Her father's brother R3 IV.iv.337
Would be her Lord? Or shall I say her Vnkle?Would be her lord? Or shall I say her uncle? R3 IV.iv.338
Or he that slew her Brothers, and her Vnkles?Or he that slew her brothers and her uncles? R3 IV.iv.339
Vnder what Title shall I woo for thee,Under what title shall I woo for theetitle (n.)name, label, designationR3 IV.iv.340
That God, the Law, my Honor, and her Loue,That God, the law, my honour, and her love R3 IV.iv.341
Can make seeme pleasing to her tender yeares?Can make seem pleasing to her tender years?tender (adj.)youngR3 IV.iv.342
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Inferre faire Englands peace by this Alliance.Infer fair England's peace by this alliance.infer (v.)
old form: Inferre
adduce, bring up, put forward
R3 IV.iv.343
Qu QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Which she shall purchase with stil lasting warre.Which she shall purchase with still-lasting war. R3 IV.iv.344
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Tell her, the King that may command, intreats.Tell her the King, that may command, entreats. R3 IV.iv.345
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
That at her hands, which the kings King forbids.That at her hands which the King's king forbids. R3 IV.iv.346
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Say she shall be a High and Mighty Queene.Say she shall be a high and mighty queen. R3 IV.iv.347
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
To vaile the Title, as her Mother doth.To vail the title, as her mother doth.vail (v.)
old form: vaile
let fall, yield, surrender
R3 IV.iv.348
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Say I will loue her euerlastingly.Say I will love her everlastingly. R3 IV.iv.349
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
But how long shall that title euer last?But how long shall that title ‘ ever ’ last?title (n.)name, label, designationR3 IV.iv.350
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Sweetly in force, vnto her faire liues end.Sweetly in force unto her fair life's end. R3 IV.iv.351
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
But how long fairely shall her sweet life last?But how long fairly shall her sweet life last?fairly (adv.)
old form: fairely
free from foul play, in a healthy state
R3 IV.iv.352
Rich. KING RICHARD 
As long as Heauen and Nature lengthens it.As long as heaven and nature lengthens it. R3 IV.iv.353
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
As long as Hell and Richard likes of it.So long as hell and Richard likes of it. R3 IV.iv.354
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Say, I her Soueraigne, am her Subiect low.Say I, her sovereign, am her subject love. R3 IV.iv.355
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
But she your Subiect, lothes such Soueraignty.But she, your subject, loathes such sovereignty. R3 IV.iv.356
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Be eloquent in my behalfe to her.Be eloquent in my behalf to her. R3 IV.iv.357
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
An honest tale speeds best, being plainly told.An honest tale speeds best being plainly told.speed (v.)meet with success, prosper, flourishR3 IV.iv.358
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Then plainly to her, tell my louing tale.Then plainly to tell her my loving tale. R3 IV.iv.359
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Plaine and not honest, is too harsh a style.Plain and not honest is too harsh a style.honest (adj.)honourable, respectable, uprightR3 IV.iv.360
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Your Reasons are too shallow, and to quicke.Your reasons are too shallow and too quick.quick (adj.)
old form: quicke
hasty, hurried
R3 IV.iv.361
reason (n.)observation, remark, point
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
O no, my Reasons are too deepe and dead,O no, my reasons are too deep and dead –  R3 IV.iv.362
Too deepe and dead (poore Infants) in their graues,Too deep and dead, poor infants, in their graves. R3 IV.iv.363
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Harpe not on that string Madam, that is past.Harp not on that string, madam; that is past. R3 IV.iv.364
QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Harpe on it still shall I, till heart-strings breake.Harp on it still shall I till heart-strings break.still (adv.)constantly, always, continuallyR3 IV.iv.365
KING RICHARD 
Now by my George, my Garter, and my Crowne.Now, by my George, my Garter, and my crown –  R3 IV.iv.366
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Prophan'd, dishonor'd, and the third vsurpt.Profaned, dishonoured, and the third usurped. R3 IV.iv.367
Rich. KING RICHARD 
I sweare.I swear –  R3 IV.iv.368.1
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
By nothing, for this is no Oath:By nothing, for this is no oath. R3 IV.iv.368.2
Thy George prophan'd, hath lost his Lordly Honor;The George, profaned, hath lost his lordly honour;George (n.)badge [of the Order of the Garter] displaying St George and the dragonR3 IV.iv.369
Thy Garter blemish'd, pawn'd his Knightly Vertue;Thy Garter, blemished, pawned his knightly virtue;virtue (n.)
old form: Vertue
quality, accomplishment, ability
R3 IV.iv.370
Thy Crowne vsurp'd, disgrac'd his Kingly Glory:Thy crown, usurped, disgraced his kingly glory. R3 IV.iv.371
If something thou would'st sweare to be beleeu'd,If something thou wouldst swear to be believed, R3 IV.iv.372
Sweare then by something, that thou hast not wrong'd.Swear then by something that thou hast not wronged. R3 IV.iv.373
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Then by my Selfe.Then by myself – R3 IV.iv.374.1
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Thy Selfe, is selfe-misvs'd.Thyself is self-misused. R3 IV.iv.374.2
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Now by the World.Now by the world –  R3 IV.iv.375.1
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
'Tis full of thy foule wrongs.'Tis full of thy foul wrongs. R3 IV.iv.375.2
Rich. KING RICHARD 
My Fathers death.My father's death –  R3 IV.iv.376.1
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Thy life hath it dishonor'd.Thy life hath it dishonoured. R3 IV.iv.376.2
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Why then, by Heauen.Why then, by God –  R3 IV.iv.377.1
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Heanens wrong is most of all:God's wrong is most of all. R3 IV.iv.377.2
If thou didd'st feare to breake an Oath with him,If thou didst fear to break an oath with Him, R3 IV.iv.378
The vnity the King my husband made,The unity the King my husband madeunity (n.)
old form: vnity
reconciliation, concord, harmony
R3 IV.iv.379
Thou had'st not broken, nor my Brothers died.Thou hadst not broken, nor my brothers died. R3 IV.iv.380
If thou had'st fear'd to breake an oath by him,If thou hadst feared to break an oath by Him, R3 IV.iv.381
Th' Imperiall mettall, circling now thy head,Th' imperial metal, circling now thy head, R3 IV.iv.382
Had grac'd the tender temples of my Child,Had graced the tender temples of my child, R3 IV.iv.383
And both the Princes had bene breathing heere,And both the princes had been breathing here, R3 IV.iv.384
Which now two tender Bed-fellowes for dust,Which now, two tender bedfellows for dust,tender (adj.)youngR3 IV.iv.385
Thy broken Faith hath made the prey for Wormes.Thy broken faith hath made the prey for worms. R3 IV.iv.386
What can'st thou sweare by now.What canst thou swear by now? R3 IV.iv.387.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
The time to come.The time to come. R3 IV.iv.387.2
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
That thou hast wronged in the time ore-past:That thou hast wronged in the time o'erpast; R3 IV.iv.388
For I my selfe haue many teares to washFor I myself have many tears to wash R3 IV.iv.389
Heereafter time, for time past, wrong'd by thee.Hereafter time, for time past wronged by thee.hereafter (adj.)
old form: Heereafter
future, forthcoming, later
R3 IV.iv.390
The Children liue, whose Fathers thou hast slaughter'd,The children live whose fathers thou hast slaughtered, R3 IV.iv.391
Vngouern'd youth, to waile it with their age:Ungoverned youth, to wail it in their age; R3 IV.iv.392
The Parents liue, whose Children thou hast butcher'd,The parents live whose children thou hast butchered, R3 IV.iv.393
Old barren Plants, to waile it with their Age.Old barren plants, to wail it with their age. R3 IV.iv.394
Sweare not by time to come, for that thou hastSwear not by time to come, for that thou hast R3 IV.iv.395
Misvs'd ere vs'd, by times ill-vs'd repast.Misused ere used, by times ill-used o'erpast.overpast (adj.)
old form: ore-past
past, now ended, former
R3 IV.iv.396
Rich. KING RICHARD 
As I entend to prosper, and repent:As I intend to prosper and repent, R3 IV.iv.397
So thriue I in my dangerous AffayresSo thrive I in my dangerous affairs R3 IV.iv.398
Of hostile Armes: My selfe, my selfe confound:Of hostile arms! Myself myself confound! R3 IV.iv.399
Heauen, and Fortune barre me happy houres:Heaven and fortune bar me happy hours!bar (v.)
old form: barre
prevent, obstruct, block
R3 IV.iv.400
Day, yeeld me not thy light; nor Night, thy rest.Day, yield me not thy light, nor, night, thy rest! R3 IV.iv.401
Be opposite all Planets of good luckeBe opposite all planets of good luckopposite (adj.)opposed, hostile, adverse, antagonistic [to]R3 IV.iv.402
To my proceeding, if with deere hearts loue,To my proceedings if, with dear heart's love, R3 IV.iv.403
Immaculate deuotion, holy thoughts,Immaculate devotion, holy thoughts, R3 IV.iv.404
I tender not thy beautious Princely daughter.I tender not thy beauteous princely daughter!tender (v.)feel concern for, hold dear, care forR3 IV.iv.405
In her, consists my Happinesse, and thine:In her consists my happiness and thine; R3 IV.iv.406
Without her, followes to my selfe, and thee;Without her, follows to myself and thee, R3 IV.iv.407
Her selfe, the Land, and many a Christian soule,Herself, the land, and many a Christian soul, R3 IV.iv.408
Death, Desolation, Ruine, and Decay:Death, desolation, ruin, and decay.decay (n.)destruction, downfall, endingR3 IV.iv.409
It cannot be auoyded, but by this:It cannot be avoided but by this; R3 IV.iv.410
It will not be auoyded, but by this.It will not be avoided but by this. R3 IV.iv.411
Therefore deare Mother (I must call you so)Therefore, dear mother – I must call you so –  R3 IV.iv.412
Be the Atturney of my loue to her:Be the attorney of my love to her:attorney (n.)
old form: Atturney
advocate, mediator, promoter
R3 IV.iv.413
Pleade what I will be, not what I haue beene;Plead what I will be, not what I have been –  R3 IV.iv.414
Not my deserts, but what I will deserue:Not my deserts, but what I will deserve; R3 IV.iv.415
Vrge the Necessity and state of times,Urge the necessity and state of times,time (n.)(the) world, (the) age, societyR3 IV.iv.416
state (n.)condition, circumstances, situation, state of affairs
And be not peeuish found, in great Designes.And be not peevish-fond in great designs.peevish-fond (adj.)
old form: peeuish found
obstinately foolish
R3 IV.iv.417
design (n.)
old form: Designes
undertaking, purpose, enterprise
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Shall I be tempted of the Diuel thus?Shall I be tempted of the devil thus? R3 IV.iv.418
Rich. KING RICHARD 
I, if the Diuell tempt you to do good.Ay, if the devil tempt you to do good. R3 IV.iv.419
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Shall I forget my selfe, to be my selfe.Shall I forget myself to be myself? R3 IV.iv.420
Rich. KING RICHARD 
I, if your selfes remembrance wrong your selfe.Ay, if yourself's remembrance wrong yourself.remembrance (n.)memory, bringing to mind, recollectionR3 IV.iv.421
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Yet thou didst kil my Children.Yet thou didst kill my children. R3 IV.iv.422
Rich. KING RICHARD 
But in your daughters wombe I bury them.But in your daughter's womb I bury them, R3 IV.iv.423
Where in that Nest of Spicery they will breedWhere, in that nest of spicery, they will breedspicery (n.)spicesR3 IV.iv.424
Selues of themselues, to your recomforture.Selves of themselves, to your recomforture.recomforture (n.)consolation, comfort, solaceR3 IV.iv.425
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
Shall I go win my daughter to thy will?Shall I go win my daughter to thy will? R3 IV.iv.426
Rich. KING RICHARD 
And be a happy Mother by the deed.And be a happy mother by the deed. R3 IV.iv.427
Qu. QUEEN ELIZABETH 
I go, write to me very shortly,I go. Write to me very shortly, R3 IV.iv.428
And you shal vnderstand from me her mind. And you shall understand from me her mind. R3 IV.iv.429
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Beare her my true loues kisse, and so farewell.Bear her my true love's kiss; and so farewell –  R3 IV.iv.430
Exit Q.Exit Queen Elizabeth R3 IV.iv.430
Relenting Foole, and shallow-changing Woman.Relenting fool, and shallow, changing woman!shallow (adj.)naive, gullible, lacking in depth of characterR3 IV.iv.431
relenting (adj.)soft-hearted, sympathetic, pitying
Enter Ratcliffe.Enter Ratcliffe, Catesby following R3 IV.iv.432
How now, what newes?How now? What news? R3 IV.iv.432
Rat. RATCLIFFE 
Most mightie Soueraigne, on the Westerne CoastMost mighty sovereign, on the western coast R3 IV.iv.433
Rideth a puissant Nauie: to our ShoresRideth a puissant navy; to our shorespuissant (adj.)powerful, mighty, strongR3 IV.iv.434
Throng many doubtfull hollow-hearted friends,Throng many doubtful, hollow-hearted friends, R3 IV.iv.435
Vnarm'd, and vnresolu'd to beat them backe.Unarmed, and unresolved to beat them back. R3 IV.iv.436
'Tis thought, that Richmond is their Admirall:'Tis thought that Richmond is their admiral; R3 IV.iv.437
And there they hull, expecting but the aideAnd there they hull, expecting but the aidhull (v.)lie, float, drift [with sails furled]R3 IV.iv.438
Of Buckingham, to welcome them ashore.Of Buckingham to welcome them ashore. R3 IV.iv.439
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Some light-foot friend post to ye Duke of Norfolk:Some light-foot friend post to the Duke of Norfolk:post (v.)hasten, speed, ride fastR3 IV.iv.440
light-foot (adj.)light-footed
Ratcliffe thy selfe, or Catesby, where is hee?Ratcliffe, thyself – or Catesby – where is he? R3 IV.iv.441
Cat. CATESBY 
Here, my good Lord.Here, my good lord. R3 IV.iv.442.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Catesby, flye to the Duke.Catesby, fly to the Duke. R3 IV.iv.442.2
Cat. CATESBY 
I will, my Lord, with all conuenient haste.I will, my lord, with all convenient haste.convenient (adj.)
old form: conuenient
fitting, suitable, appropriate
R3 IV.iv.443
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Catesby come hither, poste to Salisbury:Ratcliffe, come hither. Post to Salisbury. R3 IV.iv.444
When thou com'st thither: Dull vnmindfull Villaine,When thou com'st thither – (To Catesby) Dull unmindful villain, R3 IV.iv.445
Why stay'st thou here, and go'st not to the Duke?Why stay'st thou here and go'st not to the Duke? R3 IV.iv.446
Cat. CATESBY 
First, mighty Liege, tell me your Highnesse pleasure,First, mighty liege, tell me your highness' pleasure,liege (n.)lord, sovereignR3 IV.iv.447
What from your Grace I shall deliuer to him.What from your grace I shall deliver to him. R3 IV.iv.448
Rich. KING RICHARD 
O true, good Catesby, bid him leuie straightO, true, good Catesby; bid him levy straightstraight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at onceR3 IV.iv.449
The greatest strength and power that he can make,The greatest strength and power that he can makemake (v.)raise, acquire, procureR3 IV.iv.450
power (n.)armed force, troops, host, army
And meet me suddenly at Salisbury.And meet me suddenly at Salisbury.suddenly (adv.)immediately, at once, without delayR3 IV.iv.451
Cat. CATESBY 
I goe. I go. R3 IV.iv.452
Exit.Exit R3 IV.iv.452
Rat. RATCLIFFE 
What, may it please you, shall I doe at Salisbury? What, may it please you, shall I do at Salisbury? R3 IV.iv.453
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Why, what would'st thou doe there, before I goe?Why, what wouldst thou do there before I go? R3 IV.iv.454
Rat. RATCLIFFE 
Your Highnesse told me I should poste before.Your highness told me I should post before. R3 IV.iv.455
Rich. KING RICHARD 
My minde is chang'd:My mind is changed. R3 IV.iv.456.1
Enter Lord Stanley.Enter Earl of Derby R3 IV.iv.456
Stanley, what newes with you?Stanley, what news with you? R3 IV.iv.456.2
Sta. DERBY 
None, good my Liege, to please you with ye hearing,None good, my liege, to please you with the hearing, R3 IV.iv.457
Nor none so bad, but well may be reported.Nor none so bad but well may be reported. R3 IV.iv.458
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Hoyday, a Riddle, neither good nor bad:Hoyday, a riddle! Neither good nor bad!hoyday (int.)exclamation of contemptuous surprise, impatienceR3 IV.iv.459
What need'st thou runne so many miles about,What need'st thou run so many miles about, R3 IV.iv.460
When thou mayest tell thy Tale the neerest way?When thou mayst tell thy tale a nearest way? R3 IV.iv.461
Once more, what newes?Once more, what news? R3 IV.iv.462.1
Stan. DERBY 
Richmond is on the Seas.Richmond is on the seas. R3 IV.iv.462.2
Rich. KING RICHARD 
There let him sinke, and be the Seas on him,There let him sink, and be the seas on him! R3 IV.iv.463
White-liuer'd Runnagate, what doth he there?White-livered runagate, what doth he there?runagate (n.)
old form: Runnagate
renegade, turncoat, rebel
R3 IV.iv.464
white-livered (adj.)
old form: White-liuer'd
lily-livered, cowardly, feeble-spirited
Stan. DERBY 
I know not, mightie Soueraigne, but by guesse.I know not, mighty sovereign, but by guess. R3 IV.iv.465
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Well, as you guesse.Well, as you guess? R3 IV.iv.466
Stan. DERBY 
Stirr'd vp by Dorset, Buckingham, and Morton,Stirred up by Dorset, Buckingham, and Morton, R3 IV.iv.467
He makes for England, here to clayme the Crowne.He makes for England, here to claim the crown. R3 IV.iv.468
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Is the Chayre emptie? is the Sword vnsway'd?Is the chair empty? Is the sword unswayed?chair (n.)
old form: Chayre
throne
R3 IV.iv.469
unswayed (adj.)
old form: vnsway'd
unwielded, uncontrolled, lacking direction
Is the King dead? the Empire vnpossest?Is the King dead? The empire unpossessed? R3 IV.iv.470
What Heire of Yorke is there aliue, but wee?What heir of York is there alive but we? R3 IV.iv.471
And who is Englands King, but great Yorkes Heire?And who is England's king but great York's heir? R3 IV.iv.472
Then tell me, what makes he vpon the Seas?Then tell me, what makes he upon the seas? R3 IV.iv.473
Stan. DERBY 
Vnlesse for that, my Liege, I cannot guesse.Unless for that, my liege, I cannot guess. R3 IV.iv.474
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Vnlesse for that he comes to be your Liege,Unless for that he comes to be your liege, R3 IV.iv.475
You cannot guesse wherefore the Welchman comes.You cannot guess wherefore the Welshman comes. R3 IV.iv.476
Thou wilt reuolt, and flye to him, I feare.Thou wilt revolt and fly to him, I fear. R3 IV.iv.477
Stan. DERBY 
No, my good Lord, therefore mistrust me not.No, my good lord; therefore mistrust me not. R3 IV.iv.478
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Where is thy Power then, to beat him back?Where is thy power then to beat him back?power (n.)armed force, troops, host, armyR3 IV.iv.479
Where be thy Tenants, and thy followers?Where be thy tenants and thy followers? R3 IV.iv.480
Are they not now vpon the Westerne Shore,Are they not now upon the western shore, R3 IV.iv.481
Safe-conducting the Rebels from their Shippes?Safe-conducting the rebels from their ships? R3 IV.iv.482
Stan. DERBY 
No, my good Lord, my friends are in the North.No, my good lord, my friends are in the north. R3 IV.iv.483
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Cold friends to me: what do they in the North,Cold friends to me! What do they in the north R3 IV.iv.484
When they should serue their Soueraigne in the West?When they should serve their sovereign in the west? R3 IV.iv.485
Stan. DERBY 
They haue not been commanded, mighty King:They have not been commanded, mighty king. R3 IV.iv.486
Pleaseth your Maiestie to giue me leaue,Pleaseth your majesty to give me leave, R3 IV.iv.487
Ile muster vp my friends, and meet your Grace,I'll muster up my friends and meet your grace R3 IV.iv.488
Where, and what time your Maiestie shall please.Where and what time your majesty shall please. R3 IV.iv.489
Rich. KING RICHARD 
I, thou would'st be gone, to ioyne with Richmond:Ay, thou wouldst be gone to join with Richmond; R3 IV.iv.490
But Ile not trust thee.I will not trust thee. R3 IV.iv.491.1
Stan. DERBY 
Most mightie Soueraigne,Most mighty sovereign, R3 IV.iv.491.2
You haue no cause to hold my friendship doubtfull,You have no cause to hold my friendship doubtful. R3 IV.iv.492
I neuer was, nor neuer will be false.I never was nor never will be false.false (adj.)treacherous, traitorous, perfidiousR3 IV.iv.493
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Goe then, and muster men: but leaue behindGo then, and muster men. But leave behind R3 IV.iv.494
Your Sonne George Stanley: looke your heart be firme,Your son, George Stanley. Look your heart be firm, R3 IV.iv.495
Or else his Heads assurance is but fraile.Or else his head's assurance is but frail.assurance (n.)safety, securityR3 IV.iv.496
Stan. DERBY 
So deale with him, as I proue true to you.So deal with him as I prove true to you. R3 IV.iv.497
Exit Stanley.Exit R3 IV.iv.497
Enter a Messenger.Enter a Messenger R3 IV.iv.498
Mess. FIRST MESSENGER 
My gracious Soueraigne, now in Deuonshire,My gracious sovereign, now in Devonshire, R3 IV.iv.498
As I by friends am well aduertised,As I by friends am well advertised,advertise, advertize (v.)
old form: aduertised
make aware, inform, notify; warn
R3 IV.iv.499
Sir Edward Courtney, and the haughtie Prelate,Sir Edward Courtney and the haughty prelate, R3 IV.iv.500
Bishop of Exeter, his elder Brother,Bishop of Exeter, his elder brother, R3 IV.iv.501
With many moe Confederates, are in Armes.With many more confederates, are in arms. R3 IV.iv.502
Enter another Messenger.Enter another Messenger R3 IV.iv.503
Mess. SECOND MESSENGER 
In Kent, my Liege, the Guilfords are in Armes,In Kent, my liege, the Guildfords are in arms, R3 IV.iv.503
And euery houre more CompetitorsAnd every hour more competitorscompetitor (n.)partner, associate, colleagueR3 IV.iv.504
Flocke to the Rebels, and their power growes strong.Flock to the rebels and their power grows strong.power (n.)armed force, troops, host, armyR3 IV.iv.505
Enter another Messenger.Enter another Messenger R3 IV.iv.506
Mess. THIRD MESSENGER 
My Lord, the Armie of great Buckingham.My lord, the army of great Buckingham –  R3 IV.iv.506
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Out on ye, Owles, nothing but Songs of Death,Out on you, owls! Nothing but songs of death? R3 IV.iv.507
He striketh him.He striketh him R3 IV.iv.508
There, take thou that, till thou bring better newes.There, take thou that, till thou bring better news. R3 IV.iv.508
Mess. THIRD MESSENGER 
The newes I haue to tell your Maiestie,The news I have to tell your majesty R3 IV.iv.509
Is, that by sudden Floods, and fall of Waters,Is that by sudden flood and fall of water R3 IV.iv.510
Buckinghams Armie is dispers'd and scatter'd,Buckingham's army is dispersed and scattered, R3 IV.iv.511
And he himselfe wandred away alone,And he himself wandered away alone, R3 IV.iv.512
No man knowes whither.No man knows whither. R3 IV.iv.513.1
Rich. KING RICHARD 
I cry thee mercie:I cry thee mercy. R3 IV.iv.513.2
There is my Purse, to cure that Blow of thine.There is my purse to cure that blow of thine. R3 IV.iv.514
Hath any well-aduised friend proclaym'dHath any well-advised friend proclaimedwell-advised (adj.)
old form: well-aduised
prudent, sensible, thoughtful
R3 IV.iv.515
Reward to him that brings the Traytor in?Reward to him that brings the traitor in? R3 IV.iv.516
Mess. THIRD MESSENGER 
Such Proclamation hath been made, my Lord.Such proclamation hath been made, my lord. R3 IV.iv.517
Enter another Messenger.Enter another Messenger R3 IV.iv.518
Mess. FOURTH MESSENGER 
Sir Thomas Louell, and Lord Marquesse Dorset,Sir Thomas Lovel and Lord Marquess Dorset, R3 IV.iv.518
'Tis said, my Liege, in Yorkeshire are in Armes:'Tis said, my liege, in Yorkshire are in arms. R3 IV.iv.519
But this good comfort bring I to your Highnesse,But this good comfort bring I to your highness: R3 IV.iv.520
The Brittaine Nauie is dispers'd by Tempest.The Britain navy is dispersed by tempest;Britain (adj.)
old form: Brittaine
living in Brittany, from Brittany
R3 IV.iv.521
Richmond in Dorsetshire sent out a BoatRichmond in Dorsetshire sent out a boat R3 IV.iv.522
Vnto the shore, to aske those on the Banks,Unto the shore to ask those on the banks R3 IV.iv.523
If they were his Assistants, yea, or no?If they were his assistants, yea or no; R3 IV.iv.524
Who answer'd him, they came from Buckingham,Who answered him they came from Buckingham, R3 IV.iv.525
Vpon his partie: he mistrusting them,Upon his party. He, mistrusting them,party (n.)
old form: partie
side, faction, camp
R3 IV.iv.526
Hoys'd sayle, and made his course againe for Brittaine.Hoised sail, and made his course again for Britain.hoise (v.)
old form: Hoys'd
hoist
R3 IV.iv.527
Rich. KING RICHARD 
March on, march on, since we are vp in Armes,March on, march on, since we are up in arms; R3 IV.iv.528
If not to fight with forraine Enemies,If not to fight with foreign enemies, R3 IV.iv.529
Yet to beat downe these Rebels here at home.Yet to beat down these rebels here at home. R3 IV.iv.530
Enter Catesby.Enter Catesby R3 IV.iv.531
Cat. CATESBY 
My Liege, the Duke of Buckingham is taken,My liege, the Duke of Buckingham is taken. R3 IV.iv.531
That is the best newes: that the Earle of RichmondThat is the best news. That the Earl of Richmond R3 IV.iv.532
Is with a mighty power Landed at Milford,Is with a mighty power landed at Milfordpower (n.)armed force, troops, host, armyR3 IV.iv.533
Is colder Newes, but yet they must be told.Is colder tidings, but yet they must be told.cold (adj.)bad, unwelcome, disagreeableR3 IV.iv.534
Rich. KING RICHARD 
Away towards Salsbury, while we reason here,Away towards Salisbury! While we reason here,reason (v.)talk, speak, converseR3 IV.iv.535
A Royall batteil might be wonne and lost:A royal battle might be won and lost. R3 IV.iv.536
Some one take order Buckingham be broughtSomeone take order Buckingham be brought R3 IV.iv.537
To Salsbury, the rest march on with me. To Salisbury; the rest march on with me. R3 IV.iv.538
Florish. ExeuntFlourish. Exeunt R3 IV.iv.538
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