ORLANDO
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As I remember Adam, it was vpon this fashionAs I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashionAYL I.i.1
bequeathed me by will, but poore a thousand Crownes, andbequeathed me by will, but poor a thousand crowns, and,AYL I.i.2
as thou saist, charged my brother on his blessing toas thou sayest, charged my brother on his blessing toAYL I.i.3
breed mee well: and there begins my sadnesse: Mybreed me well; and there begins my sadness. MyAYL I.i.4
brother Iaques he keepes at schoole, and report speakesbrother Jaques he keeps at school, and report speaksAYL I.i.5
goldenly of his profit: for my part, he keepes me rusticallygoldenly of his profit: for my part, he keeps me rusticallyAYL I.i.6
at home, or (to speak more properly) staies me heere atat home, or, to speak more properly, stays me here atAYL I.i.7
home vnkept: for call you that keeping for a gentlemanhome unkept – for call you that ‘ keeping ’ for a gentlemanAYL I.i.8
of my birth, that differs not from the stalling of anof my birth, that differs not from the stalling of anAYL I.i.9
Oxe? his horses are bred better, for besides that theyox? His horses are bred better, for, besides that theyAYL I.i.10
are faire with their feeding, they are taught their mannage,are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage,AYL I.i.11
and to that end Riders deerely hir'd: but I (his brother)and to that end riders dearly hired; but I, his brother,AYL I.i.12
gaine nothing vnder him but growth, for the which hisgain nothing under him but growth, for the which hisAYL I.i.13
Animals on his dunghils are as much bound to him as I:animals on his dunghills are as much bound to him as I.AYL I.i.14
besides this nothing that he so plentifully giues me, the Besides this nothing that he so plentifully gives me, theAYL I.i.15
something that nature gaue mee, his countenance seemessomething that nature gave me his countenance seemsAYL I.i.16
to take from me: hee lets mee feede with his Hindes, barres meeto take from me: he lets me feed with his hinds, bars meAYL I.i.17
the place of a brother, and as much as in him lies, minesthe place of a brother, and, as much as in him lies, minesAYL I.i.18
my gentility with my education. This is it Adam thatmy gentility with my education. This is it, Adam, thatAYL I.i.19
grieues me, and the spirit of my Father, which I thinke isgrieves me, and the spirit of my father, which I think isAYL I.i.20
within mee, begins to mutinie against this seruitude. I willwithin me, begins to mutiny against this servitude. I willAYL I.i.21
no longer endure it, though yet I know no wise remedyno longer endure it, though yet I know no wise remedyAYL I.i.22
how to auoid it.how to avoid it.AYL I.i.23
Goe a-part Adam, and thou shalt heare how heGo apart, Adam, and thou shalt hear how heAYL I.i.25
will shake me vp.will shake me up.AYL I.i.26
Nothing: I am not taught to make any thing.Nothing: I am not taught to make anything.AYL I.i.28
Marry sir, I am helping you to mar that whichMarry, sir, I am helping you to mar that whichAYL I.i.30
God made, a poore vnworthy brother of yours withGod made, a poor unworthy brother of yours, withAYL I.i.31
idlenesse.idleness.AYL I.i.32
Shall I keepe your hogs, and eat huskes with them?Shall I keep your hogs and eat husks with them?AYL I.i.35
what prodigall portion haue I spent, that I should comeWhat prodigal portion have I spent, that I should comeAYL I.i.36
to such penury?to such penury?AYL I.i.37
O sir, very well: heere in your Orchard.O, sir, very well: here in your orchard.AYL I.i.39
I, better then him I am before knowes mee: IAy, better than him I am before knows me: IAYL I.i.41
know you are my eldest brother, and in the gentleknow you are my eldest brother, and in the gentleAYL I.i.42
condition of bloud you should so know me: the courtesiecondition of blood you should so know me. The courtesyAYL I.i.43
of nations allowes you my better, in that you are the firstof nations allows you my better, in that you are the firstAYL I.i.44
borne, but the same tradition takes not away my bloud,born, but the same tradition takes not away my blood,AYL I.i.45
were there twenty brothers betwixt vs: I haue as muchwere there twenty brothers betwixt us: I have as muchAYL I.i.46
of my father in mee, as you, albeit I confesse your commingof my father in me as you, albeit I confess your comingAYL I.i.47
before me is neerer to his reuerence.before me is nearer to his reverence.AYL I.i.48
Come, come elder Come, come, elderAYL I.i.50
brother, you are too yong in this.brother, you are too young in this.AYL I.i.51
I am no villaine: I am the yongest sonne of SirI am no villain: I am the youngest son of SirAYL I.i.53
Rowland de Boys, he was my father, and he is thrice aRowland de Boys; he was my father, and he is thrice aAYL I.i.54
villaine that saies such a father begot villaines: wert thouvillain that says such a father begot villains. Wert thouAYL I.i.55
not my brother, I would not take this hand from thynot my brother, I would not take this hand from thyAYL I.i.56
throat, till this other had puld out thy tongue for sayingthroat till this other had pulled out thy tongue for sayingAYL I.i.57
so, thou hast raild on thy selfe.so; thou hast railed on thyself.AYL I.i.58
I will not till I please: you shall heare mee: myI will not till I please: you shall hear me. MyAYL I.i.62
father charg'd you in his will to giue me good education:father charged you in his will to give me good education:AYL I.i.63
you haue train'd me like a pezant, obscuring and hidingyou have trained me like a peasant, obscuring and hidingAYL I.i.64
from me all gentleman-like qualities: the spirit of myfrom me all gentleman-like qualities. The spirit of myAYL I.i.65
father growes strong in mee, and I will no longer endure it:father grows strong in me, and I will no longer endure it.AYL I.i.66
therefore allow me such exercises as may become aTherefore allow me such exercises as may become aAYL I.i.67
gentleman, or giue mee the poore allottery my father leftgentleman, or give me the poor allottery my father leftAYL I.i.68
me by testament, with that I will goe buy my fortunes.me by testament; with that I will go buy my fortunes.AYL I.i.69
I will no further offend you, then becomes meeI will no further offend you than becomes meAYL I.i.74
for my good.for my good.AYL I.i.75
I attend them with all respect and dutie.I attend them with all respect and duty.AYL I.ii.155
No faire Princesse: he is the generall challenger,No, fair Princess. He is the general challenger;AYL I.ii.158
I come but in as others do, to try with him the strengthI come but in as others do, to try with him the strengthAYL I.ii.159
of my youth.of my youth.AYL I.ii.160
I beseech you, punish mee not with your hardeI beseech you, punish me not with your hardAYL I.ii.171
thoughts, wherein I confesse me much guiltie to denie so thoughts, wherein I confess me much guilty to deny soAYL I.ii.172
faire and excellent Ladies anie thing. But let your faire eies, fair and excellent ladies anything. But let your fair eyesAYL I.ii.173
and gentle wishes go with mee to my triall; wherein if I bee and gentle wishes go with me to my trial: wherein if I beAYL I.ii.174
foil'd, there is but one sham'd that was neuer gracious: foiled, there is but one shamed that was never gracious;AYL I.ii.175
if kil'd, but one dead that is willing to be so: I shall doif killed, but one dead that is willing to be so. I shall doAYL I.ii.176
my friends no wrong, for I haue none to lament me: the my friends no wrong, for I have none to lament me; theAYL I.ii.177
world no iniurie, for in it I haue nothing: onely in the world no injury, for in it I have nothing: only in theAYL I.ii.178
world I fil vp a place, which may bee better supplied, world I fill up a place which may be better suppliedAYL I.ii.179
when I haue made it emptie.when I have made it empty.AYL I.ii.180
Readie Sir, but his will hath in it a more Ready, sir, but his will hath in it a moreAYL I.ii.189
modest working.modest working.AYL I.ii.190
You meane to mocke me after: you should notYou mean to mock me after; you should notAYL I.ii.195
haue mockt me before: but come your waies.have mocked me before. But come your ways!AYL I.ii.196
Yes I beseech your Grace, I am not yet wellYes, I beseech your grace, I am not yet wellAYL I.ii.204
breath'd.breathed.AYL I.ii.205
Orlando my Liege, the yongest sonne of Sir Orlando, my liege; the youngest son of SirAYL I.ii.210
Roland de Boys.Rowland de Boys.AYL I.ii.211
I am more proud to be Sir Rolands sonne,I am more proud to be Sir Rowland's son,AYL I.ii.220
His yongest sonne, and would not change that callingHis youngest son, and would not change that callingAYL I.ii.221
To be adopted heire to Fredricke.To be adopted heir to Frederick.AYL I.ii.222
Can I not say, I thanke you? My better partsCan I not say ‘ I thank you ’? My better partsAYL I.ii.238
Are all throwne downe, and that which here stands vpAre all thrown down, and that which here stands upAYL I.ii.239
Is but a quintine, a meere liuelesse blocke.Is but a quintain, a mere lifeless block.AYL I.ii.240
What passion hangs these waights vpõ my toong?What passion hangs these weights upon my tongue?AYL I.ii.246
I cannot speake to her, yet she vrg'd conference.I cannot speak to her, yet she urged conference.AYL I.ii.247
O poore Orlando! thou art ouerthrowneO poor Orlando, thou art overthrown!AYL I.ii.248
Or Charles, or something weaker masters thee.Or Charles or something weaker masters thee.AYL I.ii.249
I thanke you Sir; and pray you tell me this,I thank you, sir; and pray you tell me this,AYL I.ii.257
Which of the two was daughter of the Duke,Which of the two was daughter of the DukeAYL I.ii.258
That here was at the Wrastling?That here was at the wrestling?AYL I.ii.259
I rest much bounden to you: fare you well.I rest much bounden to you: fare you well.AYL I.ii.275
Thus must I from the smoake into the smother,Thus must I from the smoke into the smother,AYL I.ii.276
From tyrant Duke, vnto a tyrant Brother.From tyrant Duke unto a tyrant brother.AYL I.ii.277
But heauenly Rosaline. But heavenly Rosalind!AYL I.ii.278
Who's there?Who's there?AYL II.iii.1
Why, what's the matter?Why, what's the matter?AYL II.iii.16.1
Why whether Adam would'st thou haue me go?Why, whither, Adam, wouldst thou have me go?AYL II.iii.29
What, would'st thou haue me go & beg my food,What, wouldst thou have me go and beg my food,AYL II.iii.31
Or with a base and boistrous Sword enforceOr with a base and boisterous sword enforceAYL II.iii.32
A theeuish liuing on the common rode?A thievish living on the common road?AYL II.iii.33
This I must do, or know not what to do:This I must do, or know not what to do:AYL II.iii.34
Yet this I will not do, do how I can,Yet this I will not do, do how I can.AYL II.iii.35
I rather will subiect me to the maliceI rather will subject me to the maliceAYL II.iii.36
Of a diuerted blood, and bloudie brother.Of a diverted blood and bloody brother.AYL II.iii.37
Oh good old man, how well in thee appearesO good old man, how well in thee appearsAYL II.iii.56
The constant seruice of the antique world,The constant service of the antique world,AYL II.iii.57
When seruice sweate for dutie, not for meede:When service sweat for duty, not for meed!AYL II.iii.58
Thou art not for the fashion of these times,Thou art not for the fashion of these times,AYL II.iii.59
Where none will sweate, but for promotion,Where none will sweat but for promotion,AYL II.iii.60
And hauing that do choake their seruice vp,And having that do choke their service upAYL II.iii.61
Euen with the hauing, it is not so with thee:Even with the having; it is not so with thee.AYL II.iii.62
But poore old man, thou prun'st a rotten tree,But, poor old man, thou prunest a rotten treeAYL II.iii.63
That cannot so much as a blossome yeelde,That cannot so much as a blossom yieldAYL II.iii.64
In lieu of all thy paines and husbandrie,In lieu of all thy pains and husbandry.AYL II.iii.65
But come thy waies, weele goe along together,But come thy ways, we'll go along together,AYL II.iii.66
And ere we haue thy youthfull wages spent,And ere we have thy youthful wages spentAYL II.iii.67
Weele light vpon some setled low content.We'll light upon some settled low content.AYL II.iii.68
Why how now Adam? No greater heart in thee:Why, how now, Adam, no greater heart in thee?AYL II.vi.4
Liue a little, comfort a little, cheere thy selfe a little. / IfLive a little, comfort a little, cheer thyself a little. IfAYL II.vi.5
this vncouth Forrest yeeld any thing sauage, / I wil eitherthis uncouth forest yield anything savage, I will eitherAYL II.vi.6
be food for it, or bring it for foode to thee: / Thy conceite isbe food for it or bring it for food to thee. Thy conceit isAYL II.vi.7
neerer death, then thy powers. / For my sakenearer death than thy powers. (Raising him) For my sakeAYL II.vi.8
be comfortable, hold death a while / At the armes end: Ibe comfortable; hold death a while at the arm's end. IAYL II.vi.9
wil heere be with thee presently, / And if I bring thee not will here be with thee presently, and if I bring thee notAYL II.vi.10
something to eate, / I wil giue thee leaue to die: but ifsomething to eat, I will give thee leave to die; but ifAYL II.vi.11
thou diest / Before I come, thou art a mocker of mythou diest before I come, thou art a mocker of myAYL II.vi.12
labor. / Wel said, thou look'st cheerely, / And Ile be withlabour. Well said! Thou lookest cheerly, and I'll be withAYL II.vi.13
thee quickly: yet thou liest / In the bleake aire. Come, Ithee quickly. Yet thou liest in the bleak air. Come, IAYL II.vi.14
wil beare thee / To some shelter, and thou shalt not diewill bear thee to some shelter, and thou shalt not dieAYL II.vi.15
For lacke of a dinner, / If there liue any thing in this Desert.for lack of a dinner, if there live anything in this desert.AYL II.vi.16
Cheerely good Adam. Cheerly, good Adam!AYL II.vi.17
Forbeare, and eate no more.Forbear, and eat no more.AYL II.vii.88
Nor shalt not, till necessity be seru'd.Nor shalt not, till necessity be served.AYL II.vii.90
You touch'd my veine at first, the thorny pointYou touched my vein at first: the thorny pointAYL II.vii.95
Of bare distresse, hath tane from me the shewOf bare distress hath ta'en from me the showAYL II.vii.96
Of smooth ciuility: yet am I in-land bred,Of smooth civility; yet am I inland bredAYL II.vii.97
And know some nourture: But forbeare, I say,And know some nurture. But forbear, I say,AYL II.vii.98
He dies that touches any of this fruite,He dies that touches any of this fruitAYL II.vii.99
Till I, and my affaires are answered.Till I and my affairs are answered.AYL II.vii.100
I almost die for food, and let me haue it.I almost die for food, and let me have it.AYL II.vii.105
Speake you so gently? Pardon me I pray you,Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you.AYL II.vii.107
I thought that all things had bin sauage heere,I thought that all things had been savage here,AYL II.vii.108
And therefore put I on the countenanceAnd therefore put I on the countenanceAYL II.vii.109
Of sterne command'ment. But what ere you areOf stern commandment. But whate'er you areAYL II.vii.110
That in this desert inaccessible,That in this desert inaccessible,AYL II.vii.111
Vnder the shade of melancholly boughes,Under the shade of melancholy boughs,AYL II.vii.112
Loose, and neglect the creeping houres of time:Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time:AYL II.vii.113
If euer you haue look'd on better dayes:If ever you have looked on better days;AYL II.vii.114
If euer beene where bels haue knoll'd to Church:If ever been where bells have knolled to church;AYL II.vii.115
If euer sate at any good mans feast:If ever sat at any good man's feast;AYL II.vii.116
If euer from your eye-lids wip'd a teare,If ever from your eyelids wiped a tear,AYL II.vii.117
And know what 'tis to pittie, and be pittied:And know what 'tis to pity and be pitied,AYL II.vii.118
Let gentlenesse my strong enforcement be,Let gentleness my strong enforcement be,AYL II.vii.119
In the which hope, I blush, and hide my Sword.In the which hope I blush, and hide my sword.AYL II.vii.120
Then but forbeare your food a little while:Then but forbear your food a little whileAYL II.vii.128
Whiles (like a Doe) I go to finde my Fawne,Whiles, like a doe, I go to find my fawnAYL II.vii.129
And giue it food. There is an old poore man,And give it food. There is an old poor manAYL II.vii.130
Who after me, hath many a weary steppeWho after me hath many a weary stepAYL II.vii.131
Limpt in pure loue: till he be first suffic'd,Limped in pure love; till he be first sufficed,AYL II.vii.132
Opprest with two weake euils, age, and hunger,Oppressed with two weak evils, age and hunger,AYL II.vii.133
I will not touch a bit.I will not touch a bit.AYL II.vii.134.1
I thanke ye, and be blest for your good comfort.I thank ye, and be blessed for your good comfort!AYL II.vii.136
I thanke you most for him.I thank you most for him.AYL II.vii.170.1
Hang there my verse, in witnesse of my loue,Hang there, my verse, in witness of my love,AYL III.ii.1
And thou thrice crowned Queene of night surueyAnd thou, thrice-crowned queen of night, surveyAYL III.ii.2
With thy chaste eye, from thy pale spheare aboueWith thy chaste eye, from thy pale sphere above,AYL III.ii.3
Thy Huntresse name, that my full life doth sway.Thy huntress' name that my full life doth sway.AYL III.ii.4
O Rosalind, these Trees shall be my Bookes,O Rosalind, these trees shall be my booksAYL III.ii.5
And in their barkes my thoughts Ile charracter,And in their barks my thoughts I'll characterAYL III.ii.6
That euerie eye, which in this Forrest lookes,That every eye which in this forest looksAYL III.ii.7
Shall see thy vertue witnest euery where.Shall see thy virtue witnessed everywhere.AYL III.ii.8
Run, run Orlando, carue on euery Tree,Run, run, Orlando, carve on every treeAYL III.ii.9
The faire, the chaste, and vnexpressiue shee. The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she.AYL III.ii.10
And so had I: but yet for fashion sake / I thankeAnd so had I; but yet, for fashion sake, I thankAYL III.ii.248
you too, for your societie.you too for your society.AYL III.ii.249
I do desire we may be better strangers.I do desire we may be better strangers.AYL III.ii.251
I pray you marre no moe of my verses withI pray you, mar no moe of my verses withAYL III.ii.254
reading them ill-fauouredly.reading them ill-favouredly.AYL III.ii.255
Yes, Iust.Yes, just.AYL III.ii.257
There was no thought of pleasing you when There was no thought of pleasing you whenAYL III.ii.259
she was christen'd.she was christened.AYL III.ii.260
Iust as high as my heart.Just as high as my heart.AYL III.ii.262
Not so: but I answer you right painted cloath,Not so; but I answer you right painted cloth,AYL III.ii.266
from whence you haue studied your questions.from whence you have studied your questions.AYL III.ii.267
I wil chide no breather in the world but my selfeI will chide no breather in the world but myself,AYL III.ii.272
against whom I know mosl faults.against whom I know most faults.AYL III.ii.273
'Tis a fault I will not change, for your best 'Tis a fault I will not change for your bestAYL III.ii.275
vertue: I am wearie of you.virtue. I am weary of you.AYL III.ii.276
He is drown'd in the brooke, looke but in, andHe is drowned in the brook; look but in andAYL III.ii.279
you shall see him.you shall see him.AYL III.ii.280
Which I take to be either a foole, or a Cipher.Which I take to be either a fool or a cipher.AYL III.ii.282
I am glad of your departure: Adieu goodI am glad of your departure. Adieu, goodAYL III.ii.285
Monsieur Melancholly.Monsieur Melancholy.AYL III.ii.286
Verie wel, what would you? Very well. What would you?AYL III.ii.290
You should aske me what time o'day: there's noYou should ask me what time o' day: there's noAYL III.ii.292
clocke in the Forrest.clock in the forest.AYL III.ii.293
And why not the swift foote of time? Had notAnd why not the swift foot of Time? Had notAYL III.ii.297
that bin as proper?that been as proper?AYL III.ii.298
I prethee, who doth he trot withal?I prithee, who doth he trot withal?AYL III.ii.303
Who ambles Time withal?Who ambles Time withal?AYL III.ii.308
Who doth he gallop withal?Who doth he gallop withal?AYL III.ii.315
Who staies it stil withal?Who stays it still withal?AYL III.ii.319
Where dwel you prettie youth?Where dwell you, pretty youth?AYL III.ii.323
Are you natiue of this place?Are you native of this place?AYL III.ii.326
Your accent is something finer, then you couldYour accent is something finer than you couldAYL III.ii.329
purchase in so remoued a dwelling.purchase in so removed a dwelling.AYL III.ii.330
Can you remember any of the principall euils,Can you remember any of the principal evilsAYL III.ii.338
that he laid to the charge of women?that he laid to the charge of women?AYL III.ii.339
I prethee recount some of them.I prithee, recount some of them.AYL III.ii.343
I am he that is so Loue-shak'd, I pray you telI am he that is so love-shaked. I pray you, tellAYL III.ii.352
me your remedie.me your remedy.AYL III.ii.353
What were his markes?What were his marks?AYL III.ii.357
Faire youth, I would I could make thee beleeueFair youth, I would I could make thee believeAYL III.ii.369
I Loue.I love.AYL III.ii.370
I sweare to thee youth, by the white hand ofI swear to thee, youth, by the white hand ofAYL III.ii.377
Rosalind, I am that he, that vnfortunate he.Rosalind, I am that he, that unfortunate he.AYL III.ii.378
Neither rime nor reason can expresse howNeither rhyme nor reason can express howAYL III.ii.381
much.much.AYL III.ii.382
Did you euer cure any so?Did you ever cure any so?AYL III.ii.388
I would not be cured, youth.I would not be cured, youth.AYL III.ii.406
Now by the faith of my loue, I will ; Tel meNow, by the faith of my love, I will. Tell meAYL III.ii.409
where it is.where it is.AYL III.ii.410
With all my heart, good youth.With all my heart, good youth.AYL III.ii.414
Good day, and happinesse, deere Rosalind.Good day, and happiness, dear Rosalind!AYL IV.i.27
My faire Rosalind, I come within an houre of myMy fair Rosalind, I come within an hour of myAYL IV.i.37
promise.promise.AYL IV.i.38
Pardon me deere Rosalind.Pardon me, dear Rosalind.AYL IV.i.44
Of a Snaile?Of a snail?AYL IV.i.47
What's that?What's that?AYL IV.i.52
Vertue is no horne-maker: and my Rosalind isVirtue is no horn-maker; and my Rosalind isAYL IV.i.56
vertuous.virtuous.AYL IV.i.57
I would kisse before I spoke.I would kiss before I spoke.AYL IV.i.65
How if the kisse be denide?How if the kiss be denied?AYL IV.i.71
Who could be out, being before his belouedWho could be out, being before his belovedAYL IV.i.74
What, of my suite?What, of my suit?AYL IV.i.78
I take some ioy to say you are, because I wouldI take some joy to say you are, because I wouldAYL IV.i.81
be talking of her.be talking of her.AYL IV.i.82
Then in mine owne person, I die.Then, in mine own person, I die.AYL IV.i.84
I would not haue my right Rosalind of thisI would not have my right Rosalind of thisAYL IV.i.99
mind, for I protest her frowne might kill me.mind, for I protest her frown might kill me.AYL IV.i.100
Then loue me Rosalind.Then love me, Rosalind.AYL IV.i.104
And wilt thou haue me?And wilt thou have me?AYL IV.i.107
What saiest thou?What sayest thou?AYL IV.i.109
I hope so.I hope so.AYL IV.i.111
Pray thee marrie vs.Pray thee, marry us.AYL IV.i.116
I will.I will.AYL IV.i.121
Why now, as fast as she can marrie vs.Why, now, as fast as she can marry us.AYL IV.i.123
I take thee Rosalind for wife.I take thee, Rosalind, for wife.AYL IV.i.126
So do all thoughts, they are wing'd.So do all thoughts, they are winged.AYL IV.i.131
For euer, and a day.For ever and a day.AYL IV.i.134
But will my Rosalind doe so?But will my Rosalind do so?AYL IV.i.146
O but she is wise.O, but she is wise.AYL IV.i.148
A man that had a wife with such a wit, he mightA man that had a wife with such a wit, he mightAYL IV.i.154
say, wit whether wil't?say ‘ Wit, whither wilt?’AYL IV.i.155
And what wit could wit haue, to excuse that?And what wit could wit have to excuse that?AYL IV.i.158
For these two houres Rosalinde, I wil leaue thee.For these two hours, Rosalind, I will leave thee.AYL IV.i.164
I must attend the Duke at dinner, by twoI must attend the Duke at dinner. By twoAYL IV.i.166
a clock I will be with thee againe.o'clock I will be with thee again.AYL IV.i.167
I, sweet Rosalind.Ay, sweet Rosalind.AYL IV.i.173
With no lesse religion, then if thou wert indeedWith no less religion than if thou wert indeedAYL IV.i.182
my Rosalind: so adieu.my Rosalind. So, adieu.AYL IV.i.183
Is't possible, that on so little acquaintance youIs't possible, that on so little acquaintance youAYL V.ii.1
should like her? that, but seeing, you should loue her?should like her? That, but seeing, you should love her?AYL V.ii.2
And louing woo? and wooing, she should graunt? AndAnd loving woo? And, wooing, she should grant? AndAYL V.ii.3
will you perseuer to enioy her?will you persever to enjoy her?AYL V.ii.4
You haue my consent. / Let your Wedding beYou have my consent. Let your wedding beAYL V.ii.13
to morrow: thither will I / Inuite the Duke, and all'stomorrow. Thither will I invite the Duke and all'sAYL V.ii.14
contented followers: / Go you, and prepare Aliena; forcontented followers. Go you and prepare Aliena; for,AYL V.ii.15
looke you, / Heere comes my Rosalinde.look you, here comes my Rosalind.AYL V.ii.16
It is my arme.It is my arm.AYL V.ii.21
Wounded it is, but with the eyes of a Lady.Wounded it is, but with the eyes of a lady.AYL V.ii.24
I, and greater wonders then that.Ay, and greater wonders than that.AYL V.ii.27
They shall be married to morrow : and I willThey shall be married tomorrow; and I willAYL V.ii.40
bid the Duke to the Nuptiall. But O, how bitter a thingbid the Duke to the nuptial. But, O, how bitter a thingAYL V.ii.41
it is, to looke into happines through another mans eies:it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes!AYL V.ii.42
by so much the more shall I to morrow be at the heightBy so much the more shall I tomorrow be at the heightAYL V.ii.43
of heart heauinesse. by how much I shal thinke myof heart-heaviness, by how much I shall think myAYL V.ii.44
brother happie, in hauing what he wishes for.brother happy in having what he wishes for.AYL V.ii.45
I can liue no longer by thinking.I can live no longer by thinking.AYL V.ii.48
Speak'st thou in sober meanings?Speakest thou in sober meanings?AYL V.ii.66
And I for Rosalind.And I for Rosalind.AYL V.ii.82
And I for Rosalind.And I for Rosalind.AYL V.ii.87
And so am I for Rosalind.And so am I for Rosalind.AYL V.ii.96
If this be so, why blame you me to loue you?If this be so, why blame you me to love you?AYL V.ii.100
To her, that is not heere, nor doth not heare.To her that is not here, nor doth not hear.AYL V.ii.103
Nor I. Nor I.AYL V.ii.118
I sometimes do beleeue, and somtimes do not,I sometimes do believe, and sometimes do not,AYL V.iv.3
As those that feare they hope, and know they feare.As those that fear they hope, and know they fear.AYL V.iv.4
That would I, were I of all kingdomes King.That would I, were I of all kingdoms king.AYL V.iv.10
My Lord, the first time that I euer saw him,My lord, the first time that I ever saw himAYL V.iv.28
Me thought he was a brother to your daughrer:Methought he was a brother to your daughter.AYL V.iv.29
But my good Lord, this Boy is Forrest borne,But, my good lord, this boy is forest-born,AYL V.iv.30
And hath bin tutor'd in the rudimentsAnd hath been tutored in the rudimentsAYL V.iv.31
Of many desperate studies, by his vnckle,Of many desperate studies by his uncle,AYL V.iv.32
Whom he reports to be a great Magitian.Whom he reports to be a great magician,AYL V.iv.33
Obscured in the circle of this Forrest.Obscured in the circle of this forest.AYL V.iv.34
If there be truth in sight, you are my Rosalind.If there be truth in sight, you are my Rosalind.AYL V.iv.116
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL