if you are searching for a compound word, note that it might appear in any of three ways, reflecting varied editorial practice: spaced ('house keeper'), solid ('housekeeper'), or hyphenated ('house-keeper')
or use Advanced Search

Search results

Search phrase: mine

Plays

 1184 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.217That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye?That makes me see, and cannot feede mine eye?
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.23In Isbel's case and mine own. Service is noIn Isbels case and mine owne: seruice is no
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.134.1Mine honourable mistress.Mine honorable Mistris.
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.139That were enwombed mine. 'Tis often seenThat were enwombed mine, 'tis often seene
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.200Religious in mine error, I adoreReligious in mine error, I adore
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.243The well-lost life of mine on his grace's cureThe well lost life of mine, on his Graces cure,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.248To those of mine in court. I'll stay at homeTo those of mine in Court, Ile staie at home
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.109Safer than mine own two, more dear; I have so,Safer then mine owne two: more deare I haue so,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.126I will no more enforce mine office on you,I will no more enforce mine office on you,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.i.156Myself against the level of mine aim,My selfe against the leuill of mine aime,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.85Do all they deny her? An they were sons of mineDo all they denie her? And they were sons of mine,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.107.1The help of mine own eyes.The helpe of mine owne eies.
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.250thy lower part where thy nose stands. By mine honour,thy lower part where thy nose stands. By mine Honor,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iv.14I hope, sir, I have your good will to have mineI hope sir I haue your good will to haue mine
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.80Nor dare I say 'tis mine – and yet it is;Nor dare I say 'tis mine: and yet it is,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.82.1What law does vouch mine own.What law does vouch mine owne.
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.120Were mine at once. No, come thou home, Rossillion,Were mine at once. No come thou home Rossillion
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.41My heart is heavy and mine age is weak;My heart is heauie, and mine age is weake,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.7Believe it, my lord, in mine own directBeleeue it my Lord, in mine owne direct
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.i.65.2Do not hide mine eyes.Do not hide mine eyes.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.36Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and everWho then recouers. Say thou art mine, and euer
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.45.2Mine honour's such a ring;Mine Honors such a Ring,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.ii.52My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,My house, mine honor, yea my life be thine,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.162hundred fifty each; mine own company, Chitopher,hundred fiftie each: Mine owne Company, Chitopher,
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.195officer of mine, and writ to me this other day to turnOfficer of mine, and writ to mee this other day, to turne
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iv.4Ere I can perfect mine intents, to kneel.Ere I can perfect mine intents, to kneele.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.47Where, the impression of mine eye infixing,Where the impression of mine eye enfixing,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.54Since I have lost, have loved, was in mine eyeSince I haue lost, haue lou'd; was in mine eye
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.81Now pray you let me see it; for mine eye,Now pray you let me see it. For mine eye,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.83This ring was mine, and when I gave it HelenThis Ring was mine, and when I gaue it Hellen,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.97To mine own fortune, and informed her fullyTo mine owne fortune, and inform'd her fully,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.104Than I have in this ring. 'Twas mine, 'twas Helen's,Then I haue in this Ring. 'Twas mine, 'twas Helens,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.113Thou speakest it falsely, as I love mine honour,Thou speak'st it falsely: as I loue mine Honor,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.169.1She's none of mine, my lord.She's none of mine my Lord.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.170You give away this hand, and that is mine,You giue away this hand, and that is mine,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.171You give away heaven's vows, and those are mine,You giue away heauens vowes, and those are mine:
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.172You give away myself, which is known mine;You giue away my selfe, which is knowne mine:
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.180Lay a more noble thought upon mine honourLay a more noble thought vpon mine honour,
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.224.1And give me mine again.And giue me mine againe.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.277This ring was mine; I gave it his first wife.This Ring was mine, I gaue it his first wife.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.303Beguiles the truer office of mine eyes?Beguiles the truer Office of mine eyes?
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.312Will you be mine now you are doubly won?Will you be mine now you are doubly wonne?
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.318Mine eyes smell onions, I shall weep anon.Mine eyes smell Onions, I shall weepe anon:
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.46Mine, and most of our fortunes, tonightMine, and most of our Fortunes to night,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.53I cannot scratch mine ear. Prithee, tell herI cannot scratch mine eare. Prythee tel her
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.27Why should I think you can be mine, and true – Why should I thinke you can be mine, & true,
Antony and CleopatraAC I.iii.65In Fulvia's death, how mine received shall be.In Fuluias death, how mine receiu'd shall be.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.v.42.1Mine ear must pluck it thence.Mine eare must plucke it thence.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.i.9The people love me, and the sea is mine;The people loue me, and the Sea is mine;
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.45You may be pleased to catch at mine intentYou may be pleas'd to catch at mine intent,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.65Which fronted mine own peace. As for my wife,Which fronted mine owne peace. As for my wife,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.95From mine own knowledge. As nearly as I may,From mine owne knowledge, as neerely as I may,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.96I'll play the penitent to you; but mine honestyIle play the penitent to you. But mine honesty,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.101So far ask pardon as befits mine honourSo farre aske pardon, as befits mine Honour
Antony and CleopatraAC II.iii.17Caesar's, or mine?Casars or mine?
Antony and CleopatraAC II.iii.37His cocks do win the battle still of mineHis Cocks do winne the Battaile, still of mine,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.iii.39Beat mine, inhooped, at odds. I will to Egypt;Beate mine (in hoopt) at odd's. I will to Egypte:
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.10Give me mine angle. We'll to th' river; there,Giue me mine Angle, weele to'th'Riuer there
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.24Ram thou thy fruitful tidings in mine ears,Ramme thou thy fruitefull tidings in mine eares,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.v.54Pour out the pack of matter to mine ear,Powre out the packe of matter to mine eare,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.1Your hostages I have; so have you mine;Your Hostages I haue, so haue you mine:
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.37.2Say in mine ear; what is't?Say in mine eare, what is't.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.76'Tis not my profit that does lead mine honour;'Tis not my profit that does lead mine Honour:
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.77Mine honour, it. Repent that e'er thy tongueMine Honour it, Repent that ere thy tongue,
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.121Is weaker than the wine, and mine own tongueIs weaker then the Wine, and mine owne tongue
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iv.22Best to preserve it. If I lose mine honour,Best to preserue it: if I loose mine Honour,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.x.4.1To see't mine eyes are blasted.To see't, mine eyes are blasted.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.x.16Mine eyes did sicken at the sight, and could notMine eyes did sicken at the sight, and could not
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.41Mine honesty and I begin to square.Mine honesty, and I, beginne to square,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.61What is most right. Mine honour was not yielded,what is most right. Mine Honour / Was not yeelded,
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xiii.178And fight maliciously. For when mine hoursAnd fight maliciously: for when mine houres
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ii.22As when mine empire was your fellow tooAs when mine Empire was your Fellow too,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ii.29As one that takes his leave. Mine honest friends,As one that takes his leaue. Mine honest Friends,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.1.1Eros! Mine armour, Eros!Eros, mine Armour Eros.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.2No, my chuck. Eros! Come, mine armour, Eros!No my Chucke. Eros, come mine Armor Eros.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.vi.27Out of the host. I must attend mine officeOut of the hoast, I must attend mine Office,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.vi.32Thou mine of bounty, how wouldst thou have paidThou Mine of Bounty, how would'st thou haue payed
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.viii.7Each man's like mine; you have shown all Hectors.Each mans like mine: you haue shewne all Hectors.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.viii.14Chain mine armed neck; leap thou, attire and all,Chaine mine arm'd necke, leape thou, Attyre and all
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.viii.18.2My nightingale,Mine Nightingale,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.44Alcides, thou mine ancestor, thy rage.Alcides, thou mine Ancestor, thy rage.
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.16Whose heart I thought I had, for she had mine,Whose heart I thought I had, for she had mine:
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.17Which, whilst it was mine, had annexed unto'tWhich whil'st it was mine, had annext vntoo't
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.45The arm of mine own body, and the heartThe Arme of mine owne Body, and the Heart
Antony and CleopatraAC V.i.46Where mine his thoughts did kindle – that our stars,Where mine his thoughts did kindle; that our Starres
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.20He gives me so much of mine own as IHe giues me so much of mine owne, as I
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.121I cannot project mine own cause so wellI cannot proiect mine owne cause so well
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.151How pomp is followed! Mine will now be yours,How pompe is followed: Mine will now be yours,
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.152And should we shift estates, yours would be mine.And should we shift estates, yours would be mine.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.162To one so meek, that mine own servant shouldTo one so meeke, that mine owne Seruant should
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.223I'll never see't! For I am sure my nailsIle neuer see't? for I am sure mine Nailes
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.224.1Are stronger than mine eyes.Are stronger then mine eyes.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.241.1No planet is of mine.No Planet is of mine.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.11thy father for mine; so wouldst thou, if the truth ofthy father for mine; so wouldst thou, if the truth of
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.12thy love to me were so righteously tempered as mine isthy loue to me were so righteously temper'd, as mine is
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.19I will render thee again in affection, by mineI will render thee againe in affection: by mine
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.58No, by mine honour, but I was bid toNo by mine honor, but I was bid to
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.183And mine, to eke out hers.And mine to eeke out hers.
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.201If I had a thunderbolt in mine eye, I can tell whoIf I had a thunderbolt in mine eie, I can tell who
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.214But I did find him still mine enemy.But I did finde him still mine enemie:
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.46Or have acquaintance with mine own desires,Or haue acquaintance with mine owne desires,
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.86If you outstay the time, upon mine honourIf you out-stay the time, vpon mine honor,
As You Like ItAYL I.iii.89Wilt thou change fathers? I will give thee mine.Wilt thou change Fathers? I will giue thee mine:
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.24But if thy love were ever like to mineBut if thy loue were euer like to mine,
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.41I have by hard adventure found mine own.I haue by hard aduenture found mine owne.
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.42And I mine. I remember when I was in loveAnd I mine: I remember when I was in loue,
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.53Nay, I shall ne'er be ware of mine own witNay, I shall nere be ware of mine owne wit,
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.57And mine, but it grows something stale with me.And mine, but it growes something stale with mee.
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.73And wish, for her sake more than for mine own,And wish for her sake more then for mine owne,
As You Like ItAYL II.vii.197And as mine eye doth his effigies witnessAnd as mine eye doth his effigies witnesse,
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.281There I shall see mine own figure.There I shal see mine owne figure.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.332religious uncle of mine taught me to speak, who was inreligious Vnckle of mine taught me to speake, who was in
As You Like ItAYL III.v.10Thou tellest me there is murder in mine eye:Thou tellst me there is murder in mine eye,
As You Like ItAYL III.v.16And if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee.And if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee:
As You Like ItAYL III.v.19Lie not, to say mine eyes are murderers!Lye not, to say mine eyes are murtherers:
As You Like ItAYL III.v.20Now show the wound mine eye hath made in thee.Now shew the wound mine eye hath made in thee,
As You Like ItAYL III.v.24Thy palm some moment keeps; but now mine eyes,Thy palme some moment keepes: but now mine eyes
As You Like ItAYL III.v.130He said mine eyes were black and my hair black,He said mine eyes were black, and my haire blacke,
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.15but it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded ofbut it is a melancholy of mine owne, compounded of
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.84Then, in mine own person, I die.Then in mine owne person, I die.
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.52Have power to raise such love in mine,Haue power to raise such loue in mine,
As You Like ItAYL V.ii.71Look, here comes a lover of mine and a lover of hers.Looke, here comes a Louer of mine, and a louer of hers.
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.45mine enemy, I have undone three tailors, I have hadmine enemie, I haue vndone three Tailors, I haue had
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.57ill-favoured thing, sir, but mine own, a poor humour ofil-fauor'd thing sir, but mine owne, a poore humour of
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.58mine, sir, to take that that no man else will. Rich honestymine sir, to take that that no man else will rich honestie
As You Like ItAYL V.iv.146I will not eat my word, now thou art mine,I wil not eate my word, now thou art mine,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.14And then return and sleep within mine inn;And then returne and sleepe within mine Inne,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.33He that commends me to mine own contentHe that commends me to mine owne content,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.66Methinks your maw, like mine, should be your clockMe thinkes your maw, like mine, should be your cooke,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.48I? Ay. He told his mind upon mine ear.I, I, he told his minde vpon mine eare, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.4By computation and mine host's report.By computation and mine hosts report. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.44O, villain, thou hast stolen both mine office and my name.O villaine, thou hast stolne both mine office and my name, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.119Upon mine hostess there. Good sir, make haste.Vpon mine hostesse there, good sir make haste: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.120Since mine own doors refuse to entertain me,Since mine owne doores refuse to entertaine me, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.30Nor by what wonder you do hit of mine.Nor by what wonder you do hit of mine:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.42Your weeping sister is no wife of mine,Your weeping sister is no wife of mine,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.61It is thyself, mine own self's better part,it is thy selfe, mine owne selfes better part:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.62Mine eye's clear eye, my dear heart's dearer heart,Mine eies cleere eie, my deere hearts deerer heart;
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.ii.172I'll stop mine ears against the mermaid's song.Ile stop mine eares against the Mermaids song.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.68Give me the ring of mine you had at dinner,Giue me the ring of mine you had at dinner, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iii.83A ring he hath of mine worth forty ducats,A Ring he hath of mine worth fortie Duckets, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.26These ears of mine, thou knowest, did hear thee.These eares of mine thou knowst did hear thee: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.30I'll prove mine honour and mine honestyIle proue mine honor, and mine honestie 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.106It is a branch and parcel of mine oath,It is a branch and parcell of mine oath, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.244And gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse,And gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.260Besides, I will be sworn these ears of mineBesides, I will be sworne these eares of mine, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.312Though now this grained face of mine be hidThough now this grained face of mine be hid 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.332I see two husbands, or mine eyes deceive me.I see two husbands, or mine eyes deceiue me. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.410Dromio, what stuff of mine hast thou embarked?Dromio, what stuffe of mine hast thou imbarkt 
CoriolanusCor I.i.60Why, masters, my good friends, mine honest neighbours,Why Masters, my good Friends, mine honest Neighbours,
CoriolanusCor I.iii.102mine honour, and so, I pray, go with us.mine Honor, and so I pray go with vs.
CoriolanusCor I.iv.5.1So, the good horse is mine.So, the good Horse is mine.
CoriolanusCor I.iv.29And he shall feel mine edge.And he shall feele mine edge.
CoriolanusCor I.ix.19.1Hath overta'en mine act.Hath ouerta'ne mine Act.
CoriolanusCor I.x.12He's mine or I am his. Mine emulationHe's mine, or I am his: Mine Emulation
CoriolanusCor II.iii.63Mine own desert.Mine owne desert.
CoriolanusCor II.iii.65Ay, but not mine own desire.I, but mine owne desire.
CoriolanusCor III.ii.1Let them pull all about mine ears, present meLet them pull all about mine eares, present me
CoriolanusCor III.ii.34For the whole state, I would put mine armour on,For the whole State; I would put mine Armour on,
CoriolanusCor III.ii.121Lest I surcease to honour mine own truthLeast I surcease to honor mine owne truth,
CoriolanusCor III.ii.129Thy valiantness was mine, thou suck'dst it from me,Thy Valiantnesse was mine, thou suck'st it from me:
CoriolanusCor III.ii.144.1Will answer in mine honour.Will answer in mine Honor.
CoriolanusCor III.iii.113More holy and profound, than mine own life,More holy, and profound, then mine owne life,
CoriolanusCor IV.v.110Mine arms about that body, whereagainstMine armes about that body, where against
CoriolanusCor IV.v.124Or lose mine arm for't. Thou hast beat me outOr loose mine Arme for't: Thou hast beate mee out
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.141.2For mine own part,For mine owne part,
CoriolanusCor IV.vii.25That which shall break his neck or hazard mineThat which shall breake his necke, or hazard mine,
CoriolanusCor IV.vii.57Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine.Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine.
CoriolanusCor V.ii.84Mine ears against your suits are stronger thanMine eares against your suites, are stronger then
CoriolanusCor V.iii.125.2Ay, and mine,I, and mine,
CoriolanusCor V.iii.197Mine eyes to sweat compassion. But, good sir,Mine eyes to sweat compassion. But (good sir)
CoriolanusCor V.vi.22Mine honour for his truth; who being so heightened,Mine Honor for his truth: who being so heighten'd,
CoriolanusCor V.vi.36In mine own person; holp to reap the fameIn mine owne person: holpe to reape the Fame
CymbelineCym I.ii.31And with mine eyes I'll drink the words you send,And with mine eyes, Ile drinke the words you send,
CymbelineCym I.ii.105Your faithful servant: I dare lay mine honourYour faithfull Seruant: I dare lay mine Honour
CymbelineCym I.iv.17I would have broke mine eye-strings, cracked them, butI would haue broke mine eye-strings;
CymbelineCym I.iv.22Have turned mine eye, and wept. But, good Pisanio,Haue turn'd mine eye, and wept. But good Pisanio,
CymbelineCym I.iv.30Mine interest, and his honour; or have charged him,Mine Interest, and his Honour: or haue charg'd him
CymbelineCym I.v.30whom I commend to you as a noble friend of mine.whom I commend to you, as a Noble Friend of mine.
CymbelineCym I.vii.93.1Not mine to speak on't.Not mine to speake on't.
CymbelineCym I.vii.103Takes prisoner the wild motion of mine eye,Takes prisoner the wild motion of mine eye,
CymbelineCym I.vii.130As I have such a heart that both mine ears(As I haue such a Heart, that both mine eares
CymbelineCym I.vii.141Away, I do condemn mine ears, that haveAway, I do condemne mine eares, that haue
CymbelineCym I.vii.194And pawn mine honour for their safety, sinceAnd pawne mine Honor for their safety, since
CymbelineCym II.i.4must take me up for swearing, as if I borrowed minemust take me vp for swearing, as if I borrowed mine
CymbelineCym II.ii.3I have read three hours then: mine eyes are weak,I haue read three houres then: / Mine eyes are weake,
CymbelineCym II.ii.30Would testify, t' enrich mine inventory.Would testifie, t'enrich mine Inuentorie.
CymbelineCym II.ii.35'Tis mine, and this will witness outwardly,'Tis mine, and this will witnesse outwardly,
CymbelineCym II.iii.141Hath left mine arm: it was thy master's. 'Shrew me,Hath left mine Arme: it was thy Masters. Shrew me
CymbelineCym II.iii.145Last night 'twas on mine arm; I kissed it:Last night 'twas on mine Arme; I kiss'd it,
CymbelineCym II.iv.45Was mine in Britain; for the ring is won.Was mine in Britaine, for the Ring is wonne.
CymbelineCym II.iv.60Your sword, or mine, or masterless leave bothYour Sword, or mine, or Masterlesse leaue both
CymbelineCym II.iv.107It is a basilisk unto mine eye,It is a Basiliske vnto mine eye,
CymbelineCym III.i.85I know your master's pleasure, and he mine:I know your Masters pleasure, and he mine:
CymbelineCym III.iii.82They think they are mine, and though trained up thus meanly,They thinke they are mine, / And though train'd vp thus meanely
CymbelineCym III.iii.91Into my story: say ‘ Thus mine enemy fell,Into my Story: say thus mine Enemy fell,
CymbelineCym III.iv.103.1I'll wake mine eye-balls out first.Ile wake mine eye-balles first.
CymbelineCym III.iv.106Mine action, and thine own? Our horses' labour?Mine Action? and thine owne? Our Horses labour?
CymbelineCym III.iv.115I have heard I am a strumpet, and mine ear,I haue heard I am a Strumpet, and mine eare
CymbelineCym III.v.58He hath a drug of mine: I pray his absenceHe hath a Drugge of mine: I pray, his absence
CymbelineCym III.v.121gratitude but be a diligent follower of mine. Wiltgratitude, but be a diligent follower of mine. Wilt
CymbelineCym III.vi.25Best draw my sword; and if mine enemyBest draw my Sword; and if mine Enemy
CymbelineCym IV.ii.314And mine to boot, be darted on thee! Thou,And mine to boot, be darted on thee: thou
CymbelineCym V.ii.7As I wear mine, are titles but of scorn.As I weare mine) are titles but of scorne.
CymbelineCym V.iii.68And yet died too! I, in mine own woe charmed,And yet dyed too. I, in mine owne woe charm'd
CymbelineCym V.iv.22For Innogen's dear life take mine, and thoughFor Imogens deere life, take mine, and though
CymbelineCym V.iv.26You rather, mine being yours: and so, great powers,(You rather) mine being yours: and so great Powres,
CymbelineCym V.iv.112Express impatience, lest you stir up mine.Expresse Impatience, least you stirre vp mine:
CymbelineCym V.v.62.2Mine eyesMine eyes
CymbelineCym V.v.64Mine ears that heard her flattery, nor my heartMine eares that heare her flattery, nor my heart,
CymbelineCym V.v.95And art mine own. I know not why, wherefore,And art mine owne. I know not why, wherefore,
CymbelineCym V.v.186By hers and mine adultery: he, true knight,By hers, and mine Adultery: he (true Knight)
CymbelineCym V.v.196Of hope, not longing, mine Italian brainOf hope, not longing; mine Italian braine,
CymbelineCym V.v.230Mine and your mistress: O, my lord Posthumus!Mine and your Mistris: Oh my Lord Posthumus,
CymbelineCym V.v.232.1Mine honoured lady!Mine honour'd Lady.
CymbelineCym V.v.297.1To tell this tale of mine.To tell this tale of mine.
CymbelineCym V.v.313For mine own part unfold a dangerous speech,For mine owne part, vnfold a dangerous speech,
CymbelineCym V.v.330And think they are my sons, are none of mine;And thinke they are my Sonnes, are none of mine,
CymbelineCym V.v.430Of mine own kindred. When I waked, I foundOf mine owne Kindred. When I wak'd, I found
HamletHam I.i.58.1Of mine own eyes.Of mine owne eyes.
HamletHam I.i.68But, in the gross and scope of mine opinion,But in the grosse and scope of my Opinion,
HamletHam I.ii.151Would have mourned longer – married with my uncle,Would haue mourn'd longer) married with mine Vnkle,
HamletHam I.ii.171Nor shall you do my ear that violenceNor shall you doe mine eare that violence,
HamletHam I.ii.254Your loves, as mine to you. Farewell.Your loue, as mine to you: farewell.
HamletHam I.v.35'Tis given out that, sleeping in my orchard,It's giuen out, that sleeping in mine Orchard,
HamletHam I.v.41My uncle?mine Vncle?
HamletHam I.v.52To those of mine!To those of mine.
HamletHam I.v.59Brief let me be. Sleeping within my orchard,Briefe let me be: Sleeping within mine Orchard,
HamletHam I.v.63And in the porches of my ears did pourAnd in the Porches of mine eares did poure
HamletHam I.v.70The thin and wholesome blood. So did it mine.The thin and wholsome blood: so did it mine;
HamletHam I.v.131Such as it is; and for my own poor partSuch as it is: and for mine owne poore part,
HamletHam II.i.92At last, a little shaking of mine armAt last, a little shaking of mine Arme:
HamletHam II.ii.46And I do think – or else this brain of mineAnd I do thinke, or else this braine of mine
HamletHam II.ii.106I have a daughter – have while she is mineI haue a daughter: haue, whil'st she is mine,
HamletHam II.ii.128.1All given to mine ear.All giuen to mine eare.
HamletHam II.ii.222My honoured lord!Mine honour'd Lord?
HamletHam II.ii.362It is not very strange. For my uncle is King ofIt is not strange: for mine Vnckle is King of
HamletHam II.ii.393Upon my honour – Vpon mine Honor.
HamletHam II.ii.437judgements in such matters cried in the top of mineiudgement in such matters, cried in the top of mine)
HamletHam II.ii.594Before mine uncle. I'll observe his looks.Before mine Vnkle. Ile obserue his lookes,
HamletHam III.ii.90Observe my uncle. If his occulted guiltObserue mine Vnkle: If his occulted guilt,
HamletHam III.ii.95For I mine eyes will rivet to his face,For I mine eyes will riuet to his Face:
HamletHam III.ii.106words are not mine.words are not mine.
HamletHam III.ii.107No, nor mine now. (to Polonius) My lord, you No, nor mine. Now my Lord, you
HamletHam III.ii.258It would cost you a groaning to take off mineIt would cost you a groaning, to take off my
HamletHam III.iii.55My crown, mine own ambition, and my Queen.My Crowne, mine owne Ambition, and my Queene:
HamletHam III.iv.90Thou turnest mine eyes into my very soul,Thou turn'st mine eyes into my very soule,
HamletHam III.iv.96These words like daggers enter in mine ears.These words like Daggers enter in mine eares.
HamletHam III.iv.160Good night. But go not to my uncle's bed.Good night, but go not to mine Vnkles bed,
HamletHam IV.ii.11That I can keep your counsel and not mine own.That I can keepe your counsell, and not mine owne.
HamletHam IV.v.157Burn out the sense and virtue of mine eye!Burne out the Sence and Vertue of mine eye.
HamletHam V.i.91to play at loggats with them? Mine ache to think on't.to play at Loggets with 'em? mine ake to thinke on't.
HamletHam V.i.117Mine, sir.Mine Sir:
HamletHam V.i.122not yours. For my part, I do not lie in't, and yet it is mine.not yours: for my part, I doe not lye in't; and yet it is mine.
HamletHam V.i.246Till I have caught her once more in mine arms.Till I haue caught her once more in mine armes:
HamletHam V.ii.16To mine own room again, making so bold,To mine owne roome againe, making so bold,
HamletHam V.ii.73It will be short. The interim is mine;It will be short, / The interim's mine,
HamletHam V.ii.105Nay, good my lord. For mine ease, in good faith.Nay, in good faith, for mine ease in good faith:
HamletHam V.ii.164three hits. He hath laid on twelve for nine; and it wouldthree hits; He hath one twelue for mine, and that would
HamletHam V.ii.185it. Thus has he, and many more of the same bevy that Iit: thus had he and mine more of the same Beauy that I
HamletHam V.ii.196King's pleasure. If his fitness speaks, mine is ready,
HamletHam V.ii.237That I have shot mine arrow o'er the houseThat I haue shot mine Arrow o're the house,
HamletHam V.ii.249I'll be your foil, Laertes. In mine ignoranceIle be your foile Laertes, in mine ignorance,
HamletHam V.ii.300Why, as a woodcock to mine own springe, Osrick.Why as a Woodcocke / To mine Sprindge, Osricke,
HamletHam V.ii.301I am justly killed with mine own treachery.I am iustly kill'd with mine owne Treacherie.
HamletHam V.ii.324Mine and my father's death come not upon thee,Mine and my Fathers death come not vpon thee,
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.88And called mine Percy, his Plantagenet!And call'd mine Percy, his Plantagenet:
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.89Then would I have his Harry, and he mine.Then would I haue his Harry, and he mine:
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.ii.34down? 'Sblood, I'll not bear my own flesh so far afootdowne? Ile not beare mine owne flesh so far afoot
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iii.1But for mine own part, my lord, I could be wellBut for mine owne part, my Lord. I could bee well
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.378make my eyes look red, that it may be thought I havemake mine eyes looke redde, that it may be thought I haue
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.198I understand thy kisses, and thou mine,I vnderstand thy Kisses, and thou mine,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.240Not mine, in good sooth.Not mine, in good sooth.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.89Save mine, which hath desired to see thee more,Saue mine, which hath desir'd to see thee more:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.62never called so in mine own house before.neuer call'd so in mine owne house before.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.79younker of me? Shall I not take mine ease in mine innYounker of me? Shall I not take mine ease in mine Inne,
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.ii.61Mine, Hal, mine.Mine, Hal, mine.
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.iii.99Rated mine uncle from the council board,Rated my Vnckle from the Councell-Boord,
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.iii.110And in the morning early shall mine uncleAnd in the Morning early shall my Vnckle
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.i.23For mine own part I could be well contentFor mine owne part, I could be well content
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iii.35more weight than mine own bowels. I have led mymore weight then mine owne Bowelles. I haue led my
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.36But mine I am sure thou art, whoe'er thou be,But mine I am sure thou art, whoere thou be,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.69Thy name in arms were now as great as mine.Thy name in Armes, were now as great as mine.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.53Upon mine honour, for a silken pointVpon mine Honor, for a silken point
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.79But in the end, to stop my ear indeed,But in the end (to stop mine Eare indeed)
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.107But these mine eyes saw him in bloody state,But these mine eyes, saw him in bloody state,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.27keep his own grace, but he's almost out of mine, I cankeepe his owne Grace, but he is almost out of mine, I can
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.14in mine own house, most beastly, in good faith. 'A caresin mine owne house, and that most beastly: he cares
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.62with mine own ears. The worst that they can say of mewith mine owne eares: the worst that they can say of me
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.158And for mine, sir, I will govern it.And for mine Sir, I will gouerne it.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.170A low transformation, that shall be mine; for in everythinga low transformation, that shall be mine: for in euery thing,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iii.59To rain upon remembrance with mine eyes,To raine vpon Remembrance with mine Eyes,
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.80Dost thou hear? It is mine ancient.Do'st thou heare? it is mine Ancient.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.109mine hostess.mine Hostesse.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.230do not bid me remember mine end.doe not bid me remember mine end.
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.308No abuse, Hal, o' mine honour, no abuse.No abuse (Hall) on mine Honor, no abuse.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.6your fairest daughter and mine, my god-daughter Ellen?your fairest Daughter, and mine, my God-Daughter Ellen?
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.33see how many of my old acquaintance are dead!see how many of mine olde Acquaintance are dead?
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.218hanged, sir, as go. And yet for mine own part, sir, I dohang'd sir, as goe: and yet, for mine owne part, sir, I do
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.220mine own part, have a desire to stay with my friends;mine owne part, haue a desire to stay with my friends:
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.221else, sir, I did not care, for mine own part, so much.else, sir, I did not care, for mine owne part, so much.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.150Upon mine honour, all too confidentVpon mine Honor, all too confident
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.114Whereof you did complain, which, by mine honour,Whereof you did complaine; which, by mine Honor,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.19of mine, and not a tongue of them all speaks any otherof mine, and not a Tongue of them all, speakes anie other
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.47particular ballad else, with mine own picture on theparticular Ballad, with mine owne Picture on the
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.48Will I to mine leave, as 'tis left to me.will I to mine leaue, / As 'tis left to me.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.95Dost thou so hunger for mine empty chairDo'st thou so hunger for my emptie Chayre,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.96That thou wilt needs invest thee with my honoursThat thou wilt needes inuest thee with mine Honors,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.172If any rebel or vain spirit of mineIf any Rebell, or vaine spirit of mine,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.i.44knave is mine honest friend, sir; therefore, I beseechKnaue is mine honest Friend Sir, therefore I beseech
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.105Till you do live to see a son of mineTill you do liue, to see a Sonne of mine
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.119My voice shall sound as you do prompt mine ear,My voice shall sound, as you do prompt mine eare,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.1Nay, you shall see my orchard, where, in anNay, you shall see mine Orchard: where, in an
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.46And drink unto thee, leman mine,& drinke vnto the Leman mine:
Henry IV Part 22H4 epilogue.5is of mine own making; and what indeed I should sayis of mine owne making: and what (indeed) I should say,
Henry IV Part 22H4 epilogue.6will, I doubt, prove mine own marring. But to thewill (I doubt) prooue mine owne marring. But to the
Henry VH5 II.i.6may. I dare not fight, but I will wink and hold out minemay. I dare not fight, but I will winke and holde out mine
Henry VH5 II.i.26How now, mine host Pistol?How now mine Hoaste Pistoll?
Henry VH5 II.i.78Mine host Pistol, you must come to my master – andMine Hoast Pistoll, you must come to my Mayster, and
Henry VH5 III.ii.4and, for mine own part, I have not a case of lives. Theand for mine owne part, I haue not a Case of Liues: the
Henry VH5 III.ii.50put into mine; for it is plain pocketing up of wrongs. Iput into mine; for it is plaine pocketting vp of Wrongs. I
Henry VH5 III.ii.110By the mess, ere theise eyes of mine take themselvesBy the Mes, ere theise eyes of mine take themselues
Henry VH5 III.vii.49Mine was not bridled.Mine was not bridled.
Henry VH5 IV.vi.17Tarry, sweet soul, for mine, then fly abreast,Tarry (sweet soule) for mine, then flye a-brest:
Henry VH5 IV.vi.31And all my mother came into mine eyesAnd all my mother came into mine eyes,
Henry VH5 IV.vii.67That I have fined these bones of mine for ransom?That I haue fin'd these bones of mine for ransome?
Henry VH5 IV.viii.47never came any from mine that might offend yourneuer came any from mine, that might offend your
Henry VH5 IV.viii.54it for your own fault, and not mine; for had you beenit for your owne fault, and not mine: for had you beene
Henry VH5 V.ii.173I will not part with a village of it – I will have it all mine:I will not part with a Village of it; I will haue it all mine:
Henry VH5 V.ii.174and, Kate, when France is mine, and I am yours, thenand Kate, when France is mine, and I am yours; then
Henry VH5 V.ii.175yours is France, and you are mine.yours is France, and you are mine.
Henry VH5 V.ii.201If ever thou beest mine, Kate, as I have a saving faithIf euer thou beest mine, Kate, as I haue a sauing Faith
Henry VH5 V.ii.218Now fie upon my false French! By mineNow fye vpon my false French: by mine
Henry VH5 V.ii.235thine:’ which word thou shalt no sooner bless mine earthine: which Word thou shalt no sooner blesse mine Eare
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.iii.11Who willed you? Or whose will stands but mine?Who willed you? or whose will stands but mine?
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.66.1Mine was secure.Mine was secure.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.66.2And so was mine, my lord.And so was mine, my Lord.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.68Within her quarter and mine own precinctWithin her Quarter, and mine owne Precinct,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iii.9Fain would mine eyes be witness with mine ears,Faine would mine eyes be witnesse with mine eares,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.22Poor gentleman, his wrong doth equal mine.Poore Gentleman, his wrong doth equall mine.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.37Direct mine arms I may embrace his neckDirect mine Armes, I may embrace his Neck,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.43First, lean thine aged back against mine arm,First, leane thine aged Back against mine Arme,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.81And this is mine; sweet Henry, favour him.And this is mine (sweet Henry) fauour him.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.122Confirm it so, mine honourable lord.Confirme it so, mine honourable Lord.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.41And mine shall ring thy dire departure out.And mine shall ring thy dire departure out.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.53Sell every man his life as dear as mine,Sell euery man his life as deere as mine,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.v.27But mine it will, that no exploit have done.But mine it will, that no Exploit haue done.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.vi.23Mean and right poor, for that pure blood of mineMeane and right poore, for that pure blood of mine,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.vii.1Where is my other life? Mine own is gone.Where is my other Life? mine owne is gone.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.vii.79O, were mine eyeballs into bullets turned,Oh were mine eye-balles into Bullets turn'd,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.64So seems this gorgeous beauty to mine eyes.So seemes this gorgeous beauty to mine eyes.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.154Enjoy mine own, the country Maine and Anjou,Enioy mine owne, the Country Maine and Aniou,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iii.166To be mine own attorney in this case.To be mine owne Atturney in this case.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.9Thou art no father nor no friend of mine.Thou art no Father, nor no Friend of mine.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.28With you, mine alderliefest sovereign,With you mine Alder liefest Soueraigne,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.54And dimmed mine eyes, that I can read no further.And dim'd mine eyes, that I can reade no further.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.86Or hath mine uncle Beaufort and myself,Or hath mine Vnckle Beauford, and my selfe,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.116My sword should shed hot blood, mine eyes no tears.My sword should shed hot blood, mine eyes no teares.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.118Those provinces these arms of mine did conquer;Those Prouinces, these Armes of mine did conquer,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.146'Tis known to you he is mine enemy;'Tis knowne to you he is mine enemy:
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.12What, is't too short? I'll lengthen it with mine;What, is't too short? Ile lengthen it with mine,
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.ii.25Methought this staff, mine office-badge in court,Me thought this staffe mine Office-badge in Court
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.iii.15Mine is, an't please your grace,Mine is, and't please your Grace,
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.17Mine eyes are full of tears, my heart of grief.Mine eyes are full of teares, my heart of griefe.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.21Sorrow would solace, and mine age would ease.Sorrow would sollace, and mine Age would ease.
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.34As ere thy father Henry made it mine;As ere thy Father Henry made it mine;
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iii.96O God, have I overcome mine enemies in thisO God, haue I ouercome mine Enemies in this
Henry VI Part 22H6 II.iv.25And ban thine enemies, both mine and thine.And banne thine Enemies, both mine and thine.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.115No, many a pound of mine own proper store,No: many a Pound of mine owne proper store,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.151But mine is made the prologue to their play;But mine is made the Prologue to their Play:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.164My liefest liege to be mine enemy.My liefest Liege to be mine Enemie:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.199Whose flood begins to flow within mine eyes,Whose floud begins to flowe within mine eyes;
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.232And yet herein I judge mine own wit good – And yet herein I iudge mine owne Wit good;
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.320Whiles I take order for mine own affairs.Whiles I take order for mine owne affaires.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.340Weaves tedious snares to trap mine enemies.Weaues tedious Snares to trap mine Enemies.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.111And bid mine eyes be packing with my heart,And bid mine eyes be packing with my Heart,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.316My tongue should stumble in mine earnest words,My tongue should stumble in mine earnest words,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.317Mine eyes should sparkle like the beaten flint,Mine eyes should sparkle like the beaten Flint,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.318Mine hair be fixed on end, as one distract;Mine haire be fixt an end, as one distract:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.385Theirs for the earth's increase, mine for my sorrows?Theirs for the earths encrease, mine for my sorrowes.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.395And cry out for thee to close up mine eyes,And cry out for thee to close vp mine eyes:
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.25I lost mine eye in laying the prize aboard,I lost mine eye in laying the prize aboord,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.63This hand of mine hath writ in thy behalf,This hand of mine hath writ in thy behalfe,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.78and I was never mine own man since. How now? Who'sand I was neuer mine owne man since. How now? Who's
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.ii.88I am sorry for't. The man is a proper man, of mineI am sorry for't: The man is a proper man of mine
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.iv.59The trust I have is in mine innocence,The trust I haue, is in mine innocence,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.43Oppose thy steadfast gazing eyes to mine,Oppose thy stedfast gazing eyes to mine,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.49And if mine arm be heaved in the air,And if mine arme be heaued in the Ayre,
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.43Upon mine honour, he is prisoner.Vpon mine Honor he is Prisoner.
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.99That gold must round engirt these brows of mine,That Gold, must round engirt these browes of mine,
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.21But that thou art so fast mine enemy.But that thou art so fast mine enemie.
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.50My heart is turned to stone, and while 'tis mineMy heart is turn'd to stone: and while 'tis mine,
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.ii.65Nothing so heavy as these woes of mine.Nothing so heauy as these woes of mine.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.172Confirm the crown to me and to mine heirs,Confirme the Crowne to me and to mine Heires,
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.i.252Will follow mine, if once they see them spread;Will follow mine, if once they see them spread:
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.10Mine, boy? Not till King Henry be dead.Mine Boy? not till King Henry be dead.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.62Sir John and Sir Hugh Mortimer, mine uncles,Sir Iohn, and Sir Hugh Mortimer, mine Vnckles,
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iii.29It could not slake mine ire nor ease my heart.It could not slake mine ire, nor ease my heart.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.37And in that hope I throw mine eyes to heaven,And in that hope, I throw mine eyes to Heauen,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.25Dazzle mine eyes, or do I see three suns?Dazle mine eyes, or doe I see three Sunnes?
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.151For thou shalt know this strong right hand of mineFor thou shalt know this strong right hand of mine,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.202I come to pierce it, or to give thee mine.I come to pierce it, or to giue thee mine.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.iii.31Till either death hath closed these eyes of mineTill either death hath clos'd these eyes of mine,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.iii.36I throw my hands, mine eyes, my heart to Thee,I throw my hands, mine eyes, my heart to thee,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.83Ah, no, no, no, it is mine only son!Ah, no, no, no, it is mine onely Sonne.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.87Upon thy wounds, that kills mine eye and heart!Vpon thy wounds, that killes mine Eye, and Heart.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.112Much is your sorrow; mine ten times so much.Much is your sorrow; Mine, ten times so much.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.114These arms of mine shall be thy winding-sheet;These armes of mine shall be thy winding sheet:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.i.14To greet mine own land with my wishful sight.To greet mine owne Land with my wishfull sight:
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.72Why, then mine honesty shall be my dower;Why then mine Honestie shall be my Dower,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.156To shrink mine arm up like a withered shrub;To shrinke mine Arme vp like a wither'd Shrub,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.13From such a cause as fills mine eyes with tearsFrom such a cause, as fills mine eyes with teares,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.116Thereon I pawn my credit and mine honour.Thereon I pawne my Credit, and mine Honor.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.130Your grant, or your denial, shall be mine;Your graunt, or your denyall, shall be mine.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.133Mine ear hath tempted judgement to desire.Mine eare hath tempted iudgement to desire.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.150That your estate requires and mine can yield.That your Estate requires, and mine can yeeld.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.172Mine, such as fill my heart with unhoped joys.Mine such, as fill my heart with vnhop'd ioyes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.173Mine, full of sorrow and heart's discontent.Mine full of sorrow, and hearts discontent.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.217And mine, fair Lady Bona, joins with yours.And mine faire Lady Bona, ioynes with yours.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.218And mine with hers, and thine, and Margaret's.And mine, with hers, and thine, and Margarets.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.242I'll join mine eldest daughter and my joyIle ioyne mine eldest daughter, and my Ioy,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.29Then this is mine opinion: that King LewisThen this is mine opinion: / That King Lewis
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.63To play the broker in mine own behalf;To play the Broker in mine owne behalfe;
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.i.72But as this title honours me and mine,But as this Title honors me and mine,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.viii.36Should not be able to encounter mine.Should not be able to encounter mine.
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.viii.39I have not stopped mine ears to their demands,I haue not stopt mine eares to their demands,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.i.2How far hence is thy lord, mine honest fellow?How farre hence is thy Lord, mine honest fellow?
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.i.35Why then, 'tis mine, if but by Warwick's gift.Why then 'tis mine, if but by Warwickes gift.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.37And thou usurpest my father's right and mine.And thou vsurp'st my Fathers right and mine.
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.vi.36Thou hadst not lived to kill a son of mine.Thou had'st not liu'd to kill a Sonne of mine:
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.22Showed like a mine. Their dwarfish pages wereShew'd like a Mine. Their Dwarfish Pages were
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.81Kinsmen of mine, three at the least, that haveKinsmen of mine, three at the least, that haue
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.208To plead mine innocence, for that dye is on meTo plead mine Innocence; for that dye is on me
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.17.2Lady mine, proceed.Lady mine proceed.
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.97And once more in mine arms I bid him welcome,And once more in mine armes I bid him welcome,
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.29Or made it not mine too? Or which of your friendsOr made it not mine too? Or which of your Friends
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.31He were mine enemy? What friend of mineHe were mine Enemy? What Friend of mine,
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.39And prove it too, against mine honour aught,And proue it too, against mine Honor, aught;
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.77You are mine enemy, and make my challengeYou are mine Enemy, and make my Challenge,
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.156I do excuse you; yea, upon mine honour,I doe excuse you; yea, vpon mine Honour,
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.71In such a point of weight, so near mine honour,In such a poynt of weight, so neere mine Honour,
Henry VIIIH8 III.i.91.1In mine own country, lords.In mine owne Countrey Lords.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.28.1As I would wish mine enemy.As I would wish mine Enemy.
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.171Yet filed with my abilities. Mine own endsYet fill'd with my Abilities: Mine owne ends
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.172Have been mine so that evermore they pointedHaue beene mine so, that euermore they pointed
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.192More than mine own; that am, have, and will be – More then mine owne: that am, haue, and will be
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.212For mine own ends – indeed, to gain the popedom,For mine owne ends, (Indeed to gaine the Popedome,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.247Mine and your master, with his own hand gave me;(Mine, and your Master) with his owne hand, gaue me:
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.301And spotless shall mine innocence ariseAnd spotlesse, shall mine Innocence arise,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.410No sun shall ever usher forth mine honours,No Sun, shall euer vsher forth mine Honors,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.454I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell,I dare now call mine owne. O Cromwel, Cromwel,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.456I served my King, He would not in mine ageI seru'd my King: he would not in mine Age
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.457Have left me naked to mine enemies.Haue left me naked to mine Enemies.
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.71To keep mine honour from corruption,To keepe mine Honor, from Corruption,
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.115First mine own service to your grace; the next,First mine owne seruice to your Grace, the next
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.164For so I will. Mine eyes grow dim. Farewell,(For so I will) mine eyes grow dimme. Farewell
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.28Of mine own way; I know you wise, religious;Of mine owne way. I know you Wise, Religious,
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.123If they shall fail, I with mine enemiesIf they shall faile, I with mine Enemies
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.141Protect mine innocence, or I fall intoProtect mine innocence, or I fall into
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.153He's honest, on mine honour. God's blest mother!He's honest on mine Honor. Gods blest Mother,
Henry VIIIH8 V.ii.15To quench mine honour. They would shame to make meTo quench mine Honor; they would shame to make me
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.57to draw mine honour in, and let 'em win the work. Theto draw mine Honour in, and let 'em win the Worke, the
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.49By means whereof this breast of mine hath buriedBy meanes whereof, this Brest of mine hath buried
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.228time gentler than other; and at every putting-by minetime gentler then other; and at euery putting by, mine
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.246swooned, and fell down at it. And for mine own part, Iswoonded, and fell downe at it: And for mine owne part, I
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.280and shook their heads; but, for mine own part, itand shooke their heads: but for mine owne part, it
Julius CaesarJC I.iii.119And I will set this foot of mine as farAnd I will set this foot of mine as farre,
Julius CaesarJC II.ii.66Have I in conquest stretched mine arm so far,Haue I in Conquest stretcht mine Arme so farre,
Julius CaesarJC II.iv.22At mine own house, good lady.At mine owne house, good Lady.
Julius CaesarJC III.i.6O Caesar, read mine first; for mine's a suitO Casar, reade mine first: for mine's a suite
Julius CaesarJC III.i.283Passion, I see, is catching, for mine eyes,Passion I see is catching from mine eyes,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.14and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me for mineand be silent, that you may heare. Beleeue me for mine
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.15honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you mayHonor, and haue respect to mine Honor, that you may
Julius CaesarJC IV.ii.38Judge me, you gods; wrong I mine enemies?Iudge me you Gods; wrong I mine Enemies?
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.53And it shall please me well. For mine own part,And it shall please me well. For mine owne part,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.86But Brutus makes mine greater than they are.But Brutus makes mine greater then they are.
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.99My spirit from mine eyes! There is my dagger,My Spirit from mine eyes. There is my Dagger,
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.101Dearer than Pluto's mine, richer than gold:Deerer then Pluto's Mine, Richer then Gold:
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.175Mine speak of seventy senators that diedMine speake of seuenty Senators, that dy'de
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.274I think it is the weakness of mine eyesI thinke it is the weakenesse of mine eyes
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.2Myself have to mine own turned enemy:My selfe haue to mine owne turn'd Enemy:
Julius CaesarJC V.iii.3This ensign here of mine was turning back;This Ensigne heere of mine was turning backe,
Julius CaesarJC V.v.41Night hangs upon mine eyes; my bones would rest,Night hangs vpon mine eyes, my Bones would rest,
King Edward IIIE3 I.i.80Tell him: the crown that he usurps is mine,Tell him the Crowne that hee vsurpes, is myne,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.133For here two day-stars that mine eyes would seeFor here to day stars that myne eies would see,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.134More than the sun steals mine own light from me.More then the Sunne steales myne owne light from mee:
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.127Read, Lod'wick, read.Fill thou the emptie hollowes of mine eares,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.128Fill thou the empty hollows of mine earsWith the sweete hearing of thy poetrie.
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.135Hers more than most, mine most and more than more;Hers more then most, myne most, and more then more,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.249In rich exchange I tender to thee mine.In rich exchaunge I tender to thee myne,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.352What if I swear by this right hand of mineWhat if I sweare by this right hand of mine,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.355But neither will I do: I'll keep mine oath,But neither will I do Ile keepe myne oath,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.62But these of mine; and these shall meet my foeBut these of myne, and these shall meete my foe,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.136That stand between your highness' love and mine.That stand betweene your highnes loue and mine,
King Edward IIIE3 III.i.28Doth not a little aggravate mine ire.Doth not a little aggrauate mine ire,
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.55For so far off as I direct'd mine eyes,For so far of as I directed mine eies,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.216Be numb, my joints, wax feeble, both mine arms,Be numbe my ioynts, waxe feeble both mine armes,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.i.2Mine enemy, Sir Charles of Blois, is slain,Mine ennemie Sir Charles of Bloys is slaine,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.i.8Bear it unto him, and withal mine oathBeare it vnto him, and with all mine othe,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iii.26Ah, but it is mine oath, my gracious lord,Ah but itis mine othe my gratious Lord,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.v.76Charactered with this princely hand of mine;Carectred with this princely hande of mine,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.10Mine ears are stopped against your bootless cries.Mine eares are stopt against your bootelesse cryes,
King JohnKJ I.i.23Bear mine to him, and so depart in peace.Beare mine to him, and so depart in peace,
King JohnKJ I.i.67That is my brother's plea, and none of mine;That is my brothers plea, and none of mine,
King JohnKJ I.i.89Mine eye hath well examined his partsMine eye hath well examined his parts,
King JohnKJ I.i.114Then, good my liege, let me have what is mine,Then good my Liedge let me haue what is mine,
King JohnKJ I.i.142That in mine ear I durst not stick a roseThat in mine eare I durst not sticke a rose,
King JohnKJ I.i.194Thus, leaning on mine elbow, I begin – Thus leaning on mine elbow I begin,
King JohnKJ I.i.223That holds in chase mine honour up and down?That holds in chase mine honour vp and downe.
King JohnKJ I.i.242That for thine own gain shouldst defend mine honour?That for thine owne gaine shouldst defend mine honor?
King JohnKJ II.i.289Sits on's horseback at mine hostess' door,sit's on's horsebacke at mine Hostesse dore
King JohnKJ II.i.510My uncle's will in this respect is mine.My vnckles will in this respect is mine,
King JohnKJ III.i.102You came in arms to spill mine enemies' blood,You came in Armes to spill mine enemies bloud,
King JohnKJ III.i.185And for mine too; when law can do no right,And for mine too, when Law can do no right.
King JohnKJ III.i.226This royal hand and mine are newly knit,This royall hand and mine are newly knit,
King JohnKJ III.i.309.1Against mine uncle.Against mine Vncle.
King JohnKJ III.iii.62And whereso'er this foot of mine doth treadAnd wheresoere this foot of mine doth tread,
King JohnKJ III.iv.45I am not mad. This hair I tear is mine.I am not mad: this haire I teare is mine,
King JohnKJ IV.i.36Out at mine eyes in tender womanish tears.Out at mine eyes, in tender womanish teares.
King JohnKJ IV.i.39Must you with hot irons burn out both mine eyes?Must you with hot Irons, burne out both mine eyes?
King JohnKJ IV.i.56Why then you must. Will you put out mine eyes – Why then you must. Will you put out mine eyes?
King JohnKJ IV.i.64Even in the matter of mine innocence;Euen in the matter of mine innocence:
King JohnKJ IV.i.66But for containing fire to harm mine eye.But for containing fire to harme mine eye:
King JohnKJ IV.i.69And told me Hubert should put out mine eyes,And told me Hubert should put out mine eyes,
King JohnKJ IV.i.101So I may keep mine eyes. O, spare mine eyes,So I may keepe mine eyes. O spare mine eyes,
King JohnKJ IV.ii.70He showed his warrant to a friend of mine.He shew'd his warrant to a friend of mine,
King JohnKJ IV.ii.251Young Arthur is alive. This hand of mineYong Arthur is aliue: This hand of mine
King JohnKJ V.ii.51Startles mine eyes, and makes me more amazedStartles mine eyes, and makes me more amaz'd
King JohnKJ V.ii.63That knit your sinews to the strength of mine.That knit your sinewes to the strength of mine.
King JohnKJ V.ii.94After young Arthur, claim this land for mine;After yong Arthur, claime this Land for mine,
King JohnKJ V.vi.5Of thine affairs as well as thou of mine?of thine affaires, / As well as thou of mine?
King JohnKJ V.vi.15Should 'scape the true acquaintance of mine ear.Should scape the true acquaintance of mine eare.
King JohnKJ V.vii.51O cousin, thou art come to set mine eye!Oh Cozen, thou art come to set mine eye:
King LearKL I.ii.109son and father. This villain of mine comes under theSonne and Father. This villaine of mine comes vnder the
King LearKL I.iii.16Whose mind and mine I know in that are one,Whose mind and mine I know in that are one,
King LearKL I.iv.66Thou but rememberest me of mine own conception.Thou but remembrest me of mine owne Conception,
King LearKL I.iv.68which I have rather blamed as mine own jealouswhich I haue rather blamed as mine owne iealous
King LearKL I.iv.108myself. There's mine. Beg another of thy daughters.my selfe, there's mine, beg another of thy Daughters.
King LearKL II.i.51My unprovided body, latched mine arm:My vnprouided body, latch'd mine arme;
King LearKL II.ii.89No more perchance does mine, nor his, nor hers.No more perchance do's mine, nor his, nor hers.
King LearKL II.iv.38Whose welcome I perceived had poisoned mineWhose welcome I perceiu'd had poison'd mine,
King LearKL II.iv.72wise man gives thee better counsel, give me mine again;wiseman giues thee better counsell giue me mine againe,
King LearKL II.iv.218Which I must needs call mine. Thou art a boil,Which I must needs call mine. Thou art a Byle,
King LearKL II.iv.239From those that she calls servants, or from mine?From those that she cals Seruants, or from mine?
King LearKL III.iii.3pity him, they took from me the use of mine own house,pity him, they tooke from me the vse of mine owne house,
King LearKL III.iv.5I had rather break mine own. Good my lord, enter.I had rather breake mine owne, / Good my Lord enter.
King LearKL IV.vii.36With this thin helm? Mine enemy's dog,Mine Enemies dogge,
King LearKL IV.vii.47Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tearsVpon a wheele of fire, that mine owne teares
King LearKL V.i.14No, by mine honour, madam.No by mine honour, Madam.
King LearKL V.iii.126Thy arm may do thee justice. Here is mine.Thy arme may do thee Iustice, heere is mine:
King LearKL V.iii.127Behold; it is the privilege of mine honours,Behold it is my priuiledge, / The priuiledge of mine Honours,
King LearKL V.iii.147This sword of mine shall give them instant wayThis Sword of mine shall giue them instant way,
King LearKL V.iii.156Say if I do; the laws are mine, not thine.Say if I do, the Lawes are mine not thine,
King LearKL V.iii.242Despite of mine own nature. Quickly send – Despight of mine owne Nature. Quickly send,
King LearKL V.iii.277Mine eyes are not o'the best, I'll tell you straight.Mine eyes are not o'th'best, Ile tell you straight.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.19In spending your wit in the praise of mine.In spending your wit in the praise of mine.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.94mine.mine.
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.114Lady, I will commend you to my mine ownLady, I will commend you to my owne
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.130him a coin), for the best ward of mine honour isfor the best ward of mine honours is rewarding
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.57O, thy letter, thy letter! He's a good friend of mine.O thy letter, thy letter: He's a good friend of mine.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.105From my Lord Berowne, a good master of mine,From my Lord Berowne, a good master of mine,
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.ii.152pupil of mine, where, if before repast it shall pleasePupill of mine, where if (being repast) it shall please
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.30As doth thy face, through tears of mine, give light.As doth thy face through teares of mine giue light:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.69If broken, then, it is no fault of mine;If broken then, it is no fault of mine:
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.90.2And I had mine!And I had mine.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.91And I mine too, good Lord!And mine too good Lord.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.92Amen, so I had mine! Is not that a good word?Amen, so I had mine: Is not that a good word?
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.90I thought to close mine eyes some half an hour,I thought to close mine eyes some halfe an houre:
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.285Dumaine is mine as sure as bark on tree.Dumaine is mine as sure as barke on tree.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.384.1All the fool mine?All the foole mine.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.439.1Upon mine honour, no.Vpon mine Honor no.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.441Despise me when I break this oath of mine.Despise me when I breake this oath of mine.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.499sir, will show whereuntil it doth amount. For minesir will shew where-vntill it doth amount: for mine
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.504the Great. For mine own part, I know not the degreethe great: for mine owne part, I know not the degree
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.718For mine own part, I breathe free breath. I haveFor mine owne part, I breath free breath: I haue
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.809To flatter up these powers of mine with rest,To flatter vp these powers of mine with rest,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.810The sudden hand of death close up mine eye!The sodaine hand of death close vp mine eie.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.827Behold the window of my heart, mine eye,Behold the window of my heart, mine eie:
MacbethMac I.iii.34Thrice to thine, and thrice to mine,Thrice to thine, and thrice to mine,
MacbethMac I.iv.21Might have been mine! Only I have left to say,Might haue beene mine: onely I haue left to say,
MacbethMac I.vi.29Conduct me to mine host. We love him highly,Conduct me to mine Host we loue him highly,
MacbethMac II.i.44Mine eyes are made the fools o'the other senses,Mine Eyes are made the fooles o'th' other Sences,
MacbethMac II.i.49Thus to mine eyes. Now o'er the one half-worldThus to mine Eyes. Now o're the one halfe World
MacbethMac II.ii.59What hands are here! Ha – they pluck out mine eyes!What Hands are here? hah: they pluck out mine Eyes.
MacbethMac II.iv.19They did so, to the amazement of mine eyesThey did so: To th' amazement of mine eyes
MacbethMac III.i.63No son of mine succeeding. If it be so,No Sonne of mine succeeding: if't be so,
MacbethMac III.i.67Only for them; and mine eternal jewelOnely for them, and mine eternall Iewell
MacbethMac III.i.115So is he mine, and in such bloody distanceSo is he mine: and in such bloody distance,
MacbethMac III.i.120For certain friends that are both his and mine,For certaine friends that are both his, and mine,
MacbethMac III.iv.115.1When mine is blanched with fear.When mine is blanch'd with feare.
MacbethMac III.iv.134By the worst means the worst. For mine own goodBy the worst meanes, the worst, for mine owne good,
MacbethMac IV.i.112Thy crown does sear mine eye-balls. And thy hair,Thy Crowne do's seare mine Eye-bals. And thy haire
MacbethMac IV.iii.30But mine own safeties. You may be rightly just,But mine owne Safeties: you may be rightly iust,
MacbethMac IV.iii.123Unspeak mine own detraction, here abjureVnspeake mine owne detraction. Heere abiure
MacbethMac IV.iii.127Scarcely have coveted what was mine own,Scarsely haue coueted what was mine owne.
MacbethMac IV.iii.199.2If it be mine,If it be mine
MacbethMac IV.iii.225Not for their own demerits, but for mine,Not for their owne demerits, but for mine
MacbethMac IV.iii.229O, I could play the woman with mine eyesO I could play the woman with mine eyes,
MacbethMac V.iii.36Hang those that talk of fear. – Give me mine armour. –Hang those that talke of Feare. Giue me mine Armor:
MacbethMac V.iii.48Come, put mine armour on, give me my staff.Come, put mine Armour on: giue me my Staffe:
MacbethMac V.vi.19.1More hateful to mine ear.More hatefull to mine eare.
MacbethMac V.vi.25If thou be'st slain, and with no stroke of mine,If thou beest slaine, and with no stroake of mine,
MacbethMac V.vi.41On mine own sword? Whiles I see lives, the gashesOn mine owne sword? whiles I see liues, the gashes
MacbethMac V.vi.97Whose voices I desire aloud with mine. –Whose voyces I desire alowd with mine.
Measure for MeasureMM I.i.63Nor need you, on mine honour, have to doNor neede you (on mine honor) haue to doe
Measure for MeasureMM I.i.64With any scruple. Your scope is as mine own,With any scruple: your scope is as mine owne,
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.30Let mine own judgement pattern out my deathLet mine owne Iudgement patterne out my death,
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.171mine action of battery on thee.mine action of battry on thee.
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.198I thank your worship. For mine own part, II thanke your worship: for mine owne part, I
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.12.2Go to; let that be mine.Goe to; let that be mine,
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.39Mine were the very cipher of a function,Mine were the verie Cipher of a Function
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.55As mine is to him?As mine is to him?
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.162What's this? What's this? Is this her fault or mine?What's this? what's this? is this her fault, or mine?
Measure for MeasureMM II.iii.10Look, here comes one: a gentlewoman of mine,Looke here comes one: a Gentlewoman of mine,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.72To have it added to the faults of mineTo haue it added to the faults of mine,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.74Your sense pursues not mine. Either you are ignorant,Your sence pursues not mine: either you are ignorant,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.147.2Believe me, on mine honour,Beleeue me on mine Honor,
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.88And hug it in mine arms.And hugge it in mine armes.
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.40a friend of mine.a friend of mine.
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.113in mine office, awakens me with this unwontedIn mine Office, awakens mee / With this vnwonted
Measure for MeasureMM IV.ii.165By the vow of mine order I warrant you, if myBy the vow of mine Order, I warrant you, / If my
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.150O pretty Isabella, I am pale at mine heart to seeOh prettie Isabella, I am pale at mine heart, to see
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.59.2By mine honesty,By mine honesty
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.100My sisterly remorse confutes mine honour,My sisterly remorse, confutes mine honour,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.196When, I'll depose, I had him in mine arms,When I'le depose I had him in mine Armes
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.312Dare no more stretch this finger of mine than heNo more stretch this finger of mine, then he
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.369But let my trial be mine own confession.But let my Triall, be mine owne Confession:
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.489Give me your hand and say you will be mine.Giue me your hand, and say you will be mine,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.515Upon mine honour, thou shalt marry her.Vpon mine honor thou shalt marrie her.
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.534What's mine is yours and what is yours is mine.What's mine is yours, and what is yours is mine.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.79.1And mine a sad one.And mine a sad one.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.123How much I have disabled mine estateHow much I haue disabled mine estate,
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.ii.17mine own teaching. The brain may devise laws for themine owne teaching: the braine may deuise lawes for the
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.110And all for use of that which is mine own.And all for vse of that which is mine owne.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.i.7To prove whose blood is reddest, his or mine.To proue whose blood is reddest, his or mine.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.i.8I tell thee, lady, this aspect of mineI tell thee Ladie this aspect of mine
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.2from this Jew my master. The fiend is at mine elbow andfrom this Iew my Maister: the fiend is at mine elbow, and
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.85be Launcelot thou art mine own flesh and blood. Lordbe Lancelet, thou art mine owne flesh and blood: Lord
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.95Well, well; but, for mine own part, as I haveWell, well, but for mine owne part, as I haue
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.180Nay more, while grace is saying hood mine eyesNay more, while grace is saying hood mine eyes
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.vi.54And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,And faire she is, if that mine eyes be true,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.52cooled my friends, heated mine enemies; and what's hiscooled my friends, heated mine enemies, and what's the
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.17Mine own I would say; but if mine then yours,Mine owne I would say: but of mine then yours,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.117Or whether, riding on the balls of mine,Or whether riding on the bals of mine
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.166Myself and what is mine to you and yoursMy selfe, and what is mine, to you and yours
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.202And so did mine too, as the matter falls;And so did mine too, as the matter falls:
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.26Until my lord's return. For mine own part,Vntill my Lords returne; for mine owne part
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.100Is dearly bought, 'tis mine, and I will have it.Is deerely bought, 'tis mine, and I will haue it.
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.118Than to live still, and write mine epitaph.Then to liue still, and write mine Epitaph.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.182That took some pains in writing, he begged mine,That tooke some paines in writing, he begg'd mine,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.192.1Till I again see mine!til I againe see mine.
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.209No, by my honour, madam! By my soulNo by mine honor Madam, by my soule
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.232Now by mine honour which is yet mine own,Now by mine honour which is yet mine owne,
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.235How you do leave me to mine own protection.How you doe leaue me to mine owne protection.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.132mine host of the Garter.mine Host of the Gater.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.143might never come in mine own great chamber againmight neuer come in mine owne great chamber againe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.149Ha, thou mountain-foreigner! – Sir John and master mine,Ha, thou mountaine Forreyner: Sir Iohn, and Master mine,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.1Mine host of the Garter –Mine Host of the Garter?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.4Truly, mine host, I must turn away some ofTruely mine Host; I must turne away some of
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.12Do so, good mine host.Doe so (good mine Host.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iii.94the revolt of mine is dangerous. That is my true humour.the reuolt of mine is dangerous: that is my true humour.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.iv.114Jack priest. And I have appointed mine host of deIack-Priest: and I haue appointed mine Host of de
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.69I protest mine never shall. I warrant he hath a thousandI protest mine neuer shall: I warrant he hath a thousand
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.80ready to wrangle with mine own honesty. I'll entertainreadie to wrangle with mine owne honesty: Ile entertaine
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.90hath pawned his horses to mine host of the Garter.hath pawn'd his horses to mine Host of the Garter.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.179when he looks so merrily. – How now, mine host?when hee lookes so merrily: How now mine Host?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.182I follow, mine host, I follow. Good even andI follow, (mine Host) I follow: Good-euen, and
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.188Good mine host o'th' Garter, a word with you.Good mine Host o'th' Garter: a word with you.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.203Have with you, mine host.Haue with you mine Host.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.2Why then, the world's mine oyster,Why then the world's mine Oyster,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.12lost the handle of her fan, I took't upon mine honour thoulost the handle of her Fan, I took't vpon mine honour thou
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.23God on the left hand and hiding mine honour in myheauen on the left hand, and hiding mine honor in my
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.50Pistol and Robin) mine own people, mine own people.mine owne people, mine owne people.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.178you wherein I must very much lay open mine ownyou, wherein I must very much lay open mine owne
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.83Diable! Jack Rugby, mine host de Jarteer, have IDiable: Iack Rugby: mine Host de Iarteer: haue I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.87place appointed. I'll be judgement by mine host of theplace appointed, Ile bee iudgement by mine Host of the
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.92Peace, I say. Hear mine host of the Garter. Am IPeace, I say: heare mine Host of the Garter, Am I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.ii.3Whether had you rather, lead mine eyes, or eye yourwhether had you rather lead mine eyes, or eye your
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.114my dear friend; and I fear not mine own shame so muchmy deere friend: and I feare not mine owne shame so much,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.225lousy knave, mine host.lowsie knaue, mine Host.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iv.60Truly, for mine own part, I would little orTruely, for mine owne part, I would little or
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.v.38So did I mine, to build upon a foolish woman'sSo did I mine, to build vpon a foolish Womans
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.12Why, none but mine own people.Why none but mine owne people.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.17How now, mine host?How now, mine Host?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.21There was, mine host, an old fat woman evenThere was (mine Host) an old-fat-woman euen
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.55Ay, that there was, mine host, one that hathI that there was (mine Host) one that hath
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.67Where is mine host?Where is mine Host?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.70friend of mine come to town tells me there is threefriend of mine come to Towne, tels mee there is three
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.76Vere is mine host de Jarteer?Ver' is mine Host de Iarteere?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.18I'll show you here at large. Hark, good mine host:Ile show you here at large (harke good mine Host:)
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.42As she is mine, I may dispose of her;As she is mine, I may dispose of her;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.96And what is mine my love shall render him;And what is mine, my loue shall render him.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.97And she is mine, and all my right of herAnd she is mine, and all my right of her,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.131Beteem them from the tempest of my eyes.Beteeme them, from the tempest of mine eyes.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.190Were the world mine, Demetrius being bated,Were the world mine, Demetrius being bated,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.200His folly, Helena, is no fault of mine.His folly Helena is none of mine.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.201None but your beauty. Would that fault were mine!None but your beauty, wold that fault wer mine
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND I.i.243He hailed down oaths that he was only mine,He hail'd downe oathes that he was onely mine.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.104What wicked and dissembling glass of mineWhat wicked and dissembling glasse of mine,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.131Mine ear is much enamoured of thy note.Mine eare is much enamored of thy note;
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.132So is mine eye enthralled to thy shape,So is mine eye enthralled to thy shape.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.i.142out of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn.out of this wood, I haue enough to serue mine owne turne.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.181Thou art not by mine eye, Lysander, found;Thou art not by mine eye, Lysander found,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.182Mine ear – I thank it – brought me to thy sound.Mine eare (I thanke it) brought me to that sound.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.243But fare ye well. 'Tis partly my own fault,But fare ye well, 'tis partly mine owne fault,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.337Of thine or mine is most in Helena.Of thine or mine is most in Helena.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.342Your hands than mine are quicker for a fray.Your hands then mine, are quicker for a fray,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.436Steal me awhile from mine own company.Steale me a while from mine owne companie.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.78O, how mine eyes do loathe his visage now!Oh, how mine eyes doth loath this visage now!
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.169The object and the pleasure of mine eye,The obiect and the pleasure of mine eye,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.191.1Mine own and not mine own.Mine owne, and not mine owne.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.69Made mine eyes water: but more ‘ merry ’ tearsmade mine eyes water: / But more merrie teares,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.172That standest between her father's ground and mine,That stands between her fathers ground and mine,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.174Show me thy chink to blink through with mine eyne.Shew me thy chinke, to blinke through with mine eine.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.175In mine eye she is the sweetest lady that ever IIn mine eie, she is the sweetest Ladie that euer I
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.208And in faith, my lord, I spoke mine.And in faith, my Lord, I spoke mine.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.210spoke mine.speake mine.
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.232mine eyes with a ballad-maker's pen and hang me upmine eyes with a Ballet-makers penne, and hang me vp
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.9mine orchard, were thus much overheard by a man ofmy orchard, were thus ouer-heard by a man of
Much Ado About NothingMA I.ii.10mine: the Prince discovered to Claudio that he lovedmine: the Prince discouered to Claudio that hee loued
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.284are mine, I am yours; I give away myself for you andare mine, I am yours, I giue away my selfe for you, and
Much Ado About NothingMA II.ii.7evenly with mine. How canst thou cross this marriage?euenly with mine, how canst thou crosse this marriage?
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.53There's not a note of mine that's worth the noting.Theres not a note of mine that's worth the noting.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.i.107What fire is in mine ears? Can this be true?What fire is in mine eares? can this be true?
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.19the poor Duke's officers; but truly, for mine own part, ifthe poore Dukes officers, but truely for mine owne part, if
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.86I am sorry you must hear. Upon mine honour,I am sorry you must heare: vpon mine honor,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.132I might have said ‘ No part of it is mine;I might haue said, no part of it is mine:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.134But mine and mine I loved and mine I praisedBut mine, and mine I lou'd, and mine I prais'd,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.135And mine that I was proud on, mine so muchAnd mine that I was proud on mine so much,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.136That I myself was to myself not mine,That I my selfe, was to my selfe not mine:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.191Time hath not yet so dried this blood of mine,Time hath not yet so dried this bloud of mine,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.245Yet, by mine honour, I will deal in thisYet, by mine honor, I will deale in this,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.295with mine enemy.with mine enemy.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.4Which falls into mine ears as profitlessWhich falls into mine eares as profitlesse,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.6Nor let no comforter delight mine earNor let no comfort delight mine eare,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.7But such a one whose wrongs do suit with mine.But such a one whose wrongs doth sute with mine.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.9Whose joy of her is overwhelmed like mine,Whose ioy of her is ouer-whelmed like mine,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.11Measure his woe the length and breadth of mine,Measure his woe the length and bredth of mine,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.63Thou hast so wronged mine innocent child and meThou hast so wrong'd my innocent childe and me,
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.67I say thou hast belied mine innocent child.I say thou hast belied mine innocent childe.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.219Sweet Prince, let me go no farther to mineSweete Prince, let me go no farther to mine
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.230is dead upon mine and my master's false accusation; and,is dead vpon mine and my masters false accusation: and
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.251.1Mine innocent child?mine innocent childe?
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.55Why, then she's mine. Sweet, let me see your face.Why then she's mine, sweet let me see your face.
OthelloOth I.iii.4.1And mine, a hundred and forty.And mine a Hundred fortie.
OthelloOth I.iii.4.2And mine two hundred;And mine two Hundred:
OthelloOth I.iii.83For since these arms of mine had seven years' pithFor since these Armes of mine, had seuen yeares pith,
OthelloOth I.iii.126.1And she in mine.And she in mine.
OthelloOth I.iii.378For I mine own gained knowledge should profaneFor I mine owne gain'd knowledge should prophane
OthelloOth II.i.201In mine own comforts. I prithee, good Iago,In mine owne comforts. I prythee, good Iago,
OthelloOth II.iii.101For mine own part – no offence to the General,For mine owne part, no offence to the Generall,
OthelloOth II.iii.243But nevermore be officer of mine.But neuer more be Officer of mine.
OthelloOth III.i.21Dost thou hear, mine honest friend?Dost thou heare me, mine honest Friend?
OthelloOth III.iii.33Unfit for mine own purposes.Vnfit for mine owne purposes.
OthelloOth III.iii.157'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands:'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has bin slaue to thousands:
OthelloOth III.iii.185Nor from mine own weak merits will I drawNor from mine owne weake merites, will I draw
OthelloOth III.iii.358Or by the worth of mine eternal soul,Or by the worth of mine eternall Soule,
OthelloOth III.iii.372God bu'y you: take mine office. O wretched fool,God buy you: take mine Office. Oh wretched Foole,
OthelloOth III.iii.385As mine own face. If there be cords or knives,As mine owne face. If there be Cords, or Kniues,
OthelloOth III.iv.13in mine own throat.in mine owne throat.
OthelloOth IV.i.173Was that mine?Was that mine?
OthelloOth IV.i.201With mine officer!With mine Officer?
OthelloOth IV.ii.78Is hushed within the hollow mine of earthIs hush'd within the hollow Myne of Earth
OthelloOth IV.ii.153Or that mine eyes, mine ears, or any senseOr that mine Eyes, mine Eares, or any Sence
OthelloOth IV.iii.55So get thee gone; good night. Mine eyes do itch:So get thee gone, good night: mine eyes do itch:
OthelloOth V.i.24That thrust had been mine enemy indeed,That thrust had beene mine enemy indeed,
PericlesPer Chorus.I.20I tell you what mine authors say.I tell you what mine Authors saye:
PericlesPer I.ii.6Here pleasures court mine eyes, and mine eyes shun them,Here pleasures court mine eies, and mine eies shun them,
PericlesPer I.ii.75Her face was to mine eye beyond all wonder,Her face was to mine eye beyond all wonder,
PericlesPer I.ii.92When all for mine – if I may call – offenceWhen all for mine, if I may call offence,
PericlesPer I.ii.96Drew sleep out of mine eyes, blood from my cheeks,Drew sleep out of mine eies, blood frõmy cheekes,
PericlesPer II.i.124And though it was mine own, part of my heritage,And though it was mine owne part of my heritage,
PericlesPer II.ii.16Which, to preserve mine honour, I'll perform.Which to preserue mine honour, I'le performe.
PericlesPer II.v.18'Tis well, mistress, your choice agrees with mine.T'is well Mistris, your choyce agrees with mine:
PericlesPer II.v.50Never did thought of mine levy offence,neuer did thought / Of mine leuie offence;
PericlesPer II.v.84Your will to mine – and you, sir, hear you,Your will to mine: and you sir, heare you;
PericlesPer III.iii.9.1To have blessed mine eyes with her.to haue blest mine eies with her.
PericlesPer III.iii.24The gods revenge it upon me and minethe Gods reuenge it / Vpon me and mine,
PericlesPer III.iii.29Unscissored shall this hair of mine remain,vnsisterd shall this heyre of mine remayne,
PericlesPer III.iv.15Moreover, if you please, a niece of mineMoreouer if you please a Neece of mine,
PericlesPer V.i.95And whispers in mine ear ‘ Go not till he speak.’and whispers in mine eare, go not till he speake.
PericlesPer V.i.97To equal mine – was it not thus? What say you?to equall mine, was it not thus, what say you?
PericlesPer V.i.131And that thou thought'st thy griefs might equal mine,and that thou thoughts thy griefs might equall mine,
PericlesPer V.i.215Give me fresh garments. Mine own, Helicanus!Giue me fresh garments, mine owne Hellicanus,
PericlesPer V.i.234Hangs upon mine eyes. Let me rest.Hangs vpon mine eyes, let me rest.
PericlesPer V.i.240And do upon mine altar sacrifice.and doe vppon mine Altar sacrifice,
PericlesPer V.iii.29If he be none of mine, my sanctityif hee be none of mine, my sanctitie
PericlesPer V.iii.48.2Blest, and mine own!Blest, and mine owne.
Richard IIR2 I.i.74As to take up mine honour's pawn, then stoop.As to take vp mine Honors pawne, then stoope.
Richard IIR2 I.i.133I slew him not, but to my own disgraceI slew him not; but (to mine owne disgrace)
Richard IIR2 I.i.182Mine honour is my life. Both grow in one.Mine Honor is my life; both grow in one:
Richard IIR2 I.i.184Then, dear my liege, mine honour let me try.Then (deere my Liege) mine Honor let me trie,
Richard IIR2 I.i.191Shall wound my honour with such feeble wrong,Shall wound mine honor with such feeble wrong;
Richard IIR2 I.iii.22And by the grace of God and this mine armAnd by the grace of God, and this mine arme,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.73Add proof unto mine armour with thy prayers,Adde proofe vnto mine Armour with thy prayres,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.84Mine innocence and Saint George to thrive!Mine innocence, and S. George to thriue.
Richard IIR2 I.iii.92This feast of battle with mine adversary.This Feast of Battell, with mine Aduersarie
Richard IIR2 I.iii.193Norfolk, so far as to mine enemy:Norfolke, so fare, as to mine enemie,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.244I was too strict, to make mine own away.I was too strict to make mine owne away:
Richard IIR2 II.i.146As theirs, so mine; and all be as it is.As theirs, so mine: and all be as it is.
Richard IIR2 II.i.234Quick is mine ear to hear of good towards him.Quicke is mine eare to heare of good towards him.
Richard IIR2 II.ii.35From some forefather grief. Mine is not so,From some fore-father greefe, mine is not so,
Richard IIR2 II.iii.17Shall make their way seem short as mine hath doneShall make their way seeme short, as mine hath done,
Richard IIR2 II.iii.102O then how quickly should this arm of mine,Oh then, how quickly should this Arme of mine,
Richard IIR2 III.i.24From my own windows torn my household coat,From mine owne Windowes torne my Household Coat,
Richard IIR2 III.i.40A gentleman of mine I have dispatchedA Gentleman of mine I haue dispatch'd
Richard IIR2 III.ii.18Yield stinging nettles to mine enemies;Yeeld stinging Nettles to mine Enemies;
Richard IIR2 III.ii.93Mine ear is open and my heart prepared.Mine eare is open, and my heart prepar'd:
Richard IIR2 III.iii.133O God, O God, that e'er this tongue of mine,Oh God, oh God, that ere this tongue of mine,
Richard IIR2 III.iii.196My gracious lord, I come but for mine own.My gracious Lord, I come but for mine owne.
Richard IIR2 III.iii.198So far be mine, my most redoubted lord,So farre be mine, my most redoubted Lord,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.13As far as Calais to mine uncle's head?’As farre as Callis, to my Vnkles head.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.23Either I must, or have mine honour soiledEither I must, or haue mine honor soyl'd
Richard IIR2 IV.i.70In proof whereof, there is my honour's pawn.In proofe whereof, there is mine Honors pawne,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.88And, though mine enemy, restored againAnd (though mine Enemie) restor'd againe
Richard IIR2 IV.i.168The favours of these men. Were they not mine?The fauors of these men: were they not mine?
Richard IIR2 IV.i.190My crown I am; but still my griefs are mine.My Crowne I am, but still my Griefes are mine:
Richard IIR2 IV.i.206With mine own tears I wash away my balm,With mine owne Teares I wash away my Balme,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.207With mine own hands I give away my crown,With mine owne Hands I giue away my Crowne,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.208With mine own tongue deny my sacred state,With mine owne Tongue denie my Sacred State,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.209With mine own breath release all duteous oaths.With mine owne Breath release all dutious Oathes;
Richard IIR2 IV.i.243Mine eyes are full of tears. I cannot see.Mine Eyes are full of Teares, I cannot see:
Richard IIR2 IV.i.246Nay, if I turn mine eyes upon myselfNay, if I turne mine Eyes vpon my selfe,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.277So many blows upon this face of mineSo many Blowes vpon this Face of mine,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.328To bury mine intents, but also to effectTo bury mine intents, but also to effect
Richard IIR2 V.i.89Go count thy way with sighs, I mine with groans.Goe, count thy Way with Sighes; I, mine with Groanes.
Richard IIR2 V.i.96Thus give I mine, and thus take I thy heart.Thus giue I mine, and thus take I thy heart.
Richard IIR2 V.i.97Give me mine own again. 'Twere no good partGiue me mine owne againe: 'twere no good part,
Richard IIR2 V.i.99So, now I have mine own again, be gone,So, now I haue mine owne againe, be gone,
Richard IIR2 V.ii.78Now, by mine honour, by my life, by my troth,Now by my Honor, my life, my troth,
Richard IIR2 V.ii.92And wilt thou pluck my fair son from mine age?And wilt thou plucke my faire Sonne from mine Age,
Richard IIR2 V.iii.67An he shall spend mine honour with his shame,And he shall spend mine Honour, with his Shame;
Richard IIR2 V.iii.69Mine honour lives when his dishonour dies,Mine honor liues, when his dishonor dies,
Richard IIR2 V.v.52Their watches on unto mine eyes, the outward watchTheir watches on vnto mine eyes, the outward Watch,
Richard IIR2 V.vi.28For though mine enemy thou hast ever been,For though mine enemy, thou hast euer beene,
Richard IIIR3 I.i.27And descant on mine own deformity.And descant on mine owne Deformity.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.148Out of my sight! Thou dost infect mine eyes.Out of my sight, thou dost infect mine eyes.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.149Thine eyes, sweet lady, have infected mine.Thine eyes (sweet Lady) haue infected mine.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.153Those eyes of thine from mine have drawn salt tears,Those eyes of thine, from mine haue drawne salt Teares;
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.124To royalize his blood I spent mine own.To royalize his blood, I spent mine owue.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.140Or Edward's soft and pitiful like mine!Or Edwards soft and pittifull, like mine;
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.172And all the pleasures you usurp are mine.And all the Pleasures you vsurpe, are mine.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.205Decked in thy rights as thou art stalled in mine!Deck'd in thy Rights, as thou art stall'd in mine.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.248Foul shame upon you! You have all moved mine.Foule shame vpon you, you haue all mou'd mine.
Richard IIIR3 I.iii.304And so doth mine. I muse why she's at liberty.And so doth mine, I muse why she's at libertie.
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.22What dreadful noise of waters in mine ears!What dreadfull noise of water in mine eares,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.23What sights of ugly death within mine eyes!What sights of vgly death within mine eyes.
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.59Environed me, and howled in mine earsInuiron'd me, and howled in mine eares
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.119this passionate humour of mine will change. It was wontthis passionate humor of mine, will change, / It was wont
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.171My voice is now the King's, my looks mine own.My voice is now the Kings, my lookes mine owne.
Richard IIIR3 II.i.24Our former hatred, so thrive I and mine!Our former hatred, so thriue I, and mine.
Richard IIIR3 II.i.134On me and you, and mine and yours, for this.On me, and you; and mine, and yours for this.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.13The King mine uncle is to blame for it.The King mine Vnckle is too blame for it.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.57But death hath snatched my husband from mine armsBut death hath snatch'd my Husband from mine Armes,
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.68All springs reduce their currents to mine eyes,All Springs reduce their currents to mine eyes,
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.73Alas for both, both mine, Edward and Clarence!Alas for both, both mine Edward and Clarence.
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.81Their woes are parcelled, mine is general.Their woes are parcell'd, mine is generall.
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.25To touch his growth nearer than he touched mine.To touch his growth, neerer then he toucht mine.
Richard IIIR3 II.iv.56How many of you have mine eyes beheld!How many of you haue mine eyes beheld?
Richard IIIR3 III.i.52And therefore, in mine opinion, cannot have it.And therefore, in mine opinion, cannot haue it.
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.43I'll have this crown of mine cut from my shouldersIle haue this Crown of mine cut frõ my shoulders,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.11He knows no more of mine than I of yours;He knowes no more of mine, then I of yours,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.12Or I of his, my lord, than you of mine.Or I of his, my Lord, then you of mine:
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.68See how I am bewitched: behold, mine armLooke how I am bewitch'd: behold, mine Arme
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.89As too triumphing, how mine enemiesAs too triumphing, how mine Enemies
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.20And when mine oratory drew toward endAnd when my Oratorie drew toward end,
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.34When he had done, some followers of mine own,When he had done, some followers of mine owne,
Richard IIIR3 IV.i.80And proved the subject of mine own soul's curse,And prou'd the subiect of mine owne Soules Curse,
Richard IIIR3 IV.i.81Which hitherto hath held mine eyes from rest;Which hitherto hath held mine eyes from rest:
Richard IIIR3 IV.ii.68Dar'st thou resolve to kill a friend of mine?Dar'st thou resolue to kill a friend of mine?
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.4To watch the waning of mine enemies.To watch the waining of mine enemies.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.36Give mine the benefit of senioryGiue mine the benefit of signeurie,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.39Tell over your woes again by viewing mine.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.117And teach me how to curse mine enemies!And teach me how to curse mine enemies.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.125Thy woes will make them sharp and pierce like mine.Thy woes will make them sharpe, And pierce like mine.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.248Canst thou demise to any child of mine?Canst thou demise to any childe of mine.
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.298Mine issue of your blood upon your daughter;Mine yssue of your blood, vpon your Daughter:
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.306But mine shall be a comfort to your age.But mine shall be a comfort to your Age,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.331And when this arm of mine hath chastisedAnd when this Arme of mine hath chastised
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.117Ere I let fall the windows of mine eyes.Ere I let fall the windowes of mine eyes:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.186Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,Griefes of mine owne lie heauie in my breast,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.189Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.Doth adde more griefe, to too much of mine owne.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.32Which, on more view of many, mine, being one,Which one more veiw, of many, mine being one,
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.58Ay, mine own fortune in my misery.I mine owne fortune in my miserie.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.67brother Valentine. Mine uncle Capulet, his wife and daughters.brother Valentine: mine vncle Capulet his wife and daughters:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.87When the devout religion of mine eyeWhen the deuout religion of mine eye
Romeo and JulietRJ I.ii.100But to rejoice in splendour of mine own.But to reioyce in splendor of mine owne.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.99But no more deep will I endart mine eyeBut no more deepe will I endart mine eye,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.127Th' exchange of thy love's faithful vow for mine.Th'exchange of thy Loues faithfull vow for mine.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.128I gave thee mine before thou didst request it.I gaue thee mine before thou did'st request it:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.162And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mineAnd make her ayrie tongue more hoarse, then
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.39That last is true. The sweeter rest was mine.That last is true, the sweeter rest was mine.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.45I have been feasting with mine enemy,I haue beene feasting with mine enemie,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.55As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine,As mine on hers, so hers is set on mine;
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.70Thy old groans yet ring in mine ancient ears.Thy old grones yet ringing in my auncient eares:
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iii.78For doting, not for loving, pupil mine.For doting, not for louing pupill mine.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.50and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.and in such a case as mine, a man may straine curtesie.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.vi.8It is enough I may but call her mine.It is inough. I may but call her mine.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.vi.25Be heaped like mine, and that thy skill be moreBe heapt like mine, and that thy skill be more
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.71As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.As dearely as my owne, be satisfied.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.80Make haste, lest mine be about your ears ere it be out.Make hast, least mine be about your eares ere it be out.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.i.191That you shall all repent the loss of mine.That you shall all repent the losse of mine.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.52I saw the wound. I saw it with mine eyes –I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes,
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.130Wash they his wounds with tears. Mine shall be spent,Wash they his wounds with tears: mine shal be spent
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.192An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend.And you be mine, Ile giue you to my Friend:
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.195Nor what is mine shall never do thee good.Nor what is mine shall neuer do thee good:
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.35Thy face is mine, and thou hast slandered it.Thy face is mine, and thou hast slaundred it.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.i.36It may be so, for it is not mine own. –It may be so, for it is not mine owne.
Romeo and JulietRJ V.iii.212What further woe conspires against mine age?What further woe conspires against my age?
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.25Mi perdonato, gentle master mine.Me Pardonato, gentle master mine:
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.99To mine own children in good bringing up.To mine owne children, in good bringing vp,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.126and mine to endure her loud alarums, why, man, there be& mine to endure her lowd alarums, why man there bee
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.91I would not wed her for a mine of gold.I would not wed her for a mine of Gold.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.197Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?Thinke you, a little dinne can daunt mine eares?
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.52Within your house, to make mine eye the witnessWithin your house, to make mine eye the witnesse
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.55I do present you with a man of mine,I do present you with a man of mine
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.88Pardon me, sir, the boldness is mine ownPardon me sir, the boldnesse is mine owne,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.225No cock of mine, you crow too like a craven.No Cocke of mine, you crow too like a crauen
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.355If whilst I live she will be only mine.If whil'st I liue she will be onely mine.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.376If you like me, she shall have me and mine.If you like me, she shall haue me and mine.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.377Why, then the maid is mine from all the worldWhy then the maid is mine from all the world
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.8No shame but mine. I must forsooth be forcedNo shame but mine, I must forsooth be forst
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.112Go to my chamber, put on clothes of mine.Goe to my chamber, put on clothes of mine.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.141I'll keep mine own despite of all the world.Ile keepe mine owne despite of all the world.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.228I will be master of what is mine own.I will be master of what is mine owne,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.233I'll bring mine action on the proudest heIle bring mine action on the proudest he
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.24And since mine eyes are witness of her lightness,And since mine eyes are witnesse of her lightnesse,
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.36For me, that I may surely keep mine oath,For me, that I may surely keepe mine oath.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.46And so shall mine before you touch the meat.And so shall mine before you touch the meate.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iii.109Braved in mine own house with a skein of thread?Brau'd in mine owne house with a skeine of thred:
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.v.57A son of mine, which long I have not seen.A sonne of mine, which long I haue not seene.
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.38Mine old master Vincentio! Now we are undone andmine old Master Uincentio: now wee are vndone and
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.76he is mine only son, and heir to the lands of me, Signorhe is mine onelie sonne and heire to the Lands of me signior
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.i.105That have by marriage made thy daughter mine,That haue by marriage made thy daughter mine,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.97The fouler fortune mine, and there an end.The fouler fortune mine, and there an end.
The TempestTem I.ii.28I have with such provision in mine artI haue with such prouision in mine Art
The TempestTem I.ii.82The creatures that were mine, I say, or changed 'em,The creatures that were mine, I say, or chang'd 'em,
The TempestTem I.ii.125Should presently extirpate me and mineShould presently extirpate me and mine
The TempestTem I.ii.135.1That wrings mine eyes to't.That wrings mine eyes too't.
The TempestTem I.ii.167From mine own library with volumes thatFrom mine owne Library, with volumes, that
The TempestTem I.ii.179Now my dear lady, hath mine enemies(Now my deere Lady) hath mine enemies
The TempestTem I.ii.291Could not again undo. It was mine art,Could not againe vndoe: it was mine Art,
The TempestTem I.ii.302Be subject to no sight but thine and mine, invisibleBe subiect to no sight but thine, and mine: inuisible
The TempestTem I.ii.331This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother,This Island's mine by Sycorax my mother,
The TempestTem I.ii.342Which first was mine own king; and here you sty meWhich first was min owne King: and here you sty-me
The TempestTem I.ii.347In mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violateIn mine owne Cell, till thou didst seeke to violate
The TempestTem I.ii.436Who with mine eyes, never since at ebb, beheldWho, with mine eyes (neuer since at ebbe) beheld
The TempestTem I.ii.467.1Mine enemy has more power.Mine enemy ha's more pow'r.
The TempestTem II.i.108You cram these words into mine ears againstYou cram these words into mine eares, against
The TempestTem II.i.113I ne'er again shall see her. O thou mine heirI ne're againe shall see her: O thou mine heire
The TempestTem II.i.194What, all so soon asleep? I wish mine eyesWhat, all so soone asleepe? I wish mine eyes
The TempestTem II.i.318.1It struck mine ear most terribly.It strooke mine eare most terribly.
The TempestTem II.i.322Upon mine honour, sir, I heard a humming,Vpon mine honour, Sir, I heard a humming,
The TempestTem II.i.324I shaked you, sir, and cried. As mine eyes opened,I shak'd you Sir, and cride: as mine eyes opend,
The TempestTem II.ii.121tree, with mine own hands, since I was cast ashore.Tree, with mine owne hands, since I was cast a'shore.
The TempestTem III.i.50Save, from my glass, mine own. Nor have I seenSaue from my glasse, mine owne: Nor haue I seene
The TempestTem III.i.77At mine unworthiness, that dare not offerAt mine vnworthinesse, that dare not offer
The TempestTem III.i.90And mine, with my heart in't; and now farewellAnd mine, with my heart in't; and now farewel
The TempestTem III.ii.115.2Ay, on mine honour.I on mine honour.
The TempestTem III.ii.139Will hum about mine ears; and sometime voicesWill hum about mine eares; and sometime voices,
The TempestTem III.iii.90And these, mine enemies, are all knit upAnd these (mine enemies) are all knit vp
The TempestTem III.iii.94And his and mine loved darling.And his, and mine lou'd darling.
The TempestTem IV.i.3Have given you here a third of mine own life,Haue giuen you here, a third of mine owne life,
The TempestTem IV.i.28Mine honour into lust, to take awayMine honor into lust, to take away
The TempestTem IV.i.41Some vanity of mine art. It is my promise,Some vanity of mine Art: it is my promise,
The TempestTem IV.i.120.2Spirits, which by mine artSpirits, which by mine Art
The TempestTem IV.i.201So is mine. Do you hear, monster? If ISo is mine. Do you heare Monster: If I
The TempestTem IV.i.264Lie at my mercy all mine enemies.Lies at my mercy all mine enemies:
The TempestTem V.i.20.1Mine would, sir, were I human.Mine would, Sir, were I humane.
The TempestTem V.i.20.2And mine shall.And mine shall.
The TempestTem V.i.53To work mine end upon their senses thatTo worke mine end vpon their Sences, that
The TempestTem V.i.63Mine eyes, ev'n sociable to the show of thine,Mine eyes ev'n sociable to the shew of thine
The TempestTem V.i.75You, brother mine, that entertained ambition,You, brother mine, that entertaine ambition,
The TempestTem V.i.189But by immortal Providence, she's mine.But by immortall prouidence, she's mine;
The TempestTem V.i.276.1Acknowledge mine.Acknowledge mine.
The TempestTem epilogue.2And what strength I have's mine own,And what strength I haue's mine owne.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.142Mine heir from forth the beggars of the world,Mine heyre from forth the Beggers of the world,
Timon of AthensTim I.i.146This gentleman of mine hath served me long.This Gentleman of mine / Hath seru'd me long:
Timon of AthensTim I.i.152My hand to thee; mine honour on my promise.My hand to thee, / Mine Honour on my promise.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.103O, joy's e'en made away ere't can be born! MineOh ioyes, e'ne made away er't can be borne: mine
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.147And entertained me with mine own device.And entertain'd me with mine owne deuice.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.217friend's affection with mine own. I'll tell you true, I'llFriends affection with mine owne: Ile tell you true, Ile
Timon of AthensTim II.i.21Out of mine own. His days and times are past,Out of mine owne, his dayes and times are past,
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.27.2Mine honest friend,Mine honest Friend,
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.140And say you found them in mine honesty.And say you sound them in mine honestie,
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.168.1And set mine eyes at flow.And set mine eyes at flow.
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.186And in some sort these wants of mine are crowned,And in some sort these wants of mine are crown'd,
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.59so far as to use mine own words to him?o farre, as to vse mine owne words to him?
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.78.2For mine own part,For mine owne part, I neuer tasted Timon in my life
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.27Who bates mine honour shall not know my coin.Who bates mine Honor, shall not know my Coyne.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.4One business does command us all, for mineone businesse do's command vs all. / For mine
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.31Five thousand mine.Fiue thousand mine.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.33Your master's confidence was above mine,Your Masters confidence was aboue mine,
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.87Here's mine.Here's mine.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.88And mine, my lord.And mine, my Lord.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.94Mine, fifty talents.Mine, fifty Talents.
Timon of AthensTim III.v.11Upon a friend of mine, who in hot bloodVpon a Friend of mine, who in hot blood
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.286So I shall mend mine own by th' lack of thine.So I shall mend mine owne, by'th'lacke of thine
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.484For his undone lord than mine eyes for you.For his vndone Lord, then mine eyes for you.
Timon of AthensTim V.i.204That mine own use invites me to cut down,That mine owne vse inuites me to cut downe,
Timon of AthensTim V.ii.6I met a courier, one mine ancient friend,I met a Currier, one mine ancient Friend,
Timon of AthensTim V.iv.56Those enemies of Timon's, and mine own,Those Enemies of Timons, and mine owne
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.8Nor wrong mine age with this indignity.Nor wrong mine Age with this indignitie.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.97How many sons hast thou of mine in storeHow many Sonnes of mine hast thou in store,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.169The cordial of mine age to glad my heart.The Cordiall of mine age to glad my hart,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.201Give me a staff of honour for mine age,Giue me a staffe of Honour for mine age.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.255Mine honour's ensigns humbled at thy feet.Mine Honours Ensignes humbled at my feete.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.279Lord Titus, by your leave, this maid is mine.Lord Titus by your leaue, this Maid is mine.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.297Nor thou, nor he, are any sons of mine;Nor thou, nor he are any sonnes of mine,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.346No, foolish tribune, no. No son of mine,No foolish Tribune, no: No sonne of mine,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.368And with these boys mine honour thou hast wounded.And with these Boyes mine Honour thou hast wounded,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.411Meanwhile I am possessed of that is mine.Meanewhile I am possest of that is mine.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.439But on mine honour dare I undertakeBut on mine honour dare, I vndertake
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.469(To Saturnine) And let it be mine honour, good my lord,And let it be mine honour good my Lord,
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.480That on mine honour here I do protest.That on mine honour heere I do protest.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.31Saturn is dominator over mine.Saturne is Dominator ouer mine:
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.196And mine, I promise you. Were it not for shame,And mine I promise you, were it not for shame,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.213My heart suspects more than mine eye can see.My heart suspects more then mine eie can see.
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.218Will not permit mine eyes once to beholdWill not permit mine eyes once to behold
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.2For pity of mine age, whose youth was spentFor pitty of mine age, whose youth was spent
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.56But me and mine; how happy art thou thenBut me and and mine: how happy art thou then,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.140Thy napkin cannot drink a tear of mine,Thy napkin cannot drinke a teare of mine,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.166And therefore mine shall save my brothers' lives.And therfore mine shall saue my brothers liues.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.178Are meet for plucking up, and therefore mine.Are meete for plucking vp, and therefore mine.
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.186Lend me thy hand, and I will give thee mine.Lend me thy hand, and I will giue thee mine,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.198And yet dear too, because I bought mine own.And yet deere too, because I bought mine owne.
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.7With folded arms. This poor right hand of mineWith foulded Armes. This poore right hand of mine,
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.55Mine eyes are cloyed with view of tyranny.Mine eyes cloi'd with view of Tirranie:
Titus AndronicusTit III.ii.85And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle.And thou shalt read, when mine begin to dazell.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.i.112Come, go with me into mine armoury.Come goe with me into mine Armorie,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.104To keep mine own, excuse it how she can.To keepe mine owne, excuse it how she can.
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.158And substituted in the place of mineAnd substituted in the place of mine,
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.172There to dispose this treasure in mine arms,There to dispose this treasure in mine armes,
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.22And as I earnestly did fix mine eyeAnd as I earnestly did fixe mine eye
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.117That both mine eyes were rainy like to his;That both mine eyes were rainie like to his:
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.42To be a torment to mine enemies?To be a torment to mine Enemies?
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.109They have been violent to me and mine.They haue bene violent to me and mine.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.262mine honesty; my mask to defend my beauty, and youmine honesty; my Maske, to defend my beauty, and you
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.295Nothing of that shall from mine eyes appear.Nothing of that shall from mine eyes appeare.
Troilus and CressidaTC II.i.43hast no more brain than I have in mine elbows; anhast no more braine then I haue in mine elbows: An
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.64My will enkindled by mine eyes and ears,My Will enkindled by mine eyes and eares,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.i.24At mine, sir, and theirs that love music.At mine sir, and theirs that loue Musicke.
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.143Sir, mine own company.Sir, mine owne company.
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.29But, in mine emulous honour let him die,But in mine emulous honor let him dye:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.2Then, sweet my lord, I'll call mine uncle down;Then sweet my Lord, Ile call mine Vnckle down;
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.105With truth and plainness I do wear mine bare.With truth and plainnesse I doe weare mine bare:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.32The first was Menelaus' kiss; this, mineThe first was Menelaus kisse, this mine:
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.161But for Achilles, mine own searching eyesBut for Achilles, mine owne serching eyes
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.231Now, Hector, I have fed mine eyes on thee;Now Hector I haue fed mine eyes on thee,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.27I prithee, do not hold me to mine oath;I prethee do not hold me to mine oath,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.131Nor mine, my lord: Cressid was here but now.Nor mine my Lord: Cressid was here but now.
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.157Cressid is mine, tied with the bonds of heaven.Cressid is mine, tied with the bonds of heauen;
Troilus and CressidaTC V.ii.172That sleeve is mine that he'll bear in his helm;That Sleeue is mine, that heele beare in his Helme:
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.26Mine honour keeps the weather of my fate.Mine honour keepes the weather of my fate:
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iii.104o' these days; and I have rheum in mine eyes too, ando'th's dayes: and I haue a rheume in mine eyes too; and
Troilus and CressidaTC V.x.35A goodly medicine for mine aching bones! – A goodly medcine for mine aking bones:
Twelfth NightTN I.i.20O, when mine eyes did see Olivia first,O when mine eyes did see Oliuia first,
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.19Mine own escape unfoldeth to my hope,Mine owne escape vnfoldeth to my hope,
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.44Till I had made mine own occasion mellow – Till I had made mine owne occasion mellow
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.64When my tongue blabs, then let mine eyes not see.When my tongue blabs, then let mine eyes not see.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.111By mine honour, half drunk! What is he at theBy mine honor halfe drunke. What is he at the
Twelfth NightTN I.v.287To creep in at mine eyes. Well, let it be!To creepe in at mine eyes. Well, let it be.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.299Mine eye too great a flatterer for my mind.Mine eye too great a flatterer for my minde:
Twelfth NightTN II.i.37least occasion more, mine eyes will tell tales of me. I amleast occasion more, mine eyes will tell tales of me: I am
Twelfth NightTN II.iii.37O mistress mine! Where are you roaming?O Mistris mine where are you roming:
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.99But mine is all as hungry as the sea,But mine is all as hungry as the Sea,
Twelfth NightTN II.v.182Or o' mine either?Or o'mine either?
Twelfth NightTN III.i.115Have you not set mine honour at the stake,Haue you not set mine Honor at the stake,
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.63Look where the youngest wren of nine comes.Looke where the youngest Wren of mine comes.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.166one of our souls. He may have mercy upon mine, but myone of our soules. He may haue mercie vpon mine, but my
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.198And laid mine honour too unchary on't.And laid mine honour too vnchary on't:
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.210How with mine honour may I give him thatHow with mine honor may I giue him that,
Twelfth NightTN IV.i.58He started one poor heart of mine, in thee.He started one poore heart of mine, in thee.
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.13That I am ready to distrust mine eyes,That I am readie to distrust mine eyes,
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.22Blame not this haste of mine. If you mean well,Blame not this haste of mine: if you meane well
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.35That they may fairly note this act of mine!That they may fairely note this acte of mine.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.88While one would wink; denied me mine own purseWhile one would winke: denide me mine owne purse,
Twelfth NightTN V.i.107It is as fat and fulsome to mine earIt is as fat and fulsome to mine eare
Twelfth NightTN V.i.240And so had mine.And so had mine.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.278A most extracting frenzy of mine ownA most extracting frensie of mine owne
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.i.60And I likewise will visit thee with mine.And I likewise will visite thee with mine.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.11But, were I you, he never should be mine.But were I you, he neuer should be mine.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.120Except mine own name. That some whirlwind bearExcept mine own name: That, some whirle-winde beare
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.iii.82And with the vantage of mine own excuseAnd with the vantage of mine owne excuse
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.1.2Not mine. My gloves are on.Not mine: my Gloues are on.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.3Ha! Let me see. Ay, give it me, it's mine.Ha? Let me see: I, giue it me, it's mine:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.67Because Love is blind. O, that you had mine eyes,Because Loue is blinde: O that you had mine eyes,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.64To clothe mine age with angel-like perfection,To cloath mine age with Angel-like perfection:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.133And made them watchers of mine own heart's sorrow.And made them watchers of mine owne hearts sorrow.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.154Have I not reason to prefer mine own?Haue I not reason to prefer mine owne?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.166Not for the world! Why, man, she is mine own;Not for the world: why man, she is mine owne,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.iv.194Is it mine eye, or Valentine's praise,It is mine, or Valentines praise?
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.1Launce! By mine honesty, welcome to Milan.Launce, by mine honesty welcome to Padua.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.86All that is mine I leave at thy dispose,All that is mine I leaue at thy dispose,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.48Upon mine honour, he shall never knowVpon mine Honor, he shall neuer know
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.74And where I thought the remnant of mine ageAnd where I thought the remnant of mine age
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.207Then in dumb silence will I bury mine,Then in dumbe silence will I bury mine,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.239If so, I pray thee breathe it in mine ear,If so: I pray thee breath it in mine eare,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.345Stop there; I'll have her; she was mine and notStop there: Ile haue her: she was mine, and not
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.346mine twice or thrice in that last article. Rehearse thatmine, twice or thrice in that last Article: rehearse that
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.28Marry, mine host, because I cannot be merry.Marry (mine Host) because I cannot be merry.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.54offered her mine own, who is a dog as big as ten ofoffer'd her mine owne, who is a dog / As big as ten of
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.134Mine shall not do his Julia so much wrong.Mine shall not doe his Iulia so much wrong.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.182If I had such a tire this face of mineIf I had such a Tyre, this face of mine
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.186Her hair is auburn, mine is perfect yellow;Her haire is Aburne, mine is perfect Yellow;
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.189Her eyes are grey as glass, and so are mine;Her eyes are grey as glasse, and so are mine.:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.64Thou hast beguiled my hopes; naught but mine eyeThou hast beguil'd my hopes; nought but mine eye
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.83All that was mine in Silvia I give thee.All that was mine, in Siluia, I giue thee.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.121And I mine.And I mine.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.126Yonder is Silvia; and Silvia's mine.Yonder is Siluia: and Siluia's mine.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.47Another's way of speech, when by mine ownAnothers way of speech, when by mine owne
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.53Why mine own barber is unblest, with himWhy mine owne Barber is unblest, with him
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.72The blood of mine that's sib to him be suckedThe blood of mine that's sibbe to him, be suckt
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.74For my most serious decking; had mine earFor my most serious decking, had mine eare
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.97Against your faith, yet I continue mine.against your faith, / Yet I continew mine.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.133We are an endless mine to one another;We are an endles mine to one another;
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.137I am your heir, and you are mine; this placeI am your heire, and you are mine: This place
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.147Without your noble hand to close mine eyes,Without your noble hand to close mine eies,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.212Beshrew mine eyes for't! Now I feel my shackles.Beshrew mine eyes for't, now I feele my Shackles.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.223First with mine eye of all those beautiesFirst with mine eye of all those beauties
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.251And let mine honour down, and never charge?And let mine honour downe, and never charge?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.ii.19I know mine own is but a heap of ruins,I know mine owne, is but a heape of ruins,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iv.33Whate'er you are you're mine, and I shall give youWhat ere you are y'ar mine, and I shall give you
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.iv.43You're mine;Y'ar mine,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.v.27When he considers more, this love of mineWhen he considers more, this love of mine
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.118.1For note you, mine she is – For note you, mine she is.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.ii.27I have not closed mine eyes,I have not closd mine eyes
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iv.20And I'll clip my yellow locks, an inch below mine ee;And ile clip my yellow lockes; an inch below mine eie.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.v.126That seek out silent hanging; then mine hostThat seeke out silent hanging: Then mine Host
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.35And quickly, yours or mine. Wilt please you arm, sir?And quickly, yours, or mine: wilt please you arme Sir,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.52.2That's mine then.That's mine then,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.65.1Prithee take mine, good cousin.Prethee take mine good Cosen.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.94This only, and no more. Thou art mine aunt's son,This onely, and no more: Thou art mine Aunts Son.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.96In me, thine, and in thee, mine; my swordIn me, thine, and in thee, mine: My Sword
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.124Mine own, and what to come shall threaten meMine owne, and what to come shall threaten me,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.289And by mine honour once again, it stands,And by mine honor, once againe it stands,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.21Mine enemy in this business, were't one eyeMine enemy in this businesse, wer't one eye
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.72Victory too. Then blend your spirits with mine,Victory too, then blend your spirits with mine,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.134Mine innocent true heart, arms in assuranceMine innocent true heart, armes in assurance
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.154Am guiltless of election. Of mine eyesAm guiltlesse of election of mine eyes,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.9No deafing, but to hear; not taint mine eyeNo deaffing, but to heare; not taint mine eye
The Winter's TaleWT I.i.20instructs me and as mine honesty puts it to utterance.instructs me, and as mine honestie puts it to vtterance.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.122They say it is a copy out of mine. Come, captain,They say it is a Coppy out of mine. Come Captaine,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.134No bourn 'twixt his and mine, yet were it trueNo borne 'twixt his and mine; yet were it true,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.160This squash, this gentleman. Mine honest friend,This Squash, this Gentleman. Mine honest Friend,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.167Now my sworn friend, and then mine enemy;Now my sworne Friend, and then mine Enemy;
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.198As mine, against their will. Should all despair(As mine) against their will. Should all despaire
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.267.1'Tis none of mine.'Tis none of mine.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.310To see alike mine honour as their profits,To see alike mine Honor, as their Profits,
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.317To give mine enemy a lasting wink;To giue mine Enemy a lasting Winke:
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.331Who I do think is mine, and love as mine(Who I doe thinke is mine, and loue as mine)
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.340Even so as I mine own course have set down.Euen so as I mine owne course haue set downe:
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.382Which shows me mine changed too: for I must beWhich shewes me mine chang'd too: for I must be
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.402Is not this suit of mine, that thou declareIs not this Suit of mine, that thou declare
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.449Still neighbour mine. My ships are ready, andStill neighbour mine. My Ships are ready, and
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.463It is in mine authority to commandIt is in mine authoritie to command
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.32And give't me in mine ear.and giu't me in mine eare.
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.146If this prove true, they'll pay for't. By mine honour,If this proue true, they'l pay for't. By mine Honor
The Winter's TaleWT II.ii.65Do not you fear. Upon mine honour, IDo not you feare: vpon mine honor, I
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.5Is quite beyond mine arm, out of the blankIs quite beyond mine Arme, out of the blanke
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.45On your displeasure's peril, and on mine,On your displeasures perill, and on mine,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.63First hand me. On mine own accord I'll off,First hand me: on mine owne accord, Ile off,
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.92And now baits me! This brat is none of mine:And now bayts me: This Brat is none of mine,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.25To say ‘ Not guilty:’ mine integrityTo say, Not guiltie: mine Integritie
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.43'Tis a derivative from me to mine,'Tis a deriuatiue from me to mine,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.109I prize it not a straw; but for mine honour,(I prize it not a straw) but for mine Honor,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.149I have too much believed mine own suspicion.I haue too much beleeu'd mine owne suspition:
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.34If the springe hold, the cock's mine.If the sprindge hold, the Cocke's mine.
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iii.38sister of mine do with rice? But my father hath made hersister of mine do with Rice? But my father hath made her
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.34Run not before mine honour, nor my lustsRun not before mine honor: nor my Lusts
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.44Mine own, nor anything to any, ifMine owne, nor any thing to any, if
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.132But quick and in mine arms. Come, take your flowers.But quicke, and in mine armes. Come, take your flours,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.134In Whitsun pastorals: sure this robe of mineIn Whitson-Pastorals: Sure this Robe of mine
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.379By th' pattern of mine own thoughts I cut outBy th' patterne of mine owne thoughts, I cut out
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.445Of your own state take care. This dream of mineOf your owne state take care: This dreame of mine
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.522May suffer alteration, on mine honour,May suffer alteration. On mine honor,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.590The scene you play were mine. For instance, sir,The Scene you play, were mine. For instance Sir,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.67.1Should be ‘ Remember mine.’Should be, Remember mine.
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.134All mine own folly – the society,(All mine owne Folly) the Societie,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.220Step forth mine advocate: at your requestStep forth mine Aduocate: at your request,
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.81and that which angled for mine eyes – caught the waterand that which angl'd for mine Eyes (caught the Water,
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.58Would thus have wrought you – for the stone is mineWould thus haue wrought you (for the Stone is mine)
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.123Upon my daughter's head! Tell me, mine own,Vpon my daughters head: Tell me (mine owne)
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.138And made between's by vows. Thou hast found mineAnd made betweene's by Vowes. Thou hast found mine,

Poems

 113 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.151 With safest distance I mine honour shielded, With safest distance I mine honour sheelded,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.190 ‘ Among the many that mine eyes have seen, Among the many that mine eyes haue seene,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.195 Kept hearts in liveries, but mine own was free, Kept hearts in liueries, but mine owne was free,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.256 And mine I pour your Ocean all among: And mine I powre your Ocean all amonge:
A Lover's ComplaintLC.274 ‘ Now all these hearts that do on mine depend, Now all these hearts that doe on mine depend,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.277 To leave the batt'ry that you make 'gainst mine, To leaue the battrie that you make gainst mine,
A Lover's ComplaintLC.301 His poisoned me, and mine did him restore. His poison'd me, and mine did him restore.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.3.12 If broken, then it is no fault of mine. If broken, then it is no fault of mine.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.7.7 Her lips to mine how often hath she joined, Her lips to mine how often hath she ioyned,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.13 Lord, how mine eyes throw gazes to the east! Lord how mine eies throw gazes to the East,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.14.16 Not daring trust the office of mine eyes, Not daring trust the office of mine eies.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.20.18 Made me think upon mine own. Made me thinke vpon mine owne.
The Phoenix and TurtlePhoen.36 Either was the other's mine. Either was the others mine.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.228 Mine eyes forgo their light, my false heart bleed? Mine eies forgo their light, my false hart bleede?
The Rape of LucreceLuc.276 My heart shall never countermand mine eye; My heart shall neuer countermand mine eie;
The Rape of LucreceLuc.483 For those thine eyes betray thee unto mine. For those thine eyes betray thee vnto mine.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.504 Yet strive I to embrace mine infamy.’ Yet striue I to embrace mine infamy.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.644 That thou shalt see thy state, and pity mine.’ That thou shalt see thy state, and pittie mine.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.793 To cross their arms and hang their heads with mine, To crosse their armes & hang their heads with mine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.825 That is as clear from this attaint of mine That is as cleare from this attaint of mine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1025 In vain I cavil with mine infamy, In vaine I cauill with mine infamie,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1076 My tongue shall utter all; mine eyes, like sluices, My tongue shall vtter all, mine eyes like sluces,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1138 Will fix a sharp knife to affright mine eye, Will fixe a sharpe knife to affright mine eye,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1179 That he may vow in that sad hour of mine That he may vow in that sad houre of mine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1190 My shame so dead, mine honour is new born. My shame so dead, mine honor is new borne.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1201 Mine honour be the knife's that makes my wound; Mine Honor be the knifes that makes my wound,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1207 My blood shall wash the slander of mine ill; My bloud shall wash the sclander of mine ill,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1274 If tears could help, mine own would do me good. If tears could help, mine own would do me good.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1646 ‘ Mine enemy was strong, my poor self weak, Mine enemy was strong, my poore selfe weake,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1653 ‘ O teach me how to make mine own excuse; O teach me how to make mine owne excuse,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1684 Thine, mine, his own. Suppose thou dost defend me Thine, mine, his own, suppose thou dost defend me
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1691 With swift pursuit to venge this wrong of mine; With swift pursuit to venge this wrong of mine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1702 ‘ What is the quality of mine offence, What is the qualitie of my offence
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1752 ‘ That life was mine which thou hast here deprived; That life was mine which thou hast here depriued,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1795 The father says ‘ She's mine ’; ‘ O, mine she is,’ The father saies, shee's mine, ô mine shee is
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1798 He weeps for her, for she was only mine, He weepes for her, for shee was onely mine,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1803 I owed her, and 'tis mine that she hath killed.’ I owed her, and tis mine that shee hath kil d.
SonnetsSonn.2.10 If thou could'st answer: this fair child of mine If thou couldst answere this faire child of mine
SonnetsSonn.20.14 Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure. Mine be thy loue and thy loues vse their treasure.
SonnetsSonn.22.13 Presume not on thy heart when mine is slain; Presume not on thy heart when mine is slaine,
SonnetsSonn.23.7 And in mine own love's strength seem to decay, And in mine owne loues strength seeme to decay,
SonnetsSonn.23.8 O'ercharged with burthen of mine own love's might: Ore-charg'd with burthen of mine owne loues might:
SonnetsSonn.24.1 Mine eye hath played the painter and hath steeled MIne eye hath play'd the painter and hath steeld,
SonnetsSonn.24.10 Mine eyes have drawn thy shape, and thine for me Mine eyes haue drawne thy shape, and thine for me
SonnetsSonn.26.5 Duty so great, which wit so poor as mine Duty so great, which wit so poore as mine
SonnetsSonn.31.6 Hath dear religious love stol'n from mine eye, Hath deare religious loue stolne from mine eye,
SonnetsSonn.33.11 But out, alack, he was but one hour mine; But out alack, he was but one houre mine,
SonnetsSonn.36.14 As, thou being mine, mine is thy good report. As thou being mine, mine is thy good report.
SonnetsSonn.38.14 The pain be mine, but thine shall be the praise. The paine be mine, but thine shal be the praise.
SonnetsSonn.39.3 What can mine own praise to mine own self bring? What can mine owne praise to mine owne selfe bring;
SonnetsSonn.39.4 And what is't but mine own when I praise thee? And what is't but mine owne when I praise thee,
SonnetsSonn.40.4 All mine was thine before thou hadst this more: All mine was thine, before thou hadst this more:
SonnetsSonn.43.1 When most I wink then do mine eyes best see, WHen most I winke then doe mine eyes best see.
SonnetsSonn.43.9 How would (I say) mine eyes be blessed made How would (I say) mine eyes be blessed made,
SonnetsSonn.46.1 Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war, MIne eye and heart are at a mortall warre,
SonnetsSonn.46.3 Mine eye my heart thy picture's sight would bar, Mine eye, my heart their pictures sight would barre,
SonnetsSonn.46.4 My heart mine eye the freedom of that right. My heart, mine eye the freeedome of that right,
SonnetsSonn.46.13 As thus: mine eye's due is thy outward part, As thus, mine eyes due is their outward part,
SonnetsSonn.47.1 Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took, BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
SonnetsSonn.47.3 When that mine eye is famished for a look, When that mine eye is famisht for a looke,
SonnetsSonn.47.7 Another time mine eye is my heart's guest, An other time mine eye is my hearts guest,
SonnetsSonn.48.7 Thou best of dearest and mine only care, Thou best of deerest, and mine onely care,
SonnetsSonn.49.10 Within the knowledge of mine own desart, Within the knowledge of mine owne desart,
SonnetsSonn.61.10 It is my love that keeps mine eye awake; It is my loue that keepes mine eie awake,
SonnetsSonn.61.11 Mine own true love that doth my rest defeat, Mine owne true loue that doth my rest defeat,
SonnetsSonn.62.1 Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye, SInne of selfe-loue possesseth al mine eie,
SonnetsSonn.62.5 Methinks no face so gracious is as mine, Me thinkes no face so gratious is as mine,
SonnetsSonn.62.7 And for myself mine own worth do define, And for my selfe mine owne worth do define,
SonnetsSonn.62.11 Mine own self-love quite contrary I read; Mine owne selfe loue quite contrary I read
SonnetsSonn.72.6 To do more for me than mine own desert, To doe more for me then mine owne desert,
SonnetsSonn.86.14 Then lacked I matter; that enfeebled mine. Then lackt I matter, that infeebled mine.
SonnetsSonn.88.5 With mine own weakness being best acquainted, With mine owne weakenesse being best acquainted,
SonnetsSonn.92.2 For term of life thou art assured mine, For tearme of life thou art assured mine,
SonnetsSonn.96.14 As thou being mine, mine is thy good report. As thou being mine, mine is thy good report.
SonnetsSonn.104.12 Hath motion and mine eye may be deceived; Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceaued.
SonnetsSonn.107.1 Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul NOt mine owne feares, nor the prophetick soule,
SonnetsSonn.108.7 Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine, Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
SonnetsSonn.110.3 Gored mine own thoughts, sold cheap what is most dear, Gor'd mine own thoughts, sold cheap what is most deare,
SonnetsSonn.110.10 Mine appetite I never more will grind Mine appetite I neuer more will grin'de
SonnetsSonn.113.1 Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind, SInce I left you, mine eye is in my minde,
SonnetsSonn.113.14 My most true mind thus maketh mine untrue. My most true minde thus maketh mine vntrue.
SonnetsSonn.114.3 Or whether shall I say mine eye saith true, Or whether shall I say mine eie saith true,
SonnetsSonn.114.11 Mine eye well knows what with his gust is 'greeing, Mine eie well knowes what with his gust is greeing,
SonnetsSonn.114.14 That mine eye loves it and doth first begin. That mine eye loues it and doth first beginne.
SonnetsSonn.119.7 How have mine eyes out of their spheres been fitted How haue mine eies out of their Spheares bene fitted
SonnetsSonn.120.14 Mine ransoms yours, and yours must ransom me. Mine ransoms yours, and yours must ransome mee.
SonnetsSonn.128.4 The wiry concord that mine ear confounds, The wiry concord that mine eare confounds,
SonnetsSonn.134.3 Myself I'll forfeit, so that other mine My selfe Ile forfeit, so that other mine,
SonnetsSonn.135.12 One will of mine to make thy large Will more. One will of mine to make thy large Will more.
SonnetsSonn.137.1 Thou blind fool Love, what dost thou to mine eyes, THou blinde foole loue, what doost thou to mine eyes,
SonnetsSonn.137.11 Or mine eyes seeing this, say this is not Or mine eyes seeing this, say this is not
SonnetsSonn.139.10 Her pretty looks have been mine enemies, Her prettie lookes haue beene mine enemies,
SonnetsSonn.141.1 In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes, IN faith I doe not loue thee with mine eyes,
SonnetsSonn.141.5 Nor are mine ears with thy tongue's tune delighted, Nor are mine eares with thy toungs tune delighted,
SonnetsSonn.142.3 O but with mine, compare thou thine own state, O but with mine, compare thou thine owne state,
SonnetsSonn.142.7 And sealed false bonds of love as oft as mine, And seald false bonds of loue as oft as mine,
SonnetsSonn.142.10 Whom thine eyes woo as mine importune thee. Whome thine eyes wooe as mine importune thee,
Venus and AdonisVen.116 Though mine be not so fair, yet are they red – Though mine be not so faire, yet are they red,
Venus and AdonisVen.117 The kiss shall be thine own as well as mine. The kisse shalbe thine owne as well as mine,
Venus and AdonisVen.119 Look in mine eyeballs, there thy beauty lies; Looke in mine ey-bals, there thy beautie lyes,
Venus and AdonisVen.140 Mine eyes are grey and bright and quick in turning: Mine eyes are grey, and bright, & quicke in turning:
Venus and AdonisVen.378 Because Adonis' heart hath made mine hard.’ Because Adonis heart hath made mine hard.
Venus and AdonisVen.502 That they have murdered this poor heart of mine; That they haue murdred this poore heart of mine,
Venus and AdonisVen.503 And these mine eyes, true leaders to their queen, And these mine eyes true leaders to their queene,
Venus and AdonisVen.584 For my sick heart commands mine eyes to watch. For my sick heart commands mine eyes to watch,
Venus and AdonisVen.644 Sawst thou not signs of fear lurk in mine eye? Sawest thou not signes of feare lurke in mine eye?
Venus and AdonisVen.659 Knocks at my heart, and whispers in mine ear Knocks at my heart, and whispers in mine eare,
Venus and AdonisVen.661 ‘ And more than so, presenteth to mine eye And more then so, presenteth to mine eye,
Venus and AdonisVen.778 Yet from mine ear the tempting tune is blown; Yet from mine eare the tempting tune is blowne,
Venus and AdonisVen.779 For know, my heart stands armed in mine ear, For know my heart stands armed in mine eare,
Venus and AdonisVen.809 Mine ears that to your wanton talk attended Mine eares that to your wanton talke attended,
Venus and AdonisVen.1072 Mine eyes are turned to fire, my heart to lead; Mine eyes are turn'd to fire, my heart to lead,
Venus and AdonisVen.1073 Heavy heart's lead, melt at mine eyes' red fire! Heauie hearts lead melt at mine eyes red fire,

Glossary

 7 result(s).
candle-minemine of candle-fat
countermineexcavated passage made by fortress defenders to intercept an enemy mine
mineundermine, sap, subvert
minesource of supply, abundant store
mineexcavated passage under a fortress wall
mineralmine, mineral deposit
nunclechild-like shortening of ‘mine uncle’; guardian, master

Thesaurus

 5 result(s).
candle-fat, mine ofcandle-mine
fortress passage excavated to intercept an enemy minecountermine
minemineral
mine of candle-fatcandle-mine
mine, passage to intercept an enemycountermine

Themes and Topics

 7 result(s).
Discourse markers...e an ts v ii 97 the fouler fortune mine and there an end and that’s that ...
Here, there, and where... true king] thereon i pawn my credit and mine honour on that upon that [place sub...
Swearing... i 157 in truth truly honesty by mine tg ii v 1 honour by...
... tg ii v 1 honour by mine ayl i ii 58 honour on / upon...
... ayl i ii 58 honour on / upon mine mm i i 63 loves of all mnd ii ...
Verb forms...ct usage h5 v ii 201 if ever thou beest mine be are 3rd person plural present...
French...nne > then yours is france and you are mine h5 v ii 186  sauf votre honneur le fra...
Frequently Encountered Words (FEW)...himself] i could be well content / to be mine own attorney in this case content (adj...
Abbreviations...sir h hay i hit j joy iy mine k key oo do l lay oy boy...

Words Families

 7 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
MINEBASICmine n, mine v
MINEACTIONundermine v
MINEOBJECTcountermine n
MINEPEOPLEcandle-mine n, underminer n
UNDERMINEBASICsee MINE
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2020 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL