CAPTAIN
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Doubtfull it stood,Doubtful it stood,Mac I.ii.7.2
As two spent Swimmers, that doe cling together,As two spent swimmers, that do cling togetherMac I.ii.8
And choake their Art: The mercilesse MacdonwaldAnd choke their art. The merciless Macdonwald –Mac I.ii.9
(Worthie to be a Rebell, for to thatWorthy to be a rebel, for to thatMac I.ii.10
The multiplying Villanies of NatureThe multiplying villainies of natureMac I.ii.11
Doe swarme vpon him) from the Westerne IslesDo swarm upon him – from the Western IslesMac I.ii.12
Of Kernes and Gallowgrosses is supply'd,Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied,Mac I.ii.13
And Fortune on his damned Quarry smiling,And fortune on his damned quarrel smilingMac I.ii.14
Shew'd like a Rebells Whore: but all's too weake:Showed like a rebel's whore. But all's too weak:Mac I.ii.15
For braue Macbeth (well hee deserues that Name)For brave Macbeth – well he deserves that name –Mac I.ii.16
Disdayning Fortune, with his brandisht Steele,Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel,Mac I.ii.17
Which smoak'd with bloody executionWhich smoked with bloody execution,Mac I.ii.18
(Like Valours Minion) caru'd out his passage,Like valour's minion carved out his passageMac I.ii.19
Till hee fac'd the Slaue:Till he faced the slave –Mac I.ii.20
Which neu'r shooke hands, nor bad farwell to him,Which ne'er shook hands nor bade farewell to himMac I.ii.21
Till he vnseam'd him from the Naue toth' Chops,Till he unseamed him from the nave to the chops,Mac I.ii.22
And fix'd his Head vpon our Battlements.And fixed his head upon our battlements.Mac I.ii.23
As whence the Sunne 'gins his reflection,As, whence the sun 'gins his reflection,Mac I.ii.25
Shipwracking Stormes, and direfull Thunders:Shipwracking storms and direful thunders;Mac I.ii.26
So from that Spring, whence comfort seem'd to come,So, from that spring whence comfort seemed to come,Mac I.ii.27
Discomfort swells: Marke King of Scotland, marke,Discomfort swells. Mark, King of Scotland, mark!Mac I.ii.28
No sooner Iustice had, with Valour arm'd,No sooner justice had, with valour armed,Mac I.ii.29
Compell'd these skipping Kernes to trust their heeles,Compelled these skipping kerns to trust their heelsMac I.ii.30
But the Norweyan Lord, surueying vantage,But the Norweyan lord, surveying vantage,Mac I.ii.31
With furbusht Armes, and new supplyes of men,With furbished arms and new supplies of men,Mac I.ii.32
Began a fresh assault.Began a fresh assault.Mac I.ii.33.1
Yes,Yes –Mac I.ii.34.2
as Sparrowes, Eagles; / Or the Hare, the Lyon:As sparrows, eagles, or the hare, the lion.Mac I.ii.35
If I say sooth, I must report they wereIf I say sooth I must report they wereMac I.ii.36
As Cannons ouer-charg'd with double Cracks,As cannons overcharged with double cracks;Mac I.ii.37
So theySo theyMac I.ii.38
doubly redoubled stroakes vpon the Foe:Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe.Mac I.ii.39
Except they meant to bathe in reeking Wounds,Except they meant to bathe in reeking woundsMac I.ii.40
Or memorize another Golgotha,Or memorize another Golgotha,Mac I.ii.41
I cannot tell:I cannot tell.Mac I.ii.42
but I am faint, My Gashes cry for helpe.– But I am faint; my gashes cry for help.Mac I.ii.43
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL