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Vp to the breach, you Dogges; auaunt you Up to the breach, you dogs! Avaunt, youH5 III.ii.20
Cullions. cullions!H5 III.ii.21
To the Mynes? Tell you the Duke, it is not so To the mines? Tell you the Duke, it is not soH5 III.ii.56
good to come to the Mynes: for looke you, the Mynes is good to come to the mines, for, look you, the mines isH5 III.ii.57
not according to the disciplines of the Warre; the not according to the disciplines of the war. TheH5 III.ii.58
concauities of it is not sufficient: for looke you, th' athuersarie, concavities of it is not sufficient; for, look you, th' athversary,H5 III.ii.59
you may discusse vnto the Duke, looke you, is digt himselfe you may discuss unto the Duke, look you, is digt himselfH5 III.ii.60
foure yard vnder the Countermines: by Cheshu, I four yard under the countermines. By Cheshu, IH5 III.ii.61
thinke a will plowe vp all, if there is not better directions. think 'a will plow up all, if there is not better directions.H5 III.ii.62
It is Captaine Makmorrice, is it not? It is Captain Macmorris, is it not?H5 III.ii.66
By Cheshu he is an Asse, as in the World, I By Cheshu, he is an ass, as in the world; IH5 III.ii.68
will verifie as much in his Beard: he ha's no more will verify as much in his beard. He has no moreH5 III.ii.69
directions in the true disciplines of the Warres, looke you, directions in the true disciplines of the wars, look you,H5 III.ii.70
of the Roman disciplines, then is a Puppy-dog. of the Roman disciplines, than is a puppy-dog.H5 III.ii.71
Captaine Iamy is a maruellous falorous Gentleman, Captain Jamy is a marvellous falorous gentleman,H5 III.ii.74
that is certain, and of great expedition that is certain, and of great expedition andH5 III.ii.75
and knowledge in th' aunchiant Warres, vpon my particular knowledge in th' aunchient wars, upon my particularH5 III.ii.76
knowledge of his directions: by Cheshu he will maintaine knowledge of his directions. By Cheshu, he will maintainH5 III.ii.77
his Argument as well as any Militarie man in the World, in his argument as well as any military man in the world, inH5 III.ii.78
the disciplines of the Pristine Warres of the Romans. the disciplines of the pristine wars of the Romans.H5 III.ii.79
Godden to your Worship, good Captaine Good-e'en to your worship, good CaptainH5 III.ii.81
Iames. James.H5 III.ii.82
Captaine Mackmorrice, I beseech you now, will Captain Macmorris, I beseech you now, willH5 III.ii.91
you voutsafe me, looke you, a few disputations with you, you voutsafe me, look you, a few disputations with you,H5 III.ii.92
as partly touching or concerning the disciplines of the as partly touching or concerning the disciplines of theH5 III.ii.93
Warre, the Roman Warres, in the way of Argument, looke you, war, the Roman wars, in the way of argument, look you,H5 III.ii.94
and friendly communication: partly to satisfie my and friendly communication? – partly to satisfy myH5 III.ii.95
Opinion, and partly for the satisfaction, looke you, of my opinion, and partly for the satisfaction, look you, of myH5 III.ii.96
Mind: as touching the direction of the Militarie discipline, mind – as touching the direction of the military discipline,H5 III.ii.97
that is the Point. that is the point.H5 III.ii.98
Captaine Mackmorrice, I thinke, looke you, vnder Captain Macmorris, I think, look you, underH5 III.ii.116
your correction, there is not many of your Nation. your correction, there is not many of your nation – H5 III.ii.117
Looke you, if you take the matter otherwise Look you, if you take the matter otherwiseH5 III.ii.121
then is meant, Captaine Mackmorrice, peraduenture I shall than is meant, Captain Macmorris, peradventure I shallH5 III.ii.122
thinke you doe not vse me with that affabilitie, as in think you do not use me with that affability as inH5 III.ii.123
discretion you ought to vse me, looke you, being as good a discretion you ought to use me, look you, being as good aH5 III.ii.124
man as your selfe, both in the disciplines of Warre, and in man as yourself, both in the disciplines of war, and inH5 III.ii.125
the deriuation of my Birth, and in other particularities. the derivation of my birth, and in other particularities.H5 III.ii.126
Captaine Mackmorrice, when there is more Captain Macmorris, when there is moreH5 III.ii.132
better oportunitie to be required, looke you, I will be better opportunity to be required, look you, I will beH5 III.ii.133
so bold as to tell you, I know the disciplines of Warre: and so bold as to tell you, I know the disciplines of war; andH5 III.ii.134
there is an end.there is an end.H5 III.ii.135
I assure you, there is very excellent Seruices I assure you, there is very excellent servicesH5 III.vi.3
committed at the Bridge. committed at the bridge.H5 III.vi.4
The Duke of Exeter is as magnanimous as The Duke of Exeter is as magnanimous asH5 III.vi.6
Agamemnon, and a man that I loue and honour with my Agamemnon, and a man that I love and honour with myH5 III.vi.7
soule, and my heart, and my dutie, and my liue, and my soul, and my heart, and my duty, and my live, and myH5 III.vi.8
liuing, and my vttermost power. He is not, God be living, and my uttermost power. He is not – God beH5 III.vi.9
praysed and blessed, any hurt in the World, but keepes praised and blessed! – any hurt in the world, but keepsH5 III.vi.10
the Bridge most valiantly, with excellent discipline. the bridge most valiantly, with excellent discipline.H5 III.vi.11
There is an aunchient Lieutenant there at the Pridge, I There is an aunchient lieutenant there at the pridge, IH5 III.vi.12
thinke in my very conscience hee is as valiant a man as think in my very conscience he is as valiant a man asH5 III.vi.13
Marke Anthony, and hee is a man of no estimation in the Mark Antony, and he is a man of no estimation in theH5 III.vi.14
World, but I did see him doe as gallant seruice. world, but I did see him do as gallant service.H5 III.vi.15
Hee is call'd aunchient Pistoll. He is called Aunchient Pistol.H5 III.vi.17
Here is the man. Here is the man.H5 III.vi.19
I, I prayse God, and I haue merited some loue Ay, I praise God, and I have merited some loveH5 III.vi.22
at his hands. at his hands.H5 III.vi.23
By your patience, aunchient Pistoll: Fortune By your patience, Aunchient Pistol: FortuneH5 III.vi.29
is painted blinde, with a Muffler afore his eyes, to signifie is painted blind, with a muffler afore her eyes, to signifyH5 III.vi.30
to you, that Fortune is blinde; and shee is painted also to you that Fortune is blind; and she is painted alsoH5 III.vi.31
with a Wheele, to signifie to you, which is the Morall of it, with a wheel, to signify to you, which is the moral of it,H5 III.vi.32
that shee is turning and inconstant, and mutabilitie, and that she is turning, and inconstant, and mutability, andH5 III.vi.33
variation: and her foot, looke you, is fixed vpon a variation; and her foot, look you, is fixed upon aH5 III.vi.34
Sphericall Stone, which rowles, and rowles, and rowles: in spherical stone, which rolls, and rolls, and rolls. InH5 III.vi.35
good truth, the Poet makes a most excellent description good truth, the poet makes a most excellent descriptionH5 III.vi.36
of it: Fortune is an excellent Morall. of it: Fortune is an excellent moral.H5 III.vi.37
Aunchient Pistoll, I doe partly vnderstand your Aunchient Pistol, I do partly understand yourH5 III.vi.49
meaning. meaning.H5 III.vi.50
Certainly Aunchient, it is not a thing to Certainly, Aunchient, it is not a thing toH5 III.vi.52
reioyce at: for if, looke you, he were my Brother, I would rejoice at, for if, look you, he were my brother, I wouldH5 III.vi.53
desire the Duke to vse his good pleasure, and put him to desire the Duke to use his good pleasure, and put him toH5 III.vi.54
execution; for discipline ought to be vsed. execution; for discipline ought to be used.H5 III.vi.55
It is well. It is well.H5 III.vi.57
Very good. Very good.H5 III.vi.59
Ile assure you, a vtt'red as praue words at I'll assure you, 'a uttered as prave words atH5 III.vi.62
the Pridge, as you shall see in a Summers day: but it is the pridge as you shall see in a summer's day. But it isH5 III.vi.63
very well: what he ha's spoke to me, that is well I very well; what he has spoke to me, that is well, IH5 III.vi.64
warrant you, when time is serue. warrant you, when time is serve.H5 III.vi.65
I tell you what, Captaine Gower: I doe perceiue I tell you what, Captain Gower; I do perceiveH5 III.vi.80
hee is not the man that hee would gladly make shew to he is not the man that he would gladly make show toH5 III.vi.81
the World hee is: if I finde a hole in his Coat, I will tell the world he is. If I find a hole in his coat, I will tellH5 III.vi.82
him my minde: hearke you, the King is him my mind. (Drum within) Hark you, the King isH5 III.vi.83
comming, and I must speake with him from the Pridge. coming, and I must speak with him from the pridge.H5 III.vi.84
God plesse your Maiestie. God pless your majesty!H5 III.vi.85
I, so please your Maiestie: The Duke of Ay, so please your majesty. The Duke ofH5 III.vi.87
Exeter ha's very gallantly maintain'd the Pridge; the Exeter has very gallantly maintained the pridge. TheH5 III.vi.88
French is gone off, looke you, and there is gallant and French is gone off, look you, and there is gallant andH5 III.vi.89
most praue passages: marry, th' athuersarie was haue most prave passages. Marry, th' athversary was haveH5 III.vi.90
possession of the Pridge, but he is enforced to retyre, possession of the pridge, but he is enforced to retire,H5 III.vi.91
and the Duke of Exeter is Master of the Pridge: I can and the Duke of Exeter is master of the pridge. I canH5 III.vi.92
tell your Maiestie, the Duke is a praue man. tell your majesty, the Duke is a prave man.H5 III.vi.93
The perdition of th' athuersarie hath beene very The perdition of th' athversary hath been veryH5 III.vi.95
great, reasonnable great: marry for my part, I thinke the great, reasonable great. Marry, for my part, I think theH5 III.vi.96
Duke hath lost neuer a man, but one that is like to be Duke hath lost never a man, but one that is like to beH5 III.vi.97
executed for robbing a Church, one Bardolph, if your executed for robbing a church, one Bardolph, if yourH5 III.vi.98
Maiestie know the man: his face is all bubukles and majesty know the man: his face is all bubukles, andH5 III.vi.99
whelkes, and knobs, and flames a fire, and his lippes blowes whelks, and knobs, and flames o' fire; and his lips blowsH5 III.vi.100
at his nose, and it is like a coale of fire, sometimes plew, at his nose, and it is like a coal of fire, sometimes plue,H5 III.vi.101
and sometimes red, but his nose is executed, and his and sometimes red; but his nose is executed, and hisH5 III.vi.102
fire's out. fire's out.H5 III.vi.103
'So, in the Name of Iesu Christ, speake fewer: So! In the name of Jesu Christ, speak fewer.H5 IV.i.65
it is the greatest admiration in the vniuersall World, It is the greatest admiration in the universal world,H5 IV.i.66
when the true and aunchient Prerogatifes and Lawes of when the true and aunchient prerogatifes and laws ofH5 IV.i.67
the Warres is not kept: if you would take the paines but tothe wars is not kept. If you would take the pains but toH5 IV.i.68
examine the Warres of Pompey the Great,you shall finde,examine the wars of Pompey the Great, you shall find,H5 IV.i.69
I warrant you, that there is no tiddle tadle nor pibble bable I warrant you, that there is no tiddle-taddle or pibble-pabbleH5 IV.i.70
in Pompeyes Campe: I warrant you, you shall in Pompey's camp. I warrant you, you shallH5 IV.i.71
finde the Ceremonies of the Warres, and the Cares of it, andfind the ceremonies of the wars, and the cares of it, andH5 IV.i.72
the Formes of it, and the Sobrietie of it, and the Modestiethe forms of it, and the sobriety of it, and the modestyH5 IV.i.73
of it, to be otherwise.of it, to be otherwise.H5 IV.i.74
If the Enemie is an Asse and a Foole, and a If the enemy is an ass, and a fool, and aH5 IV.i.76
prating Coxcombe; is it meet, thinke you, that wee shouldprating coxcomb, is it meet, think you, that we shouldH5 IV.i.77
also, looke you, be an Asse and a Foole, and a prating also, look you, be an ass, and a fool, and a pratingH5 IV.i.78
Coxcombe, in your owne conscience now?coxcomb? In your own conscience now?H5 IV.i.79
I pray you, and beseech you, that you will. I pray you and beseech you that you will.H5 IV.i.81
Kill the poyes and the luggage, 'Tis expresselyKill the poys and the luggage? 'Tis expresslyH5 IV.vii.1
against the Law of Armes, tis as arrant a peece of knauery against the law of arms: 'tis as arrant a piece of knavery,H5 IV.vii.2
marke you now, as can bee offert in your Conscience now, mark you now, as can be offert – in your conscience now,H5 IV.vii.3
is it not?is it not?H5 IV.vii.4
I, hee was porne at Monmouth Captaine Ay, he was porn at Monmouth, CaptainH5 IV.vii.11
Gower: What call you the Townes name where Alexander Gower. What call you the town's name where AlexanderH5 IV.vii.12
the pig was borne?the Pig was born!H5 IV.vii.13
Why I pray you, is not pig, great? The pig, Why, I pray you, is not ‘ pig ’ great? The pig,H5 IV.vii.15
or the grear, or the mighty, or the huge, or the magnanimous, or the great, or the mighty, or the huge, or the magnanimous,H5 IV.vii.16
are all one reckonings, saue the phrase is a litle are all one reckonings, save the phrase is a littleH5 IV.vii.17
variations.variations.H5 IV.vii.18
I thinke it is in Macedon where Alexander isI think it is in Macedon where Alexander isH5 IV.vii.21
porne: I tell you Captaine, if you looke in the Maps of the porn. I tell you, Captain, if you look in the maps of theH5 IV.vii.22
Orld, I warrant you sall finde in the comparisons betweene 'orld, I warrant you sall find, in the comparisons betweenH5 IV.vii.23
Macedon & Monmouth, that the situations looke you, Macedon and Monmouth, that the situations, look you,H5 IV.vii.24
is both alike. There is a Riuer in Macedon, & there is is both alike. There is a river in Macedon, and there isH5 IV.vii.25
also moreouer a Riuer at Monmouth, it is call'd Wye also moreover a river at Monmouth – it is called WyeH5 IV.vii.26
at Monmouth: but it is out of my praines, what is the at Monmouth, but it is out of my prains what is theH5 IV.vii.27
name of the other Riuer: but 'tis all one, tis alike as my name of the other river; but 'tis all one, 'tis alike as myH5 IV.vii.28
fingers is to my fingers, and there is Salmons in both. fingers is to my fingers, and there is salmons in both.H5 IV.vii.29
If you marke Alexanders life well, Harry of Monmouthes If you mark Alexander's life well, Harry of Monmouth'sH5 IV.vii.30
life is come after it indifferent well, for there is figures in life is come after it indifferent well; for there is figures inH5 IV.vii.31
all things. Alexander God knowes, and you know, in hisall things. Alexander, God knows and you know, in hisH5 IV.vii.32
rages, and his furies, and his wraths, and his chollers, rages, and his furies, and his wraths, and his cholers,H5 IV.vii.33
and his moodes, and his displeasures, and his indignations,and his moods, and his displeasures, and his indignations,H5 IV.vii.34
and also being a little intoxicates in his praines, and also being a little intoxicates in his prains,H5 IV.vii.35
did in his Ales and his angers (looke you) kill his best did in his ales and his angers, look you, kill his bestH5 IV.vii.36
friend Clytus.friend Cleitus.H5 IV.vii.37
It is not well done (marke you now) to take theIt is not well done, mark you now, to take theH5 IV.vii.40
tales out of my mouth, ere it is made and finished. I tales out of my mouth, ere it is made and finished. IH5 IV.vii.41
speak but in the figures, and comparisons of it: as speak but in the figures and comparisons of it. AsH5 IV.vii.42
Alexander kild his friend Clytus, being in his Ales Alexander killed his friend Cleitus, being in his alesH5 IV.vii.43
and his Cuppes; so also Harry Monmouth being in his and his cups, so also Harry Monmouth, being in hisH5 IV.vii.44
right wittes, and his good iudgements, turn'd away the right wits and his good judgements, turned away theH5 IV.vii.45
fat Knight with the great-belly doublet: he was full of fat knight with the great-belly doublet – he was full ofH5 IV.vii.46
iests, and gypes, and knaueries, and mockes, I haue forgot jests, and gipes, and knaveries, and mocks: I have forgotH5 IV.vii.47
his name.his name.H5 IV.vii.48
That is he: Ile tell you, there is good men porneThat is he. I'll tell you, there is good men pornH5 IV.vii.50
at Monmouth.at Monmouth.H5 IV.vii.51
Your Grandfather of famous memory (an't Your grandfather of famous memory, an'tH5 IV.vii.90
please your Maiesty) and your great Vncle Edward theplease your majesty, and your great-uncle Edward theH5 IV.vii.91
Placke Prince of Wales, as I haue read in the Chronicles, Plack Prince of Wales, as I have read in the chronicles,H5 IV.vii.92
fought a most praue pattle here in France.fought a most prave pattle here in France.H5 IV.vii.93
Your Maiesty sayes very true: If your MaiestiesYour majesty says very true. If your majestiesH5 IV.vii.95
is remembred of it, the Welchmen did good seruice in ais remembered of it, the Welshmen did good service in aH5 IV.vii.96
Garden where Leekes did grow, wearing Leekes in theirgarden where leeks did grow, wearing leeks in theirH5 IV.vii.97
Monmouth caps, which your Maiesty know to this houreMonmouth caps, which, your majesty know to this hourH5 IV.vii.98
is an honourable badge of the seruice: And I do beleeueis an honourable badge of the service; and I do believeH5 IV.vii.99
your Maiesty takes no scorne to weare the Leeke vppon S. your majesty takes no scorn to wear the leek upon SaintH5 IV.vii.100
Tauies day.Tavy's day.H5 IV.vii.101
All the water in Wye, cannot wash your All the water in Wye cannot wash yourH5 IV.vii.104
Maiesties Welsh plood out of your pody, I can tell you majesty's Welsh plood out of your pody, I can tell youH5 IV.vii.105
that: God plesse it, and preserue it, as long as it pleases that. God pless it and preserve it, as long as it pleasesH5 IV.vii.106
his Grace, and his Maiesty too.His grace, and His majesty too!H5 IV.vii.107
By Ieshu, I am your Maiesties Countreyman, IBy Jeshu, I am your majesty's countryman, IH5 IV.vii.109
care not who know it: I will confesse it to all the Orld, care not who know it; I will confess it to all the 'orld.H5 IV.vii.110
I need not to be ashamed of your Maiesty, praised be I need not to be ashamed of your majesty, praised beH5 IV.vii.111
God so long as your Maiesty is an honest man.God, so long as your majesty is an honest man.H5 IV.vii.112
Hee is a Crauen and a Villaine else, and't pleaseHe is a craven and a villain else, an't pleaseH5 IV.vii.130
your Maiesty in my conscience.your majesty, in my conscience.H5 IV.vii.131
Though he be as good a Ientleman as the Though he be as good a gentleman as theH5 IV.vii.134
diuel is, as Lucifer and Belzebub himselfe, it is necessary devil is, as Lucifer and Belzebub himself, it is necessary,H5 IV.vii.135
(looke your Grace) that he keepe his vow and his oath: If look your grace, that he keep his vow and his oath. IfH5 IV.vii.136
hee bee periur'd (see you now) his reputation is as arrant he be perjured, see you now, his reputation is as arrantH5 IV.vii.137
a villaine and a Iacke sawce, as euer his blacke shoo trodda villain and a Jack-sauce as ever his black shoe trodH5 IV.vii.138
vpon Gods ground, and his earth, in my conscience lawupon God's ground and His earth, in my conscience, la!H5 IV.vii.139
Gower is a good Captaine, and is good knowledge Gower is a good captain, and is good knowledgeH5 IV.vii.145
and literatured in the Warres.and literatured in the wars.H5 IV.vii.146
Your Grace doo's me as great Honors as can Your grace doo's me as great honours as canH5 IV.vii.155
be desir'd in the hearts of his Subiects: I would faine seebe desired in the hearts of his subjects. I would fain seeH5 IV.vii.156
the man, that ha's but two legges, that shall find himselfethe man that has but two legs that shall find himselfH5 IV.vii.157
agreefd at this Gloue; that is all: but I would faine see it aggriefed at this glove, that is all: but I would fain see itH5 IV.vii.158
once, and please God of his grace that I might see.once, an please God of His grace that I might see.H5 IV.vii.159
He is my deare friend, and please you.He is my dear friend, an please you.H5 IV.vii.161
I will fetch him.I will fetch him.H5 IV.vii.164
Gods will, and his pleasure, Captaine, I God's will and His pleasure, Captain, IH5 IV.viii.2
beseech you now, come apace to the King: there is beseech you now, come apace to the King. There isH5 IV.viii.3
more good toward you peraduenture, then is in your more good toward you, peradventure, than is in yourH5 IV.viii.4
knowledge to dreame of.knowledge to dream of.H5 IV.viii.5
Know the Gloue? I know the Gloue is a Gloue.Know the glove? I know the glove is a glove.H5 IV.viii.7
'Sblud, an arrant Traytor as anyes in the 'Sblood! an arrant traitor as any's in theH5 IV.viii.9
Vniuersall World, or in France, or in England.universal world, or in France, or in England!H5 IV.viii.10
Stand away Captaine Gower, I will giue TreasonStand away, Captain Gower: I will give treasonH5 IV.viii.13
his payment into plowes, I warrant you.his payment into plows, I warrant you.H5 IV.viii.14
That's a Lye in thy Throat. I charge you in hisThat's a lie in thy throat. I charge you in hisH5 IV.viii.16
Maiesties Name apprehend him, he's a friend of the majesty's name, apprehend him: he's a friend of theH5 IV.viii.17
Duke Alansons.Duke Alençon's.H5 IV.viii.18
My Lord of Warwick, heere is, praysed be My Lord of Warwick, here is – praised beH5 IV.viii.20
God for it, a most contagious Treason come to light, God for it! – a most contagious treason come to light,H5 IV.viii.21
looke you, as you shall desire in a Summers day. Heere is look you, as you shall desire in a summer's day. Here isH5 IV.viii.22
his Maiestie.his majesty.H5 IV.viii.23
My Liege, heere is a Villaine, and a Traytor, that My liege, here is a villain and a traitor, that,H5 IV.viii.25
looke your Grace, ha's strooke the Gloue which your Maiestie look your grace, has struck the glove which your majestyH5 IV.viii.26
is take out of the Helmet of Alanson.is take out of the helmet of Alençon.H5 IV.viii.27
Your Maiestie heare now, sauing your MaiestiesYour majesty hear now, saving your majesty'sH5 IV.viii.33
Manhood, what an arrant rascally, beggerly, lowsie Knaue manhood, what an arrant, rascally, beggarly, lousy knaveH5 IV.viii.34
it is: I hope your Maiestie is peare me testimonie and it is. I hope your majesty is pear me testimony andH5 IV.viii.35
witnesse, and will auouchment, that this is the Gloue of witness, and will avouchment, that this is the glove ofH5 IV.viii.36
Alanson, that your Maiestie is giue me, in your Conscience Alençon that your majesty is give me, in your conscience,H5 IV.viii.37
now.now.H5 IV.viii.38
And please your Maiestie, let his Neck answere for An please your majesty, let his neck answer forH5 IV.viii.43
it, if there is any Marshall Law in the World.it, if there is any martial law in the world.H5 IV.viii.44
By this Day and this Light, the fellow ha's By this day and this light, the fellow hasH5 IV.viii.62
mettell enough in his belly: Hold, there is twelue-pence mettle enough in his belly. Hold, there is twelve penceH5 IV.viii.63
for you, and I pray you to serue God, and keepe you out for you, and I pray you to serve God, and keep you out H5 IV.viii.64
of prawles and prabbles, and quarrels and dissentions, of prawls, and prabbles, and quarrels, and dissensions,H5 IV.viii.65
and I warrant you it is the better for you. and I warrant you it is the better for you.H5 IV.viii.66
It is with a good will: I can tell you it will serueIt is with a good will: I can tell you it will serveH5 IV.viii.68
you to mend your shooes: come, wherefore should youyou to mend your shoes. Come, wherefore should youH5 IV.viii.69
be so pashfull, your shooes is not so good: 'tis a goodbe so pashful? – your shoes is not so good; 'tis a goodH5 IV.viii.70
silling I warrant you, or I will change it.silling, I warrant you, or I will change it.H5 IV.viii.71
Is it not lawfull and please your Maiestie, to tellIs it not lawful, an please your majesty, to tellH5 IV.viii.116
how many is kill'd?how many is killed?H5 IV.viii.117
Yes, my conscience, he did vs great good.Yes, my conscience, He did us great good.H5 IV.viii.120
There is occasions and causes why and whereforeThere is occasions and causes why and whereforeH5 V.i.3
in all things: I will tell you asse my friend, Captainein all things. I will tell you ass my friend, CaptainH5 V.i.4
Gower; the rascally, scauld, beggerly, lowsie, praggingGower: the rascally, scauld, beggarly, lousy, praggingH5 V.i.5
Knaue Pistoll, which you and your selfe, and all the World,knave, Pistol – which you and yourself and all the worldH5 V.i.6
know to be no petter then a fellow, looke you now, of noknow to be no petter than a fellow, look you now, of noH5 V.i.7
merits: hee is come to me, and prings me pread and sault merits – he is come to me and prings me pread and saltH5 V.i.8
yesterday, looke you, and bid me eate my Leeke: it was in a yesterday, look you, and bid me eat my leek. It was in aH5 V.i.9
place where I could not breed no contention with him; place where I could not breed no contention with him;H5 V.i.10
but I will be so bold as to weare it in my Cap till I see but I will be so bold as to wear it in my cap till I seeH5 V.i.11
him once againe, and then I will tell him a little piece ofhim once again, and then I will tell him a little piece ofH5 V.i.12
my desires.my desires.H5 V.i.13
'Tis no matter for his swellings, nor his Turky-cocks. 'Tis no matter for his swellings nor his turkey-cocks.H5 V.i.15
God plesse you aunchient Pistoll: you scuruie God pless you, Aunchient Pistol! You scurvy,H5 V.i.16
lowsie Knaue, God plesse you.lousy knave, God pless you!H5 V.i.17
I peseech you heartily, scuruie lowsie Knaue, I peseech you heartily, scurvy, lousy knave,H5 V.i.21
at my desires, and my requests, and my petitions, to eate,at my desires, and my requests, and my petitions, to eat,H5 V.i.22
looke you, this Leeke; because, looke you, you doe not loue look you, this leek. Because, look you, you do not loveH5 V.i.23
it, nor your affections, and your appetites and yourit, nor your affections, and your appetites, and yourH5 V.i.24
disgestions doo's not agree with it, I would desire you to digestions, doo's not agree with it, I would desire you toH5 V.i.25
eate it.eat it.H5 V.i.26
There is one Goat for you. Strikes him.There is one goat for you. (He strikes him)H5 V.i.28
Will you be so good, scauld Knaue, as eate it?Will you be so good, scauld knave, as eat it?H5 V.i.29
You say very true, scauld Knaue, when GodsYou say very true, scauld knave, when God'sH5 V.i.31
will is: I will desire you to liue in the meane time, andwill is. I will desire you to live in the meantime, andH5 V.i.32
eate your Victuals: come, there is sawce for it. eat your victuals – come, there is sauce for it. (He strikesH5 V.i.33
You call'd me yesterday Mountaine-Squier, him again) You called me yesterday mountain-squire,H5 V.i.34
but I will make you to day a squire of low degree. I pray but I will make you today a squire of low degree. I prayH5 V.i.35
you fall too, if you can mocke a Leeke, you can eate a Leeke.you fall to – if you can mock a leek, you can eat a leek.H5 V.i.36
I say, I will make him eate some part of my leeke,I say, I will make him eat some part of my leek,H5 V.i.38
or I will peate his pate foure dayes: bite I pray you, it isor I will peat his pate four days. Bite, I pray you, it isH5 V.i.39
good for your greene wound, and your ploodie Coxecombe.good for your green wound and your ploody coxcomb.H5 V.i.40
Yes certainly, and out of doubt and out of Yes, certainly, and out of doubt, and out ofH5 V.i.42
question too, and ambiguities.question too, and ambiguities.H5 V.i.43
Eate I pray you, will you haue some more Eat, I pray you; will you have some moreH5 V.i.46
sauce to your Leeke: there is not enough Leeke to sweare sauce to your leek? There is not enough leek to swearH5 V.i.47
by.by.H5 V.i.48
Much good do you scald knaue, heartily. Much good do you, scauld knave, heartily.H5 V.i.50
Nay, pray you throw none away, the skinne is good for Nay, pray you throw none away, the skin is good forH5 V.i.51
your broken Coxcombe; when you take occasions to seeyour broken coxcomb. When you take occasions to seeH5 V.i.52
Leekes heereafter, I pray you mocke at 'em, that is all.leeks hereafter, I pray you mock at 'em, that is all.H5 V.i.53
I, Leekes is good: hold you, there is a groat toAy, leeks is good. Hold you, there is a groat toH5 V.i.55
heale your pate.heal your pate.H5 V.i.56
Yes verily, and in truth you shall take it, or I Yes, verily and in truth you shall take it, or IH5 V.i.58
haue another Leeke in my pocket, which you shall eate.have another leek in my pocket which you shall eat.H5 V.i.59
If I owe you any thing, I will pay you in If I owe you anything, I will pay you inH5 V.i.61
Cudgels, you shall be a Woodmonger, and buy nothing cudgels – you shall be a woodmonger, and buy nothingH5 V.i.62
of me but cudgels: God bu'y you, and keepe you, &healeof me but cudgels. God bye you, and keep you, and healH5 V.i.63
your pate.your pate.H5 V.i.64
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL