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Search phrase: might

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 531 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.121might blow up men?might blow vp men?
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.148How might one do, sir, to lose it to her ownHow might one do sir, to loose it to her owne
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.179Which might be felt, that we, the poorer born,Which might be felt, that we the poorer borne,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.181Might with effects of them follow our friends,Might with effects of them follow our friends,
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.ii.46Might be a copy to these younger times;Might be a copie to these yonger times;
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.4content I wish might be found in the calendar of mycontent, I wish might be found in the Kalender of my
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.83if I were the parson. One in ten, quoth 'a! An we mightif I were the Parson, one in ten quoth a? and wee might
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.109would not extend his might only where qualities werewould not extend his might onelie, where qualities were
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.iii.162Yes, Helen, you might be my daughter-in-law.Yes Hellen you might be my daughter in law,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.iii.202travel; it might pass. Yet the scarfs and the banneretstrauell, it might passe: yet the scarffes and the bannerets
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.ii.81That twenty such rude boys might tend uponThat twenty such rude boyes might tend vpon,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.2Might you not know she would do as she has doneMight you not know she would do, as she has done,
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.iv.24She might have been o'erta'en; and yet she writesShe might haue beene ore-tane: and yet she writes
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.v.66Her heart weighs sadly. This young maid might do herHer hart waighes sadly: this yong maid might do her
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.13too far in his virtue which he hath not, he might at sometoo farre in his vertue which he hath not, he might at some
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.53It might have been recovered.It might haue beene recouered.
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vi.54It might, but it is not now.It might, but it is not now.
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.31him see his company anatomized, that he might take ahim see his company anathomiz'd, that hee might take a
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.318might begin an impudent nation. Fare ye well, sir. I ammight begin an impudent Nation. Fare yee well sir, I am
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.87might safely be admitted.might safely be admitted.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.190He might have bought me at a common price.He might haue bought me at a common price.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.218And I had that which any inferior mightAnd I had that which any inferiour might
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.278It might be yours or hers for aught I know.It might be yours or hers for ought I know.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.v.5That I might sleep out this great gap of timeThat I might sleepe out this great gap of time:
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.42Might be to you in Egypt. Yet if you thereMight be to you in Egypt: yet if you there
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.44.1Might be my question.Might be my question.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.70might go to wars with the women.might go to Warres with the women.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.ii.103If it might please you to enforce no furtherIf it might please you, to enforce no further
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vi.96might take two thieves kissing.might take two Theeues kissing.
Antony and CleopatraAC II.vii.91That it might go on wheels!that it might go on wheeles.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.ii.31The fortress of it; for better might weThe Fortresse of it: for better might we
Antony and CleopatraAC III.iii.6Through whom I might command it? – Come thou near.through whom I might commaund it: / Come thou neere.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.v.21.1I might have told hereafter.I might haue told heareafter.
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vii.26Which might have well becomed the best of menWhich might haue well becom'd the best of men
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xi.60Thy beck might from the bidding of the godsThy becke, might from the bidding of the Gods
Antony and CleopatraAC III.xii.17Submits her to thy might, and of thee cravesSubmits her to thy might, and of thee craues
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.ii.18An Antony, that I might do you serviceAn Anthony: that I might do you seruice,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.36He goes forth gallantly. That he and Caesar mightHe goes forth gallantly: That he and Caesar might
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xii.42Might have prevented many. Eros, ho!Might haue preuented many. Eros, hoa?
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xiv.125But, fearing since how it might work, hath sentBut fearing since how it might worke, hath sent
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.77O, such another sleep, that I might seeOh such another sleepe, that I might see
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.78.2If it might please ye – If it might please ye.
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.93Think you there was or might be such a manThinke you there was, or might be such a man
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.102As answering to the weight. Would I might neverAs answering to the waight, would I might neuer
Antony and CleopatraAC V.ii.306That I might hear thee call great Caesar assThat I might heare thee call great Casar Asse,
As You Like ItAYL I.i.124hither to acquaint you withal, that either you mighthither to acquaint you withall, that either you might
As You Like ItAYL I.ii.170that the wrestling might not go forward.that the wrastling might not go forward.
As You Like ItAYL III.ii.163That's no matter: the feet might bear the verses.That's no matter: the feet might beare ye verses.
As You Like ItAYL III.iii.23honest; now, if thou wert a poet, I might have some hopehonest: Now if thou wert a Poet, I might haue some hope
As You Like ItAYL III.v.35 And why, I pray you? Who might be your mother,And why I pray you? who might be your mother
As You Like ItAYL III.v.81Dead Shepherd, now I find thy saw of might,Dead Shepheard, now I find thy saw of might,
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.67were gravelled for lack of matter, you might take occasionwere grauel'd, for lacke of matter, you might take occasion
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.100mind, for I protest her frown might kill me.mind, for I protest her frowne might kill me.
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.127I might ask you for your commission, but II might aske you for your Commission, / But I
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.154A man that had a wife with such a wit, he mightA man that had a wife with such a wit, he might
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.156Nay, you might keep that check for it, till youNay, you might keepe that checke for it, till you
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.56How then might your prayers move?How then might your praiers moue?
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.124.2And well he might so do,And well he might so doe,
As You Like ItAYL IV.iii.154To tell this story, that you might excuseTo tell this story, that you might excuse
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.130Might bear him company in the quest of him;Might beare him company in the quest of him:
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.63Are you there, wife? You might have come before.Are you there Wife? you might haue come before. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.ii.14With words that in an honest suit might move. With words, that in an honest suit might moue.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.25I might not feel your blows.I might not feele your blowes.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.iv.83Money by me? Heart and good will you might,Monie by me? Heart and good will you might,
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.8His word might bear my wealth at any time.His word might beare my wealth at any time. 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE V.i.217Albeit my wrongs might make one wiser mad.Albeit my wrongs might make one wiser mad. 
CoriolanusCor I.i.17were wholesome, we might guess they relieved uswere wholsome, wee might guesse they releeued vs
CoriolanusCor I.iii.86sensible as your finger, that you might leave pricking itsensible as your finger, that you might leaue pricking it
CoriolanusCor I.ix.30Well might they fester 'gainst ingratitudeWell might they fester 'gainst Ingratitude,
CoriolanusCor II.ii.94When he might act the woman in the scene,When he might act the Woman in the Scene,
CoriolanusCor II.ii.143That I shall blush in acting, and might wellI shall blush in acting, / And might well
CoriolanusCor II.iii.183Fast foe to th' plebeii, your voices mightFast Foe to th'Plebeij, your Voyces might
CoriolanusCor II.iii.192Either his gracious promise, which you might,Eyther his gracious Promise, which you might
CoriolanusCor III.i.16To hopeless restitution, so he mightTo hopelesse restitution, so he might
CoriolanusCor III.ii.4That the precipitation might down stretchThat the precipitation might downe stretch
CoriolanusCor III.ii.19You might have been enough the man you areYou might haue beene enough the man you are,
CoriolanusCor III.ii.69.1Of what that want might ruin.Of what that want might ruine.
CoriolanusCor IV.v.196he might have boiled and eaten him too.hee might haue boyld and eaten him too.
CoriolanusCor IV.vi.16All's well, and might have been much better ifAll's well, and might haue bene much better, if
CoriolanusCor V.i.39.1Might stop our countryman.Might stop our Countryman.
CoriolanusCor V.iii.134The Volsces whom you serve, you might condemn usThe Volces whom you serue, you might condemne vs
CoriolanusCor V.vi.65Might have found easy fines. But there to endMight haue found easie Fines: But there to end
CymbelineCym I.ii.70O blessed, that I might not! I chose an eagle,O blessed, that I might not: I chose an Eagle,
CymbelineCym I.ii.92.2There might have been,There might haue beene,
CymbelineCym I.ii.99Myself by with a needle, that I might prickMy selfe by with a Needle, that I might pricke
CymbelineCym I.v.20which else an easy battery might lay flat, forwhich else an easie battery might lay flat, for
CymbelineCym I.vii.78Not he: but yet heaven's bounty towards him mightNot he: But yet Heauen's bounty towards him, might
CymbelineCym I.vii.126As well might poison poison! Be revenged,As well might poyson Poyson. Be reueng'd,
CymbelineCym II.i.5oaths of him, and might not spend them at myoathes of him, and might not spend them at my
CymbelineCym II.ii.16And whiter than the sheets! That I might touch!And whiter then the Sheetes: that I might touch,
CymbelineCym II.iv.77And this you might have heard of here, by me,And this you might haue heard of heere, by me,
CymbelineCym II.iv.86Which you might from relation likewise reap,Which you might from Relation likewise reape,
CymbelineCym II.iv.164Might well have warmed old Saturn; that I thought herMight well haue warm'd olde Saturne; / That I thought her
CymbelineCym IV.ii.42.1I might know more.I might know more.
CymbelineCym IV.ii.140As it is like him – might break out, and swear(As it is like him) might breake out, and sweare
CymbelineCym IV.ii.160That possible strength might meet, would seek us throughThat possible strength might meet, wold seek vs through
CymbelineCym IV.ii.322Pisanio might have killed thee at the heart,Pisanio might haue kill'd thee at the heart,
CymbelineCym V.v.190Of Phoebus' wheel; and might so safely, had itOf Phobus Wheele; and might so safely, had it
CymbelineCym V.v.412Speak, Iachimo: I had you down, and mightSpeake Iachimo, I had you downe, and might
HamletHam I.i.56Before my God, I might not this believeBefore my God, I might not this beleeue
HamletHam I.i.77What might be toward that this sweaty hasteWhat might be toward, that this sweaty hast
HamletHam I.ii.84For they are actions that a man might play.For they are actions that a man might play:
HamletHam I.ii.141That he might not beteem the winds of heavenThat he might not beteene the windes of heauen
HamletHam I.ii.238While one with moderate haste might tell a hundred.While one with moderate hast might tell a hun-(dred.
HamletHam I.iv.73Which might deprive your sovereignty of reasonWhich might depriue your Soueraignty of Reason,
HamletHam I.v.177Or ‘ If we list to speak,’ or ‘ There be, an if they might,’Or if we list to speake; or there be and if there might,
HamletHam II.i.118This must be known, which, being kept close, might moveThis must be knowne, wc being kept close might moue
HamletHam II.ii.27Might, by the sovereign power you have of us,Might by the Soueraigne power you haue of vs,
HamletHam II.ii.77That it might please you to give quiet passThat it might please you to giue quiet passe
HamletHam II.ii.131I would fain prove so. But what might you thinkI wold faine proue so. But what might you think?
HamletHam II.ii.134Before my daughter told me – what might you,Before my Daughter told me what might you
HamletHam II.ii.139What might you think? No, I went round to work,What might you thinke? No, I went round to worke,
HamletHam II.ii.441savoury, nor no matter in the phrase that might indictsauouty; nor no matter in the phrase, that might indite
HamletHam III.i.75When he himself might his quietus makeWhen he himselfe might his Quietus make
HamletHam III.ii.294You might have rhymed.You might haue Rim'd.
HamletHam III.iii.73Now might I do it pat, now 'a is a-praying.Now might I do it pat, now he is praying,
HamletHam IV.v.12Indeed would make one think there might be thought,Indeed would make one thinke there would be thought,
HamletHam IV.vii.17Why to a public count I might not goWhy to a publike count I might not go,
HamletHam IV.vii.69.1That I might be the organ.
HamletHam IV.vii.152Should have a back or second, that might holdShould haue a backe or second, that might hold,
HamletHam V.i.77Cain's jawbone, that did the first murder! This might beCaines Iaw-bone, that did the first murther: It might be
HamletHam V.i.79one that would circumvent God, might it not?one that could circumuent God, might it not?
HamletHam V.i.80It might, my lord.It might, my Lord.
HamletHam V.i.83might be my Lord Such-a-one, that praised my Lordmight be my Lord such a one, that prais'd my Lord
HamletHam V.i.84Such-a-one's horse when 'a meant to beg it, might itsuch a ones Horse, when he meant to begge it; might it
HamletHam V.i.96There's another. Why may not that be the skullThere's another: why might not that bee the Scull
HamletHam V.i.101action of battery? Hum! This fellow might be in'sAction of Battery? hum. This fellow might be in's
HamletHam V.i.208might they not stop a beer barrel?might they not stopp a Beere-barrell?
HamletHam V.i.210Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.Might stop a hole to keepe the winde away.
HamletHam V.ii.40As love between them like the palm might flourish,As loue betweene them, as the Palme should flourish,
HamletHam V.ii.157it might be ‘ hangers ’ till then. But on! Six Barbaryit might be Hangers till then; but on sixe Barbary
HamletHam V.ii.224What I have doneWhat I haue done / That might your nature honour, and exception
HamletHam V.ii.225That might your nature, honour, and exception
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.17And majesty might never yet endureAnd Maiestie might neuer yet endure
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.204So he that doth redeem her thence might wearSo he that doth redeeme her thence, might weare
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.iii.267As what I think might be, but what I knowAs what I thinke might be, but what I know
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.168Might so have tempted him as you have doneMight so haue tempted him, as you haue done,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.ii.48And that no man might draw short breath todayAnd that no man might draw short breath to day,
Henry IV Part 11H4 V.iv.52If it were so, I might have let aloneIf it were so, I might haue let alone
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.i.169That in the dole of blows your son might drop.That in the dole of blowes, your Son might drop.
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.4water; but, for the party that owed it, he might havewater: but for the party that ow'd it, he might haue
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.213anything but a bottle – I would I might never spit whiteany thing but my Bottle, would I might neuer spit white
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.ii.163How might we see Falstaff bestowHow might we see Falstaffe bestow
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iii.44Today might I, hanging on Hotspur's neck,To day might I (hanging on Hotspurs Necke)
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iv.315might not fall in love with (turning to Prince Henry) theemight not fall in loue with him:
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.45O God, that one might read the book of fate,Oh Heauen, that one might read the Book of Fate,
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.84King Richard might create a perfect guessKing Richard might create a perfect guesse,
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.161I would Wart might have gone, sir.I would Wart might haue gone sir.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.ii.314might have thrust him and all his apparel into anmight haue truss'd him and all his Apparrell into an
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.11As might hold sortance with his quality,As might hold sortance with his Qualitie,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.76And might by no suit gain our audience.And might, by no Suit, gayne our Audience:
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.144That might so much as think you enemies.That might so much as thinke you Enemies.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.ii.14Alack, what mischiefs might he set abroachAlack, what Mischiefes might hee set abroach,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.130England shall give him office, honour, might;England, shall giue him Office, Honor, Might:
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.174Give entertainment to the might of it,Giue entertainment to the might of it,
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.207And by whose power I well might lodge a fearAnd by whose power, I well might lodge a Feare
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.211Lest rest and lying still might make them lookLeast rest, and lying still, might make them looke
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.ii.68How might a prince of my great hopes forgetHow might a Prince of my great hopes forget
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iii.60An I might see you there, Davy – If I might see you there, Dauie.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.2might die, that I might have thee hanged. Thou hastmight dy, that I might haue thee hang'd: Thou hast
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.13the fruit of her womb miscarry!the Fruite of her Wombe might miscarry.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.iv.24O God, that right should thus overcome might!O, that right should thus o'recome might.
Henry VH5 I.ii.125They know your grace hath cause and means and mightThey know your Grace hath cause, and means, and might;
Henry VH5 II.i.63An oath of mickle might, and fury shall abate.An oath of mickle might, and fury shall abate.
Henry VH5 II.ii.102That might annoy my finger? 'Tis so strangeThat might annoy my finger? 'Tis so strange,
Henry VH5 II.ii.123He might return to vasty Tartar back,He might returne to vastie Tartar backe,
Henry VH5 IV.iv.74might have a good prey of us, if he knew of it, for theremight haue a good pray of vs, if he knew of it, for there
Henry VH5 IV.v.21If any order might be thought upon.If any order might be thought vpon.
Henry VH5 IV.vii.159once, an please God of His grace that I might see.once, and please God of his grace that I might see.
Henry VH5 IV.viii.47never came any from mine that might offend yourneuer came any from mine, that might offend your
Henry VH5 V.ii.139should quickly leap into a wife. Or if I might buffet forshould quickly leape into a Wife: Or if I might buffet for
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.i.53That now our loss might be ten times so much?That now our losse might be ten times so much?
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.32That so he might recover what was lost.That so he might recouer what was lost.
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.v.108Might but redeem the passage of your age!Might but redeeme the passage of your Age.
Henry VI Part 11H6 III.i.67I would prevail, if prayers might prevail,I would preuayle, if Prayers might preuayle,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.72I should have begged I might have been employed.I should haue begg'd I might haue bene employd.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iv.4Might with a sally of the very townMight with a sally of the very Towne
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iv.9That, Talbot dead, great York might bear the name.That Talbot dead, great Yorke might beare the name.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iv.33York lies; he might have sent and had the horse.York lyes: He might haue sent, & had the Horse:
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.iv.44And fly would Talbot never, though he might.And flye would Talbot neuer though he might.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.v.3That Talbot's name might be in thee revivedThat Talbots name might be in thee reuiu'd,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.vii.80That I in rage might shoot them at your faces!That I in rage might shoot them at your faces.
Henry VI Part 22H6 I.i.90How France and Frenchmen might be kept in awe?How France and Frenchmen might be kept in awe,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.148And if my death might make this island happy,And if my death might make this Iland happy,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.306Might happily have proved far worse than his.Might happily haue prou'd farre worse then his.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.60Might liquid tears or heart-offending groansMight liquid teares, or heart-offending groanes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.100Might in thy palace perish Margaret.Might in thy Pallace, perish Elianor.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.109And so I wished thy body might my heart;And so I wish'd thy body might my Heart:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.263The mortal worm might make the sleep eternal;The mortall Worme might make the sleepe eternall.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.27And so should these, if I might have my will.And so should these, if I might haue my will.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.iv.45So might your grace's person be in danger.So might your Graces person be in danger.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.5if I might have a lease of my life for a thousand years,if I might haue a Lease of my life for a thousand yeares,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.77So wish I I might thrust thy soul to hell.So wish I, I might thrust thy soule to hell.
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.201Might I but know thee by thy house's badge.Might I but know thee by thy housed Badge.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.58When he might spurn him with his foot away?When he might spurne him with his Foot away?
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.76Might in the ground be closed up in rest!Might in the ground be closed vp in rest:
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.153He might have kept that glory to this day.He might haue kept that glory to this day.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.vi.81That I in all despite might rail at him,That I (in all despight) might rayle at him,
Henry VI Part 33H6 IV.ii.10Else might I think that Clarence, Edward's brother,Else might I thinke, that Clarence, Edwards Brother,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.ii.30We might recover all our loss again.We might recouer all our Losse againe:
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.ii.46I well might hear, delivered with a groan,I well might heare, deliuered with a groane,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iv.11Which industry and courage might have saved?Which Industrie and Courage might haue sau'd?
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iv.46Lest in our need he might infect anotherLeast in our need he might infect another,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.v.23That you might still have worn the petticoatThat you might still haue worne the Petticoat,
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.14The view of earthly glory; men might say,The view of earthly glory: Men might say
Henry VIIIH8 I.i.181England and France might through their amityEngland and France, might through their amity
Henry VIIIH8 I.ii.179The monk might be deceived, and that 'twas dangerousThe Monke might be deceiu'd, and that 'twas dangerous
Henry VIIIH8 II.ii.110A woman of less place might ask by law – A Woman of lesse Place might aske by Law;
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.33.1If you might please to stretch it.If you might please to stretch it.
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.150Laid any scruple in your way which mightLaid any scruple in your way, which might
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.153A royal lady, spake one the least word that mightA Royall Lady, spake one, the least word that might
Henry VIIIH8 II.iv.178Wherein he might the King his lord advertiseWherein he might the King his Lord aduertise,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.158Employed you where high profits might come home,Imploy'd you where high Profits might come home,
Henry VIIIH8 III.ii.262That might have mercy on the fault thou gav'st him;That might haue mercie on the fault, thou gau'st him:
Henry VIIIH8 V.i.132Might corrupt minds procure knaves as corruptMight corrupt mindes procure, Knaues as corrupt
Henry VIIIH8 V.iii.36Might go one way, and safely; and the endMight goe one way, and safely; and the end
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.50hit that woman, who cried out ‘ Clubs!’, when I mighthit that Woman, who cryed out Clubbes, when I might
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.58That you might see your shadow. I have heard,That you might see your shadow: / I haue heard,
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.165I would not – so with love I might entreat you – I would not so (with loue I might intreat you)
Julius CaesarJC I.ii.265would not have taken him at a word, I would I might gowould not haue taken him at a word, I would I might goe
Julius CaesarJC II.i.13How that might change his nature, there's the question.How that might change his nature, there's the question?
Julius CaesarJC II.iv.8I have a man's mind, but a woman's might.I haue a mans minde, but a womans might:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.16He wished today our enterprise might thrive.He wisht to day our enterprize might thriue:
Julius CaesarJC III.i.37Might fire the blood of ordinary men,Might fire the blood of ordinary men,
Julius CaesarJC III.ii.119But yesterday the word of Caesar mightBut yesterday, the word of Casar might
Julius CaesarJC IV.iii.259I should not urge thy duty past thy might;I should not vrge thy duty past thy might,
Julius CaesarJC V.i.47If Cassius might have ruled.If Cassius might haue rul'd.
Julius CaesarJC V.i.104For fear of what might fall, so to preventFor feare of what might fall, so to preuent
Julius CaesarJC V.i.122Why then, lead on. O, that a man might knowWhy then leade on. O that a man might know
Julius CaesarJC V.v.74So mixed in him, that Nature might stand upSo mixt in him, that Nature might stand vp,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.50We might descry a mighty host of men.We might discry a mighty host of men,
King Edward IIIE3 I.ii.138What might I speak to make my sovereign stay?What might I speake to make my soueraigne stay?
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.1I might perceive his eye in her eye lost,I might perceiue his eye in her eye lost,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.306O, that a man might hold the heart's close bookO that a man might hold the hartes close booke,
King Edward IIIE3 II.ii.193May better boast of than ever Roman mightMay better boast of then euer Romaine might,
King Edward IIIE3 III.i.169Then might ye see the reeling vessels split,Then might ye see the reeling vessels split,
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.56I might perceive five cities all on fire,I might perceaue fiue Cities all on fire,
King Edward IIIE3 III.ii.59Turned but aside, I likewise might discernI tourned but a side I like wise might disserne.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.12Whom now in heart I wish I might behold.Whom now in heart I wish I might behold.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.139That, night approaching, they might escape unfought.That night approching, they might escape vnfought.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.69Oh, would my life might ransom him from death!O would my life might ransome him from death.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.124That so her nest of young ones might be fedThat so her nest of young ones might be fed,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.i.20And that I might for ransom, if I would,And that I might for ransome if I would,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iii.79Or say this might be true; yet, in the end,Or say this might be true, yet in the end,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.60Now might we hear of our affairs abroad.Now might we heare of our affaires abroad,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.227The heat and cold and what else might displease,The heate and cold, and what else might displease
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.231Might thereby be inflamed with such resolve,Might thereby be inflamd with such resolue,
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.235Might at their presence tremble and retire.Might at their presence tremble and retire.
King JohnKJ I.i.35This might have been prevented and made wholeThis might haue beene preuented, and made whole
King JohnKJ I.i.123In sooth, good friend, your father might have keptInsooth, good friend, your father might haue kept
King JohnKJ I.i.125In sooth he might. Then, if he were my brother's,Insooth he might: then if he were my brothers,
King JohnKJ I.i.126My brother might not claim him, nor your father,My brother might not claime him, nor your father
King JohnKJ I.i.145Would I might never stir from off this place,Would I might neuer stirre from off this place,
King JohnKJ I.i.234Sir Robert might have eat his part in meSir Robert might haue eat his part in me
King JohnKJ II.i.325Heralds, from off our towers we might behold,Heralds, from off our towres we might behold
King JohnKJ IV.i.30That I might sit all night and watch with you.That I might sit all night, and watch with you.
King JohnKJ IV.ii.236And those thy fears might have wrought fears in me.And those thy feares, might haue wrought feares in me.
King JohnKJ V.ii.37Where these two Christian armies might combineWhere these two Christian Armies might combine
King JohnKJ V.vi.25To acquaint you with this evil, that you mightTo acquaint you with this euill, that you might
King JohnKJ V.vii.45.1That might relieve you!That might releeue you.
King LearKL I.iv.207Might in their working do you that offenceMight in their working do you that offence,
King LearKL II.iv.238Why might not you, my lord, receive attendanceWhy might not you my Lord, receiue attendance
King LearKL III.i.7That things might change or cease; tears his white hair,That things might change, or cease.
King LearKL III.iii.2dealing. When I desired their leave that I mightdealing; when I desired their leaue that I might
King LearKL III.vi.96This rest might yet have balmed thy broken sinews
King LearKL IV.i.23Might I but live to see thee in my touchMight I but liue to see thee in my touch,
King LearKL IV.ii.94.1Might have the freer course.Might haue the freer course.
King LearKL IV.v.6What might import my sister's letter to him?What night import my Sisters Letter to him?
King LearKL IV.v.19Why should she write to Edmund? Might not youWhy should she write to Edmund?
King LearKL IV.v.20Transport her purposes by word? BelikeMight not you transport her purposes by word? Belike,
King LearKL IV.vi.47Thus might he pass indeed. Yet he revives – Thus might he passe indeed: yet he reuiues.
King LearKL V.iii.63Methinks our pleasure might have been demandedMethinkes our pleasure might haue bin demanded
King LearKL V.iii.142What safe and nicely I might well delayWhat safe, and nicely I might well delay,
King LearKL V.iii.268I might have saved her; now she's gone for ever.I might haue sau'd her, now she's gone for euer:
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.150Not by might mastered, but by special grace.Not by might mastred, but by speciall grace.
Love's Labour's LostLLL III.i.200Of his almighty dreadful little might.Of his almighty dreadfull little might.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.i.69beggar Zenelophon, and he it was that might rightlyBegger Zenelophon: and he it was that might rightly
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.108Air, would I might triumph so!Ayre, would I might triumph so.
Love's Labour's LostLLL IV.iii.241Might shake off fifty, looking in her eye.Might shake off fiftie, looking in her eye:
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.17She might ha' been a grandam ere she died.she might a bin a Grandam ere she died.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.57Ay, or I would these hands might never part.I, or I would these hands might neuer part.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.92Toward that shade I might behold addressedToward that shade I might behold addrest,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.472Much upon this 'tis. (To Boyet) And might not youMuch vpon this tis: and might not you
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.560By east, west, north, and south, I spread my conquering might;By East, West, North, & South, I spred my conquering might
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.865Might well have made our sport a comedy.Might wel haue made our sport a Comedie.
MacbethMac I.iii.120Might yet enkindle you unto the crownMight yet enkindle you vnto the Crowne,
MacbethMac I.iv.21Might have been mine! Only I have left to say,Might haue beene mine: onely I haue left to say,
MacbethMac I.vii.5Might be the be-all and the end-all! – here,Might be the be all, and the end all. Heere,
MacbethMac III.i.81Who wrought with them, and all things else that mightwho wrought with them: / And all things else, that might
MacbethMac III.iv.59.1Which might appal the devil.Which might appall the Diuell.
MacbethMac III.vi.43.2And that well mightAnd that well might
MacbethMac V.v.6We might have met them dareful, beard to beard,We might haue met them darefull, beard to beard,
Measure for MeasureMM I.iv.27For that which, if myself might be his judge,For that, which if my selfe might be his Iudge,
Measure for MeasureMM I.iv.78And make us lose the good we oft might win,And makes vs loose the good we oft might win,
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.77woman cardinally given, might have been accused inwoman Cardinally giuen, might haue bin accus'd in
Measure for MeasureMM II.i.172If he took you a box o'th' ear, you might haveIf he tooke you a box o'th' eare, you might haue
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.9.2Lest I might be too rash.Lest I might be too rash:
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.49Yes, I do think that you might pardon him,Yes: I doe thinke that you might pardon him,
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.53But might you do't, and do the world no wrong,But might you doe't & do the world no wrong
Measure for MeasureMM II.ii.74And He that might the vantage best have tookAnd he that might the vantage best haue tooke,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.32That you might know it, would much better please meThat you might know it, wold much better please me,
Measure for MeasureMM II.iv.63Might there not be a charity in sinMight there not be a charitie in sinne,
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.147Die, perish. Might but my bending downDie, perish: Might but my bending downe
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.157Might you dispense with your leisure, I would byMight you dispense with your leysure, I would by
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.127What, I prithee, might be the cause?What (I prethee) might be the cause?
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.175No might nor greatness in mortalityNo might, nor greatnesse in mortality
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iii.83To save me from the danger that might comeTo saue me from the danger that might come,
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iv.23How might she tongue me? Yet reason dares her no,How might she tongue me? yet reason dares her no,
Measure for MeasureMM IV.iv.28Might in the times to come have ta'en revenge,Might in the times to come haue ta'ne reuenge
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.418For that he knew you, might reproach your lifeFor that he knew you, might reproach your life,
Measure for MeasureMM V.i.503rather it would please you I might be whipped.rather it would please you, I might be whipt.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.20And every object that might make me fearAnd euery obiect that might make me feare
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.i.24What harm a wind too great might do at sea.What harme a winde too great might doe at sea.
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.69Nay, indeed if you had your eyes you mightNay, indeede if you had your eies you might
The Merchant of VeniceMV II.ii.86worshipped might he be, what a beard hast thou got!worshipt might he be, what a beard hast thou got;
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.18I would it might prove the end of his losses.I would it might proue the end of his losses.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.156I might in virtues, beauties, livings, friends,I might in vertues, beauties, liuings, friends,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.319might but see you at my death. Notwithstanding, use yourmight see you at my death: notwithstanding, vse your
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.143might never come in mine own great chamber againmight neuer come in mine owne great chamber againe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW I.i.239Ay, or else I would I might be hanged, la!I, or else I would I might be hang'd (la.)
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.16With all his mightwith all his might,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.51Perceive how I might be knighted. I shall think theperceiue how I might bee knighted, I shall thinke the
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.263I would you knew Ford, sir, that you might avoidI would you knew Ford, sir, that you might auoid
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.48Otherwise you might slip away ere he came. But whatotherwise you might slip away ere hee came: But what
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.64How might we disguise him?How might we disguise him?
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.ii.66woman's gown big enough for him. Otherwise he mightwomans gowne bigge enough for him: otherwise he might
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.v.85I would all the world might be cozened, for II would all the world might be cozond, for I
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.vi.11So far forth as herself might be her chooser,(So farre forth, as her selfe might be her chooser)
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.184Page, would I might never stir! And 'tis a postmaster'sPage, would I might neuer stirre, and 'tis a Post-masters
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.161But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaftBut I might see young Cupids fiery shaft
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.74On whose eyes I might approveOne whose eyes I might approue
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.ii.149And, all my powers, address your love and mightAnd all my powers addresse your loue and might,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND III.ii.368To take from thence all error with his might,To take from thence all error, with his might,
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND IV.i.151Was to be gone from Athens where we mightWas to be gone from Athens, where we might be
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.92Takes it in might, not merit.Takes it in might, not merit.
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND V.i.302With the help of a surgeon he might yet recover,With the helpe of a Surgeon, he might yet recouer,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.293But lest my liking might too sudden seem,But lest my liking might too sodaine seeme,
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.209made, and the garland too; for the garland he mightmade, and the garland too, for the garland he might
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.210have worn himself, and the rod he might have bestowedhaue worne himselfe, and the rod hee might haue bestowed
Much Ado About NothingMA II.i.302No, my lord, unless I might have another forNo, my Lord, vnlesse I might haue another for
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.132I might have said ‘ No part of it is mine;I might haue said, no part of it is mine:
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.258Ah, how much might the man deserve of meAh, how much might the man deserue of mee
Much Ado About NothingMA V.i.98How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst;How they might hurt their enemies, if they durst.
Much Ado About NothingMA V.iv.111Beatrice, that I might have cudgelled thee out of thyBeatrice, yt I might haue cudgel'd thee out of thy
OthelloOth I.i.183And raise some special officers of night.And raise some speciall Officers of might:
OthelloOth I.ii.16The law, with all his might to enforce it on,The Law (with all his might, to enforce it on)
OthelloOth II.iii.226The town might fall in fright. He, swift of foot,The Towne might fall in fright. He, (swift of foote)
OthelloOth II.iii.230I ne'er might say before. When I came back –I nere might say before. When I came backe
OthelloOth III.i.46He might not but refuse you; but he protests he loves youHe might not but refuse you. But he protests he loues you
OthelloOth III.iii.126Or those that be not, would they might seem none!Or those that be not, would they might seeme none.
OthelloOth III.iii.242My lord, I would I might entreat your honourMy Lord, I would I might intreat your Honor
OthelloOth III.iii.405Will give you satisfaction, you might have't.Will giue you satisfaction, you might haue't.
OthelloOth IV.i.183hath not a sweeter creature! She might lie by anhath not a sweeter Creature: she might lye by an
OthelloOth IV.i.273What he might be. If what he might he is not,What he might be: if what he might, he is not,
OthelloOth IV.ii.107How have I been behaved, that he might stickHow haue I bin behau'd, that he might sticke
OthelloOth IV.ii.112He might have chid me so, for, in good faith,He might haue chid me so: for in good faith
OthelloOth IV.ii.162To do the act that might the addition earnTo do the Act, that might the addition earne,
OthelloOth IV.iii.63Nor I neither by this heavenly light: I might do'tNor I neither, by this Heauenly light: / I might doo't
OthelloOth IV.iii.81own world, and you might quickly make it right.owne world, and you might quickly make it right.
OthelloOth V.ii.61As I might love. I never gave him token.As I might loue. I neuer gaue him Token.
PericlesPer Chorus.I.15I life would wish, and that I mightI life would wish, and that I might
PericlesPer I.i.114We might proceed to cancel of your days,We might proceed to counsell of your dayes;
PericlesPer I.ii.14And what was first but fear what might be doneAnd what was first but feare, what might be done,
PericlesPer I.ii.23He'll stop the course by which it might be known.Heele stop the course by which it might be knowne,
PericlesPer I.ii.73From whence an issue I might propagate,From whence an issue I might propogate,
PericlesPer I.ii.83Bethought me what was past, what might succeed.Bethought what was past, what might succeed,
PericlesPer I.ii.98How I might stop this tempest ere it came;How I might stop this tempest ere it came,
PericlesPer I.iii.5bid to ask what he would of the king, desired he mightbid to aske what hee would of the King, desired he might
PericlesPer II.iii.56Had not a show might countervail his worth.Had not a shew might counteruaile his worth:
PericlesPer II.v.52A deed might gain her love or your displeasure.a deed might gaine her loue, / Or your displeasure.
PericlesPer Chorus.III.57Which might not what by me is told.Which might not? what by me is told,
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.32With dove of Paphos might the crowThe Doue of Paphos might with the crow
PericlesPer Chorus.IV.40Might stand peerless by this slaughter.Might stand peerlesse by this slaughter.
PericlesPer IV.i.81Wherein my death might yield her any profit,wherein my death might yeeld her anie profit,
PericlesPer Chorus.V.23Where what is done in action, more if might,Where what is done in action, more if might
PericlesPer V.i.87Might equal yours, if both were justly weighed.might equall yours, if both were iustly wayde,
PericlesPer V.i.107And such a one my daughter might have been.and such a one my daughter might haue beene:
PericlesPer V.i.131And that thou thought'st thy griefs might equal mine,and that thou thoughts thy griefs might equall mine,
Richard IIR2 I.iii.137Might from our quiet confines fright fair peaceMight from our quiet Confines fright faire peace,
Richard IIR2 II.ii.46That he, our hope, might have retired his power,That he our hope, might haue retyr'd his power,
Richard IIR2 III.iii.192Me rather had my heart might feel your loveMe rather had, my Heart might feele your Loue,
Richard IIR2 III.iv.62They might have lived to bear, and he to tasteThey might haue liu'd to beare, and he to taste
Richard IIR2 III.iv.102Poor Queen, so that thy state might be no worsePoore Queen, so that thy State might be no worse,
Richard IIR2 V.iii.4I would to God, my lords, he might be found.I would to heauen (my Lords) he might be found:
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.124So I might live one hour in your sweet bosom.So I might liue one houre in your sweet bosome.
Richard IIIR3 I.ii.151I would they were, that I might die at once,I would they were, that I might dye at once:
Richard IIIR3 II.ii.137Which haply by much company might be urged.Which haply by much company might be vrg'd:
Richard IIIR3 II.iii.30This sickly land might solace as before.This sickly Land, might solace as before.
Richard IIIR3 III.i.99Too late he died that might have kept that title,Too late he dy'd, that might haue kept that Title,
Richard IIIR3 III.i.123I would, that I might thank you as you call me.I would that I might thanke you, as, as, you call me.
Richard IIIR3 III.ii.91They, for their truth, might better wear their headsThey, for their truth, might better wear their Heads,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.25Which by my presence might have been concluded.Which by my presence might haue beene concluded.
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.29Than my Lord Hastings no man might be bolder.Then my Lord Hastings, no man might be bolder,
Richard IIIR3 III.iv.81For I, too fond, might have prevented this.For I, too fond, might haue preuented this:
Richard IIIR3 III.v.58That you might well have signified the sameThat you might well haue signify'd the same
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.113You have, my lord. Would it might please your grace,You haue, my Lord: / Would it might please your Grace,
Richard IIIR3 III.vii.143If not to answer, you might haply thinkIf not to answer, you might haply thinke,
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.137O, she that might have intercepted thee,O she, that might haue intercepted thee
Richard IIIR3 IV.iv.536A royal battle might be won and lost.A Royall batteil might be wonne and lost:
Richard IIIR3 V.i.14I wished might fall on me when I was foundI wish'd might fall on me, when I was found
Romeo and JulietRJ I.i.127Which then most sought where most might not be found,Which then most sought, wher most might not be found:
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.62An I might live to see thee married once,and I might liue to see thee married once,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.25.1That I might touch that cheek!That I might touch that cheeke.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.120Which modern lamentation might have moved?Which moderne lamentation might haue mou'd.
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.86Would none but I might venge my cousin's death!Would none but I might venge my Cozins death.
Romeo and JulietRJ IV.ii.26And gave him what becomed love I might,And gaue him what becomed Loue I might,
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.i.170That mortal ears might hardly endure the din?That mortal eares might hardly indure the din.
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.i.36that we might beguile the old pantaloon.that we might beguile the old Pantalowne.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.i.5were not I a little pot and soon hot, my very lips mightwere not I a little pot, & soone hot; my very lippes might
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.ii.87You might have heard it else proclaimed about.you might haue heard it else proclaim'd about.
The Taming of the ShrewTS IV.iv.54And happily we might be interrupted.And happilie we might be interrupted.
The TempestTem I.ii.99But what my power might else exact, like oneBut what my power might els exact. Like one
The TempestTem I.ii.118.1If this might be a brother.If this might be a brother.
The TempestTem I.ii.168.2Would I mightWould I might
The TempestTem I.ii.418.2I might call himI might call him
The TempestTem I.ii.491Might I but through my prison once a dayMight I but through my prison once a day
The TempestTem II.i.208They dropped, as by a thunderstroke. What might,They dropt, as by a Thunder-stroke: what might
The TempestTem II.i.209Worthy Sebastian? – O, what might? – No more!Worthy Sebastian? O, what might? no more:
The TempestTem II.i.290To the perpetual wink for aye might putTo the perpetuall winke for aye might put
The TempestTem II.ii.52Yet a tailor might scratch her where'er she did itch.Yet a Tailor might scratch her where ere she did itch.
The TempestTem III.i.35Chiefly that I might set it in my prayers,Cheefely, that I might set it in my prayers,
The TempestTem IV.i.169Lest I might anger thee.Least I might anger thee.
Timon of AthensTim I.i.35One might interpret.One might interpret.
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.82Might we but have that happiness, myMight we but haue that happinesse my
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.84might express some part of our zeals, we should thinkmight expresse some part of our zeales, we should thinke
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.98have often wished myself poorer that I might comehaue often wisht my selfe poorer, that I might come
Timon of AthensTim I.ii.161That man might ne'er be wretched for his mind.That man might ne're be wretched for his minde.
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.80might answer thee profitably.might answer thee profitably.
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.121That answer might have becomeThat answer might haue become
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.131That I might so have rated my expenseThat I might so haue rated my expence
Timon of AthensTim III.ii.46against such a good time, when I might ha' shown myselfagainst such a good time, when I might ha shewn my selfe
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.2He might have tried Lord Lucius or Lucullus.He might haue tried Lord Lucius, or Lucullus,
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.15That might have known my place. I see no sense for'tThat might haue knowne my place. I see no sense for't,
Timon of AthensTim III.iii.16But his occasions might have wooed me first;But his Occasions might haue wooed me first:
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.69If I might beseech you, gentlemen, to repairIf I might beseech you Gentlemen, to repayre
Timon of AthensTim III.v.76.2Hard fate! He might have died in war.Hard fate: he might haue dyed in warre.
Timon of AthensTim III.v.78Though his right arm might purchase his own timeThough his right arme might purchase his owne time,
Timon of AthensTim IV.iii.56.1That I might love thee something.That I might loue thee something.
Titus AndronicusTit I.i.478That what we did was mildly as we might,That what we did, was mildly, as we might,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.159That gave thee life when well he might have slain thee.That gaue thee life when well he might haue slaine thee:
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.20And might not gain so great a happinessAnd might not gaine so great a happines
Titus AndronicusTit II.iv.35That I might rail at him to ease my mind!That I might raile at him to ease my mind.
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.149So I might have your company in hellSo I might haue your company in hell,
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.201To make this banquet, which I wish may proveTo make this Banket, which I wish might proue,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.187Would I perform if I might have my will.Would I performe if I might haue my will:
Troilus and CressidaTC I.i.116Better at home, if ‘ would I might ’ were ‘ may ’ – Better at home, if would I might were may:
Troilus and CressidaTC I.iii.227I ask, that I might waken reverence,I aske, that I might waken reuerence,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.129Such things as might offend the weakest spleenSuch things as might offend the weakest spleene,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.131Else might the world convince of levityElse might the world conuince of leuitie,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.119But I might master it. In faith, I lie;But I might maister it; infaith I lye:
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.155Exceeds man's might – that dwells with gods above.Exceedes mans might, that dwels with gods aboue.
Troilus and CressidaTC III.ii.164Might be affronted with the match and weightMight be affronted with the match and waight
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.185And still it might, and yet it may again,And still it might, and yet it may againe,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.311again, that I might water an ass at it! I had rather be aagaine, that I might water an Asse at it: I had rather be a
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.ii.17O foolish Cressid, I might have still held off,O foolish Cressid, I might haue still held off,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.v.149If I might in entreaties find success,If I might in entreaties finde successe,
Troilus and CressidaTC V.iv.6loves the whore there, might send that Greekishloues the whore there, might send that Greekish
Twelfth NightTN I.i.25So please my lord, I might not be admitted,So please my Lord, I might not be admitted,
Twelfth NightTN I.ii.43And might not be delivered to the world – And might not be deliuered to the world
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.60An you part so, mistress, I would I mightAnd you part so mistris, I would I might
Twelfth NightTN I.v.252He might have took his answer long ago.He might haue tooke his answer long ago.
Twelfth NightTN I.v.265.2You might do much.You might do much:
Twelfth NightTN II.i.4over me. The malignancy of my fate might perhapsouer me; the malignancie of my fate, might perhaps
Twelfth NightTN II.ii.5She returns this ring to you, sir. You mightShe returnes this Ring to you (sir) you might
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.75put to sea, that their business might be everything,put to Sea, that their businesse might be euery thing,
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.107As it might be perhaps, were I a woman,As it might be perhaps, were I a woman
Twelfth NightTN II.v.132Ay, an you had any eye behind you, you mightI, and you had any eye behinde you, you might
Twelfth NightTN III.i.19word might make my sister wanton. But indeed, wordsword, might make my sister wanton: But indeede, words
Twelfth NightTN III.i.56and what you would are out of my welkin – I might sayand what you would are out of my welkin, I might say
Twelfth NightTN III.i.114Which you knew none of yours. What might you think?Which you knew none of yours. What might you think?
Twelfth NightTN III.i.141I wish it might, for now I am your fool.I wish it might, for now I am your foole.
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.7As might have drawn one to a longer voyage – As might haue drawne one to a longer voyage)
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.8But jealousy what might befall your travel,But iealousie, what might befall your rrauell,
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.33Might well have given us bloody argument.Might well haue giuen vs bloody argument:
Twelfth NightTN III.iii.34It might have since been answered in repayingIt might haue since bene answer'd in repaying
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.213A fiend like thee might bear my soul to hell.A Fiend like thee might beare my soule to hell.
Twelfth NightTN III.iv.244you might answer him. Therefore on, or strip youryou might answer him: therefore on, or strippe your
Twelfth NightTN IV.ii.51That the soul of our grandam might haplyThat the soule of our grandam, might happily
Twelfth NightTN IV.iii.8His counsel now might do me golden service.His councell now might do me golden seruice,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.68That you might kill your stomach on your meat,That you might kill your stomacke on your meat,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.ii.80That I might sing it, madam, to a tune.That I might sing it (Madam) to a tune:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.158Or fearing else some messenger, that might her mind discover,Or fearing els some messẽger, yt might her mind discouer
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.i.28But, fearing lest my jealous aim might err,But fearing lest my iealous ayme might erre,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG III.ii.29What might we do to make the girl forgetWhat might we doe to make the girle forget
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.i.20Some sixteen months, and longer might have stayed,Some sixteene moneths, and longer might haue staid,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.ii.42That she might admired be.that she might admired be.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.168Wept bitterly; and would I might be deadWept bitterly: and would I might be dead,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.ii.23To get the soldier work, that peace might purgeTo get the Soldier worke, that peace might purge
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iii.4Excess and overflow of power, an't might be,Exces, and overflow of power, and't might be
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iv.27They might have been recovered. Yet they breathe,They might have bin recovered; Yet they breathe
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.129The poison of pure spirits, might like womenThe poyson of pure spirits; might like women
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.143A wife might part us lawfully, or business;A wife might part us lawfully, or busines,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.145Crave our acquaintance. I might sicken, cousin,Crave our acquaintance, I might sicken Cosen,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.210Might not a man well lose himself and love her?Might not a man well lose himselfe and love her?
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.12That I, poor man, might eftsoons come betweenThat I poore man might eftsoones come betweene
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.20A brace of horses; two such steeds might wellA brace of horses, two such Steeds might well
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.64Might justify your manhood; you were calledMight justifie your manhood, you were calld
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.i.69.2Kinsman, you might as wellKinsman; you might as well
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.ii.15Might call fell things to listen, who have in themMight call fell things to listen, who have in them
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.iii.8.2I might;I might.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.23.1Might thank ye, not my blows.Might thanke ye, not my blowes.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.240Might breed the ruin of my name, opinion.Might breed the ruine of my name; Opinion,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.5Was fully ended. Yet I might perceive,Was fully ended: Yet I might perceive
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.57I gave my ear, when I might well perceiveI gave my eare, when I might well perceive
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.ii.57.3Would I might end first!Would I might end first:
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.i.79And weep unto a girl; that hast the mightAnd weepe unto a Girle; that ha'st the might
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.ii.54I think he might be brought to play at tennis.I thinke he might be broght to play at Tennis.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.61I might do hurt, for they would glance their eyesI might doe hurt, for they would glance their eies
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK V.iii.62Toward my seat, and in that motion mightToward my Seat, and in that motion might
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK epilogue.17Your old loves to us. We, and all our might,Your old loves to us: we, and all our might,
The Winter's TaleWT II.i.161.1Be blamed for't how you might.Be blam'd for't how you might.
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.9.1Might come to me again. Who's there?Might come to me againe. Whose there?
The Winter's TaleWT II.iii.96And, might we lay th' old proverb to your charge,And might we lay th' old Prouerb to your charge,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.63With such a kind of love as might becomeWith such a kind of Loue, as might become
The Winter's TaleWT IV.ii.8might be some allay – or I o'erween to think so – whichmight be some allay, or I oreweene to thinke so) which
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.113I would I had some flowers o'th' spring, that mightI would I had some Flowres o'th Spring, that might
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.141A wave o'th' sea, that you might ever doA waue o'th Sea, that you might euer do
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.150With wisdom I might fear, my Doricles,With wisedome, I might feare (my Doricles)
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.458If I might die within this hour, I have livedIf I might dye within this houre, I haue liu'd
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.605that all their other senses stuck in ears: you might havethat all their other Sences stucke in Eares: you might haue
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.741Yet Nature might have made me as these are:Yet Nature might haue made me as these are,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.21You might have spoken a thousand things that wouldYou might haue spoken a thousand things, that would
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.53I might have looked upon my queen's full eyes,I might haue look'd vpon my Queenes full eyes,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.107Would she begin a sect, might quench the zealWould she begin a Sect, might quench the zeale
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.132Might thus have stood, begetting wonder, asMight thus haue stood, begetting wonder, as
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.175Worthy his goodness. What might I have been,Worthy his goodnesse. What might I haue been,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.176Might I a son and daughter now have looked on,Might I a Sonne and Daughter now haue look'd on,
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.214.1That you might well enjoy her.That you might well enioy her.
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.42was to be seen, cannot be spoken of. There might youwas to bee seene, cannot bee spoken of. There might you
The Winter's TaleWT V.ii.76she might no more be in danger of losing.shee might no more be in danger of loosing.
The Winter's TaleWT V.iii.32.2As now she might have done,As now she might haue done,

Poems

 54 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.10 Whereon the thought might think sometime it saw Whereon the thought might thinke sometime it saw
A Lover's ComplaintLC.75 I might as yet have been a spreading flower I might as yet haue bene a spreading flower
A Lover's ComplaintLC.245 And makes her absence valiant, not her might. And makes her absence valiant, not her might.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.1.3 That she might think me some untutored youth, That she might thinke me some vntutor'd youth,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.15.2 That liked of her master as well as well might be, That liked of her maister, as well as well might be,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.16.10 Air, would I might triumph so! Ayre, would I might triumph so
The Passionate PilgrimPP.18.4 As well as fancy's partial might; As well as fancy (partyall might)
The Passionate PilgrimPP.19.19 These pretty pleasures might me move These pretty pleasures might me moue,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.20 That kings might be espoused to more fame, That Kings might be espowsed to more fame,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.235 Might have excuse to work upon his wife, Might haue excuse to worke vppon his wife:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.346 That his foul thoughts might compass his fair fair, That his foule thoughts might cõpasse his fair faire,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.382 In his clear bed might have reposed still: In his cleare bed might haue reposed still.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.399 Till they might open to adorn the day. Till they might open to adorne the day.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.488 Which I to conquer sought with all my might; Which I to conquer sought with all my might.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1263 Of present death, and shame that might ensue Of present death, and shame that might insue.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1321 From that suspicion which the world might bear her. From that suspiciõ which the world might bear her.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1323 With words, till action might become them better. With words, till action might becom thẽ better.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1380 There might you see the labouring pioneer There might you see the labouring Pyoner
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1386 That one might see those far-off eyes look sad. That one might see those farre of eyes looke sad.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1388 You might behold, triumphing in their faces; You might behold triumphing in their faces,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1395 Of physiognomy might one behold! Of Phisiognomy might one behold!
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1401 There pleading might you see grave Nestor stand, There pleading might you see graue NESTOR stand,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1623 By foul enforcement might be done to me, By foule inforcement might be done to me,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1649 No rightful plea might plead for justice there. No rightfull plea might plead for Iustice there.
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1681 ‘ And for my sake, when I might charm thee so, And for my sake when I might charme thee so,
SonnetsSonn.1.2 That thereby beauty's rose might never die, That thereby beauties Rose might neuer die,
SonnetsSonn.1.4 His tender heir might bear his memory: His tender heire might beare his memory:
SonnetsSonn.13.10 Which husbandry in honour might uphold Which husbandry in honour might vphold,
SonnetsSonn.23.8 O'ercharged with burthen of mine own love's might: Ore-charg'd with burthen of mine owne loues might:
SonnetsSonn.48.3 That to my use it might unused stay That to my vse it might vn-vsed stay
SonnetsSonn.56.4 Tomorrow sharpened in his former might. To morrow sharpned in his former might.
SonnetsSonn.59.9 That I might see what the old world could say That I might see what the old world could say,
SonnetsSonn.65.13 O none, unless this miracle have might, O none, vnlesse this miracle haue might,
SonnetsSonn.80.3 And in the praise thereof spends all his might And in the praise thereof spends all his might,
SonnetsSonn.82.13 And their gross painting might be better used And their grosse painting might be better vs'd,
SonnetsSonn.83.6 That you yourself being extant well might show That you your selfe being extant well might show,
SonnetsSonn.90.12 At first the very worst of fortune's might, At first the very worst of fortunes might.
SonnetsSonn.96.9 How many lambs might the stern wolf betray, How many Lambs might the sterne Wolfe betray,
SonnetsSonn.100.2 To speak of that which gives thee all thy might? To speake of that which giues thee all thy might?
SonnetsSonn.109.3 As easy might I from myself depart As easie might I from my selfe depart,
SonnetsSonn.115.10 Might I not then say now I love you best, Might I not then say now I loue you best,
SonnetsSonn.115.13 Love is a babe; then might I not say so, Loue is a Babe, then might I not say so
SonnetsSonn.120.9 O, that our night of woe might have remembered O that our night of wo might haue remembred
SonnetsSonn.123.2 Thy pyramids built up with newer might Thy pyramyds buylt vp with newer might
SonnetsSonn.124.2 It might for Fortune's bastard be unfathered, It might for fortunes basterd be vnfathered,
SonnetsSonn.138.3 That she might think me some untutored youth, That she might thinke me some vntuterd youth,
SonnetsSonn.139.7 What need'st thou wound with cunning when thy might What needst thou wound with cunning when thy might
SonnetsSonn.139.12 That they elsewhere might dart their injuries. That they else-where might dart their iniuries:
SonnetsSonn.140.5 If I might teach thee wit, better it were, If I might teach thee witte better it weare,
SonnetsSonn.140.10 And in my madness might speak ill of thee: And in my madnesse might speake ill of thee,
SonnetsSonn.150.1 Oh from what power hast thou this powerful might, OH from what powre hast thou this powrefull might,
Venus and AdonisVen.113 O, be not proud, nor brag not of thy might, Oh be not proud, nor brag not of thy might,
Venus and AdonisVen.244 He might be buried in a tomb so simple, He might be buried in a tombe so simple,
Venus and AdonisVen.447 Would they not wish the feast might ever last, Would they not wish the feast might euerlast,

Glossary

 10 result(s).
adventurewhatever might happen, regardless of the risks
amainforcefully, with all one's might
armstrong arm [in attack]; or: might, power
forcephysical strength, might, vigour
fortitudestrength, might, power
greatnesspower, might, authority
mainstrength, force, full might
moughtmight (in the sense of 'could')
powerforce, strength, might
puissancepower, might, force

Thesaurus

 10 result(s).
arms, might/powerful inarmipotent
happen, whatever mightadventure
mightpuissance
mightarm
mightfortitude
mightforce
mightpower
mightgreatness
might, fullmain
might, with all one'samain

Themes and Topics

 5 result(s).
Elision...al practice and partly on whether a form might legitimately be considered a word in its...
Greetings... of application good even for example might be said any time after noon   a g...
Ly...t easy sonn 109 3 as easy might i from myself depart equal h...
Plurals...plicated by the existence of forms which might reflect a personal or regional dialect ...
Verb forms...ii 203 long mayst thou live mought might [in the sense of ‘could’] 3h6 v ii 45 ...

Words Families

 9 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
ALMIGHTYBASICsee MIGHT
MIGHTBASICmight n, mightful adj, mightily adv, mightiness n, mighty adj
MIGHTGODAlmighty n
MIGHTINTENSITYalmighty adj, almighty n
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