WIDOW
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Nay come, / For if they do approach the Citty, / We Nay, come, for if they do approach the city, weAW III.v.1
shall loose all the sight.shall lose all the sight.AW III.v.2
It is reported, / That he has taken their great'st It is reported that he has taken their greatestAW III.v.5
Commander, / And that with his owne hand he slew / Thecommander, and that with his own hand he slew theAW III.v.6
Dukes brother:Duke's brother.AW III.v.7
we haue lost our labour, / They are gone a contrarie way:We have lost our labour; they are gone a contrary way.AW III.v.8
harke, you may know by their Trumpets.Hark! You may know by their trumpets.AW III.v.9
I haue told my neighbour / How you haue beene I have told my neighbour how you have beenAW III.v.14
solicited by a Gentleman / His Companion.solicited by a gentleman his companion.AW III.v.15
I hope so: looke here comes a pilgrim, I knowI hope so. Look, here comes a pilgrim. I knowAW III.v.29
she will lye at my house, thither they send one another,she will lie at my house; thither they send one another.AW III.v.30
Ile question her. God saue you pilgrim, whether areI'll question her. God save you, pilgrim! Whither areAW III.v.31
bound?bound?AW III.v.32
At the S. Francis heere beside the Port.At the Saint Francis here beside the port.AW III.v.35
I marrie ist. Harke you, they come this way:Ay, marry, is't. Hark you, they come this way.AW III.v.37
If you will tarrie holy PilgrimeIf you will tarry, holy pilgrim,AW III.v.38
But till the troopes come by,But till the troops come by,AW III.v.39
I will conduct you where you shall be lodg'd,I will conduct you where you shall be lodged;AW III.v.40
The rather for I thinke I know your hostesseThe rather for I think I know your hostessAW III.v.41
As ample as my selfe.As ample as myself.AW III.v.42.1
If you shall please so Pilgrime.If you shall please so, pilgrim.AW III.v.43
You came I thinke from France?You came, I think, from France?AW III.v.45.1
Heere you shall see a Countriman of yoursHere you shall see a countryman of yoursAW III.v.46
That has done worthy seruice.That has done worthy service.AW III.v.47.1
I write good creature, wheresoere she is,I warrant, good creature, wheresoe'er she is,AW III.v.65
Her hart waighes sadly: this yong maid might do herHer heart weighs sadly. This young maid might do herAW III.v.66
A shrewd turne if she pleas'd.A shrewd turn, if she pleased.AW III.v.67.1
He does indeede,He does indeed,AW III.v.69.2
And brokes with all that can in such a suiteAnd brokes with all that can in such a suitAW III.v.70
Corrupt the tender honour of a Maide:Corrupt the tender honour of a maid;AW III.v.71
But she is arm'd for him, and keepes her guardBut she is armed for him and keeps her guardAW III.v.72
In honestest defence.In honestest defence.AW III.v.73.1
So, now they come:So, now they come.AW III.v.74
That is Anthonio the Dukes eldest sonne,That is Antonio, the Duke's eldest son;AW III.v.75
That Escalus.That Escalus.AW III.v.76.1
Marrie hang you.Marry, hang you!AW III.v.90
The troope is past: Come pilgrim, I wil bring you,The troop is past. Come, pilgrim, I will bring youAW III.v.92
Where you shall host: Of inioyn'd penitentsWhere you shall host. Of enjoined penitentsAW III.v.93
There's foure or fiue, to great S. Iaques bound,There's four or five, to great Saint Jaques bound,AW III.v.94
Alreadie at my house.Already at my house.AW III.v.95.1
Both.WIDOW and MARIANA
Wee'l take your offer kindly. We'll take your offer kindly.AW III.v.100.2
Though my estate be falne, I was well borne,Though my estate be fallen, I was well born,AW III.vii.4
Nothing acquainted with these businesses,Nothing acquainted with these businesses,AW III.vii.5
And would not put my reputation nowAnd would not put my reputation nowAW III.vii.6
In any staining act.In any staining act.AW III.vii.7.1
I should beleeue you,I should believe you,AW III.vii.12.2
For you haue shew'd me that which well approuesFor you have showed me that which well approvesAW III.vii.13
Y'are great in fortune.Y'are great in fortune.AW III.vii.14.1
Now I seeNow I seeAW III.vii.28.2
the bottome of your purpose.The bottom of your purpose.AW III.vii.29
I haue yeelded:I have yielded.AW III.vii.36.2
Instruct my daughter how she shall perseuer,Instruct my daughter how she shall perseverAW III.vii.37
That time and place with this deceite so lawfullThat time and place with this deceit so lawfulAW III.vii.38
May proue coherent. Euery night he comesMay prove coherent. Every night he comesAW III.vii.39
With Musickes of all sorts, and songs compos'dWith musics of all sorts, and songs composedAW III.vii.40
To her vnworthinesse: It nothing steeds vsTo her unworthiness. It nothing steads usAW III.vii.41
To chide him from our eeues, for he persistsTo chide him from our eaves, for he persistsAW III.vii.42
As if his life lay on't.As if his life lay on't.AW III.vii.43.1
Gentle Madam,Gentle madam,AW IV.iv.14.2
You neuer had a seruant to whose trustYou never had a servant to whose trustAW IV.iv.15
Your busines was more welcome.Your business was more welcome.AW IV.iv.16.1
Lord how we loose our paines.Lord, how we lose our pains!AW V.i.24.2
I am her Mother sir, whose age and honourI am her mother, sir, whose age and honourAW V.iii.162
Both suffer vnder this complaint we bring,Both suffer under this complaint we bring,AW V.iii.163
And both shall cease, without your remedie.And both shall cease, without your remedy.AW V.iii.164
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