Twelfth Night
mainCont width actsCont width
mainCont left actsCont left
mainCont right actsCont right
selAct left selAct right
  absolutní levá pozice
  acts cont padding (l/r) 3%

First folio
Modern text

Definitions

Key line

Enter Sir Toby, and Maria.Enter Sir Toby Belch and Maria TN I.iii.1
Sir To. SIR TOBY 
What a plague meanes my Neece to take the death What a plague means my niece to take the death TN I.iii.1
of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemie to life.of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemy to life. TN I.iii.2
Mar. MARIA 
By my troth sir Toby you must come in earlyerBy my troth, Sir Toby, you must come in earliertroth, by myby my truth [exclamation emphasizing an assertion]TN I.iii.3
a nights: your Cosin, my Lady, takes great exceptions to o' nights. Your cousin, my lady, takes great exceptions toexception (n.)(often plural) objection, dislike, disapprovalTN I.iii.4
your ill houres.your ill hours.ill (adj.)bad, adverse, unfavourableTN I.iii.5
To. SIR TOBY 
Why let her except, before excepted.Why, let her except before excepted.except, except against (v.)take exception to, object to, repudiateTN I.iii.6
Ma. MARIA 
I, but you must confine your selfe within theAy, but you must confine yourself within the TN I.iii.7
modest limits of order.modest limits of order.modest (adj.)moderate, reasonable, mild, limitedTN I.iii.8
order (n.)prescribed practice, regular procedure
To. SIR TOBY 
Confine? Ile confine my selfe no finer then I am:Confine! I'll confine myself no finer than I am. TN I.iii.9
these cloathes are good enough to drinke in, and so beeThese clothes are good enough to drink in, and so be TN I.iii.10
these boots too: and they be not, let them hang themselues these boots too; an they be not, let them hang themselvesand, an (conj.)if, whetherTN I.iii.11
in their owne straps.in their own straps. TN I.iii.12
Ma. MARIA 
That quaffing and drinking will vndoe you: I heard That quaffing and drinking will undo you. I heard TN I.iii.13
my Lady talke of it yesterday: and of a foolish knight that my lady talk of it yesterday, and of a foolish knight that TN I.iii.14
you brought in one night here, to be hir woer.you brought in one night here, to be her wooer. TN I.iii.15
To. SIR TOBY 
Who, Sir Andrew Ague-cheeke?Who? Sir Andrew Aguecheek? TN I.iii.16
Ma. MARIA 
I he.Ay, he. TN I.iii.17
To. SIR TOBY 
He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.tall (adj.)brave, valiant, boldTN I.iii.18
Ma. MARIA 
What's that to th'purpose?What's that to the purpose?purpose (n.)point at issue, matter in handTN I.iii.19
To. SIR TOBY 
Why he ha's three thousand ducates a yeare.Why, he has three thousand ducats a year.ducat (n.)gold (sometimes silver) coin used in several European countriesTN I.iii.20
Ma. MARIA 
I, but hee'l haue but a yeare in all these ducates:Ay, but he'll have but a year in all these ducats. TN I.iii.21
He's a very foole, and a prodigall.He's a very fool and a prodigal.prodigal (n.)
old form: prodigall
waster, squanderer, spendthrift
TN I.iii.22
very (adj.)[intensifying] thorough-going, absolute
To. SIR TOBY 
Fie, that you'l say so: he playes o'th Viol-de-ganboys, Fie, that you'll say so. He plays o'the viol-de-gamboys,viol-de-gamboys (n.)
old form: Viol-de-ganboys
viola da gamba
TN I.iii.23
and speaks three or four languages word for and speaks three or four languages word for TN I.iii.24
word without booke, & hath all the good gifts of nature.word without book, and hath all the good gifts of nature.book, without
old form: booke
off by heart, by rote
TN I.iii.25
Ma. MARIA 
He hath indeed, almost naturall: for besides thatHe hath indeed all, most natural; for besides thatnatural (adv.)
old form: naturall
like a half-wit, idiotically
TN I.iii.26
he's a foole, he's a great quarreller: and but that hee hathhe's a fool, he's a great quarreller; and but that he hath TN I.iii.27
the gift of a Coward, to allay the gust he hath in quarrelling, the gift of a coward to allay the gust he hath in quarrelling,gift (n.)quality, accomplishment, talentTN I.iii.28
gust (n.)relish, taste, inclination
'tis thought among the prudent, he would quickely'tis thought among the prudent he would quickly TN I.iii.29
haue the gift of a graue.have the gift of a grave. TN I.iii.30
Tob. SIR TOBY 
By this hand they are scoundrels and substractors By this hand, they are scoundrels and substractorssubstractor (n.)detractor, slanderer, calumniatorTN I.iii.31
that say so of him. Who are they?that say so of him. Who are they? TN I.iii.32
Ma. MARIA 
They that adde moreour, hee's drunke nightly in They that add, moreover, he's drunk nightly in TN I.iii.33
your company.your company. TN I.iii.34
To. SIR TOBY 
With drinking healths to my Neece: Ile drinke to With drinking healths to my niece. I'll drink tohealth (n.)toast, salutation in drinkTN I.iii.35
her as long as there is a passage in my throat, & drinkeher as long as there is a passage in my throat and drink TN I.iii.36
in Illyria: he's a Coward and a Coystrill that will notin Illyria. He's a coward and a coistrel that will notcoistrel (n.)
old form: Coystrill
groom, low fellow, knave
TN I.iii.37
drinke to my Neece. till his braines turne o'th toe, like adrink to my niece till his brains turn o'the toe like a TN I.iii.38
parish top. What wench? Castiliano vulgo : for here parish top. What, wench! Castiliano, vulgo – for hereCastiliano (n.)[unclear meaning] in Christian tradition, possibly a name of a devilTN I.iii.39
wench (n.)girl, lass
parish top (n.)whipping-top kept for parishioners' use [of unclear purpose]
vulgo (adv.)[unclear meaning] popularly, commonly; in everyday speech
coms Sir Andrew Agueface.comes Sir Andrew Agueface! TN I.iii.40
Enter Sir Andrew.Enter Sir Andrew Aguecheek TN I.iii.41
And. SIR ANDREW 
Sir Toby Belch. How now sir Toby Sir Toby Belch! How now, Sir Toby TN I.iii.41
Belch?Belch? TN I.iii.42
To. SIR TOBY 
Sweet sir Andrew.Sweet Sir Andrew! TN I.iii.43
And. SIR ANDREW 
Blesse you faire Shrew.Bless you, fair shrew.shrew (n.)vexatious person, troubleseome individual [of either sex]TN I.iii.44
Mar. MARIA 
And you too sir.And you too, sir. TN I.iii.45
Tob. SIR TOBY 
Accost Sir Andrew, accost.Accost, Sir Andrew, accost.accost (v.)approach, make up to, pay court toTN I.iii.46
And. SIR ANDREW 
What's that?What's that? TN I.iii.47
To. SIR TOBY 
My Neeces Chamber-maid.My niece's chambermaid. TN I.iii.48
Ma. SIR ANDREW 
Good Mistris accost, I desire better Good Mistress Accost, I desire better TN I.iii.49
acquaintanceacquaintance. TN I.iii.50
Ma. MARIA 
My name is Mary sir.My name is Mary, sir. TN I.iii.51
And. SIR ANDREW 
Good mistris Mary, accost.Good Mistress Mary Accost –  TN I.iii.52
To, SIR TOBY  
(aside) TN I.iii.53.1
You mistake knight: Accost, is front You mistake, knight. ‘ Accost ’ is frontfront (v.)confront, face, meetTN I.iii.53
her, boord her, woe her, assayle her.her, board her, woo her, assail her.assail (v.)
old form: assayle
approach with offers of love, woo with vigour, attempt to seduce
TN I.iii.54
board (v.)
old form: boord
accost, address, approach, tackle
And. SIR ANDREW  
(aside) TN I.iii.55.1
By my troth I would not vndertake By my troth, I would not undertakeundertake (v.)approach, make overtures to, commit to deal withTN I.iii.55
her in this company. Is that the meaning of Accost? her in this company. Is that the meaning of ‘ accost ’? TN I.iii.56
Ma. MARIA 
Far you well Gentlemen.Fare you well, gentlemen.fare ... well (int.)
old form: Far you well
goodbye [to an individual]
TN I.iii.57
To. SIR TOBY  
(aside) TN I.iii.58.1
And thou let part so Sir Andrew, would An thou let part so, Sir Andrew, wouldand, an (conj.)if, whetherTN I.iii.58
part (v.)depart [from], leave, quit
thou mightst neuer draw sword agen.thou mightst never draw sword again. TN I.iii.59
And. SIR ANDREW 
And you part so mistris, I would I might An you part so, mistress, I would I mightand, an (conj.)if, whetherTN I.iii.60
neuer draw sword agen: Faire Lady, doe you thinke you never draw sword again. Fair lady, do you think you TN I.iii.61
haue fooles in hand?have fools in hand?hand, into deal with, here presentTN I.iii.62
Ma. MARIA 
Sir, I haue not you by'th hand.Sir, I have not you by the hand. TN I.iii.63
An. SIR ANDREW 
Marry but you shall haue, and heeres my Marry, but you shall have, and here's mymarry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryTN I.iii.64
hand.hand. TN I.iii.65
Ma. MARIA 
Now sir, thought is free: I pray you bring yourNow, sir, ‘ Thought is free.’ I pray you, bring yourthought is freethink what you likeTN I.iii.66
hand to'th Buttry barre, and let it drinke.hand to the buttery bar and let it drink.buttery bar
old form: Buttry barre
ledge by the hatch of a buttery [liquor store]
TN I.iii.67
An. SIR ANDREW 
Wherefore (sweet-heart?) What's your Wherefore, sweetheart? What's your TN I.iii.68
Metaphor? metaphor? TN I.iii.69
Ma. MARIA 
It's dry sir.It's dry, sir. TN I.iii.70
And. SIR ANDREW 
Why I thinke so: I am not such an asse, but Why, I think so. I am not such an ass, but TN I.iii.71
I can keepe my hand dry. But what's your iest?I can keep my hand dry. But what's your jest? TN I.iii.72
Ma. MARIA 
A dry iest Sir.A dry jest, sir. TN I.iii.73
And. SIR ANDREW 
Are you full of them?Are you full of them? TN I.iii.74
Ma. MARIA 
I Sir, I haue them at my fingers ends: marry Ay, sir. I have them at my fingers' ends. Marry, TN I.iii.75
now I let go your hand, I am barren. now I let go your hand, I am barren. TN I.iii.76
Exit MariaExit TN I.iii.76
To. SIR TOBY 
O knight, thou lack'st a cup of Canarie: when O knight, thou lack'st a cup of canary. Whencanary, canaries (n.)
old form: Canarie
variety of sweet wine from the Canary Islands
TN I.iii.77
did I see thee so put downe?did I see thee so put down?put down (v.)
old form: downe
crush, defeat, put to silence
TN I.iii.78
An. SIR ANDREW 
Neuer in your life I thinke, vnlesse you see Never in your life, I think, unless you see TN I.iii.79
Canarie put me downe: mee thinkes sometimes I haue nocanary put me down. Methinks sometimes I have nomethinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: mee thinkes
it seems / seemed to me
TN I.iii.80
more wit then a Christian, or an ordinary man ha's: but Imore wit than a Christian or an ordinary man has; but Iwit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityTN I.iii.81
am a great eater of beefe, and I beleeue that does harme to am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to TN I.iii.82
my wit.my wit. TN I.iii.83
To. SIR TOBY 
No question.No question. TN I.iii.84
An. SIR ANDREW 
And I thought that, I'de forsweare it. Ile rideAn I thought that, I'd forswear it. I'll rideforswear (v), past forms forsworn, forswore
old form: forsweare
abandon, renounce, reject, give up
TN I.iii.85
and, an (conj.)if, whether
home to morrow sir Toby.home tomorrow, Sir Toby. TN I.iii.86
To. SIR TOBY 
Pur-quoy my deere knight?Pourquoi, my dear knight?pourquoi (French adv.)whyTN I.iii.87
An. SIR ANDREW 
What is purquoy? Do, or not do? I would I What is pourquoi? Do or not do? I would I TN I.iii.88
had bestowed that time in the tongues, that I haue in had bestowed that time in the tongues that I have in TN I.iii.89
fencing, dancing, and beare-bayting: O had I but followed fencing, dancing, and bear-baiting. O, had I but followed TN I.iii.90
the Arts.the arts! TN I.iii.91
To. SIR TOBY 
Then hadst thou had an excellent head of haire.Then hadst thou had an excellent head of hair. TN I.iii.92
An. SIR ANDREW 
Why, would that haue mended my haire?Why, would that have mended my hair? TN I.iii.93
To. SIR TOBY 
Past question, for thou seest it will not coole my Past question, for thou seest it will not curl by TN I.iii.94
nature.nature. TN I.iii.95
An. SIR ANDREW 
But it becoms we wel enough, dost not?But it becomes me well enough, does't not?become (v.)
old form: becoms
grace, honour, dignify
TN I.iii.96
To. SIR TOBY 
Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaffe: & I Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaff; and Idistaff (n.)
old form: distaffe
device for weaving, spindle
TN I.iii.97
hope to see a huswife take thee between her legs, & hope to see a huswife take thee between her legs andhousewife, huswife (n.)
old form: huswife
[pron: 'husif] hussy, wanton, minx
TN I.iii.98
spin it off.spin it off. TN I.iii.99
An. SIR ANDREW 
Faith Ile home to morrow sir Toby, your Faith, I'll home tomorrow, Sir Toby. Your TN I.iii.100
niece wil not be seene, or if she be it's four to one, she'l niece will not be seen, or if she be, it's four to one she'll TN I.iii.101
none of me: the Connt himselfe here hard by, wooes her.none of me; the Count himself, here hard by, woos her.hard (adv.)close, nearTN I.iii.102
To. SIR TOBY 
Shee'l none o'th Count, she'l not match aboue She'll none o'the Count; she'll not match abovematch (v.)join in marriage, make a matchTN I.iii.103
hir degree, neither in estate, yeares, nor wit: I haue heard her degree, neither in estate, years, nor wit. I have hearddegree (n.)rank, station, standingTN I.iii.104
estate (n.)high rank, standing, status
wit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental ability
her swear't. Tut there's life in't man.her swear't. Tut, there's life in't, man. TN I.iii.105
And. SIR ANDREW 
Ile stay a moneth longer. I am a fellow o'thI'll stay a month longer. I am a fellow o'the TN I.iii.106
strangest minde i'th world: I delight in Maskes and strangest mind i'the world. I delight in masques and TN I.iii.107
Reuels sometimes altogether.revels sometimes altogether. TN I.iii.108
To. SIR TOBY 
Art thou good at these kicke-chawses Knight?Art thou good at these kickshawses, knight?kickshaw (n.)
old form: kicke-chawses
trifle, triviality, worthless distraction
TN I.iii.109
And. SIR ANDREW 
As any man in Illyria, whatsoeuer he be, As any man in Illyria, whatsoever he be, TN I.iii.110
vnder the degree of my betters, & yet I will not compare under the degree of my betters, and yet I will not comparedegree (n.)rank, station, standingTN I.iii.111
with an old man.with an old man.old (adj.)experienced, practised, skilledTN I.iii.112
To. SIR TOBY 
What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?galliard (n.)type of lively, high-spirited danceTN I.iii.113
And. SIR ANDREW 
Faith, I can cut a caper.Faith, I can cut a caper.caper, cut aperform a leap in which the feet are kicked together in the airTN I.iii.114
To. SIR TOBY 
And I can cut the Mutton too't.And I can cut the mutton to't. TN I.iii.115
And. SIR ANDREW 
And I thinke I haue the backe-tricke, simply asAnd I think I have the back-trick, simply asback-trick (n.)
old form: backe-tricke
type of backwards dance leap
TN I.iii.116
strong as any man in Illyria.strong as any man in Illyria. TN I.iii.117
To. SIR TOBY 
Wherefore are these things hid? Wherefore Wherefore are these things hid? Wherefore TN I.iii.118
haue these gifts a Curtaine before 'em? Are they like to have these gifts a curtain before 'em? Are they like to TN I.iii.119
take dust, like mistris Mals picture? Why dost thoutake dust, like Mistress Mall's picture? Why dost thouMall, MistressMary; several contemporary figures possibleTN I.iii.120
not goe to Church in a Galliard, and come home in a not go to church in a galliard and come home in agalliard (n.)type of lively, high-spirited danceTN I.iii.121
Carranto? My verie walke should be a Iigge: I would not so coranto? My very walk should be a jig. I would not socoranto (n.)
old form: Carranto
lively dance with quick running steps
TN I.iii.122
jig (n.)lively song; frivolous dance
much as make water but in a Sinke-a-pace: What dooest thoumuch as make water but in a sink-apace. What dost thoucinquepace (n.)
old form: Sinke-a-pace
five-step capering dance
TN I.iii.123
meane? Is it a world to hide vertues in? I did thinke bymean? Is it a world to hide virtues in? I did think by TN I.iii.124
the excellent constitution of thy legge, it was form'd vnder the excellent constitution of thy leg it was formed underconstitution (n.)construction, make-up, frameTN I.iii.125
the starre of a Galliard.the star of a galliard. TN I.iii.126
And. SIR ANDREW 
I, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in Ay, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in TN I.iii.127
a dam'd colour'd stocke. Shall we sit about some Reuels?a dun-coloured stock. Shall we set about some revels?dun (adj.)grey-brownTN I.iii.128
stock (n.)
old form: stocke
stocking
To. SIR TOBY 
What shall we do else: were we not borne vnderWhat shall we do else? Were we not born under TN I.iii.129
Taurus?Taurus?Taurus (n.)Bull [second sign of the zodiac, associated with cuckoldry]TN I.iii.130
And. SIR ANDREW 
Taurus? That sides and heart.Taurus? That's sides and heart. TN I.iii.1313
To. SIR TOBY 
No sir, it is leggs and thighes: let me see thee No, sir, it is legs and thighs. Let me see thee TN I.iii.132
caper. Ha, higher: ha, ha, excellent. caper. Ha! Higher! Ha! Ha! Excellent!caper (v.)dance with joy, leap with delightTN I.iii.133
ExeuntExeunt TN I.iii.133
 Previous Act I, Scene III Next  
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL