OLIVER
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Now Sir, what make you heere?Now, sir, what make you here?AYL I.i.27
What mar you then sir?What mar you then, sir?AYL I.i.29
Marry sir be better employed, and be naught aMarry, sir, be better employed, and be naught aAYL I.i.33
while.while.AYL I.i.34
Know you where you are sir?Know you where your are, sir?AYL I.i.38
Know you before whom sir?Know you before whom, sir?AYL I.i.40
What Boy. What, boy!AYL I.i.49
Wilt thou lay hands on me villaine?Wilt thou lay hands on me, villain?AYL I.i.52
Let me goe I say.Let me go, I say.AYL I.i.61
And what wilt thou do? beg when that is spent?And what wilt thou do, beg when that is spent?AYL I.i.70
Well sir, get you in. I will not long be troubled withWell, sir, get you in. I will not long be troubled withAYL I.i.71
you: you shall haue some part of your will, I pray youyou: you shall have some part of your will. I pray you,AYL I.i.72
leaue me.leave me.AYL I.i.73
Get you with him, you olde dogge.Get you with him, you old dog.AYL I.i.76
Is it euen so, begin you to grow vpon me? I willIs it even so? Begin you to grow upon me? I willAYL I.i.80
physicke your ranckenesse, and yet giue no thousand crownesphysic your rankness, and yet give no thousand crownsAYL I.i.81
neyther: holla Dennis.neither. Holla, Dennis!AYL I.i.82
Was not Charles the Dukes Wrastler heere toWas not Charles, the Duke's wrestler, here toAYL I.i.84
speake with me?speak with me?AYL I.i.85
Call him in:Call him in.AYL I.i.88
'twill be a good way: and to morrow the wrastling is.'Twill be a good way – and tomorrow the wrestling is.AYL I.i.89
Good Mounsier Charles: what's the new newes atGood Monsieur Charles, what's the new news atAYL I.i.91
the new Court?the new court?AYL I.i.92
Can you tell if Rosalind the Dukes daughter beeCan you tell if Rosalind, the Duke's daughter, beAYL I.i.99
banished with her Father?banished with her father?AYL I.i.100
Where will the old Duke liue?Where will the old Duke live?AYL I.i.107
What, you wrastle to morrow before the newWhat, you wrestle tomorrow before the newAYL I.i.113
Duke.Duke?AYL I.i.114
Charles, I thanke thee for thy loue to me, whichCharles, I thank thee for thy love to me, whichAYL I.i.128
thou shalt finde I will most kindly requite: I had my selfethou shalt find I will most kindly requite. I had myselfAYL I.i.129
notice of my Brothers purpose heerein, and haue bynotice of my brother's purpose herein, and have byAYL I.i.130
vnder-hand meanes laboured to disswade him from it;underhand means laboured to dissuade him from it;AYL I.i.131
but he is resolute. Ile tell thee Charles, it is the stubbornest but he is resolute. I'll tell thee, Charles, it is the stubbornestAYL I.i.132
yong fellow of France, full of ambition, anyoung fellow of France, full of ambition, anAYL I.i.133
enuious emulator of euery mans good parts, a secret &envious emulator of every man's good parts, a secret andAYL I.i.134
villanous contriuer against mee his naturall brother:villanous contriver against me his natural brother.AYL I.i.135
therefore vse thy discretion, I had as liefe thou didst Therefore use thy discretion; I had as lief thou didstAYL I.i.136
breake his necke as his finger. And thou wert best lookebreak his neck as his finger. And thou wert best lookAYL I.i.137
to't; for if thou dost him any slight disgrace, or if heeto't; for if thou dost him any slight disgrace, or if heAYL I.i.138
doe not mightilie grace himselfe on thee, hee will practisedo not mightily grace himself on thee, he will practiseAYL I.i.139
against thee by poyson, entrap thee by some treacherousagainst thee by poison, entrap thee by some treacherousAYL I.i.140
deuise, and neuer leaue thee till he hath tane thy lifedevice, and never leave thee till he hath ta'en thy lifeAYL I.i.141
by some indirect meanes or other: for I assure thee,by some indirect means or other: for, I assure thee – AYL I.i.142
(and almost with teares I speake it) there is not one soand almost with tears I speak it – there is not one soAYL I.i.143
young, and so villanous this day liuing. I speake butyoung and so villainous this day living. I speak butAYL I.i.144
brotherly of him, but should I anathomize him to thee,brotherly of him, but should I anatomize him to theeAYL I.i.145
as hee is, I must blush, and weepe, and thou must lookeas he is, I must blush and weep, and thou must lookAYL I.i.146
pale and wonder.pale and wonder.AYL I.i.147
Farewell good Charles. Now will I stirre thisFarewell, good Charles. Now will I stir thisAYL I.i.152
Gamester: I hope I shall see an end of him; for my soulegamester. I hope I shall see an end of him, for my soul – AYL I.i.153
(yet I know not why) hates nothing more then he: yetyet I know not why – hates nothing more than he. YetAYL I.i.154
hee's gentle, neuer school'd, and yet learned, full ofhe's gentle, never schooled and yet learned, full ofAYL I.i.155
noble deuise, of all sorts enchantingly beloued, andnoble device, of all sorts enchantingly beloved, andAYL I.i.156
indeed so much in the heart of the world, and especiallyindeed so much in the heart of the world, and especiallyAYL I.i.157
of my owne people, who best know him, that I amof my own people, who best know him, that I amAYL I.i.158
altogether misprised: but it shall not be so long, thisaltogether misprized. But it shall not be so long; thisAYL I.i.159
wrastler shall cleare all: nothing remaines, but that Iwrestler shall clear all. Nothing remains but that IAYL I.i.160
kindle the boy thither, which now Ile goe about. kindle the boy thither, which now I'll go about.AYL I.i.161
Oh that your Highnesse knew my heart in this:O that your highness knew my heart in this!AYL III.i.13
I neuer lou'd my brother in my life.I never loved my brother in my life.AYL III.i.14
Good morrow, faire ones: pray you, (if you know)Good morrow, fair ones. Pray you, if you know,AYL IV.iii.76
Where in the Purlews of this Forrest, stands Where in the purlieus of this forest standsAYL IV.iii.77
A sheep-coat, fenc'd about with Oliue-trees.A sheepcote fenced about with olive trees?AYL IV.iii.78
If that an eye may profit by a tongue,If that an eye may profit by a tongue,AYL IV.iii.84
Then should I know you by description,Then should I know you by description.AYL IV.iii.85
Such garments, and such yeeres: the boy is faire,Such garments and such years: ‘The boy is fair,AYL IV.iii.86
Of femall fauour, and bestowes himselfeOf female favour, and bestows himselfAYL IV.iii.87
Like a ripe sister: the woman lowLike a ripe sister; the woman lowAYL IV.iii.88
And browner then her brother: are not youAnd browner than her brother'. Are not youAYL IV.iii.89
The owner of the house I did enquire for?The owner of the house I did inquire for?AYL IV.iii.90
Orlando doth commend him to you both,Orlando doth commend him to you both,AYL IV.iii.92
And to that youth hee calls his Rosalind,And to that youth he calls his ‘ Rosalind ’AYL IV.iii.93
He sends this bloudy napkin; are you he?He sends this bloody napkin. Are you he?AYL IV.iii.94
Some of my shame, if you will know of meSome of my shame, if you will know of meAYL IV.iii.96
What man I am, and how, and why, and whereWhat man I am, and how, and why, and whereAYL IV.iii.97
This handkercher was stain'd.This handkercher was stained.AYL IV.iii.98.1
When last the yong Orlando parted from you,When last the young Orlando parted from you,AYL IV.iii.99
He left a promise to returne againeHe left a promise to return againAYL IV.iii.100
Within an houre, and pacing through the Forrest,Within an hour; and pacing through the forest,AYL IV.iii.101
Chewing the food of sweet and bitter fancie,Chewing the food of sweet and bitter fancy,AYL IV.iii.102
Loe what befell: he threw his eye aside,Lo, what befell! He threw his eye aside,AYL IV.iii.103
And marke what obiect did present it selfeAnd mark what object did present itself!AYL IV.iii.104
Vnder an old Oake, whose bows were moss'd with ageUnder an oak, whose boughs were mossed with ageAYL IV.iii.105
And high top, bald with drie antiquitie:And high top bald with dry antiquity,AYL IV.iii.106
A wretched ragged man, ore-growne with haireA wretched ragged man, o'ergrown with hair,AYL IV.iii.107
Lay sleeping on his back; about his neckeLay sleeping on his back. About his neckAYL IV.iii.108
A greene and guilded snake had wreath'd it selfe,A green and gilded snake had wreathed itself,AYL IV.iii.109
Who with her head, nimble in threats approach'dWho with her head nimble in threats approachedAYL IV.iii.110
The opening of his mouth: but sodainlyThe opening of his mouth; but suddenly,AYL IV.iii.111
Seeing Orlando, it vnlink'd it selfe,Seeing Orlando, it unlinked itselfAYL IV.iii.112
And with indented glides, did slip awayAnd with indented glides did slip awayAYL IV.iii.113
Into a bush, vnder which bushes shadeInto a bush: under which bush's shadeAYL IV.iii.114
A Lyonnesse, with vdders all drawne drie,A lioness, with udders all drawn dry,AYL IV.iii.115
Lay cowching head on ground, with catlike watchLay couching, head on ground, with catlike watchAYL IV.iii.116
When that the sleeping man should stirre; for 'tisWhen that the sleeping man should stir; for 'tisAYL IV.iii.117
The royall disposition of that beastThe royal disposition of that beastAYL IV.iii.118
To prey on nothing, that doth seeme as dead:To prey on nothing that doth seem as dead.AYL IV.iii.119
This seene, Orlando did approach the man,This seen, Orlando did approach the man,AYL IV.iii.120
And found it was his brother, his elder brother.And found it was his brother, his elder brother.AYL IV.iii.121
And well he might so doe,And well he might so do,AYL IV.iii.124.2
For well I know he was vnnaturall.For well I know he was unnatural.AYL IV.iii.125
Twice did he turne his backe, and purpos'd so:Twice did he turn his back and purposed so.AYL IV.iii.128
But kindnesse, nobler euer then reuenge,But kindness, nobler ever than revenge,AYL IV.iii.129
And Nature stronger then his iust occasion,And nature, stronger than his just occasion,AYL IV.iii.130
Made him giue battell to the Lyonnesse:Made him give battle to the lioness,AYL IV.iii.131
Who quickly fell before him, in which hurtlingWho quickly fell before him; in which hurtlingAYL IV.iii.132
From miserable slumber I awaked.From miserable slumber I awaked.AYL IV.iii.133
'Twas I: but 'tis not I: I doe not shame'Twas I, but 'tis not I: I do not shameAYL IV.iii.136
To tell you what I was, since my conuersionTo tell you what I was, since my conversionAYL IV.iii.137
So sweetly tastes, being the thing I am.So sweetly tastes, being the thing I am.AYL IV.iii.138
By and by:By and by.AYL IV.iii.139.2
When from the first to last betwixt vs two,When from the first to last betwixt us twoAYL IV.iii.140
Teares our recountments had most kindely bath'd,Tears our recountments had most kindly bathed,AYL IV.iii.141
As how I came into that Desert place.As how I came into that desert place – AYL IV.iii.142
I briefe, he led me to the gentle Duke,I' brief, he led me to the gentle Duke,AYL IV.iii.143
Who gaue me fresh aray, and entertainment,Who gave me fresh array and entertainment,AYL IV.iii.144
Committing me vnto my brothers loue,Committing me unto my brother's love,AYL IV.iii.145
Who led me instantly vnto his Caue,Who led me instantly unto his cave,AYL IV.iii.146
There stript himselfe, and heere vpon his armeThere stripped himself, and here upon his armAYL IV.iii.147
The Lyonnesse had torne some flesh away,The lioness had torn some flesh away,AYL IV.iii.148
Which all this while had bled; and now he fainted,Which all this while had bled; and now he fainted,AYL IV.iii.149
And cride in fainting vpon Rosalinde.And cried, in fainting, upon Rosalind.AYL IV.iii.150
Briefe, I recouer'd him, bound vp his wound,Brief, I recovered him, bound up his wound,AYL IV.iii.151
And after some small space, being strong at heart,And after some small space, being strong at heart,AYL IV.iii.152
He sent me hither, stranger as I amHe sent me hither, stranger as I am,AYL IV.iii.153
To tell this story, that you might excuseTo tell this story, that you might excuseAYL IV.iii.154
His broken promise, and to giue this napkinHis broken promise, and to give this napkin,AYL IV.iii.155
Died in this bloud, vnto the Shepheard youth,Dyed in this blood, unto the shepherd youthAYL IV.iii.156
That he in sport doth call his Rosalind.That he in sport doth call his ‘ Rosalind.’AYL IV.iii.157
Many will swoon when they do look on bloud.Many will swoon when they do look on blood.AYL IV.iii.159
Looke, he recouers.Look, he recovers.AYL IV.iii.161
Be of good cheere youth: you a man? / You lackeBe of good cheer, youth! You a man? You lackAYL IV.iii.164
a mans heart.a man's heart.AYL IV.iii.165
This was not counterfeit, there is too great testimonyThis was not counterfeit, there is too great testimonyAYL IV.iii.169
in your complexion, that it was a passion of earnest.in your complexion that it was a passion of earnest.AYL IV.iii.170
Well then, take a good heart, and counterfeit toWell then, take a good heart, and counterfeit toAYL IV.iii.172
be a man.be a man.AYL IV.iii.173
That will I: for I must beare answere backeThat will I: for I must bear answer backAYL IV.iii.178
How you excuse my brother, Rosalind.How you excuse my brother, Rosalind.AYL IV.iii.179
Neither call the giddinesse of it in question; theNeither call the giddiness of it in question: theAYL V.ii.5
pouertie of her, the small acquaintance, my sodainepoverty of her, the small acquaintance, my suddenAYL V.ii.6
woing, nor sodaine consenting: but say with mee,wooing, nor her sudden consenting; but say with meAYL V.ii.7
I loue Aliena: say with her, that she loues mee; consent‘ I love Aliena;’ say with her that she loves me; consentAYL V.ii.8
with both, that we may enioy each other: it shall be towith both that we may enjoy each other. It shall be toAYL V.ii.9
your good: for my fathers house, and all the reuennew,your good, for my father's house and all the revenueAYL V.ii.10
that was old Sir Rowlands will I estate vpon you, andthat was old Sir Rowland's will I estate upon you, andAYL V.ii.11
heere liue and die a Shepherd.here live and die a shepherd.AYL V.ii.12
And you faire sister.And you, fair sister.AYL V.ii.18
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