King Lear
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Key line

Enter Gloucester, and Edgar.Enter Gloucester and Edgar in peasant's clothes KL IV.vi.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
When shall I come to th'top of that same hill?When shall I come to the top of that same hill? KL IV.vi.1
Edg. EDGAR 
You do climbe vp it now. Look how we labor.You do climb up it now. Look how we labour. KL IV.vi.2
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Me thinkes the ground is eeuen.Methinks the ground is even.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: Me thinkes
it seems / seemed to me
KL IV.vi.3.1
Edg. EDGAR 
Horrible steepe.Horrible steep.horrible (adv.)extremely, exceedingly, terriblyKL IV.vi.3.2
Hearke, do you heare the Sea?Hark, do you hear the sea? KL IV.vi.4.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
No truly.No, truly. KL IV.vi.4.2
Edg. EDGAR 
Why then your other Senses grow imperfectWhy then your other senses grow imperfect KL IV.vi.5
By your eyes anguish.By your eyes' anguish. KL IV.vi.6.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
So may it be indeed.So may it be indeed. KL IV.vi.6.2
Me thinkes thy voyce is alter'd, and thou speak'stMethinks thy voice is altered, and thou speak'stmethinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: Me thinkes
it seems / seemed to me
KL IV.vi.7
In better phrase, and matter then thou did'st.In better phrase and matter than thou didst.phrase (n.)phrasing, language, mode of expressionKL IV.vi.8
matter (n.)subject-matter, content, substance
Edg. EDGAR 
Y'are much deceiu'd: In nothing am I chang'dY'are much deceived. In nothing am I changed KL IV.vi.9
But in my Garments.But in my garments. KL IV.vi.10.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Me thinkes y'are better spoken.Methinks y'are better spoken. KL IV.vi.10.2
Edg. EDGAR 
Come on Sir, / Heere's the place: stand still: how fearefullCome on, sir; here's the place. Stand still! How fearful KL IV.vi.11
And dizie 'tis, to cast ones eyes so low,And dizzy 'tis to cast one's eyes so low! KL IV.vi.12
The Crowes and Choughes, that wing the midway ayreThe crows and choughs that wing the midway airchough (n.)
old form: Choughes
jackdaw
KL IV.vi.13
Shew scarse so grosse as Beetles. Halfe way downeShow scarce so gross as beetles. Halfway downshow (v.)
old form: Shew
appear, look [like], present [as]
KL IV.vi.14
gross (adj.)
old form: grosse
large, big, huge
Hangs one that gathers Sampire: dreadfull Trade:Hangs one that gathers sampire – dreadful trade!sampire, samphire (n.)aromatic marine plant, used in picklesKL IV.vi.15
Me thinkes he seemes no bigger then his head.Methinks he seems no bigger than his head.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: Me thinkes
it seems / seemed to me
KL IV.vi.16
The Fishermen, that walk'd vpon the beachThe fishermen that walk upon the beach KL IV.vi.17
Appeare like Mice: and yond tall Anchoring Barke,Appear like mice, and yon tall anchoring bark,tall (adj.)large, fine, grandKL IV.vi.18
anchoring (adj.)riding at anchor
bark, barque (n.)
old form: Barke
ship, vessel
Diminish'd to her Cocke: her Cocke, a BuoyDiminished to her cock; her cock, a buoycock (n.)small ship's boat, dinghyKL IV.vi.19
Almost too small for sight. The murmuring Surge,Almost too small for sight. The murmuring surge KL IV.vi.20
That on th'vnnumbred idle Pebble chafesThat on th' unnumbered idle pebble chafeschafe (v.)fret, rage, seetheKL IV.vi.21
idle (adj.)inactive, unmoving, inert
unnumbered (adj.)
old form: vnnumbred
innumerable, countless, uncountable
Cannot be heard so high. Ile looke no more,Cannot be heard so high. I'll look no more, KL IV.vi.22
Least my braine turne, and the deficient sightLest my brain turn, and the deficient sightturn (v.)
old form: turne
spin round, whirl about, go round and round
KL IV.vi.23
Topple downe headlong.Topple down headlong. KL IV.vi.24.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Set me where you stand.Set me where you stand. KL IV.vi.24.2
Edg. EDGAR 
Giue me your hand:Give me your hand. You are now within a foot KL IV.vi.25
You are now within a foote of th'extreme Verge:Of th' extreme verge. For all beneath the moon KL IV.vi.26
For all beneath the Moone would I not leape vpright.Would I not leap upright. KL IV.vi.27.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Let go my hand:Let go my hand. KL IV.vi.27.2
Heere Friend's another purse: in it, a IewellHere, friend, 's another purse; in it a jewel KL IV.vi.28
Well worth a poore mans taking. Fayries, and GodsWell worth a poor man's taking. Fairies and gods KL IV.vi.29
Prosper it with thee. Go thou further off,Prosper it with thee! Go thou further off.prosper (v.)make prosperous, give success toKL IV.vi.30
Bid me farewell, and let me heare thee going.Bid me farewell; and let me hear thee going. KL IV.vi.31
Edg. EDGAR 
Now fare ye well, good Sir.Now fare ye well, good sir.fare ... well (int.)goodbye [to an individual]KL IV.vi.32.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
With all my heart.With all my heart. KL IV.vi.32.2
Edg. EDGAR  
(aside) KL IV.vi.33
Why I do trifle thus with his dispaire,Why I do trifle thus with his despair KL IV.vi.33
Is done to cure it.Is done to cure it. KL IV.vi.34.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER  
(kneeling) KL IV.vi.34
O you mighty Gods!O you mighty gods! KL IV.vi.34.2
This world I do renounce,and in your sightsThis world I do renounce, and in your sights KL IV.vi.35
Shake patiently my great affliction off:Shake patiently my great affliction off.patiently (adv.)with endurance, with fortitudeKL IV.vi.36
If I could beare it longer, and not fallIf I could bear it longer and not fall KL IV.vi.37
To quarrell with your great opposelesse willes,To quarrel with your great opposeless wills,opposeless (adj.)
old form: opposelesse
unable to be resisted, unchallengeable
KL IV.vi.38
My snuffe, and loathed part of Nature shouldMy snuff and loathed part of nature shouldpart (n.)remnant, fragment, vestigeKL IV.vi.39
snuff (n.)
old form: snuffe
smouldering candle-end, burnt-out wick
Burne it selfe out. If Edgar liue, O blesse him:Burn itself out. If Edgar live, O, bless him! KL IV.vi.40
Now Fellow, fare thee well.Now, fellow, fare thee well.fare ... well (int.)goodbye [to an individual]KL IV.vi.41.1
Edg. EDGAR 
Gone Sir, farewell:Gone, sir. Farewell. KL IV.vi.41.2
Gloucester throws himself forward KL IV.vi.41
And yet I know not how conceit may robAnd yet I know not how conceit may robconceit (n.)imagination, fancy, witKL IV.vi.42
The Treasury of life, when life it selfeThe treasury of life, when life itselftreasury (n.)money, wealth, richesKL IV.vi.43
Yeelds to the Theft. Had he bin where he thought,Yields to the theft. Had he been where he thought, KL IV.vi.44
By this had thought bin past. Aliue, or dead?By this had thought been past. – Alive or dead? KL IV.vi.45
Hoa, you Sir: Friend, heare you Sir, speake:Ho, you, sir! Friend! Hear you, sir? Speak! –  KL IV.vi.46
Thus might he passe indeed: yet he reuiues.Thus might he pass indeed. Yet he revives – pass (v.)
old form: passe
pass away, pass from life, die
KL IV.vi.47
What are you Sir?What are you, sir? KL IV.vi.48.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Away, and let me dye.Away, and let me die. KL IV.vi.48.2
Edg. EDGAR 
Had'st thou beene ought / But Gozemore, Feathers, Ayre,Hadst thou been aught but gossamer, feathers, air,aught (n.)
old form: ought
anything, [with negative word] nothing
KL IV.vi.49
(So many fathome downe precipitating)So many fathom down precipitating,precipitate (v.)fall headlong, plunge, tumbleKL IV.vi.50
Thou'dst shiuer'd like an Egge: but thou do'st breath:Thou'dst shivered like an egg; but thou dost breathe,shiver (v.)
old form: shiuer'd
smash to pieces, fragment
KL IV.vi.51
Hast heauy substance, bleed'st not, speak'st, art sound,Hast heavy substance, bleed'st not, speak'st, art sound. KL IV.vi.52
Ten Masts at each, make not the altitudeTen masts at each make not the altitude KL IV.vi.53
Which thou hast perpendicularly fell,Which thou hast perpendicularly fell. KL IV.vi.54
Thy life's a Myracle. Speake yet againe.Thy life's a miracle. Speak yet again. KL IV.vi.55
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
But haue I falne, or no?But have I fallen or no? KL IV.vi.56
Edg. EDGAR 
From the dread Somnet of this Chalkie BourneFrom the dread summit of this chalky bourn.dread (adj.)revered, deeply honoured, held in aweKL IV.vi.57
bourn (n.)
old form: Bourne
frontier, destination, boundary
Looke vp a height, the shrill-gorg'd Larke so farreLook up a-height. The shrill-gorged lark so farshrill-gorged (adj.)
old form: shrill-gorg'd
shrill-sounding, with high-pitched voice
KL IV.vi.58
a-height (adv.)
old form: a height
on high, aloft
Cannot be seene, or heard: Do but looke vp.Cannot be seen or heard. Do but look up. KL IV.vi.59
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Alacke, I haue no eyes:Alack, I have no eyes. KL IV.vi.60
Is wretchednesse depriu'd that benefitIs wretchedness deprived that benefit KL IV.vi.61
To end it selfe by death? 'Twas yet some comfort,To end itself by death? 'Twas yet some comfort KL IV.vi.62
When misery could beguile the Tyranrs rage,When misery could beguile the tyrant's ragebeguile (v.)cheat, deceive, trickKL IV.vi.63
And frustrate his proud will.And frustrate his proud will. KL IV.vi.64.1
Edg. EDGAR 
Giue me your arme.Give me your arm. KL IV.vi.64.2
Vp, so: How is't? Feele you your Legges? You stand.Up – so. How is't? Feel you your legs? You stand. KL IV.vi.65
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Too well, too well.Too well, too well. KL IV.vi.66.1
Edg. EDGAR 
This is aboue all strangenesse,This is above all strangeness. KL IV.vi.66.2
Vpon the crowne o'th'Cliffe. What thing was thatUpon the crown o'the cliff what thing was that KL IV.vi.67
Which parted from you?Which parted from you? KL IV.vi.68.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
A poore vnfortunate Beggar.A poor unfortunate beggar. KL IV.vi.68.2
Edg. EDGAR 
As I stood heere below, me thought his eyesAs I stood here below methought his eyesmethinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: me thought
it seems / seemed to me
KL IV.vi.69
Were two full Moones: he had a thousand Noses,Were two full moons; he had a thousand noses, KL IV.vi.70
Hornes wealk'd, and waued like the enraged Sea:Horns welked and waved like the enridged sea.enridged (adj.)thrown into ridges, ripplingKL IV.vi.71
welked (adj.)
old form: wealk'd
twisted, ridged, convoluted
It was some Fiend: Therefore thou happy Father,It was some fiend. Therefore, thou happy father,happy (adj.)fortunate, lucky, favouredKL IV.vi.72
father (n.)old man, venerable sir
Thinke that the cleerest Gods, who make them HonorsThink that the clearest gods, who make them honoursclear (adj.)
old form: cleerest
pure, spotless, faultless
KL IV.vi.73
Of mens Impossibilities, haue preserued thee.Of men's impossibilities, have preserved thee. KL IV.vi.74
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
I do remember now: henceforth Ile beareI do remember now. Henceforth I'll bear KL IV.vi.75
Affliction, till it do cry out it selfeAffliction till it do cry out itself KL IV.vi.76
Enough, enough, and dye. That thing you speake of,‘ Enough, enough,’ and die. That thing you speak of, KL IV.vi.77
I tooke it for a man: often 'twould sayI took it for a man; often 'twould say KL IV.vi.78
The Fiend, the Fiend, he led me to that place.‘ The fiend, the fiend;’ he led me to that place. KL IV.vi.79
Edgar. EDGAR 
Beare free and patient thoughts.Bear free and patient thoughts.patient (adj.)calm, serene, of quiet mindKL IV.vi.80.1
free (adj.)free of worry, untroubled, carefree
Enter Lear.Enter Lear fantastically dressed with wild flowersfantastically (adv.)fancifully, grotesquely, bizarrelyKL IV.vi.80
But who comes heere?But who comes here? KL IV.vi.80.2
The safer sense will ne're accommodateThe safer sense will ne'er accommodatesafe (adj.)sane, sound, mentally balancedKL IV.vi.81
accommodate (v.)furnish, equip
His Master thus.His master thus. KL IV.vi.82
Lear. LEAR 
No, they cannot touch me for crying. I am theNo, they cannot touch me for coining.; I am thetouch (v.)stain, taint, infectKL IV.vi.83
coining (n.)making coins
King himselfe.King himself. KL IV.vi.84
Edg.EDGAR 
O thou side-piercing sight!O thou side-piercing sight!side-piercing (adj.)heart-rending, heart-breaking, harrowingKL IV.vi.85
Lear. LEAR 
Nature's aboue Art, in that respect. Ther's yourNature's above art in that respect. There's yournature (n.)natural order, ungoverned state, way of the world [often personified]KL IV.vi.86
Presse-money. That fellow handles his bow, like apress-money. – That fellow handles his bow like apress-money (n.)
old form: Presse-money
money paid to recruits when conscripted
KL IV.vi.87
Crow-keeper: draw mee a Cloathiers yard. Looke, looke, acrow-keeper. – Draw me a clothier's yard. – Look, look, acrowkeeper, crow-keeper (n.)scarecrow, farmer's boy, person who keeps crows awayKL IV.vi.88
draw (v.)pull out, force out
clothier's yard
old form: Cloathiers yard
yard [36 inches / c.90 cm] by which clothiers measured their cloth
Mouse: peace, peace, this peece of toasted Cheese willmouse! – Peace, peace! this piece of toasted cheese will KL IV.vi.89
doo't. There's my Gauntlet, Ile proue it on a Gyant.do't. – There's my gauntlet; I'll prove it on a giant. – prove (v.)
old form: proue
test, try out, make trial [of]
KL IV.vi.90
gauntlet (n.)armoured glove protecting the hand and wrist
Bring vp the browne Billes. O well flowne Bird: i'th'Bring up the brown bills. – O, well flown, bird! I'the bill (n.)
old form: Billes
[applied to various kinds of long-handled spear-like weapon] halberd; bill-hook
KL IV.vi.91
clout, i'th'clout: Hewgh. Giue the word.clout, i' the clout! Hewgh! – Give the word.clout (n.)[archery] pin fixing a target, cloth patch at the centre of a target; mark, bullKL IV.vi.92
Edg. EDGAR 
Sweet Mariorum.Sweet marjoram. KL IV.vi.93
Lear. LEAR 
Passe.Pass. KL IV.vi.94
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
I know that voice.I know that voice. KL IV.vi.95
He falls to his knees KL IV.iv.95
Lear. LEAR 
Ha! Gonerill with a white beard? They flatter'd meHa! Gonerill with a white beard! They flattered me KL IV.vi.96
like a Dogge, and told mee I had the white hayres in my Beard,like a dog and told me I had the white hairs in my beard. KL IV.vi.97
ere the blacke ones were there. To say I, and no, toere the black ones were there. To say ‘ ay ’ and ‘ no ’ to KL IV.vi.98
euery thing that I said: I, and no too, was no goodeverything that I said! ‘Ay' and ‘no' too was no good KL IV.vi.99
Diuinity. When the raine came to wet me once, and thedivinity. When the rain came to wet me once and thedivinity (n.)
old form: Diuinity
theology
KL IV.vi.100
winde to make me chatter: when the Thunder would notwind to make me chatter; when the thunder would not KL IV.vi.101
peace at my bidding, there I found 'em, there I smeltpeace at my bidding; there I found 'em, there I smeltpeace (v.)be still, keep silent, be calmKL IV.vi.102
'em out. Go too, they are not men o'their words; they'em out. Go to, they are not men o' their words. They KL IV.vi.103
told me, I was euery thing: 'Tis a Lye, I am nottold me I was everything. 'Tis a lie: I am not KL IV.vi.104
Agu-proofe.ague-proof.ague-proof (adj.)immune to fevers, resistant to sicknessKL IV.vi.105
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
The tricke of that voyce, I do well remember:The trick of that voice I do well remember.trick (n.)
old form: tricke
peculiarity, idiosyncrasy, distinguishing trait
KL IV.vi.106
Is't not the King?Is't not the King? KL IV.vi.107.1
Lear. LEAR 
I, euery inch a King.Ay, every inch a king. KL IV.vi.107.2
When I do stare, see how the Subiect quakes.When I do stare see how the subject quakes. KL IV.vi.108
I pardon that mans life. What was thy cause?I pardon that man's life. What was thy cause?cause (n.)court case, legal action, matter before the courtKL IV.vi.109
Adultery?Adultery? KL IV.vi.110
thou shalt not dye: dye for Adultery? No,Thou shalt not die. Die for adultery? No. KL IV.vi.111
the Wren goes too't, and the small gilded FlyThe wren goes to't, and the small gilded flygilded (adj.)glittering, gold-coloured, tinged with goldKL IV.vi.112
Do's letcher in my sight.Does lecher in my sight.lecher (v.)
old form: letcher
copulate, play the part of a lecher
KL IV.vi.113
Let Copulation thriue: / For Glousters bastard SonLet copulation thrive; for Gloucester's bastard son KL IV.vi.114
was kinder to his Father, / Then my DaughtersWas kinder to his father than my daughters KL IV.vi.115
got 'tweene the lawfull sheets.Got 'tween the lawful sheets. KL IV.vi.116
Too't Luxury pell-mell, for I lacke Souldiers.To't, luxury, pell-mell, for I lack soldiers.pell-mell (adv.)in headlong confusion, in disordered hasteKL IV.vi.117
luxury (n.)lust, lechery, lasciviousness
Behold yond simpring Dame,Behold yon simpering dame KL IV.vi.118
whose face betweene her Forkes presages Snow;Whose face between her forks presages snow,presage (v.)signify, indicateKL IV.vi.119
fork (n.)
old form: Forkes
(plural) legs
that minces Vertue, & do's shake the headThat minces virtue and does shake the headmince (v.)suggest by walking pretentiously, give an affected impression ofKL IV.vi.120
to heare of pleasures name.To hear of pleasure's name –  KL IV.vi.121
The Fitchew, nor the soyled Horse goes too'tThe fitchew nor the soiled horse goes to'tsoiled (adj.)
old form: soyled
fully fed with fresh fodder; lively, skittish
KL IV.vi.122
go to it
old form: too
copulate, engage in sexual intercourse
fitchew, fichew, ficho (n.)polecat, skunk; also: prostitute
a more riotous appetite:With a more riotous appetite. KL IV.vi.123
Downe from the waste they are Centaures,Down from the waist they are centaurs,Centaur (n.)creature with the upper half of a man and the rear legs of a horse; reputed for bestial behaviourKL IV.vi.124
though Women all aboue:Though women all above; KL IV.vi.125
but to the Girdle do the Gods inherit,But to the girdle do the gods inherit,inherit (v.)possess, hold power overKL IV.vi.126
girdle (n.)waist
beneath is all the Fiends.Beneath is all the fiends' –  KL IV.vi.127
There's hell, there's darkenes,there is the sulphurousThere's hell, there's darkness, there is the sulphurous KL IV.vi.128
pit; burning, scalding, stench, consumption: Fye, fie, pit – burning, scalding, stench, consumption! Fie, fie,consumption (n.)destruction, being consumed by fireKL IV.vi.129
fie; pah, pah: Giue me an Ounce of Ciuet; good Apothecary fie! Pah, pah! Give me an ounce of civet, good apothecary,civet (n.)
old form: Ciuet
type of musky perfume [obtained form the civet cat]
KL IV.vi.130
apothecary, pothecary (n.)one who prepares and sells medicinal drugs
sweeten my immagination: There's money forsweeten my imagination. There's money for KL IV.vi.131
thee.thee. KL IV.vi.132
He gives flowers KL IV.iv.133
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
O let me kisse that hand.O, let me kiss that hand! KL IV.vi.133
Lear. LEAR 
Let me wipe it first, / It smelles of Mortality.Let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality. KL IV.vi.134
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
O ruin'd peece of Nature, this great worldO ruined piece of nature! This great worldpiece (n.)
old form: peece
specimen, masterpiece
KL IV.vi.135
Shall so weare out to naught. / Do'st thou know me?Shall so wear out to naught. Dost thou know me? KL IV.vi.136
Lear. LEAR 
I remember thine eyes well enough: dost thouI remember thine eyes well enough. Dost thou KL IV.vi.137
squiny at me? No, doe thy worst blinde Cupid, Ile notsquiny at me? No, do thy worst, blind Cupid; I'll notsqueny, squiny (v.)make squintKL IV.vi.138
Cupid (n.)[pron: 'kyoopid] Roman god of love, son of Venus and Mercury; a winged, blindfolded boy with curved bow and arrows
loue. Reade thou this challenge, marke but the penninglove. Read thou this challenge; mark but the penningpenning (n.)handwriting, penmanshipKL IV.vi.139
mark (v.)
old form: marke
note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]
of it.of it. KL IV.vi.140
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Were all thy Letters Sunnes, I could not see.Were all the letters suns, I could not see. KL IV.vi.141
Edg. EDGAR  
(aside) KL IV.iv.142
I would not take this from report, / It is,I would not take this from report. It is;take (v.)accept, believe, trustKL IV.vi.142
and my heart breakes at it.And my heart breaks at it. KL IV.vi.143
Lear. LEAR 
Read.Read. KL IV.vi.144
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
What with the Case of eyes?What, with the case of eyes?case (n.)state, plight, situation, circumstanceKL IV.vi.145
case (n.)holder, covering, receptacle
Lear. LEAR 
Oh ho, are you there with me? No eies in your head,O, ho, are you there with me? No eyes in your head, KL IV.vi.146
nor no mony in your purse? Your eyes are in a heauynor no money in your purse? Your eyes are in a heavyheavy (adj.)
old form: heauy
grave, serious, weighty
KL IV.vi.147
heavy (adj.)
old form: heauy
sorrowful, sad, gloomy
case, your purse in a light, yet you see how this worldcase, your purse in a light; yet you see how this worldcase (n.)state, plight, situation, circumstanceKL IV.vi.148
goes.goes. KL IV.vi.149
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
I see it feelingly.I see it feelingly.feelingly (adv.)in ways that reach the sensesKL IV.vi.150
Lear. LEAR 
What, art mad? A man may see how this world goes,What, art mad? A man may see how this world goes KL IV.vi.151
with no eyes. Looke with thine eares: See how yond Iusticewith no eyes. Look with thine ears. See how yon justice KL IV.vi.152
railes vpon yond simple theefe. Hearke in thine eare: Changerails upon yon simple thief. Hark in thine ear – changesimple (adj.)common, ordinary, average, humbleKL IV.vi.153
rail (v.)
old form: railes
rant, rave, be abusive [about]
places, and handy-dandy, which is the Iustice, which isplaces and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which ishandy-dandychoose, make your choice [from the children's game: choosing which hand holds an object]KL IV.vi.154
the theefe: Thou hast seene a Farmers dogge barke at athe thief? Thou hast seen a farmer's dog bark at a KL IV.vi.155
Beggar?beggar? KL IV.vi.156
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
I Sir.Ay, sir. KL IV.vi.157
Lear. LEAR 
And the Creature run from the Cur: there thouAnd the creature run from the cur? There thoucreature (n.)man, humanKL IV.vi.158
might'st behold the great image of Authoritie, a Dogg'smightst behold the great image of authority: a dog's KL IV.vi.159
obey'd in Office.obeyed in office.office (n.)role, position, place, functionKL IV.vi.160
Thou, Rascall Beadle, hold thy bloody hand:Thou rascal beadle, hold thy bloody hand.beadle (n.)parish constableKL IV.vi.161
why dost thou lash that Whore? Strip thy owne backe,Why dost thou lash that whore? Strip thy own back. KL IV.vi.162
thou hotly lusts to vse her in that kind,Thou hotly lusts to use her in that kindhotly (adv.)ardently, desperately, avidlyKL IV.vi.163
kind (n.)manner, way, state
for which thou whip'st her. The Vsurer hangs the Cozener.For which thou whipp'st her. The usurer hangs the cozener.usurer (n.)
old form: Vsurer
money-lender, one who charges excessive interest
KL IV.vi.164
cozener (n.)cheat, deceiver, fraud
Thorough tatter'd cloathes great Vices do appeare:Thorough tattered clothes great vices do appear; KL IV.vi.165
Robes, and Furr'd gownes hide all. Place sinnes with Gold,Robes and furred gowns hide all. Plate sins with gold, KL IV.vi.166
and the strong Lance of Iustice, hurtlesse breakes:And the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks;hurtless (adj.)
old form: hurtlesse
without hurting, harmlessly
KL IV.vi.167
Arme it in ragges, a Pigmies straw do's pierce it.Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw does pierce it. KL IV.vi.168
None do's offend, none, I say none, Ile able 'em;None does offend, none, I say, none; I'll able 'em.able (v.)strengthen, fortify, give power toKL IV.vi.169
take that of me my Friend, who haue the powerTake that of me, my friend, (giving flowers) who have the power KL IV.vi.170
to seale th'accusers lips. Get thee glasse-eyes,To seal th' accuser's lips. Get thee glass eyes,glass eyes
old form: glasse-eyes
spectacles
KL IV.vi.171
and like a scuruy Politician, seemeAnd like a scurvy politician seempolitician (n.)schemer, intriguer, plotterKL IV.vi.172
scurvy (adj.)
old form: scuruy
contemptible, despicable, wretched
to see the things thou dost not. Now, now, now, now.To see the things thou dost not. Now, now, now, now! KL IV.vi.173
Pull off my Bootes: harder, harder, so.Pull off my boots. Harder, harder – so. KL IV.vi.174
Edg. EDGAR 
O matter, and impertinency mixt,O matter and impertinency mixed,impertinency (n.)irrelevance, nonsense, senselessnessKL IV.vi.175
matter (n.)subject-matter, content, substance
Reason in Madnesse.Reason in madness! KL IV.vi.176
Lear. LEAR 
If thou wilt weepe my Fortunes, take my eyes.If thou wilt weep my fortunes, take my eyes. KL IV.vi.177
I know thee well enough, thy name is Glouster:I know thee well enough; thy name is Gloucester. KL IV.vi.178
Thou must be patient; we came crying hither:Thou must be patient; we came crying hither. KL IV.vi.179
Thou know'st, the first time that we smell the AyreThou knowest the first time that we smell the air KL IV.vi.180
We wawle, and cry. I will preach to thee: Marke.We wawl and cry. I will preach to thee – Mark!wawl (v.)
old form: wawle
yell, howl, bawl
KL IV.vi.181
mark (v.)
old form: Marke
note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]
He takes off his coronet of flowerscoronet (n.)garland, wreath, circlet [of flowers, etc]KL IV.iv.182.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Alacke, alacke the day.Alack, alack the day! KL IV.vi.182
Lear. LEAR 
When we are borne, we cry that we are comeWhen we are born we cry that we are come KL IV.vi.183
To this great stage of Fooles. This a good blocke:To this great stage of fools. – This's a good block.block (n.)[of hats] style, fashion, shape, mouldKL IV.vi.184
It were a delicate stratagem to shooIt were a delicate stratagem to shoedelicate (adj.)cunning, ingenious, skilfulKL IV.vi.185
A Troope of Horse with Felt: Ile put't in proofe,A troop of horse with felt. I'll put 't in proof;proof (n.)
old form: proofe
test, trial
KL IV.vi.186
And when I haue stolne vpon these Son in Lawes,And when I have stolen upon these son-in-laws, KL IV.vi.187
Then kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill.Then kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, kill! KL IV.vi.188
Enter a Gentleman.He throws down his flowers and stamps on them KL IV.vi.189.1
Enter a Gentleman and two attendants. Gloucester KL IV.vi.189.2
and Edgar draw back KL IV.vi.189.3
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
Oh heere he is: lay hand vpon him, Sir.O, here he is. Lay hand upon him. – Sir, KL IV.vi.189
Your most deere Daughter----Your most dear daughter –  KL IV.vi.190
Lear. LEAR 
No rescue? What, a Prisoner? I am euenNo rescue? What, a prisoner? I am even KL IV.vi.191
The Naturall Foole of Fortune. Vse me well,The natural fool of fortune. Use me well;natural fool
old form: Naturall Foole
born fool, simpleton by nature
KL IV.vi.192
You shall haue ransome. Let me haue Surgeons,You shall have ransom. Let me have surgeons;surgeon (n.)doctor, physicianKL IV.vi.193
I am cut to'th'Braines.I am cut to the brains. KL IV.vi.194.1
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
You shall haue any thing.You shall have anything. KL IV.vi.194.2
Lear. LEAR 
No Seconds? All my selfe?No seconds? All myself?second (n.)supporter, helper, championKL IV.vi.195
Why, this would make a man, a man of SaltWhy, this would make a man a man of salt,salt (n.)salt tearsKL IV.vi.196
To vse his eyes for Garden water-pots.To use his eyes for garden water-pots, KL IV.vi.197
I wil die brauely,Ay, and laying autumn's dust. I will die bravely,bravely (adv.)
old form: brauely
in fine clothes, splendidly dressed
KL IV.vi.198
Like a smugge Bridegroome. What? I will be Iouiall:Like a smug bridegroom. What! I will be jovial.jovial (adj.)
old form: Iouiall
majestic, like Jove [Jupiter]
KL IV.vi.199
smug (adj.)
old form: smugge
neat, spruce, trim
Come, come, I am a King, Masters, know you that?Come, come, I am a king; masters, know you that? KL IV.vi.200
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
You are a Royall one, and we obey you.You are a royal one, and we obey you. KL IV.vi.201
Lear. LEAR 
Then there's life in't. Come, and you get it, / You shallThen there's life in't. Nay, and you get it you shall KL IV.vi.202
get it by running: Sa, sa, sa, sa. get it by running. Sa, sa, sa, sa. KL IV.vi.203
Exit.Exit running, followed by attendants KL IV.vi.203
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
A sight most pittifull in the meanest wretch,A sight most pitiful in the meanest wretch,mean (adj.)of low rank, inferior in position, less importantKL IV.vi.204
Past speaking ofin a King. Thou hast a DaughterPast speaking of in a king. – Thou hast one daughter KL IV.vi.205
Who redeemes Nature from the generall curseWho redeems nature from the general cursegeneral (adj.)
old form: generall
common, of everyone, public
KL IV.vi.206
Which twaine haue brought her to.Which twain have brought her to. KL IV.vi.207
Edg. EDGAR  
(coming forward) KL IV.iv.208
Haile gentle Sir.Hail, gentle sir.gentle (adj.)well-born, honourable, nobleKL IV.vi.208.1
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
Sir, speed you: what's your will?Sir, speed you; what's your will? KL IV.vi.208.2
Edg. EDGAR 
Do you heare ought (Sir) of a Battell toward.Do you hear aught, sir, of a battle toward?toward (adv.)impending, forthcoming, in preparationKL IV.vi.209
aught (n.)
old form: ought
anything, [with negative word] nothing
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
Most sure, and vulgar: / Euery one heares that,Most sure and vulgar. Everyone hears thatsure (adj.)certain, definite, reliableKL IV.vi.210
vulgar (adj.)generally known, commonly acknowledged
which can distinguish sound.Which can distinguish sound. KL IV.vi.211.1
Edg. EDGAR 
But by your fauour:But, by your favour, KL IV.vi.211.2
How neere's the other Army?How near's the other army? KL IV.vi.212
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
Neere, and on speedy foot: the maine descryNear, and on speedy foot. The main descrydescry (n.)sighting, spotting, discovery of what is distantKL IV.vi.213
Stands on the hourely thought.Stands on the hourly thought.stand (v.)continue, remain, wait, stay putKL IV.vi.214.1
Edg. EDGAR 
I thanke you Sir, that's all.I thank you, sir; that's all. KL IV.vi.214.2
Gent. GENTLEMAN 
Though that the Queen on special cause is hereThough that the Queen on special cause is here,cause (n.)reason, motive, groundKL IV.vi.215
Her Army is mou'd on. Her army is moved on. KL IV.vi.216.1
Edg. EDGAR 
I thanke you Sir.I thank you, sir. KL IV.vi.216.2
Exit.Exit Gentleman KL IV.vi.216
Glou. GLOUCESTER  
(coming forward) KL IV.vi.217
You euer gentle Gods, take my breath from me,You ever-gentle gods, take my breath from me. KL IV.vi.217
Let not my worser Spirit tempt me againeLet not my worser spirit tempt me againworse (adj.)evil, harmful, wickedKL IV.vi.218
To dye before you please.To die before you please. KL IV.vi.219.1
Edg. EDGAR 
Well pray you Father.Well pray you, father. KL IV.vi.219.2
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Now good sir, what are you?Now, good sir, what are you? KL IV.vi.220
Edg. EDGAR 
A most poore man, made tame to Fortunes blowsA most poor man made tame to fortune's blows,tame (adj.)submissive, resigned, habituatedKL IV.vi.221
Who, by the Art of knowne, and feeling sorrowes,Who, by the art of known and feeling sorrows,feeling (adj.)deeply felt, heartfelt, acutely sensedKL IV.vi.222
art (n.)knowledge, mastery, acquisition
Am pregnant to good pitty. Giue me your hand,Am pregnant to good pity. Give me your hand,pregnant (adj.)well-disposed, ready, inclined, receptiveKL IV.vi.223
Ile leade you to some biding.I'll lead you to some biding.biding (n.)place to stay, dwellingKL IV.vi.224.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Heartie thankes:Hearty thanks; KL IV.vi.224.2
The bountie, and the benizon of HeauenThe bounty and the benison of heavenbenison (n.)
old form: benizon
blessing, benediction
KL IV.vi.225
To boot, and boot.To boot, and boot!boot (n.)booty, plunder, spoilsKL IV.vi.226.1
boot, toin addition, as well
Enter Steward.Enter Oswald KL IV.vi.226
Stew. OSWALD 
A proclaim'd prize: most happieA proclaimed prize! Most happy!proclaimed (adj.)publicly declared [as an outlaw], announced by proclamationKL IV.vi.226.2
happy (adj.)fortunate, lucky, favoured
That eyelesse head of thine, was first fram'd fleshThat eyeless head of thine was first framed fleshframe (v.)
old form: fram'd
fashion, make, form, create
KL IV.vi.227
To raise my fortunes. Thou old, vnhappy Traitor,To raise my fortunes. Thou old unhappy traitor,unhappy (adj.)
old form: vnhappy
hapless, miserable, wretched
KL IV.vi.228
Breefely thy selfe remember: the Sword is outBriefly thyself remember; the sword is outremember (v.)recollect, recall, call to mindKL IV.vi.229
That must destroy thee.That must destroy thee. KL IV.vi.230.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Now let thy friendly handNow let thy friendly hand KL IV.vi.230.2
Put strength enough too't.Put strength enough to't. KL IV.vi.231.1
Edgar intervenes KL IV.vi.231
Stew. OSWALD 
Wherefore, bold Pezant,Wherefore, bold peasant, KL IV.vi.231.2
Dar'st thou support a publish'd Traitor? Hence,Darest thou support a published traitor? Hence,published (adj.)
old form: publish'd
proclaimed, publicly announced
KL IV.vi.232
Least that th'infection of his fortune takeLest that th' infection of his fortune take KL IV.vi.233
Like hold on thee. Let go his arme.Like hold on thee. Let go his arm!like (adj.)same, similar, alike, equalKL IV.vi.234
Edg. EDGAR 
Chill not let go Zir, / Without vurther 'casion.Ch'ill not let go, zir, without vurther 'cagion.'chill (pron. + v.)dialect version of ‘I will’KL IV.vi.235
occasion (n.)ground, reason, cause, matter
zir (n.)dialect variant of ‘sir’
'cagion, 'casion (n.)dialect version of ‘occasion’ [= cause]
Stew. OSWALD 
Let go Slaue, or thou dy'st.Let go, slave, or thou diest! KL IV.vi.236
Edg. EDGAR 
Good Gentleman goe your gate, and let poore volkeGood gentleman, go your gait and let poor volkgate (n.)way, road, pathKL IV.vi.237
passe: and 'chud ha'bin zwaggerd out of my life,pass. And 'choud ha' bin zwaggered out of my life,swagger (v.)
old form: zwaggerd
force by blustering language, bully
KL IV.vi.238
'chould (v.)
old form: 'chud
dialect version of ‘I should’
'twould not ha'bin zo long as 'tis, by a vortnight. Nay,'twould not ha' bin zo long as 'tis by a vortnight. Nay,zo (adv.)dialect form of ‘so’KL IV.vi.239
come not neere th'old man: keepe out che vor'ye, or icecome not near th' old man; keep out, che vor' ye, or I'ceche (pron.)dialect version of ‘I’KL IV.vi.240
'ce (v.)dialect version of ‘shall’
vor (v.)dialect version of ‘warn’
try whither your Costard, or my Ballow be the harder;try whether your costard or my ballow be the harder.ballow (n.)cudgel, stickKL IV.vi.241
costard (n.)[jocular: large kind of apple] head
chill be plaine with you.'Chill be plain with you. KL IV.vi.242
Stew. OSWALD 
Out Dunghill.Out, dunghill! KL IV.vi.243
Edg. EDGAR 
Chill picke your teeth Zir: come, no matter vor'Chill pick your teeth, zir. Come; no matter vorzir (n.)dialect variant of ‘sir’KL IV.vi.244
your foynes.your foins.foin (n.)
old form: foynes
sword-thrust
KL IV.vi.245
They fight KL IV.vi.246
Stew. OSWALD 
Slaue thou hast slaine me: Villain, take my purse;Slave, thou hast slain me. Villain, take my purse. KL IV.vi.246
If euer thou wilt thriue, bury my bodie,If ever thou wilt thrive, bury my body KL IV.vi.247
And giue the Letters which thou find'st about me,And give the letters which thou find'st about me KL IV.vi.248
To Edmund Earle of Glouster: seeke him outTo Edmund, Earl of Gloucester. Seek him out KL IV.vi.249
Vpon the English party. Oh vntimelyUpon the English party. O, untimelyparty (n.)side, faction, campKL IV.vi.250
death, death.Death! – Death –  KL IV.vi.251
He dies KL IV.vi.251
Edg. EDGAR 
I know thee well. A seruiceable Villaine,I know thee well: a serviceable villain,serviceable (adj.)
old form: seruiceable
diligent, subservient, ready to do anything
KL IV.vi.252
As duteous to the vices of thy Mistris,As duteous to the vices of thy mistressduteous (adj.)dutiful, obedient, of allegianceKL IV.vi.253
As badnesse would desire.As badness would desire. KL IV.vi.254.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
What, is he dead?What, is he dead? KL IV.vi.254.2
Edg. EDGAR 
Sit you downe Father: rest you.Sit you down, father; rest you. –  KL IV.vi.255
Let's see these Pockets; the Letters that he speakes ofLet's see these pockets. The letters that he speaks of KL IV.vi.256
May be my Friends: hee's dead; I am onely sorryMay be my friends. He's dead. I am only sorry KL IV.vi.257
He had no other Deathsman. Let vs see:He had no other deathsman. Let us see.deathsman (n.)executionerKL IV.vi.258
Leaue gentle waxe, and manners: blame vs notLeave, gentle wax; and manners blame us not;gentle (adj.)courteous, friendly, kindKL IV.vi.259
To know our enemies mindes, we rip their hearts,To know our enemies' minds we rip their hearts; KL IV.vi.260
Their Papers is more lawfull.Their papers is more lawful. KL IV.vi.261
Reads the Letter.(He reads the letter) KL IV.vi.262
LEt our reciprocall vowes be remembred. You haue manieLet our reciprocal vows be remembered. You have many KL IV.vi.262
opportunities to cut him off: if your will want not, time andopportunities to cut him off; if your will want not, time andwant (v.)fall short [of], be deficient [in]KL IV.vi.263
place will be fruitfully offer'd. There is nothing done. If heeplace will be fruitfully offered. There is nothing done if hefruitfully (adv.)plentifully, amply, abundantlyKL IV.vi.264
returne the Conqueror, then am I the Prisoner, and his bed, return the conqueror. Then am I the prisoner, and his bed KL IV.vi.265
my Gaole, from the loathed warmth whereof, deliuer me, and my gaol; from the loathed warmth whereof deliver me and KL IV.vi.266
supply the place for your Labour.supply the place for your labour. KL IV.vi.267
Your (Wife, so I would say) affectionate Seruant.Your – wife, so I would say – affectionate servant,  KL IV.vi.268
Gonerill.Gonerill. KL IV.vi.269
Oh indinguish'd space of Womans will,O indistinguished space of woman's will!indistinguished, undistinguished (adj.)
old form: indinguish'd
limitless, unimaginable, beyond apprehension
KL IV.vi.270
will (n.)lust, sexual desire, passion
A plot vpon her vertuous Husbands life,A plot upon her virtuous husband's life, KL IV.vi.271
And the exchange my Brother: heere, in the sandsAnd the exchange, my brother! Here in the sands KL IV.vi.272
Thee Ile rake vp, the poste vnsanctifiedThee I'll rake up, the post unsanctifiedpost (n.)
old form: poste
express messenger, courier
KL IV.vi.273
rake up (v.)
old form: vp
bury, cover up
unsanctified (adj.)
old form: vnsanctified
unholy, wicked, ungodly
Of murtherous Letchers: and in the mature time,Of murderous lechers; and in the mature timemature (adj.)ready, ripe, setKL IV.vi.274
With this vngracious paper strike the sightWith this ungracious paper strike the sightungracious (adj.)
old form: vngracious
wicked, without grace, profane
KL IV.vi.275
Of the death-practis'd Duke: for him 'tis well,Of the death-practised Duke. For him 'tis welldeath-practised (adj.)
old form: death-practis'd
whose death has been plotted
KL IV.vi.276
That of thy death, and businesse, I can tell.That of thy death and business I can tell. KL IV.vi.277
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
The King is mad: / How stiffe is my vilde senseThe King is mad; how stiff is my vile sense,sense (n.)feeling, sensibility, capacity to feelKL IV.vi.278
stiff (adj.)
old form: stiffe
unresponsive, unbending, stubborn
vile, vild (adj.)
old form: vilde
shameful, contemptible, wretched
That I stand vp, and haue ingenious feelingThat I stand up and have ingenious feelingingenious (adj.)alert, fully conscious, intelligent, capableKL IV.vi.279
Of my huge Sorrowes? Better I were distract,Of my huge sorrows! Better I were distract;distract (adj.)deranged, mad, mentally disturbedKL IV.vi.280
So should my thoughts be seuer'd from my greefes,So should my thoughts be severed from my griefs, KL IV.vi.281
And woes, by wrong imaginations looseAnd woes by wrong imaginations loseimagination (n.)delusion, fancy, imaginingKL IV.vi.282
The knowledge of themselues.The knowledge of themselves. KL IV.vi.283.1
Drum afarre off.Drum afar off KL IV.vi.283
Edg. EDGAR 
Giue me your hand:Give me your hand. KL IV.vi.283.2
Farre off methinkes I heare the beaten Drumme.Far off methinks I hear the beaten drum.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: methinkes
it seems / seemed to me
KL IV.vi.284
Come Father, Ile bestow you with a Friend. Come, father, I'll bestow you with a friend.bestow (v.)accommodate, lodge, quarterKL IV.vi.285
Exeunt.Exeunt KL IV.vi.285
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