MARIA
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By my troth sir Toby you must come in earlyerBy my troth, Sir Toby, you must come in earlierTN I.iii.3
a nights: your Cosin, my Lady, takes great exceptions to o' nights. Your cousin, my lady, takes great exceptions toTN I.iii.4
your ill houres.your ill hours.TN I.iii.5
I, but you must confine your selfe within theAy, but you must confine yourself within theTN I.iii.7
modest limits of order.modest limits of order.TN I.iii.8
That quaffing and drinking will vndoe you: I heard That quaffing and drinking will undo you. I heardTN I.iii.13
my Lady talke of it yesterday: and of a foolish knight that my lady talk of it yesterday, and of a foolish knight thatTN I.iii.14
you brought in one night here, to be hir woer.you brought in one night here, to be her wooer.TN I.iii.15
I he.Ay, he.TN I.iii.17
What's that to th'purpose?What's that to the purpose?TN I.iii.19
I, but hee'l haue but a yeare in all these ducates:Ay, but he'll have but a year in all these ducats.TN I.iii.21
He's a very foole, and a prodigall.He's a very fool and a prodigal.TN I.iii.22
He hath indeed, almost naturall: for besides thatHe hath indeed all, most natural; for besides thatTN I.iii.26
he's a foole, he's a great quarreller: and but that hee hathhe's a fool, he's a great quarreller; and but that he hathTN I.iii.27
the gift of a Coward, to allay the gust he hath in quarrelling, the gift of a coward to allay the gust he hath in quarrelling,TN I.iii.28
'tis thought among the prudent, he would quickely'tis thought among the prudent he would quicklyTN I.iii.29
haue the gift of a graue.have the gift of a grave.TN I.iii.30
They that adde moreour, hee's drunke nightly in They that add, moreover, he's drunk nightly inTN I.iii.33
your company.your company.TN I.iii.34
And you too sir.And you too, sir.TN I.iii.45
My name is Mary sir.My name is Mary, sir.TN I.iii.51
Far you well Gentlemen.Fare you well, gentlemen.TN I.iii.57
Sir, I haue not you by'th hand.Sir, I have not you by the hand.TN I.iii.63
Now sir, thought is free: I pray you bring yourNow, sir, ‘ Thought is free.’ I pray you, bring yourTN I.iii.66
hand to'th Buttry barre, and let it drinke.hand to the buttery bar and let it drink.TN I.iii.67
It's dry sir.It's dry, sir.TN I.iii.70
A dry iest Sir.A dry jest, sir.TN I.iii.73
I Sir, I haue them at my fingers ends: marry Ay, sir. I have them at my fingers' ends. Marry,TN I.iii.75
now I let go your hand, I am barren. now I let go your hand, I am barren.TN I.iii.76
Nay, either tell me where thou hast bin, or I willNay, either tell me where thou hast been, or I willTN I.v.1
not open my lippes so wide as a brissle may enter, in way of not open my lips so wide as a bristle may enter, in way ofTN I.v.2
thy excuse: my Lady will hang thee for thy absence.thy excuse. My lady will hang thee for thy absence.TN I.v.3
Make that good.Make that good.TN I.v.6
A good lenton answer: I can tell thee where ytA good lenten answer! I can tell thee where thatTN I.v.8
saying was borne, of I feare no colours.saying was born, of ‘ I fear no colours.’TN I.v.9
In the warrs, & that may you be bolde to say inIn the wars; and that may you be bold to say inTN I.v.11
your foolerie.your foolery.TN I.v.12
Yet you will be hang'd for being so long absent,Yet you will be hanged for being so long absent;TN I.v.15
or to be turn'd away: is not that as good as a hanging or to be turned away – is not that as good as a hangingTN I.v.16
to you?to you?TN I.v.17
You are resolute then?You are resolute, then?TN I.v.20
That if one breake, the other will hold: or if bothThat if one break, the other will hold; or if bothTN I.v.22
breake, your gaskins fall.break, your gaskins fall.TN I.v.23
Peace you rogue, no more o'that: here comes myPeace, you rogue, no more o' that. Here comes myTN I.v.27
Lady: make your excuse wisely, you were best.lady. Make your excuse wisely, you were best.TN I.v.28
Madam, there is at the gate, a young Gentleman, Madam, there is at the gate a young gentlemanTN I.v.94
much desires to speake with you.much desires to speak with you.TN I.v.95
I know not (Madam) 'tis a faire young man, andI know not, madam. 'Tis a fair young man, andTN I.v.997
well attended.well attended.TN I.v.98
Sir Toby Madam, your kinsman.Sir Toby, madam, your kinsman.TN I.v.100
Will you hoyst sayle sir, Will you hoist sail, sir?TN I.v.194
here lies your way.Here lies your way.TN I.v.195
What a catterwalling doe you keepe heere? If my Ladie What a caterwauling do you keep here! If my ladyTN II.iii.70
haue not call'd vp her Steward Maluolio, and bid him have not called up her steward Malvolio and bid himTN II.iii.71
turne you out of doores, neuer trust me.turn you out of doors, never trust me.TN II.iii.72
For the loue o'God peace.For the love o' God, peace!TN II.iii.84
Nay good Sir Toby.Nay, good Sir Toby!TN II.iii.100
Go shake your eares.Go, shake your ears.TN II.iii.121
Sweet Sir Toby be patient for to night: Since the Sweet Sir Toby, be patient for tonight. Since theTN II.iii.127
youth of the Counts was to day with my Lady, she isyouth of the Count's was today with my lady, she isTN II.iii.128
much out of quiet. For Monsieur Maluolio, let me alonemuch out of quiet. For Monsieur Malvolio, let me aloneTN II.iii.129
with him: If I do not gull him into an ayword, and makewith him. If I do not gull him into a nayword, and makeTN II.iii.130
him a common recreation, do not thinke I haue witte him a common recreation, do not think I have witTN II.iii.131
enough to lye straight in my bed: I know I can do it.enough to lie straight in my bed. I know I can do it.TN II.iii.132
Marrie sir, sometimes he is a kinde of Puritane.Marry, sir, sometimes he is a kind of puritan – TN II.iii.134
The diu'll a Puritane that hee is, or any thing constantly The devil a puritan that he is, or anything, constantly,TN II.iii.140
but a time-pleaser, an affection'd Asse, that cons but a time-pleaser, an affectioned ass that consTN II.iii.141
State without booke, and vtters it by great swarths. The state without book and utters it by great swathes; the TN II.iii.142
best perswaded of himselfe: so cram'd (as he thinkes) best persuaded of himself, so crammed, as he thinks,TN II.iii.143
with excellencies, that it is his grounds of faith, that allwith excellencies, that it is his grounds of faith that allTN II.iii.144
that looke on him, loue him: and on that vice in him, willthat look on him love him – and on that vice in him willTN II.iii.145
my reuenge finde notable cause to worke.my revenge find notable cause to work.TN II.iii.146
I will drop in his way some obscure Epistles ofI will drop in his way some obscure epistles ofTN II.iii.148
loue, wherein by the colour of his beard, the shape of love; wherein, by the colour of his beard, the shape ofTN II.iii.149
his legge, the manner of his gate, the expressure of his eye,his leg, the manner of his gait, the expressure of his eye,TN II.iii.150
forehead, and complection, he shall finde himselfe mostforehead, and complexion, he shall find himself mostTN II.iii.151
feelingly personated. I can write very like my Ladie your feelingly personated. I can write very like my lady, yourTN II.iii.152
Neece, on a forgotten matter wee can hardly makeniece; on a forgotten matter we can hardly makeTN II.iii.153
distinction of our hands.distinction of our hands.TN II.iii.154
My purpose is indeed a horse of that colour.My purpose is indeed a horse of that colour.TN II.iii.160
Asse, I doubt not.Ass, I doubt not.TN II.iii.163
Sport royall I warrant you: I know my Physicke will Sport royal, I warrant you. I know my physic willTN II.iii.165
worke with him, I will plant you two, and let the Foole work with him. I will plant you two, and let the foolTN II.iii.166
make a third, where he shall finde the Letter: obserue his make a third, where he shall find the letter. Observe hisTN II.iii.167
construction of it: For this night to bed, and dreame on construction of it. For this night, to bed, and dream onTN II.iii.168
the euent: Farewell. the event. Farewell.TN II.iii.169
Get ye all three into the box tree: Maluolio'sGet ye all three into the box-tree. Malvolio'sTN II.v.15
comming downe this walke, he has beene yonder i'the Sunne coming down this walk, he has been yonder i'the sunTN II.v.16
practising behauiour to his own shadow this halfe houre: practising behaviour to his own shadow this half-hour.TN II.v.17
obserue him for the loue of Mockerie: for I know this Observe him, for the love of mockery, for I know thisTN II.v.18
Letter wil make a contemplatiue Ideot of him. Close in letter will make a contemplative idiot of him. Close, inTN II.v.19
the name of ieasting, the name of jesting!TN II.v.20
lye thou there: for heere comes the Trowt, that must be Lie thou there – for here comes the trout that must beTN II.v.21
caught with tickling. caught with tickling.TN II.v.22
Nay but say true, do's it worke vpon him?Nay, but say true: does it work upon him?TN II.v.188
If you will then see the fruites of the sport, markIf you will then see the fruits of the sport, markTN II.v.190
his first approach before my Lady: hee will come to her in his first approach before my lady. He will come to her inTN II.v.191
yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhorres, and crosse garter'd, yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhors; and cross-gartered,TN II.v.192
a fashion shee detests: and hee will smile vpon a fashion she detests; and he will smile uponTN II.v.193
her, which will now be so vnsuteable to her disposition, her, which will now be so unsuitable to her disposition – TN II.v.194
being addicted to a melancholly, as shee is, that it cannot being addicted to a melancholy as she is – that it cannotTN II.v.195
but turn him into a notable contempt: if you wil see it but turn him into a notable contempt. If you will see it,TN II.v.196
follow me.follow me.TN II.v.197
If you desire the spleene, and will laughe your selues If you desire the spleen, and will laugh yourselvesTN III.ii.64
into stitches, follow me; yond gull Maluolio is turned into stitches, follow me. Yond gull Malvolio is turnedTN III.ii.65
Heathen, a verie Renegatho; for there is no christian that heathen, a very renegado; for there is no Christian, thatTN III.ii.66
meanes to be saued by beleeuing rightly, can euer beleeue means to be saved by believing rightly, can ever believeTN III.ii.67
such impossible passages of grossenesse. Hee's in yellow such impossible passages of grossness. He's in yellowTN III.ii.68
stockings.stockings!TN III.ii.69
Most villanously: like a Pedant that keepes aMost villainously; like a pedant that keeps aTN III.ii.71
Schoole i'th Church: I haue dogg'd him like his murtherer. school i'the church. I have dogged him like his murderer.TN III.ii.72
He does obey euery point of the Letter that I He does obey every point of the letter that ITN III.ii.73
dropt, to betray him: He does smile his face into more dropped to betray him. He does smile his face into moreTN III.ii.74
lynes, then is in the new Mappe, with the augmentation of lines than is in the new map with the augmentation ofTN III.ii.75
the Indies: you haue not seene such a thing as tis: I can the Indies. You have not seen such a thing as 'tis. I canTN III.ii.76
hardly forbeare hurling things at him, I know my Ladie hardly forbear hurling things at him; I know my ladyTN III.ii.77
will strike him: if shee doe, hee'l smile, and take't for a will strike him. If she do, he'll smile, and take it for aTN III.ii.78
great fauour.great favour.TN III.ii.79
He's comming Madame: / But in very strange manner. He's coming, madam, but in very strange manner.TN III.iv.8
He is sure possest Madam.He is sure possessed, madam.TN III.iv.9
No Madam, he does nothing but smile: your No, madam, he does nothing but smile. YourTN III.iv.11
Ladyship were best to haue some guard about you, if heeladyship were best to have some guard about you, if heTN III.iv.12
come, for sure the man is tainted in's wits.come, for sure the man is tainted in's wits.TN III.iv.13
How do you Maluolio?How do you, Malvolio?TN III.iv.33
Why appeare you with this ridiculous boldnesse Why appear you with this ridiculous boldnessTN III.iv.36
before my Lady.before my lady?TN III.iv.37
Lo, how hollow the fiend speakes within him; did Lo, how hollow the fiend speaks within him. DidTN III.iv.91
not I tell you? Sir Toby, my Lady prayes you to haue a not I tell you? Sir Toby, my lady prays you to have aTN III.iv.92
care of him.care of him.TN III.iv.93
La you, and you speake ill of the diuell, how he takes La you, an you speak ill of the devil, how he takesTN III.iv.100
it at heart. Pray God he be not bewitch'd.it at heart! Pray God he be not bewitched!TN III.iv.101
Marry and it shall be done to morrow morning if Marry, and it shall be done tomorrow morning, ifTN III.iv.103
I liue. My Lady would not loose him for more then ileI live. My lady would not lose him, for more than I'llTN III.iv.104
say.say.TN III.iv.105
Oh Lord.O Lord!TN III.iv.107
Get him to say his prayers, good sir Toby gette him Get him to say his prayers, good Sir Toby; get himTN III.iv.118
to pray.to pray.TN III.iv.119
No I warrant you, he will not heare of godlynesse.No, I warrant you, he will not hear of godliness.TN III.iv.121
Nay pursue him now, least the deuice take ayre, and Nay, pursue him now, lest the device take air, andTN III.iv.130
taint.taint.TN III.iv.131
The house will be the quieter.The house will be the quieter.TN III.iv.133
Yon may haue verie fit occasion fot't: he is now in You may have very fit occasion for't. He is now inTN III.iv.170
some commerce with my Ladie, and will by and bysome commerce with my lady, and will by and byTN III.iv.171
depart.depart.TN III.iv.172
Nay, I prethee put on this gown, & this beard,Nay, I prithee, put on this gown and this beard;TN IV.ii.1
make him beleeue thou art sir Topas the Curate, doe itmake him believe thou art Sir Topas the curate. Do itTN IV.ii.2
quickly. Ile call sir Toby the whilst.quickly. I'll call Sir Toby the whilst.TN IV.ii.3
Thou mightst haue done this without thy berdThou mightst have done this without thy beardTN IV.ii.63
and gowne, he sees thee not.and gown; he sees thee not.TN IV.ii.64
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