As You Like It
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Enter Orlando & Oliuer.Enter Orlando and Oliver AYL V.ii.1
Orl. ORLANDO 
Is't possible, that on so little acquaintance youIs't possible, that on so little acquaintance you AYL V.ii.1
should like her? that, but seeing, you should loue her?should like her? That, but seeing, you should love her? AYL V.ii.2
And louing woo? and wooing, she should graunt? AndAnd loving woo? And, wooing, she should grant? And AYL V.ii.3
will you perseuer to enioy her?will you persever to enjoy her?enjoy (v.)
old form: enioy
possess in love, sleep with
AYL V.ii.4
persever (v.)
old form: perseuer
persevere, persist, keep at it
Ol. OLIVER 
Neither call the giddinesse of it in question; theNeither call the giddiness of it in question: thegiddiness (n.)
old form: giddinesse
rashness, foolishness, madness
AYL V.ii.5
pouertie of her, the small acquaintance, my sodainepoverty of her, the small acquaintance, my suddensudden (adj.)
old form: sodaine
swift, rapid, prompt
AYL V.ii.6
woing, nor sodaine consenting: but say with mee,wooing, nor her sudden consenting; but say with me AYL V.ii.7
I loue Aliena: say with her, that she loues mee; consent‘ I love Aliena;’ say with her that she loves me; consentconsent (v.)agree, concur, acquiesceAYL V.ii.8
with both, that we may enioy each other: it shall be towith both that we may enjoy each other. It shall be toenjoy (v.)
old form: enioy
possess in love, sleep with
AYL V.ii.9
your good: for my fathers house, and all the reuennew,your good, for my father's house and all the revenue AYL V.ii.10
that was old Sir Rowlands will I estate vpon you, andthat was old Sir Rowland's will I estate upon you, andestate (v.)endow, settle upon, bestow (up)onAYL V.ii.11
heere liue and die a Shepherd.here live and die a shepherd. AYL V.ii.12
Enter Rosalind.Enter Rosalind AYL V.ii.13
Orl. ORLANDO 
You haue my consent. / Let your Wedding beYou have my consent. Let your wedding be AYL V.ii.13
to morrow: thither will I / Inuite the Duke, and all'stomorrow. Thither will I invite the Duke and all's AYL V.ii.14
contented followers: / Go you, and prepare Aliena; forcontented followers. Go you and prepare Aliena; for, AYL V.ii.15
looke you, / Heere comes my Rosalinde.look you, here comes my Rosalind. AYL V.ii.16
Ros. ROSALIND 
God saue you brother.God save you, brother. AYL V.ii.17
Ol. OLIVER 
And you faire sister.And you, fair sister. AYL V.ii.18
Exit AYL V.ii.18
Ros. ROSALIND 
Oh my deere Orlando, how it greeues me to seeO my dear Orlando, how it grieves me to see AYL V.ii.19
thee weare thy heart in a scarfe.thee wear thy heart in a scarf.scarf (n.)
old form: scarfe
sling
AYL V.ii.20
Orl. ORLANDO 
It is my arme.It is my arm. AYL V.ii.21
Ros. ROSALIND 
I thought thy heart had beene wounded withI thought thy heart had been wounded with AYL V.ii.22
the clawes of a Lion.the claws of a lion. AYL V.ii.23
Orl. ORLANDO 
Wounded it is, but with the eyes of a Lady.Wounded it is, but with the eyes of a lady. AYL V.ii.24
Ros. ROSALIND 
Did your brother tell you how I counterfeytedDid your brother tell you how I counterfeitedcounterfeit (v.)
old form: counterfeyted
pretend, feign, make believe
AYL V.ii.25
to sound, when he shew'd me your handkercher?to sound, when he showed me your handkercher?sound (v.)swoon, faint, pass outAYL V.ii.26
handkercher (n.)handkerchief
Orl. ORLANDO 
I, and greater wonders then that.Ay, and greater wonders than that. AYL V.ii.27
Ros. ROSALIND 
O, I know where you are: nay, tis true: thereO, I know where you are. Nay, 'tis true; there AYL V.ii.28
was neuer any thing so sodaine, but the sight of two Rammes, was never anything so sudden but the fight of two rams, AYL V.ii.29
and Cesars Thrasonicall bragge of I came, saw, andand Caesar's thrasonical brag of ‘ I came, saw, andthrasonical (adj.)
old form: Thrasonicall
boastful, bragging, vainglorious
AYL V.ii.30
ouercome. For your brother, and my sister, no sooner met,overcame.’ For your brother and my sister no sooner met AYL V.ii.31
but they look'd: no sooner look'd, but they lou'd; no but they looked; no sooner looked but they loved; no AYL V.ii.32
sooner lou'd, but they sigh'd: no sooner sigh'd but theysooner loved but they sighed; no sooner sighed but they AYL V.ii.33
ask'd one another the reason: no sooner knew theasked one another the reason; no sooner knew the AYL V.ii.34
reason, but they sought the remedie: and in thesereason but they sought the remedy: and in these AYL V.ii.35
degrees, haue they made a paire of staires to marriage,degrees have they made a pair of stairs to marriagepair of stairs
old form: paire, staires
flight of stairs
AYL V.ii.36
which they will climbe incontinent, or else bee incontinentwhich they will climb incontinent or else be incontinentincontinent (adj.)unchaste, unable to restrain oneselfAYL V.ii.37
incontinent (adv.)immediately, forthwith, at once
before marriage; they are in the verie wrath of loue, andbefore marriage. They are in the very wrath of love and AYL V.ii.38
they will together. Clubbes cannot part them.they will together; clubs cannot part them. AYL V.ii.39
Orl. ORLANDO 
They shall be married to morrow : and I willThey shall be married tomorrow; and I will AYL V.ii.40
bid the Duke to the Nuptiall. But O, how bitter a thingbid the Duke to the nuptial. But, O, how bitter a thing AYL V.ii.41
it is, to looke into happines through another mans eies:it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes! AYL V.ii.42
by so much the more shall I to morrow be at the heightBy so much the more shall I tomorrow be at the height AYL V.ii.43
of heart heauinesse. by how much I shal thinke myof heart-heaviness, by how much I shall think my AYL V.ii.44
brother happie, in hauing what he wishes for.brother happy in having what he wishes for. AYL V.ii.45
Ros. ROSALIND 
Why then to morrow, I cannot serue yourWhy, then, tomorrow I cannot serve your AYL V.ii.46
turne for Rosalind?turn for Rosalind? AYL V.ii.47
Orl. ORLANDO 
I can liue no longer by thinking.I can live no longer by thinking. AYL V.ii.48
Ros. ROSALIND 
I will wearie you then no longer with idleI will weary you then no longer with idleidle (adj.)foolish, stupid, empty-headedAYL V.ii.49
talking. Know of me then (for now I speake to sometalking. Know of me then, for now I speak to some AYL V.ii.50
purpose) that I know you are a Gentleman of good conceit:purpose, that I know you are a gentleman of good conceit.conceit (n.)understanding, intelligence, apprehensionAYL V.ii.51
purpose (n.)point at issue, matter in hand
I speake not this, that you should beare a goodI speak not this that you should bear a good AYL V.ii.52
opinion of my knowledge: insomuch (I say) I know youopinion of my knowledge, insomuch I say I know you AYL V.ii.53
are: neither do I labor for a greater esteeme then mayare; neither do I labour for a greater esteem than may AYL V.ii.54
in some little measure draw a beleefe from you, to doin some little measure draw a belief from you to do AYL V.ii.55
your selfe good, and not to grace me. Beleeue then, if youyourself good, and not to grace me. Believe then, if yougrace (v.)favour, add merit to, do honour toAYL V.ii.56
please, that I can do strange things: I haue since I wasplease, that I can do strange things: I have, since I was AYL V.ii.57
three yeare old conuerst with a Magitian, most profoundthree year old, conversed with a magician, most profoundconverse (v.)
old form: conuerst
associate, keep company
AYL V.ii.58
in his Art, and yet not damnable. If you do loue in his art, and yet not damnable. If you do lovedamnabledeserving damnation, evil, in a state of mortal sinAYL V.ii.59
Rosalinde so neere the hart, as your gesture cries it out:Rosalind so near the heart as your gesture cries it out,gesture (n.)demeanour, attitude, mannerAYL V.ii.60
when your brother marries Aliena, shall you marrie her.when your brother marries Aliena, shall you marry her. AYL V.ii.61
I know into what straights of Fortune she is driuen, and itI know into what straits of fortune she is driven, and it AYL V.ii.62
is not impossible to me, if it appeare not inconuenientis not impossible to me, if it appear not inconvenientinconvenient (adj.)
old form: inconuenient
unsuitable, inappropriate, out of place
AYL V.ii.63
to you, to set her before your eyes to morrow, humane as to you, to set her before your eyes tomorrow, human as AYL V.ii.64
she is, and without any danger.she is, and without any danger. AYL V.ii.65
Orl. ORLANDO 
Speak'st thou in sober meanings?Speakest thou in sober meanings?sober (adj.)serious, sincere, not playfulAYL V.ii.66
Ros. ROSALIND 
By my life I do, which I tender deerly, thoughBy my life I do, which I tender dearly thoughtender (v.)rate, esteem, regardAYL V.ii.67
I say I am a Magitian: Therefore put you in your best I say I am a magician. Therefore, put you in your best AYL V.ii.68
aray, bid your friends: for if you will be marriedarray, bid your friends; for if you will be marriedarray (n.)
old form: aray
attire, clothes, clothing, dress
AYL V.ii.69
bid (v.), past form badeinvite, ask, entice
to morrow, you shall: and to Rosalind if you will.tomorrow, you shall; and to Rosalind, if you will. AYL V.ii.70
Enter Siluius & Phebe.Enter Silvius and Phebe AYL V.ii.71
Looke, here comes a Louer of mine, and a louer of hers.Look, here comes a lover of mine and a lover of hers. AYL V.ii.71
Phe. PHEBE 
Youth, you haue done me much vngentlenesse,Youth, you have done me much ungentleness,ungentleness (n.)
old form: vngentlenesse
discourtesy, lack of manners, boorishness
AYL V.ii.72
To shew the letter that I writ to you.To show the letter that I writ to you. AYL V.ii.73
Ros. ROSALIND 
I care not if I haue: it is my studieI care not if I have: it is my studystudy (n.)
old form: studie
aim, object, purpose
AYL V.ii.74
To seeme despightfull and vngentle to you:To seem despiteful and ungentle to you.despiteful (adj.)
old form: despightfull
cruel, spiteful, malicious
AYL V.ii.75
ungentle (adj.)
old form: vngentle
unmannerly, discourteous, impolite
you are there followed by a faithful shepheard,You are there followed by a faithful shepherd; AYL V.ii.76
Looke vpon him, loue him: he worships you.Look upon him, love him: he worships you. AYL V.ii.77
Phe. PHEBE 
Good shepheard, tell this youth what 'tis to loueGood shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love. AYL V.ii.78
Sil. SILVIUS 
It is to be all made of sighes and teares,It is to be all made of sighs and tears, AYL V.ii.79
And so am I for Phebe.And so am I for Phebe. AYL V.ii.80
Phe. PHEBE 
And I for Ganimed.And I for Ganymede. AYL V.ii.81
Orl. ORLANDO 
And I for Rosalind.And I for Rosalind. AYL V.ii.82
Ros. ROSALIND 
And I for no woman.And I for no woman. AYL V.ii.83
Sil. SILVIUS 
It is to be all made of faith and seruice,It is to be all made of faith and service, AYL V.ii.84
And so am I for Phebe.And so am I for Phebe. AYL V.ii.85
Phe. PHEBE 
And I for Ganimed.And I for Ganymede. AYL V.ii.86
Orl. ORLANDO 
And I for Rosalind.And I for Rosalind. AYL V.ii.87
Ros. ROSALIND 
And I for no woman.And I for no woman. AYL V.ii.88
Sil. SILVIUS 
It is to be all made of fantasie,It is to be all made of fantasy,fantasy (n.)
old form: fantasie
ardent desire, amorous fancy
AYL V.ii.89
All made of passion, and all made of wishes,All made of passion, and all made of wishes, AYL V.ii.90
All adoration, dutie, and obseruance,All adoration, duty and observance,duty (n.)
old form: dutie
reverence, due respect, proper attitude
AYL V.ii.91
observance (n.)
old form: obseruance
proper attention, attentiveness, heed
All humblenesse, all patience, and impatience,All humbleness, all patience, and impatience, AYL V.ii.92
All puritie, all triall, all obseruance:All purity, all trial, all observance; AYL V.ii.93
And so am I for Phebe.And so am I for Phebe. AYL V.ii.94
Phe. PHEBE 
And so am I for Ganimed.And so am I for Ganymede. AYL V.ii.95
Orl. ORLANDO 
And so am I for Rosalind.And so am I for Rosalind. AYL V.ii.96
Ros. ROSALIND 
And so am I for no woman.And so am I for no woman. AYL V.ii.97
Phe. PHEBE  
(to Rosalind) AYL V.ii.98
If this be so, why blame you me to loue you?If this be so, why blame you me to love you? AYL V.ii.98
Sil. SILVIUS  
(to Phebe) AYL V.ii.99
If this be so, why blame you me to loue you?If this be so, why blame you me to love you? AYL V.ii.99
Orl. ORLANDO 
If this be so, why blame you me to loue you?If this be so, why blame you me to love you? AYL V.ii.100
Ros. ROSALIND 
Why do you speake too, Why blame you mee toWho do you speak too ‘Why blame you me to AYL V.ii.101
loue you.love you?' AYL V.ii.102
Orl. ORLANDO 
To her, that is not heere, nor doth not heare.To her that is not here, nor doth not hear. AYL V.ii.103
Ros. ROSALIND 
Pray you no more of this, 'tis like the howlingPray you no more of this, 'tis like the howling AYL V.ii.104
of Irish Wolues against the Moone : I willof Irish wolves against the moon. (To Silvius) I will AYL V.ii.105
helpe you if I can : I would loue you if Ihelp you, if I can. (To Phebe) I would love you, if I AYL V.ii.106
could : To morrow meet me altogether : Icould. – Tomorrow meet me all together. (To Phebe) I AYL V.ii.107
wil marrie you, if euer I marrie Woman, and Ile bewill marry you if ever I marry woman, and I'll be AYL V.ii.108
married to morrow : I will satisfie you, ifmarried tomorrow. (To Orlando) I will satisfy you, if AYL V.ii.109
euer I satisfi'd man, and you shall bee married to morrow.ever I satisfied man, and you shall be married tomorrow. AYL V.ii.110
I wil content you, if what pleases you(To Silvius) I will content you, if what pleases youcontent (v.)please, gratify, delight, satisfyAYL V.ii.111
contents you, and you shal be married to morrow:contents you, and you shall be married tomorrow. (To AYL V.ii.112
As you loue Rosalind meet, asOrlando) As you love Rosalind, meet. (To Silvius) As AYL V.ii.113.2
you loue Phebe meet, and as I loue no woman, Ileyou love Phebe, meet. – And as I love no woman, I'll AYL V.ii.114
meet : so fare you wel: I haue left you commands.meet. So fare you well; I have left you commands.fare ... well (int.)
old form: fare you wel
goodbye [to an individual]
AYL V.ii.115
Sil. SILVIUS 
Ile not faile, if I liue.I'll not fail, if I live. AYL V.ii.116
Phe. PHEBE 
Nor I.Nor I. AYL V.ii.117
Orl. ORLANDO 
Nor I. Nor I. AYL V.ii.118
Exeunt.Exeunt AYL V.ii.118
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