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I would not be thy executioner,I would not be thy executioner.AYL III.v.8
I flye thee, for I would not iniure thee:I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.AYL III.v.9
Thou tellst me there is murder in mine eye,Thou tellest me there is murder in mine eye:AYL III.v.10
'Tis pretty sure, and very probable,'Tis pretty, sure, and very probable,AYL III.v.11
That eyes that are the frailst, and softest things,That eyes, that are the frail'st and softest things,AYL III.v.12
Who shut their coward gates on atomyes,Who shut their coward gates on atomies,AYL III.v.13
Should be called tyrants, butchers, murtherers.Should be called tyrants, butchers, murderers!AYL III.v.14
Now I doe frowne on thee with all my heart,Now I do frown on thee with all my heart,AYL III.v.15
And if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee:And if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee.AYL III.v.16
Now counterfeit to swound, why now fall downe,Now counterfeit to swoon, why now fall down,AYL III.v.17
Or if thou canst not, oh for shame, for shame,Or if thou canst not, O for shame, for shame,AYL III.v.18
Lye not, to say mine eyes are murtherers:Lie not, to say mine eyes are murderers!AYL III.v.19
Now shew the wound mine eye hath made in thee,Now show the wound mine eye hath made in thee.AYL III.v.20
Scratch thee but with a pin, and there remainesScratch thee but with a pin, and there remainsAYL III.v.21
Some scarre of it: Leane vpon a rushSome scar of it; lean upon a rush,AYL III.v.22
The Cicatrice and capable impressureThe cicatrice and capable impressureAYL III.v.23
Thy palme some moment keepes: but now mine eyesThy palm some moment keeps; but now mine eyes,AYL III.v.24
Which I haue darted at thee, hurt thee not,Which I have darted at thee, hurt thee not,AYL III.v.25
Nor I am sure there is no force in eyesNor, I am sure, there is no force in eyesAYL III.v.26
That can doe hurt.That can do hurt.AYL III.v.27.1
But till that timeBut till that timeAYL III.v.31.2
Come not thou neere me: and when that time comes,Come not thou near me; and when that time comes,AYL III.v.32
Afflict me with thy mockes, pitty me not,Afflict me with thy mocks, pity me not,AYL III.v.33
As till that time I shall not pitty thee.As till that time I shall not pity thee.AYL III.v.34
Sweet youth, I pray you chide a yere together,Sweet youth, I pray you chide a year together;AYL III.v.64
I had rather here you chide, then this man wooe.I had rather hear you chide than this man woo.AYL III.v.65
For no ill will I beare you.For no ill will I bear you.AYL III.v.71
Dead Shepheard, now I find thy saw of might,Dead Shepherd, now I find thy saw of might,AYL III.v.81
Who euer lov'd, that lou'd not at first sight?‘Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?'AYL III.v.82
Hah: what saist thou Siluius?Ha, what sayest thou, Silvius?AYL III.v.83.2
Why I am sorry for thee gentle Siluius.Why, I am sorry for thee, gentle Silvius.AYL III.v.85
Thou hast my loue, is not that neighbourly?Thou hast my love; is not that neighbourly?AYL III.v.90
Why that were couetousnesse:Why, that were covetousness.AYL III.v.91.2
Siluius; the time was, that I hated thee;Silvius, the time was that I hated thee,AYL III.v.92
And yet it is not, that I beare thee loue,And yet it is not that I bear thee love;AYL III.v.93
But since that thou canst talke of loue so well,But since that thou canst talk of love so well,AYL III.v.94
Thy company, which erst was irkesome to meThy company, which erst was irksome to me,AYL III.v.95
I will endure; and Ile employ thee too:I will endure, and I'll employ thee too.AYL III.v.96
But doe not looke for further recompenceBut do not look for further recompenseAYL III.v.97
Then thine owne gladnesse, that thou art employd.Than thine own gladness that thou art employed.AYL III.v.98
Knowst thou the youth that spoke to mee yerewhile?Knowest thou the youth that spoke to me erewhile?AYL III.v.105
Thinke not I loue him, though I ask for him,Think not I love him, though I ask for him.AYL III.v.109
'Tis but a peeuish boy, yet he talkes well,'Tis but a peevish boy. Yet he talks well.AYL III.v.110
But what care I for words? yet words do wellBut what care I for words? Yet words do wellAYL III.v.111
When he that speakes them pleases those that heare:When he that speaks them pleases those that hear.AYL III.v.112
It is a pretty youth, not very prettie,It is a pretty youth – not very pretty – AYL III.v.113
But sure hee's proud, and yet his pride becomes him;But, sure, he's proud – and yet his pride becomes him.AYL III.v.114
Hee'll make a proper man: the best thing in himHe'll make a proper man. The best thing in himAYL III.v.115
Is his complexion: and faster then his tongueIs his complexion; and faster than his tongueAYL III.v.116
Did make offence, his eye did heale it vp:Did make offence, his eye did heal it up.AYL III.v.117
He is not very tall, yet for his yeeres hee's tall:He is not very tall – yet for his years he's tall.AYL III.v.118
His leg is but so so, and yet 'tis well:His leg is but so so – and yet 'tis well.AYL III.v.119
There was a pretty rednesse in his lip,There was a pretty redness in his lip,AYL III.v.120
A little riper, and more lustie redA little riper and more lusty redAYL III.v.121
Then that mixt in his cheeke: 'twas iust the differenceThan that mixed in his cheek; 'twas just the differenceAYL III.v.122
Betwixt the constant red, and mingled Damaske.Between the constant red and mingled damask.AYL III.v.123
There be some women Siluius, had they markt himThere be some women, Silvius, had they marked himAYL III.v.124
In parcells as I did, would haue gone neereIn parcels, as I did, would have gone nearAYL III.v.125
To fall in loue with him: but for my partTo fall in love with him: but, for my part,AYL III.v.126
I loue him not, nor hate him not: and yetI love him not, nor hate him not; and yetAYL III.v.127
Haue more cause to hate him then to loue him,I have more cause to hate him than to love him,AYL III.v.128
For what had he to doe to chide at me?For what had he to do to chide at me?AYL III.v.129
He said mine eyes were black, and my haire blacke,He said mine eyes were black and my hair black,AYL III.v.130
And now I am remembred, scorn'd at me:And, now I am remembered, scorned at me;AYL III.v.131
I maruell why I answer'd not againe,I marvel why I answered not again.AYL III.v.132
But that's all one: omittance is no quittance:But that's all one: omittance is no quittance;AYL III.v.133
Ile write to him a very tanting Letter,I'll write to him a very taunting letter,AYL III.v.134
And thou shalt beare it, wilt thou Siluius?And thou shalt bear it – wilt thou, Silvius?AYL III.v.135
Ile write it strait:I'll write it straight:AYL III.v.136.2
The matter's in my head, and in my heart,The matter's in my head and in my heart.AYL III.v.137
I will be bitter with him, and passing short;I will be bitter with him and passing short.AYL III.v.138
Goe with me Siluius. Go with me, Silvius.AYL III.v.139
Youth, you haue done me much vngentlenesse,Youth, you have done me much ungentleness,AYL V.ii.72
To shew the letter that I writ to you.To show the letter that I writ to you.AYL V.ii.73
Good shepheard, tell this youth what 'tis to loueGood shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love.AYL V.ii.78
And I for Ganimed.And I for Ganymede.AYL V.ii.81
And I for Ganimed.And I for Ganymede.AYL V.ii.86
And so am I for Ganimed.And so am I for Ganymede.AYL V.ii.95
If this be so, why blame you me to loue you?If this be so, why blame you me to love you?AYL V.ii.98
Nor I.Nor I.AYL V.ii.117
That will I, should I die the houre after.That will I, should I die the hour after.AYL V.iv.12
So is the bargaine.So is the bargain.AYL V.iv.15
If sight & shape be true,If sight and shape be true,AYL V.iv.117
why then my loue adieuWhy then, my love adieu!AYL V.iv.118
I wil not eate my word, now thou art mine,I will not eat my word, now thou art mine,AYL V.iv.146
Thy faith, my fancie to thee doth combine.Thy faith my fancy to thee doth combine.AYL V.iv.147
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