King Lear
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Enter Cornwall, Regan, Gonerill, Bastard, and Enter Cornwall, Regan, Gonerill, Edmund, and KL III.vii.1.1
Seruants.servants KL III.vii.1.2
Corn. CORNWALL 
(to Gonerill) KL III.vii.1.3
Poste speedily to my Lord yourPost speedily to my lord yourpost (v.)hasten, speed, ride fastKL III.vii.1
husband, shew him this Letter, the Army of France ishusband, show him this letter. The army of France is KL III.vii.2
landed: seeke out the Traitor Glouster. landed. – Seek out the traitor Gloucester. KL III.vii.3
Exeunt some servants KL III.vii.3
Reg. REGAN 
Hang him instantly.Hang him instantly! KL III.vii.4
Gon. GONERILL 
Plucke out his eyes.Pluck out his eyes! KL III.vii.5
Corn. CORNWALL 
Leaue him to my displeasure. Edmond, keepeLeave him to my displeasure. Edmund, keep KL III.vii.6
you our Sister company: the reuenges wee are bound toyou our sister company; the revenges we are bound tobound (adj.)ready, preparedKL III.vii.7
take vppon your Traitorous Father, are not fit for your beholding.take upon your traitorous father are not fit for your beholding.beholding (n.)sightKL III.vii.8
Aduice the Duke where you are going, to a most Advise the Duke where you are going to a mostadvise, avise (v.)
old form: Aduice
warn, counsel, caution
KL III.vii.9
festiuate preparation: we are bound to the like. Ourfestinate preparation; we are bound to the like. Ourbound (adj.)obliged, required, forcedKL III.vii.10
like, thethe same
festinate (adj.)
old form: festiuate
speedy, hasty, hurried
Postes shall be swift, and intelligent betwixt vs. Farewellposts shall be swift and intelligent betwixt us. Farewell,intelligent (adj.)bearing intelligence, giving inside informationKL III.vii.11
post (n.)
old form: Postes
express messenger, courier
deere Sister, farewell my Lord of Glouster.dear sister. Farewell, my lord of Gloucester. KL III.vii.12
Enter Steward.Enter Oswald KL III.vii.13
How now? Where's the King?How now? Where's the King? KL III.vii.13
Stew. OSWALD 
My Lord of Glouster hath conuey'd him henceMy lord of Gloucester hath conveyed him hence. KL III.vii.14
Some fiue or six and thirty of his KnightsSome five- or six-and-thirty of his knights, KL III.vii.15
Hot Questrists after him, met him at gate,Hot questrists after him, met him at gate,questrist (n.)one who goes in quest of another, seekerKL III.vii.16
hot (adj.)enthusiastic, ardent, eager, keen
Who, with some other of the Lords, dependants,Who with some other of the lord's dependants KL III.vii.17
Are gone with him toward Douer; where they boastAre gone with him toward Dover, where they boast KL III.vii.18
To haue well armed Friends.To have well-armed friends. KL III.vii.19
Corn. CORNWALL 
Get horses for your Mistris.Get horses for your mistress. KL III.vii.20
ExitExit Oswald KL III.vii.20
Gon. GONERILL 
Farewell sweet Lord, and Sister. Farewell, sweet lord, and sister. KL III.vii.21
Corn. CORNWALL 
Edmund farewell:Edmund, farewell. KL III.vii.22.1
Exeunt Gonerill and Edmund KL III.vii.22
go seek the Traitor Gloster,Go seek the traitor Gloucester. KL III.vii.22.2
Pinnion him like a Theefe, bring him before vs:Pinion him like a thief; bring him before us. KL III.vii.23
Exeunt servants KL III.vii.23
Though well we may not passe vpon his lifeThough well we may not pass upon his lifepass (v.)
old form: passe
pass sentence, adjudicate
KL III.vii.24
Without the forme of Iustice: yet our powerWithout the form of justice, yet our powerpower (n.)exercise of power, authoritative actionKL III.vii.25
form (n.)
old form: forme
formal procedure, due process, formality
Shall do a curt'sie to our wrath, which menShall do a curtsy to our wrath, which mencurtsy, curtsey (n.)
old form: curt'sie
act of courteous respect, deferential action, bow
KL III.vii.26
May blame, but not comptroll.May blame but not control.control (v.)curb, restrain, hold backKL III.vii.27.1
Enter Gloucester, and Seruants.Enter Gloucester, brought in by two or three servants KL III.vii.27
Who's there? the Traitor?Who's there? The traitor? KL III.vii.27.2
Reg. REGAN 
Ingratefull Fox, 'tis he.Ingrateful fox, 'tis he!ingrateful (adj.)
old form: Ingratefull
ungrateful, unappreciative
KL III.vii.28
Corn. CORNWALL 
Binde fast his corky armes.Bind fast his corky arms.corky (adj.)dry, withered, saplessKL III.vii.29
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
What meanes your Graces? / Good my Friends considerWhat means your graces? Good my friends, consider KL III.vii.30
you are my Ghests: / Do me no foule play, Friends.You are my guests. Do me no foul play, friends. KL III.vii.31
Corn. CORNWALL 
Binde him I say.Bind him, I say. KL III.vii.32.1
Servants tie his hands KL III.vii.32
Reg. REGAN 
Hard, hard: O filthy Traitor.Hard, hard! O filthy traitor! KL III.vii.32.2
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Vnmercifull Lady, as you are, I'me none.Unmerciful lady as you are, I'm none. KL III.vii.33
Corn. CORNWALL 
To this Chaire binde him, / Villaine, thou shalt finde.To this chair bind him. Villain, thou shalt find –  KL III.vii.34
Regan plucks his beard KL III.vii.35.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
By the kinde Gods, 'tis most ignobly doneBy the kind gods, 'tis most ignobly doneignobly (adv.)dishonourably, shamefully, badlyKL III.vii.35
To plucke me by the Beard.To pluck me by the beard. KL III.vii.36
Reg. REGAN 
So white, and such a Traitor?So white, and such a traitor! KL III.vii.37.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Naughty Ladie,Naughty lady,naughty (adj.)wicked, evil, vileKL III.vii.37.2
These haires which thou dost rauish from my chinThese hairs which thou dost ravish from my chinravish (v.)
old form: rauish
snatch from, tear from
KL III.vii.38
Will quicken and accuse thee. I am your Host,Will quicken and accuse thee. I am your host;quicken (v.)revive, rejuvenate, give life [to]KL III.vii.39
With Robbers hands, my hospitable fauoursWith robbers' hands my hospitable favoursfavour (n.)[facial] appearance, countenance, features, looksKL III.vii.40
You should not ruffle thus. What will you do?You should not ruffle thus. What will you do?ruffle (v.)handle roughly, treat with outrageKL III.vii.41
Corn. CORNWALL 
Come Sir. / What Letters had you late from France?Come, sir; what letters had you late from France? KL III.vii.42
Reg. REGAN 
Be simple answer'd, for we know the truth.Be simple-answered, for we know the truth.simple-answered (adj.)
old form: simple answer'd
straight in reply, direct in answer
KL III.vii.43
Corn. CORNWALL 
And what confederacie haue you with the Traitors,And what confederacy have you with the traitors KL III.vii.44
late footed in the Kingdome?Late footed in the kingdom – late (adv.)recently, a little while ago / beforeKL III.vii.45
foot (v.)gain a foothold, land
Reg. REGAN 
To whose hands/ You haue sent the Lunaticke King: Speake.To whose hands you have sent the lunatic King? Speak! KL III.vii.46
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
I haue a Letter guessingly set downeI have a letter guessingly set downguessingly (adv.)as conjecture, by guessworkKL III.vii.47
Which came from one that's of a newtrall heart,Which came from one that's of a neutral heart KL III.vii.48
And not from one oppos'd.And not from one opposed. KL III.vii.49.1
Corn. CORNWALL 
Cunning.Cunning. KL III.vii.49.2
Reg. REGAN 
And false.And false.false (adj.)treacherous, traitorous, perfidiousKL III.vii.49.3
Corn. CORNWALL 
Where hast thou sent the King?Where hast thou sent the King? KL III.vii.50.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
To Douer.To Dover. KL III.vii.50.2
Reg. REGAN 
Wherefore to Douer? Was't thou not charg'd at perill.Wherefore to Dover? Wast thou not charged at peril – charge (v.)
old form: charg'd
order, command, enjoin
KL III.vii.51
peril, at
old form: perill
at risk of punishment
Corn. CORNWALL 
Wherefore to Douer? Let him answer that.Wherefore to Dover? Let him answer that. KL III.vii.52
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
I am tyed to'th'Stake, / And I must stand the Course.I am tied to the stake, and I must stand the course.course (n.)course of action, way of proceedingKL III.vii.53
course (n.)[in bear-baiting] attack by a set of dogs
stand (v.)withstand, endure, stand up to
Reg. REGAN 
Wherefore to Douer?Wherefore to Dover? KL III.vii.54
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Because I would not see thy cruell NailesBecause I would not see thy cruel nails KL III.vii.55
Plucke out his poore old eyes: nor thy fierce Sister,Pluck out his poor old eyes; nor thy fierce sister KL III.vii.56
In his Annointed flesh, sticke boarish phangs.In his anointed flesh rash boarish fangs.rash (v.)force, drive; or: slash withKL III.vii.57
The Sea, with such a storme as his bare head,The sea, with such a storm as his bare head KL III.vii.58
In Hell-blacke-night indur'd, would haue buoy'd vpIn hell-black night endured, would have buoyed upbuoy up (v.)
old form: buoy'd vp
surge, swell, rise up
KL III.vii.59
And quench'd the Stelled fires:And quenched the stelled fires;stelled (adj.)starry, stellar, heavenlyKL III.vii.60
Yet poore old heart, he holpe the Heauens to raine.Yet, poor old heart, he holp the heavens to rain. KL III.vii.61
If Wolues had at thy Gate howl'd that sterne time,If wolves had at thy gate howled that dern timedern, dearn, dearne (adj.)dread, dark, sombreKL III.vii.62
Thou should'st haue said, good Porter turne the Key:Thou shouldst have said, ‘ Good porter, turn the key;  KL III.vii.63
All Cruels else subscribe: but I shall seeAll cruels else subscribe.’ But I shall seecruel (n.)[unclear meaning] form of cruelty, cruel creatureKL III.vii.64
subscribe (v.)concur, consent, give assent
The winged Vengeance ouertake such Children.The winged Vengeance overtake such children. KL III.vii.65
Corn. CORNWALL 
See't shalt thou neuer. Fellowes hold ye Chaire,See't shalt thou never. Fellows, hold the chair. KL III.vii.66
Vpon these eyes of thine, Ile set my foote.Upon these eyes of thine I'll set my foot. KL III.vii.67
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
He that will thinke to liue, till he be old,He that will think to live till he be old, KL III.vii.68
Giue me some helpe.----O cruell! O you Gods.Give me some help! – O, cruel! O, you gods! KL III.vii.69
Reg. REGAN 
One side will mocke another: Th'other too.One side will mock another. Th' other too! KL III.vii.70
Corn. CORNWALL 
If you see vengeance.If you see Vengeance –  KL III.vii.71.1
Seru. FIRST SERVANT 
Hold your hand, my Lord:Hold your hand, my lord! KL III.vii.71.2
I haue seru'd you euer since I was a Childe:I have served you ever since I was a child; KL III.vii.72
But better seruice haue I neuer done you,But better service have I never done you KL III.vii.73
Then now to bid you hold.Than now to bid you hold. KL III.vii.74.1
Reg. REGAN 
How now, you dogge?How now, you dog! KL III.vii.74.2
Ser. FIRST SERVANT 
If you did weare a beard vpon your chin,If you did wear a beard upon your chin KL III.vii.75
I'ld shake it on this quarrell.I'd shake it on this quarrel.shake (v.)seize, grasp, moveKL III.vii.76.1
(Cornwall draws his sword) KL III.vii.76
What do you meane?What do you mean?mean (v.)intend, purpose, mean to actKL III.vii.76.2
Corn. CORNWALL 
My Villaine?My villain!villain (n.)
old form: Villaine
serf, servant, bondman
KL III.vii.77
He lunges at him KL III.vii.78.1
Seru.FIRST SERVANT  
(drawing his sword) KL III.vii.78.2
Nay then come on, and take the chance of anger.Nay then, come on, and take the chance of anger.chance (n.)fortune, lot, destinyKL III.vii.78
He wounds Cornwall KL III.vii.79.1
Reg. REGAN 
Giue me thy Sword. A pezant stand vp thus?Give me thy sword. A peasant stand up thus!stand up (v.)confront boldly, make a standKL III.vii.79
Killes him.She takes a sword and runs at him behind KL III.vii.80
Ser. FIRST SERVANT 
Oh I am slaine: my Lord, you haue one eye leftO, I am slain! My lord, you have one eye left KL III.vii.80
To see some mischefe on him. Oh.To see some mischief on him. O!mischief (n.)
old form: mischefe
harm, injury, damage
KL III.vii.81
He dies KL III.vii.81
Corn. CORNWALL 
Lest it see more, preuent it; Out vilde gelly:Lest it see more, prevent it. Out, vile jelly! KL III.vii.82
Where is thy luster now?Where is thy lustre now? KL III.vii.83
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
All datke and comfortlesse? / Where's my Sonne Edmund?All dark and comfortless. Where's my son Edmund? KL III.vii.84
Edmund, enkindle all the sparkes of NatureEdmund, enkindle all the sparks of nature KL III.vii.85
To quit this horrid acte.To quit this horrid act.quit (v.)avenge, requite, take vengeance [on]KL III.vii.86.1
Reg. REGAN 
Out treacherous Villaine,Out, treacherous villain! KL III.vii.86.2
Thou call'st on him, that hates thee. It was heThou call'st on him that hates thee. It was he KL III.vii.87
That made the ouerture of thy Treasons to vs:That made the overture of thy treasons to us;overture (n.)
old form: ouerture
disclosure, revelation
KL III.vii.88
Who is too good to pitty thee.Who is too good to pity thee. KL III.vii.89
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
O my Follies! then Edgar was abus'd,O my follies! Then Edgar was abused.abuse (v.)
old form: abus'd
misuse, maltreat, treat badly, wrong
KL III.vii.90
Kinde Gods, forgiue me that, and prosper him.Kind gods, forgive me that and prosper him. KL III.vii.91
Reg. REGAN 
Go thrust him out at gates, and let him smellGo thrust him out at gates and let him smell KL III.vii.92
His way to Douer. His way to Dover. KL III.vii.93.1
Exit with Glouster.Exit a servant with Gloucester KL III.vii.93
How is't my Lord? How looke you?How is't, my lord? How look you? KL III.vii.93.2
Corn. CORNWALL 
I haue receiu'd a hurt: Follow me Lady;I have received a hurt. Follow me, lady. KL III.vii.94
Turne out that eyelesse Villaine: throw this SlaueTurn out that eyeless villain. Throw this slave KL III.vii.95
Vpon the Dunghill: Regan, I bleed apace,Upon the dunghill. Regan, I bleed apace.apace (adv.)quickly, speedily, at a great rateKL III.vii.96
Vntimely comes this hurt. Giue me your arme. Untimely comes this hurt. Give me your arm.untimely (adv.)
old form: Vntimely
inopportunely, at a bad time
KL III.vii.97
Exit Cornwall, supported by Regan KL III.vii.97
SECOND SERVANT 
I'll never care what wickedness I do KL III.vii.98
If this man come to good. KL III.vii.99.1
THIRD SERVANT 
If she live long, KL III.vii.99.2
And in the end meet the old course of death,course (n.)habit, custom, practise, normal procedureKL III.vii.100
old (adj.)normal, usual, commonplace
Women will all turn monsters. KL III.vii.101
SECOND SERVANT 
Let's follow the old Earl, and get the Bedlambedlam (n.)mad beggar, madman/woman, lunaticKL III.vii.102
To lead him where he would; his roguish madnessroguish (adj.)characteristic of vagabonds, wildKL III.vii.103
Allows itself to anything.allow (v.)permit to indulge, surrender, give overKL III.vii.104
THIRD SERVANT 
Go thou. I'll fetch some flax and whites of eggs KL III.vii.105
To apply to his bleeding face. Now heaven help him! KL III.vii.106
Exeunt,Exeunt by opposite doors KL III.vii.106
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