SIR TOBY
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What a plague meanes my Neece to take the death What a plague means my niece to take the deathTN I.iii.1
of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemie to life.of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemy to life.TN I.iii.2
Why let her except, before excepted.Why, let her except before excepted.TN I.iii.6
Confine? Ile confine my selfe no finer then I am:Confine! I'll confine myself no finer than I am.TN I.iii.9
these cloathes are good enough to drinke in, and so beeThese clothes are good enough to drink in, and so beTN I.iii.10
these boots too: and they be not, let them hang themselues these boots too; an they be not, let them hang themselvesTN I.iii.11
in their owne straps.in their own straps.TN I.iii.12
Who, Sir Andrew Ague-cheeke?Who? Sir Andrew Aguecheek?TN I.iii.16
He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.TN I.iii.18
Why he ha's three thousand ducates a yeare.Why, he has three thousand ducats a year.TN I.iii.20
Fie, that you'l say so: he playes o'th Viol-de-ganboys, Fie, that you'll say so. He plays o'the viol-de-gamboys,TN I.iii.23
and speaks three or four languages word for and speaks three or four languages word forTN I.iii.24
word without booke, & hath all the good gifts of nature.word without book, and hath all the good gifts of nature.TN I.iii.25
By this hand they are scoundrels and substractors By this hand, they are scoundrels and substractorsTN I.iii.31
that say so of him. Who are they?that say so of him. Who are they?TN I.iii.32
With drinking healths to my Neece: Ile drinke to With drinking healths to my niece. I'll drink toTN I.iii.35
her as long as there is a passage in my throat, & drinkeher as long as there is a passage in my throat and drinkTN I.iii.36
in Illyria: he's a Coward and a Coystrill that will notin Illyria. He's a coward and a coistrel that will notTN I.iii.37
drinke to my Neece. till his braines turne o'th toe, like adrink to my niece till his brains turn o'the toe like aTN I.iii.38
parish top. What wench? Castiliano vulgo : for here parish top. What, wench! Castiliano, vulgo – for hereTN I.iii.39
coms Sir Andrew Agueface.comes Sir Andrew Agueface!TN I.iii.40
Sweet sir Andrew.Sweet Sir Andrew!TN I.iii.43
Accost Sir Andrew, accost.Accost, Sir Andrew, accost.TN I.iii.46
My Neeces Chamber-maid.My niece's chambermaid.TN I.iii.48
You mistake knight: Accost, is front You mistake, knight. ‘ Accost ’ is frontTN I.iii.53
her, boord her, woe her, assayle her.her, board her, woo her, assail her.TN I.iii.54
And thou let part so Sir Andrew, would An thou let part so, Sir Andrew, wouldTN I.iii.58
thou mightst neuer draw sword agen.thou mightst never draw sword again.TN I.iii.59
O knight, thou lack'st a cup of Canarie: when O knight, thou lack'st a cup of canary. WhenTN I.iii.77
did I see thee so put downe?did I see thee so put down?TN I.iii.78
No question.No question.TN I.iii.84
Pur-quoy my deere knight?Pourquoi, my dear knight?TN I.iii.87
Then hadst thou had an excellent head of haire.Then hadst thou had an excellent head of hair.TN I.iii.92
Past question, for thou seest it will not coole my Past question, for thou seest it will not curl byTN I.iii.94
nature.nature.TN I.iii.95
Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaffe: & I Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaff; and ITN I.iii.97
hope to see a huswife take thee between her legs, & hope to see a huswife take thee between her legs andTN I.iii.98
spin it off.spin it off.TN I.iii.99
Shee'l none o'th Count, she'l not match aboue She'll none o'the Count; she'll not match aboveTN I.iii.103
hir degree, neither in estate, yeares, nor wit: I haue heard her degree, neither in estate, years, nor wit. I have heardTN I.iii.104
her swear't. Tut there's life in't man.her swear't. Tut, there's life in't, man.TN I.iii.105
Art thou good at these kicke-chawses Knight?Art thou good at these kickshawses, knight?TN I.iii.109
What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?TN I.iii.113
And I can cut the Mutton too't.And I can cut the mutton to't.TN I.iii.115
Wherefore are these things hid? Wherefore Wherefore are these things hid? WhereforeTN I.iii.118
haue these gifts a Curtaine before 'em? Are they like to have these gifts a curtain before 'em? Are they like toTN I.iii.119
take dust, like mistris Mals picture? Why dost thoutake dust, like Mistress Mall's picture? Why dost thouTN I.iii.120
not goe to Church in a Galliard, and come home in a not go to church in a galliard and come home in aTN I.iii.121
Carranto? My verie walke should be a Iigge: I would not so coranto? My very walk should be a jig. I would not soTN I.iii.122
much as make water but in a Sinke-a-pace: What dooest thoumuch as make water but in a sink-apace. What dost thouTN I.iii.123
meane? Is it a world to hide vertues in? I did thinke bymean? Is it a world to hide virtues in? I did think byTN I.iii.124
the excellent constitution of thy legge, it was form'd vnder the excellent constitution of thy leg it was formed underTN I.iii.125
the starre of a Galliard.the star of a galliard.TN I.iii.126
What shall we do else: were we not borne vnderWhat shall we do else? Were we not born underTN I.iii.129
Taurus?Taurus?TN I.iii.130
No sir, it is leggs and thighes: let me see thee No, sir, it is legs and thighs. Let me see theeTN I.iii.132
caper. Ha, higher: ha, ha, excellent. caper. Ha! Higher! Ha! Ha! Excellent!TN I.iii.133
A Gentleman.A gentleman.TN I.v.113
'Tis a Gentleman heere. A plague o'these 'Tis a gentleman here – a plague o' theseTN I.v.115
pickle herring: How now Sot.pickle-herring! (To Feste) How now, sot!TN I.v.116
Letcherie, I defie Letchery: there's one at theLechery! I defy lechery! There's one at theTN I.v.120
gate.gate.TN I.v.121
Let him be the diuell and he will, I care not: giueLet him be the devil an he will, I care not. GiveTN I.v.123
me faith say I. Well, it's all one. me faith, say I. Well, it's all one.TN I.v.124
Approach Sir Andrew: not to bee a bedde afterApproach, Sir Andrew. Not to be abed afterTN II.iii.1
midnight, is to be vp betimes, and Deliculo surgere, midnight, is to be up betimes, and diluculo surgere,TN II.iii.2
thou know'st.thou knowest – TN II.iii.3
A false conclusion: I hate it as an vnfill'd Canne.A false conclusion! I hate it as an unfilled can.TN II.iii.6
To be vp after midnight, and to go to bed then is early:To be up after midnight and to go to bed then is early;TN II.iii.7
so that to go to bed after midnight, is to goe to bed betimes. so that to go to bed after midnight is to go to bed betimes.TN II.iii.8
Does not our liues consist of the foure Elements? Does not our lives consist of the four elements?TN II.iii.9
Th'art a scholler; let vs therefore eate and Thou'rt a scholar. Let us therefore eat andTN II.iii.12
drinke. Marian I say, a stoope of wine. drink. Marian, I say! A stoup of wine!TN II.iii.13
Welcome asse, now let's haue a catch.Welcome, ass! Now let's have a catch.TN II.iii.17
Come on, there is sixe pence for you. Let's haue a Come on, there is sixpence for you. Let's have aTN II.iii.30
song.song.TN II.iii.31
A loue song, a loue song.A love song! A love song!TN II.iii.35
Good, good.Good, good.TN II.iii.44
A contagious breath.A contagious breath.TN II.iii.52
To heare by the nose, it is dulcet in contagion.To hear by the nose, it is dulcet in contagion.TN II.iii.54
But shall we make the Welkin dance indeed? Shall weeBut shall we make the welkin dance indeed? Shall weTN II.iii.55
rowze the night-Owle in a Catch, that will drawe three soules rouse the night-owl in a catch that will draw three soulsTN II.iii.56
out of one Weauer? Shall we do that?out of one weaver? Shall we do that?TN II.iii.57
My Lady's a Catayan, we are politicians, My lady's a – Cataian; we are – politicians;TN II.iii.73
Maluolios a Peg-a-ramsie, and Malvolio's a – Peg-a-Ramsey; and (he sings)TN II.iii.74
Three merry men be wee. Three merry men be we!TN II.iii.75
Am not I consanguinious? Am I not of her blood: Am not I consanguineous? Am I not of her blood?TN II.iii.76
tilly vally. Ladie, Tilly-vally! ‘ Lady ’! (He sings)TN II.iii.77
There dwelt a man in Babylon, Lady, Lady.There dwelt a man in Babylon, lady, lady – TN II.iii.78
O the twelfe day of December.O' the twelfth day of December – TN II.iii.83
We did keepe time sir in our Catches. Snecke vp.We did keep time, sir, in our catches. Sneck up!TN II.iii.92
Farewell deere heart, since I must needs be gone.Farewell, dear heart, since I must needs be gone – TN II.iii.99
But I will neuer dye.But I will never die – TN II.iii.103
Shall I bid him go.Shall I bid him go?TN II.iii.106
Shall I bid him go, and spare not?Shall I bid him go and spare not?TN II.iii.108
Out o'tune sir, ye lye: Art any Out o' tune, sir, ye lie. (To Malvolio) Art anyTN II.iii.110
more then a Steward? Dost thou thinke because thou art more than a steward? Dost thou think, because thou artTN II.iii.111
vertuous, there shall be no more Cakes and Ale?virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?TN II.iii.112
Th'art i'th right. Goe sir, rub Th' art i'the right. (To Malvolio) Go, sir, rub TN II.iii.115
your Chaine with crums. A stope of Wine Maria.your chain with crumbs. A stoup of wine, Maria!TN II.iii.116
Doo't knight, Ile write thee a Challenge: or IleDo't, knight, I'll write thee a challenge; or I'llTN II.iii.125
deliuer thy indignation to him by word of mouth.deliver thy indignation to him by word of mouth.TN II.iii.126
Possesse vs, possesse vs, tell vs something of him.Possess us, possess us, tell us something of him.TN II.iii.133
What for being a Puritan, thy exquisite reason,What, for being a puritan? Thy exquisite reason,TN II.iii.136
deere knight.dear knight?TN II.iii.137
What wilt thou do?What wilt thou do?TN II.iii.147
Excellent, I smell a deuice.Excellent! I smell a device.TN II.iii.155
He shall thinke by the Letters that thou wilt He shall think by the letters that thou wiltTN II.iii.157
drop that they come from my Neece, and that shee's in drop that they come from my niece, and that she's inTN II.iii.158
loue with him.love with him.TN II.iii.159
Good night Penthisilea.Good night, Penthesilea.TN II.iii.170
She's a beagle true bred, and one that adores She's a beagle true bred, and one that adoresTN II.iii.172
me: what o'that?me – what o' that?TN II.iii.173
Let's to bed knight: Thou hadst neede send forLet's to bed, knight. Thou hadst need send forTN II.iii.175
more money.more money.TN II.iii.176
Send for money knight, if thou hast her not Send for money, knight. If thou hast her notTN II.iii.179
i'th end, call me Cut.i'the end, call me cut.TN II.iii.180
Come, come, Ile go burne some Sacke, tis too Come, come, I'll go burn some sack, 'tis tooTN II.iii.183
late to go to bed now: Come knight, come knight. late to go to bed now. Come, knight; come, knight.TN II.iii.184
Come thy wayes Signior Fabian.Come thy ways, Signor Fabian.TN II.v.1
Wouldst thou not be glad to haue the niggardly Wouldst thou not be glad to have the niggardly,TN II.v.4
Rascally sheepe-biter, come by some notable rascally sheep-biter come by some notableTN II.v.5
shame?shame?TN II.v.6
To anger him wee'l haue the Beare againe, andTo anger him, we'll have the bear again, andTN II.v.9
we will foole him blacke and blew, shall we not sir we will fool him black and blue – shall we not, SirTN II.v.10
Andrew? Andrew?TN II.v.11
Heere comes the little villaine: How now myHere comes the little villain. How now, myTN II.v.13
Mettle of India?metal of India?TN II.v.14
Heere's an ouer-weening rogue.Here's an overweening rogue!TN II.v.29
Peace I say.Peace, I say!TN II.v.33
Ah Rogue.Ah, rogue!TN II.v.35
Peace, peace.Peace, peace!TN II.v.37
O for a stone-bow to hit him in the eye.O for a stone-bow to hit him in the eye!TN II.v.45
Fire and Brimstone.Fire and brimstone!TN II.v.49
Boltes and shackles.Bolts and shackles!TN II.v.55
Shall this fellow liue?Shall this fellow live?TN II.v.62
And do's not Toby take you a blow o'the lippes,And does not Toby take you a blow o'the lipsTN II.v.67
then?then?TN II.v.68
What, what?What, what!TN II.v.72
Out scab.Out, scab!TN II.v.74
Oh peace, and the spirit of humors intimate O, peace, and the spirit of humours intimateTN II.v.84
reading aloud to him.reading aloud to him!TN II.v.85
Marrie hang thee brocke.Marry, hang thee, brock!TN II.v.102
Excellent Wench, say I.Excellent wench, say I!TN II.v.108
And with what wing the stallion checkes at it?And with what wing the staniel checks at it!TN II.v.112
O I, make vp that, he is now at a cold sent.O, ay, make up that. He is now at a cold scent.TN II.v.119
I, or Ile cudgell him, and make him cry O.Ay, or I'll cudgel him and make him cry O.TN II.v.130
I could marry this wench for this deuice.I could marry this wench for this device.TN II.v.175
And aske no other dowry with her, but such another And ask no other dowry with her but such anotherTN II.v.177
iest.jest.TN II.v.178
Wilt thou set thy foote o'my necke.Wilt thou set thy foot o' my neck?TN II.v.181
Shall I play my freedome at tray-trip, and becomShall I play my freedom at tray-trip and becomeTN II.v.183
thy bondslaue?thy bondslave?TN II.v.184
Why, thou hast put him in such a dreame, thatWhy, thou hast put him in such a dream, thatTN II.v.186
when the image of it leaues him, he must run mad.when the image of it leaves him, he must run mad.TN II.v.187
Like Aqua vite with a Midwife.Like aqua-vitae with a midwife.TN II.v.189
To the gates of Tartar, thou most excellent To the gates of Tartar, thou most excellentTN II.v.198
diuell of wit.devil of wit!TN II.v.199
Saue you Gentleman.Save you, gentleman!TN III.i.67
Will you incounter the house, my Neece is Will you encounter the house? My niece isTN III.i.72
desirous you should enter, if your trade be to her.desirous you should enter, if your trade be to her.TN III.i.73
Taste your legges sir, put them to motion.Taste your legs, sir; put them to motion.TN III.i.76
I meane to go sir, to enter.I mean to go, sir, to enter.TN III.i.79
Thy reason deere venom, giue thy reason.Thy reason, dear venom, give thy reason.TN III.ii.2
Did she see the while, old boy, tell me Did she see thee the while, old boy, tell meTN III.ii.7
that.that?TN III.ii.8
And they haue beene grand Iurie men, since beforeAnd they have been grand-jury men since beforeTN III.ii.15
Noah was a Saylor.Noah was a sailor.TN III.ii.16
Why then build me thy fortunes vpon the basis Why then, build me thy fortunes upon the basisTN III.ii.31
of valour. Challenge me the Counts youth to fight with of valour. Challenge me the Count's youth to fight withTN III.ii.32
him / hurt him in eleuen places, my Neece shall take note him; hurt him in eleven places; my niece shall take noteTN III.ii.33
of it, and assure thy selfe, there is no loue-Broker in the of it – and, assure thyself, there is no love-broker in theTN III.ii.34
world, can more preuaile in mans commendation with world can more prevail in man's commendation withTN III.ii.35
woman, then report of valour.woman than report of valour.TN III.ii.36
Go, write it in a martial hand, be curst and Go, write it in a martial hand. Be curst andTN III.ii.40
briefe: it is no matter how wittie, so it bee eloquent, and brief. It is no matter how witty, so it be eloquent andTN III.ii.41
full of inuention: taunt him with the license of Inke: if full of invention. Taunt him with the licence of ink. IfTN III.ii.42
thou thou'st him some thrice, it shall not be amisse, and thou ‘ thou’-est him some thrice it shall not be amiss, andTN III.ii.43
as many Lyes, as will lye in thy sheete of paper, although as many lies as will lie in thy sheet of paper – althoughTN III.ii.44
the sheete were bigge enough for the bedde of Ware in England, the sheet were big enough for the bed of Ware in England,TN III.ii.45
set 'em downe, go about it. Let there bee gaulle enough set 'em down, go about it. Let there be gall enoughTN III.ii.46
in thy inke, though thou write with a Goose-pen, no in thy ink, though thou write with a goose pen, noTN III.ii.47
matter: about it.matter. About it!TN III.ii.48
Wee'l call thee at the Cubiculo: Go.We'll call thee at thy cubiculo. Go!TN III.ii.50
I haue beene deere to him lad, some two thousandI have been dear to him, lad, some two thousandTN III.ii.52
strong, or so.strong or so.TN III.ii.53
Neuer trust me then: and by all meanes stirre onNever trust me then – and by all means stir onTN III.ii.56
the youth to an answer. I thinke Oxen and waine-ropesthe youth to an answer. I think oxen and wain-ropesTN III.ii.57
cannot hale them together. For Andrew, if he were cannot hale them together. For Andrew, if he wereTN III.ii.58
open'd and you finde so much blood in his Liuer, as will opened and you find so much blood in his liver as willTN III.ii.59
clog the foote of a flea, Ile eate the rest of th'anatomy.clog the foot of a flea, I'll eat the rest of the anatomy.TN III.ii.60
Looke where the youngest Wren of mine comes.Look where the youngest wren of nine comes.TN III.ii.63
And crosse garter'd?And cross-gartered?TN III.ii.70
Come bring vs, bring vs where he is.Come, bring us, bring us where he is.TN III.ii.80
Which way is hee in the name of sanctity. If allWhich way is he, in the name of sanctity? If allTN III.iv.84
the diuels of hell be drawne in little, and Legion himselfethe devils of hell be drawn in little and Legion himselfTN III.iv.85
possest him, yet Ile speake to him.possessed him, yet I'll speak to him.TN III.iv.86
Go too, go too: peace, peace, wee must deale gently Go to, go to! Peace, peace, we must deal gentlyTN III.iv.95
with him: Let me alone. How do you Maluolio? How with him. Let me alone. How do you, Malvolio? HowTN III.iv.96
ist with you? What man, defie the diuell: consider,is't with you? What, man, defy the devil! Consider,TN III.iv.97
he's an enemy to mankinde.he's an enemy to mankind.TN III.iv.98
Prethee hold thy peace, this is not the way: DoePrithee, hold thy peace, this is not the way. DoTN III.iv.108
you not see you moue him? Let me alone with him.you not see you move him? Let me alone with him.TN III.iv.109
Why how now my bawcock? how dost yu Why, how now, my bawcock? How dost thou,TN III.iv.112
chuck?chuck?TN III.iv.113
I biddy, come with me. What man, tis not Ay, biddy, come with me. What, man, 'tis notTN III.iv.115
for grauity to play at cherrie-pit with sathan Hang him for gravity to play at cherry-pit with Satan. Hang him,TN III.iv.116
foul Colliar.foul collier!TN III.iv.117
Ist possible?Is't possible?TN III.iv.125
His very genius hath taken the infection of theHis very genius hath taken the infection of theTN III.iv.128
deuice man.device, man.TN III.iv.129
Come, wee'l haue him in a darke room & Come, we'll have him in a dark room andTN III.iv.134
bound. My Neece is already in the beleefe that he's mad: bound. My niece is already in the belief that he's mad.TN III.iv.135
we may carry it thus for our pleasure, and his pennance, We may carry it thus for our pleasure and his penanceTN III.iv.136
til our very pastime tyred out of breath, prompt vs to till our very pastime, tired out of breath, prompt us toTN III.iv.137
haue mercy on him: at which time, we wil bring the have mercy on him; at which time, we will bring theTN III.iv.138
deuice to the bar and crowne thee for a finder of madmen: device to the bar, and crown thee for a finder of madmen.TN III.iv.139
but see, but see.But see, but see!TN III.iv.140
Giue me.Give me.TN III.iv.146
Youth, whatsoeuer thou art, thou art but a scuruy fellow.Youth, whatsoever thou art, thou art but a scurvy fellow.TN III.iv.147
Wonder not, nor admire not in thy minde Wonder not, nor admire not in thy mind,TN III.iv.149
why I doe call thee so, for I will shew thee no reason for't.why I do call thee so, for I will show thee no reason for't.TN III.iv.150
Thou comst to the Lady Oliuia, and in Thou com'st to the Lady Olivia, and inTN III.iv.153
my sight she vses thee kindly: but thou lyest in thy throat,my sight she uses thee kindly. But thou liest in thy throat;TN III.iv.154
that is not the matter I challenge thee for.that is not the matter I challenge thee for.TN III.iv.155
I will way-lay thee going home, where if I will waylay thee going home; where, ifTN III.iv.158
it be thy chance to kill me.it be thy chance to kill meTN III.iv.159
Thou kilst me like a rogue and a thou kill'st me like a rogue and aTN III.iv.161
villaine.villain.TN III.iv.162
Fartheewell, and God haue mercie vpon Fare thee well, and God have mercy uponTN III.iv.165
one of our soules. He may haue mercie vpon mine, but myone of our souls. He may have mercy upon mine, but myTN III.iv.166
hope is better, and so looke to thy selfe. Thy friend as thou hope is better – and so, look to thyself. Thy friend as thouTN III.iv.167
vsest him, & thy sworne enemie, Andrew Ague-cheeke. If usest him, and thy sworn enemy, Andrew Aguecheek. IfTN III.iv.168
this Letter moue him not, his legges cannot: Ile giu't him.this letter move him not, his legs cannot. I'll give't him.TN III.iv.169
Go sir Andrew: scout mee for him at the Go, Sir Andrew. Scout me for him at the TN III.iv.173
corner of the Orchard like a bum-Baylie: so soone as euer corner of the orchard like a bum-baily. So soon as everTN III.iv.174
thou seest him, draw, and as thou draw'st, sweare horrible: thou seest him, draw, and as thou drawest, swear horrible;TN III.iv.175
for t comes to passe oft, that a terrible oath, with a for it comes to pass oft that a terrible oath, with aTN III.iv.176
swaggering accent sharpely twang'd off, giues manhoode swaggering accent sharply twanged off, gives manhoodTN III.iv.177
more approbation, then euer proofe it selfe would haue more approbation than ever proof itself would haveTN III.iv.178
earn'd him. Away.earned him. Away!TN III.iv.179
Now will not I deliuer his Letter: for the behauiour Now will not I deliver his letter. For the behaviourTN III.iv.181
of the yong Gentleman, giues him out to be of of the young gentleman gives him out to be ofTN III.iv.182
good capacity, and breeding: his employment betweene good capacity and breeding; his employment betweenTN III.iv.183
his Lord and my Neece, confirmes no lesse. Therefore, thishis lord and my niece confirms no less. Therefore thisTN III.iv.184
Letter being so excellently ignorant, will breed no terrorletter, being so excellently ignorant, will breed no terrorTN III.iv.185
in the youth: he will finde it comes from a Clodde-pole. But in the youth; he will find it comes from a clodpole. But,TN III.iv.186
sir, I will deliuer his Challenge by word of mouth; set sir, I will deliver his challenge by word of mouth; setTN III.iv.187
vpon Ague-cheeke a notable report of valor, and driueupon Aguecheek a notable report of valour, and driveTN III.iv.188
the Gentleman (as I know his youth will aptly receiue it)the gentleman – as I know his youth will aptly receive itTN III.iv.189
into a most hideous opinion of his rage, skill, furie, and – into a most hideous opinion of his rage, skill, fury, andTN III.iv.190
impetuositie. This will so fright them both, that they impetuosity. This will so fright them both, that theyTN III.iv.191
wil kill one another by the looke, like Cockatrices.will kill one another by the look, like cockatrices.TN III.iv.192
I wil meditate the while vpon some horrid I will meditate the while upon some horridTN III.iv.195
message for a Challenge.message for a challenge.TN III.iv.196
Gentleman, God saue thee.Gentleman, God save thee!TN III.iv.214
That defence thou hast, betake the too't: of That defence thou hast, betake thee to't. OfTN III.iv.216
what nature the wrongs are thou hast done him, I knowe what nature the wrongs are thou hast done him, I knowTN III.iv.217
not: but thy intercepter full of despight, bloody as the Hunter, not; but thy intercepter, full of despite, bloody as theTN III.iv.218
attends thee at the Orchard end: dismount thy hunter, attends thee at the orchard end. Dismount thyTN III.iv.219
tucke, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assaylant is tuck; be yare in thy preparation; for thy assailant isTN III.iv.220
quick, skilfull, and deadly.quick, skilful, and deadly.TN III.iv.221
You'l finde it otherwise I assure you: therefore, You'll find it otherwise, I assure you. Therefore,TN III.iv.225
if you hold your life at any price, betake you to if you hold your life at any price, betake you toTN III.iv.226
your gard: for your opposite hath in him what youth, your guard; for your opposite hath in him what youth,TN III.iv.227
strength, skill, and wrath, can furnish man withall.strength, skill, and wrath can furnish man withal.TN III.iv.228
He is knight dubb'd with vnhatch'd Rapier, andHe is knight dubbed with unhatched rapier andTN III.iv.230
on carpet consideration, but he is a diuell in priuate on carpet consideration – but he is a devil in privateTN III.iv.231
brall, soules and bodies hath he diuorc'd three, and his brawl. Souls and bodies hath he divorced three; and hisTN III.iv.232
incensement at this moment is so implacable, that incensement at this moment is so implacable, thatTN III.iv.233
satisfaction can be none, but by pangs of death and satisfaction can be none, but by pangs of death, andTN III.iv.234
sepulcher: Hob, nob, is his word: giu't or take't.sepulchre. Hob, nob! is his word: give't or take't.TN III.iv.235
Sir, no: his indignation deriues it selfe out of a Sir, no. His indignation derives itself out of aTN III.iv.240
very computent iniurie, therefore get you on, and giue very computent injury. Therefore, get you on and giveTN III.iv.241
him his desire. Backe you shall not to the house, vnlesse him his desire. Back you shall not to the house, unlessTN III.iv.242
you vndertake that with me, which with as much safetie you undertake that with me, which with as much safetyTN III.iv.243
you might answer him: therefore on, or strippe your you might answer him. Therefore on, or strip yourTN III.iv.244
sword starke naked: for meddle you must that's certain, sword stark naked; for meddle you must, that's certain,TN III.iv.245
or forsweare to weare iron about you.or forswear to wear iron about you.TN III.iv.246
I will doe so. Signiour Fabian, stay you by thisI will do so. Signor Fabian, stay you by thisTN III.iv.251
Gentleman, till my returne. gentleman till my return.TN III.iv.252
Why man hee s a verie diuell, I haue not seen Why, man, he's a very devil. I have not seenTN III.iv.267
such a firago: I had a passe with him, rapier, scabberd, such a firago. I had a pass with him, rapier, scabbardTN III.iv.268
and all: and he giues me the stucke in with such a mortall and all; and he gives me the stuck-in with such a mortalTN III.iv.269
motion that it is ineuitable: and on the answer, he payes motion that it is inevitable; and on the answer, he paysTN III.iv.270
you as surely, as your feete hits the ground they step on. you as surely as your feet hits the ground they step on.TN III.iv.271
They say, he has bin Fencer to the Sophy.They say he has been fencer to the Sophy.TN III.iv.272
I but he will not now be pacified, / Fabian can Ay, but he will not now be pacified. Fabian canTN III.iv.274
scarse hold him yonder.scarce hold him yonder.TN III.iv.275
Ile make the motion: stand heere, make a goodI'll make the motion. Stand here, make a goodTN III.iv.280
shew on't, this shall end without the perdition of soules,show on't. This shall end without the perdition of souls.TN III.iv.281
marry Ile ride your (Aside, as he crosses to Fabian) Marry, I'll ride yourTN III.iv.282
horse as well as I ride you. I haue his horse horse as well as I ride you! (To Fabian) I have his horseTN III.iv.283
to take vp the quarrell, I haue perswaded him the youths to take up the quarrel. I have persuaded him the youth'sTN III.iv.284
a diuell.a devil.TN III.iv.285
There's no remedie sir, he will fight There's no remedy, sir, he will fightTN III.iv.288
with you for's oath sake: marrie hee hath better with you for's oath's sake. Marry, he hath betterTN III.iv.289
bethought him of his quarrell, and hee findes that now scarse bethought him of his quarrel, and he finds that now scarceTN III.iv.290
to bee worth talking of: therefore draw for the supportance to be worth talking of. Therefore, draw for the supportanceTN III.iv.291
of his vowe, he protests he will not hurt you.of his vow. He protests he will not hurt you.TN III.iv.292
Come sir Andrew, Come, Sir Andrew,TN III.iv.296
there's no remedie, the Gentleman will for his honors there's no remedy. The gentleman will, for his honour'sTN III.iv.297
sake haue one bowt with you: he cannot by the Duello sake, have one bout with you, he cannot by the duelloTN III.iv.298
auoide it: but hee has promised me, as he is a Gentleman avoid it. But he has promised me, as he is a gentlemanTN III.iv.299
and a Soldiour, he will not hurt you. Come on, too't.and a soldier, he will not hurt you. Come on, to't!TN III.iv.300
You sir? Why, what are you?You, sir? Why, what are you?TN III.iv.306
Nay, if you be an vndertaker, I am for you.Nay, if you be an undertaker, I am for you.TN III.iv.309
Ile be with you anon.I'll be with you anon.TN III.iv.311
Come hither Knight, come hither Fabian: Come hither, knight; come hither, Fabian.TN III.iv.368
Weel whisper ore a couplet or two of most sage sawes.We'll whisper o'er a couplet or two of most sage saws.TN III.iv.369
A very dishonest paltry boy, and more a A very dishonest, paltry boy, and more aTN III.iv.376
coward then a Hare, his dishonesty appeares, in leauing coward than a hare. His dishonesty appears in leavingTN III.iv.377
his frend heere in necessity, and denying him: and for his his friend here in necessity and denying him; and for hisTN III.iv.378
cowardship aske Fabian.cowardship, ask Fabian.TN III.iv.379
Do, cuffe him soundly, but neuer draw thy Do, cuff him soundly, but never draw thyTN III.iv.382
swordsword.TN III.iv.383
I dare lay any money, twill be nothing yet. I dare lay any money, 'twill be nothing yet.TN III.iv.386
Hold sir, or Ile throw your dagger ore the Hold, sir, or I'll throw your dagger o'er theTN IV.i.27
house.house.TN IV.i.28
Come on sir, hold.Come on, sir, hold!TN IV.i.31
Come sir, I will not let you go. Come my Come, sir, I will not let you go. Come, myTN IV.i.37
yong souldier put vp your yron: you are well flesh'd: young soldier, put up your iron; you are well fleshed.TN IV.i.38
Come on.Come on!TN IV.i.39
What, what? Nay then I must haue an Ounce What, what! Nay, then, I must have an ounceTN IV.i.42
or two of this malapert blood from you.or two of this malapert blood from you.TN IV.i.43
Madam.Madam!TN IV.i.45
Ioue blesse thee M. Parson.Jove bless thee, Master Parson!TN IV.ii.11
To him sir Topas.To him, Sir Topas.TN IV.ii.17
The knaue counterfets well: a good knaue.The knave counterfeits well; a good knave.TN IV.ii.19
Well said M. Parson.Well said, Master Parson.TN IV.ii.27
My most exquisite sir Topas.My most exquisite Sir Topas!TN IV.ii.61
To him in thine owne voyce, and bring me wordTo him in thine own voice, and bring me wordTN IV.ii.65
how thou findst him: I would we were well ridde of thishow thou findest him. I would we were well rid of thisTN IV.ii.66
knauery. If he may bee conueniently deliuer'd, I wouldknavery. If he may be conveniently delivered, I wouldTN IV.ii.67
he were, for I am now so farre in offence with my Niece,he were, for I am now so far in offence with my nieceTN IV.ii.68
that I cannot pursue with any safety this sport the vppeshot. that I cannot pursue with any safety this sport the upshot.TN IV.ii.69
Come by and by to my Chamber. Come by and by to my chamber.TN IV.ii.70
That's all one, has hurt me, and there's th'That's all one; he's hurt me, and there's theTN V.i.193
end on't: Sot, didst see Dicke Surgeon, sot?end on't. (To Feste) Sot, didst see Dick Surgeon, sot?TN V.i.194
Then he's a Rogue, and a passy measures panyn: Then he's a rogue and a passy-measures pavin.TN V.i.197
I hate a drunken rogue.I hate a drunken rogue.TN V.i.198
Will you helpe an Asse-head, and a coxcombe, Will you help? An asshead, and a coxcomb,TN V.i.203
& a knaue: a thin fac'd knaue, a gull?and a knave – a thin-faced knave, a gull!TN V.i.204
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