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Search phrase: thousand

Plays

 342 result(s). alternate result(s)
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
All's Well That Ends WellAW I.i.163There shall your master have a thousand loves,There shall your Master haue a thousand loues,
All's Well That Ends WellAW II.v.29known truth to pass a thousand nothings with, shouldknown truth to passe a thousand nothings with, should
All's Well That Ends WellAW III.vii.35To marry her I'll add three thousand crownsTo marry her, Ile adde three thousand Crownes
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.130Five or six thousand, but very weak andFiue or sixe thousand, but very weake and
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.147‘ Five or six thousand horse ’ I said – I will sayFiue or six thousand horse I sed, I will say
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.iii.165not to fifteen thousand poll; half of the which dare notnot to fifteene thousand pole, halfe of the which, dare not
All's Well That Ends WellAW IV.v.13a thousand sallets ere we light on such another herb.a thousand sallets ere wee light on such another hearbe.
All's Well That Ends WellAW V.iii.199.1That ring's a thousand proofs.That Ring's a thousand proofes.
Antony and CleopatraAC I.ii.130Ten thousand harms, more than the ills I know,Ten thousand harmes, more then the illes I know
Antony and CleopatraAC III.vii.59And our twelve thousand horse. We'll to our ship.And our twelue thousand Horse. Wee'l to our Ship,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.iv.21.2A thousand, sir,A thousand Sir,
Antony and CleopatraAC IV.xv.20Of many thousand kisses the poor lastOf many thousand kisses, the poore last
As You Like ItAYL I.i.2bequeathed me by will, but poor a thousand crowns, and,bequeathed me by will, but poore a thousand Crownes, and
As You Like ItAYL I.i.81physic your rankness, and yet give no thousand crownsphysicke your ranckenesse, and yet giue no thousand crownes
As You Like ItAYL II.i.45O, yes, into a thousand similes.O yes, into a thousand similies.
As You Like ItAYL II.iv.28Into a thousand that I have forgotten.Into a thousand that I haue forgotten.
As You Like ItAYL III.v.51You are a thousand times a properer manYou are a thousand times a properer man
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.40divide a minute into a thousand parts, and break but adiuide a minute into a thousand parts, and breake but a
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.41part of the thousandth part of a minute in the affairs ofpart of the thousand part of a minute in the affairs of
As You Like ItAYL IV.i.86almost six thousand years old, and in all this time therealmost six thousand yeeres old, and in all this time there
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.i.22Unless a thousand marks be levied,Vnlesse a thousand markes be leuied
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.81Where is the thousand marks thou hadst of me?Where is the thousand Markes thou hadst of me?
The Comedy of ErrorsCE I.ii.84But not a thousand marks between you both.But not a thousand markes betweene you both.
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.61He asked me for a thousand marks in gold.He ask'd me for a hundred markes in gold: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.i.65‘ Where is the thousand marks I gave thee, villain?’Where is the thousand markes I gaue thee villaine? 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE II.ii.218And shrive you of a thousand idle pranks. – And shriue you of a thousand idle prankes: 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE III.i.8And charged him with a thousand marks in gold,And charg'd him with a thousand markes in gold, 
The Comedy of ErrorsCE IV.i.21I buy a thousand pound a year, I buy a rope.I buy a thousand pound a yeare, I buy a rope.
CoriolanusCor I.i.68The way it takes, cracking ten thousand curbsThe way it takes: cracking ten thousand Curbes
CoriolanusCor II.i.176A hundred thousand welcomes. I could weepA hundred thousand Welcomes: / I could weepe,
CoriolanusCor II.ii.77That's thousand to one good one – when you now seeThat's thousand to one good one, when you now see
CoriolanusCor III.iii.70Within thine eyes sat twenty thousand deaths,Within thine eyes sate twenty thousand deaths
CoriolanusCor IV.v.148Say yea to thy desires. A thousand welcomes!Say yea to thy desires. A thousand welcomes,
CoriolanusCor V.iv.55This morning for ten thousand of your throatsThis Morning, for ten thousand of your throates,
CymbelineCym I.v.124I will lay you ten thousand ducats to your ring, that,I will lay you ten thousands Duckets to your Ring, that
CymbelineCym I.v.147part of your mistress, my ten thousand ducats arepart of your Mistris: my ten thousand Duckets are
CymbelineCym II.ii.29Above ten thousand meaner movablesAboue ten thousand meaner Moueables
CymbelineCym III.i.9Yearly three thousand pounds; which – by thee – latelyYeerely three thousand pounds; which (by thee) lately
CymbelineCym V.iii.29Three thousand confident, in act as many – Three thousand confident, in acte as many:
HamletHam II.ii.73Gives him three thousand crowns in annual feeGiues him three thousand Crownes in Annuall Fee,
HamletHam II.ii.179one man picked out of ten thousand.one man pick'd out of two thousand.
HamletHam III.i.62The heartache and the thousand natural shocksThe Heart-ake, and the thousand Naturall shockes
HamletHam III.ii.296thousand pound. Didst perceive?thousand pound. Did'st perceiue?
HamletHam III.iii.19To whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser thingsTo whose huge Spoakes, ten thousand lesser things
HamletHam IV.iv.25Two thousand souls and twenty thousand ducats
HamletHam IV.iv.60The imminent death of twenty thousand men
HamletHam V.i.44outlives a thousand tenants.outliues a thousand Tenants.
HamletHam V.i.183He hath bore me on his back a thousand times. Andhe hath borne me on his backe a thousand times: And
HamletHam V.i.265I loved Ophelia. Forty thousand brothersI lou'd Ophelia; fortie thousand Brothers
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.42A thousand of his people butchered,And a thousand of his people butchered:
Henry IV Part 11H4 I.i.68Ten thousand bold Scots, two-and-twenty knights,Ten thousand bold Scots, two and twenty Knights
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.59I will give thee for it a thousand pound – I will giue thee for it a thousand pound:
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.142call thee coward, but I would give a thousand pound Icall the Coward: but I would giue a thousand pound I
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.154have taken a thousand pound this day morning.haue ta'ne a thousand pound this Morning.
Henry IV Part 11H4 II.iv.350and one Mordake, and a thousand blue-caps more.and one Mordake, and a thousand blew-Cappes more.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.i.219Hang in the air a thousand leagues from hence,Hang in the Ayre a thousand Leagues from thence;
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.158And I will die a hundred thousand deathsAnd I will dye a hundred thousand Deaths,
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.ii.160A hundred thousand rebels die in this.A hundred thousand Rebels dye in this:
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.41everlasting bonfire-light! Thou hast saved me a thousandeuer-lasting Bone-fire-Light: thou hast saued me a thousand
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.132you owed him a thousand pound.You ought him a thousand pound.
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.133Sirrah, do I owe you a thousand pound?Sirrah, do I owe you a thousand pound?
Henry IV Part 11H4 III.iii.134A thousand pound, Hal? A million, thy love isA thousand pound Hal? A Million. Thy loue is
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.88The Earl of Westmorland seven thousand strongThe Earle of Westmerland, seuen thousand strong,
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.i.130.1To thirty thousand.To thirty thousand.
Henry IV Part 11H4 IV.iv.9Wherein the fortune of ten thousand menWherein the fortune of ten thousand men
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.194thousand marks, let him lend me the money, and havethousand Markes, let him lend me the mony, & haue
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.ii.225Will your lordship lend me a thousand poundWill your Lordship lend mee a thousand pound,
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.iii.11To five-and-twenty thousand men of choice;To fiue and twenty thousand men of choice:
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.iii.16Whether our present five-and-twenty thousandWhether our present fiue and twenty thousand
Henry IV Part 22H4 I.iii.68What, is the King but five-and-twenty thousand?What is the King but fiue & twenty thousand?
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.i.145worth a thousand of these bed-hangers and these fly-bittenworth a thousand of these Bed-hangings, and these Fly-bitten
Henry IV Part 22H4 II.iii.66But many thousand reasons hold me back.But many thousand Reasons hold me backe.
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.4How many thousand of my poorest subjectsHow many thousand of my poorest Subiects
Henry IV Part 22H4 III.i.92.1Are fifty thousand strong.Are fiftie thousand strong.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.i.22Upon or near the rate of thirty thousand.Vpon, or neere, the rate of thirtie thousand.
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.iii.120valiant. I had a thousand sons, the first humanvaliant. If I had a thousand Sonnes, the first
Henry IV Part 22H4 IV.v.107Thou hidest a thousand daggers in thy thoughts,Thou hid'st a thousand Daggers in thy thoughts,
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.12liveries, I would have bestowed the thousand pound ILiueries, I would haue bestowed the thousand pound I
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.76Master Shallow, I owe you a thousand pound.Master Shallow, I owe you a thousand pound.
Henry IV Part 22H4 V.v.87thousand.thousand.
Henry VH5 I.chorus.24Into a thousand parts divide one man,Into a thousand parts diuide one Man,
Henry VH5 I.i.14Six thousand and two hundred good esquires;Six thousand and two hundred good Esquires:
Henry VH5 I.i.19A thousand pounds by th' year. Thus runs the bill.A thousand pounds by th' yeere. Thus runs the Bill.
Henry VH5 I.ii.212So may a thousand actions, once afoot,So may a thousand actions once a foote,
Henry VH5 I.ii.285That shall fly with them: for many a thousand widowsThat shall flye with them: for many a thousand widows
Henry VH5 IV.iii.3Of fighting men they have full threescore thousand.Of fighting men they haue full threescore thousand.
Henry VH5 IV.iii.17But one ten thousand of those men in EnglandBut one ten thousand of those men in England,
Henry VH5 IV.iii.76Why, now thou hast unwished five thousand men,Why now thou hast vnwisht fiue thousand men:
Henry VH5 IV.iv.59He gives you upon his knees a thousand thanks; andHe giues you vpon his knees a thousand thanks, and
Henry VH5 IV.viii.79This note doth tell me of ten thousand FrenchThis Note doth tell me of ten thousand French
Henry VH5 IV.viii.84Eight thousand and four hundred; of the which,Eight thousand and foure hundred: of the which,
Henry VH5 IV.viii.86So that, in these ten thousand they have lost,So that in these ten thousand they haue lost,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.112Having full scarce six thousand in his troop,Hauing full scarce six thousand in his troupe,
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.113By three-and-twenty thousand of the FrenchBy three and twentie thousand of the French
Henry VI Part 11H6 I.i.155Ten thousand soldiers with me I will take,Ten thousand Souldiers with me I will take,
Henry VI Part 11H6 II.iv.127A thousand souls to death and deadly night.A thousand Soules to Death and deadly Night.
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.i.20When, but in all, I was six thousand strong,When (but in all) I was sixe thousand strong,
Henry VI Part 11H6 IV.ii.28Ten thousand French have ta'en the sacramentTen thousand French haue tane the Sacrament,
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.45Corrupt and tainted with a thousand vices,Corrupt and tainted with a thousand Vices:
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.iv.75It dies, an if it had a thousand lives.It dyes, and if it had a thousand liues.
Henry VI Part 11H6 V.v.95I rest perplexed with a thousand cares.I rest perplexed with a thousand Cares.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.i.350Shall blow ten thousand souls to heaven or hell;Shall blowe ten thousand Soules to Heauen, or Hell:
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.142With twenty thousand kisses, and to drainWith twenty thousand kisses, and to draine
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.206Though Suffolk dare him twenty thousand times.Though Suffolke dare him twentie thousand times.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.218Quitting thee thereby of ten thousand shames,Quitting thee thereby of ten thousand shames,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.345Through whom a thousand sighs are breathed for thee.Through whom a thousand sighes are breath'd for thee.
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.ii.354Embrace and kiss and take ten thousand leaves,Embrace, and kisse, and take ten thousand leaues,
Henry VI Part 22H6 III.iii.13I'll give a thousand pound to look upon him.Ile giue a thousand pound to looke vpon him.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.16A thousand crowns, or else lay down your head.A thousand Crownes, or else lay down your head
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.i.18What, think you much to pay two thousand crowns,What thinke you much to pay 2000. Crownes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.viii.46Better ten thousand base-born Cades miscarryBetter ten thousand base-borne Cades miscarry,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.viii.66Shall have a thousand crowns for his reward.Shall haue a thousand Crownes for his reward.
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.5if I might have a lease of my life for a thousand years,if I might haue a Lease of my life for a thousand yeares,
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.26thousand crowns of the King by carrying my head to1000. Crownes of the King by carrying my head to
Henry VI Part 22H6 IV.x.59ten thousand devils come against me, and give me butten thousand diuelles come against me, and giue me but
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.79We give thee for reward a thousand marks,We giue thee for reward a thousand Markes,
Henry VI Part 22H6 V.i.85For thousand Yorks he shall not hide his head,For thousand Yorkes he shall not hide his head,
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.17I would break a thousand oaths to reign one year.I would breake a thousand Oathes, to reigne one yeere.
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.51She is hard by with twenty thousand men;She is hard by, with twentie thousand men:
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.ii.66What, with five thousand men?What, with fiue thousand men?
Henry VI Part 33H6 I.iv.51Hold, valiant Clifford! For a thousand causesHold valiant Clifford, for a thousand causes
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.176Their power, I think, is thirty thousand strong.Their power (I thinke) is thirty thousand strong:
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.i.180Will but amount to five-and-twenty thousand,Will but amount to fiue and twenty thousand,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.52As brings a thousandfold more care to keepAs brings a thousand fold more care to keepe,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.68For with a band of thirty thousand menFor with a Band of thirty thousand men,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.127A thousand men have broke their fasts today,A thousand men haue broke their Fasts to day,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.144A wisp of straw were worth a thousand crownsA wispe of straw were worth a thousand Crowns,
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.ii.177These words will cost ten thousand lives this day.These words will cost ten thousand liues this day.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.46O yes, it doth; a thousandfold it doth.Oh yes, it doth; a thousand fold it doth.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.v.102If you contend, a thousand lives must wither.If you contend, a thousand liues must wither.
Henry VI Part 33H6 II.vi.18I and ten thousand in this luckless realmI, and ten thousand in this lucklesse Realme,
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.ii.56I take my leave with many thousand thanks.I take my leaue with many thousand thankes.
Henry VI Part 33H6 III.iii.234Thou and Oxford, with five thousand men,Thou and Oxford, with fiue thousand men
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.iii.14The Queen is valued thirty thousand strong,The Queene is valued thirtie thousand strong,
Henry VI Part 33H6 V.vi.37And thus I prophesy, that many a thousand,And thus I prophesie, that many a thousand,
Henry VIIIH8 prologue.29Of thousand friends: then, in a moment, seeOf thousand Friends: Then, in a moment, see
Henry VIIIH8 I.iv.74A thousand thanks, and pray 'em take their pleasures.a thousand thankes, / And pray 'em take their pleasures.
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.8To leave a thousandfold more bitter thanTo leaue, a thousand fold more bitter, then
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.64A thousand pound a year, annual support,A Thousand pound a yeare, Annuall support,
Henry VIIIH8 II.iii.95A thousand pounds a year for pure respect!A thousand pounds a yeare, for pure respect?
Henry VIIIH8 IV.ii.89Cast thousand beams upon me, like the sun?Cast thousand beames vpon me, like the Sun?
Henry VIIIH8 V.iv.37one christening will beget a thousand: here will beone Christening will beget a thousand, here will bee
Henry VIIIH8 V.v.19Upon this land a thousand thousand blessings,Vpon this Land a thousand thousand Blessings,
Julius CaesarJC III.i.159Fulfil your pleasure. Live a thousand years,Fulfill your pleasure. Liue a thousand yeeres,
King Edward IIIE3 II.i.90Ten times ten thousand more the worth exceedsTen tymes ten thousand more thy worth exceeds,
King Edward IIIE3 III.i.1Here, till our navy of a thousand sailHeere till our Nauie of a thousand saile,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iii.37With full a hundred thousand fighting menWith full a hundred thousand fighting men,
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.11Than by the enemy a thousandfold.Then by the ennimie a thousand fold.
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.110A hundred-and-twenty knights, and thirty thousandA hundred and twenty knights, and thirty thousand
King Edward IIIE3 III.iv.111Common soldiers; and of our men, a thousand.Common souldiers, and of our men a thousand.
King Edward IIIE3 IV.i.21Require of thee a hundred thousand francs,Require of thee a hundred thousand Francks,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iii.61What else, my son? He's scarce eight thousand strong,What else my son, hees scarse eight thousand strong
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iii.62And we are threescore thousand at the least.and we are threescore thousand at the least,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.48And make a thousand millions of a taskAnd make a thousand millions of a taske,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.iv.150Ah, good old man, a thousand thousand armoursAh good olde man, a thousand thousand armors,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vi.41No less than forty thousand wicked eldersNo lesse than fortie thousand wicked elders,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vii.19Alas, what thousand armed men of FranceAlas what thousand armed men of Fraunce,
King Edward IIIE3 IV.vii.49Three thousand marks a year in English land.Three thousand Marks a yeere in English land.
King Edward IIIE3 V.i.136Here stood a battle of ten thousand horse;Heere stood a battaile of ten tstousand horse,
King JohnKJ II.i.275Twice fifteen thousand hearts of England's breed – Twice fifteene thousand hearts of Englands breed.
King JohnKJ II.i.530Full thirty thousand marks of English coin.Full thirty thousand Markes of English coyne:
King JohnKJ III.iii.41And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs;And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs:
King JohnKJ III.iv.64Even to that drop ten thousand wiry friendsEuen to that drop ten thousand wiery fiends
King JohnKJ III.iv.175To train ten thousand English to their side,To traine ten thousand English to their side;
King JohnKJ IV.ii.199Told of a many thousand warlike FrenchTold of a many thousand warlike French,
King JohnKJ IV.iii.7I'll find a thousand shifts to get away.Ile finde a thousand shifts to get away;
King JohnKJ IV.iii.158A thousand businesses are brief in hand,A thousand businesses are briefe in hand,
King LearKL II.iv.280Shall break into a hundred thousand flawsshal break into a hundred thousand flawes
King LearKL III.vi.15To have a thousand with red burning spitsTo haue a thousand with red burning spits
King LearKL IV.vi.70Were two full moons; he had a thousand noses,Were two full Moones: he had a thousand Noses,
Love's Labour's LostLLL I.i.148Three thousand times within this three years' space;Three thousand times within this three yeeres space:
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.130The payment of a hundred thousand crowns,The paiment of a hundred thousand Crownes,
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.135A hundred thousand more, in surety of the whichA hundred thousand more: in surety of the which,
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.144A hundred thousand crowns, and not demands,An hundred thousand Crownes, and not demands
Love's Labour's LostLLL II.i.145On payment of a hundred thousand crowns,One paiment of a hundred thousand Crownes,
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.11For he hath been five thousand year a boy.For he hath beene fiue thousand yeeres a Boy.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.37I am compared to twenty thousand fairs.I am compar'd to twenty thousand fairs.
Love's Labour's LostLLL V.ii.50Some thousand verses of a faithful lover;Some thousand Verses of a faithfull Louer.
MacbethMac I.ii.65Ten thousand dollars to our general use.Ten thousand Dollars, to our generall vse.
MacbethMac IV.iii.134Old Seyward with ten thousand warlike men,Old Seyward with ten thousand warlike men
MacbethMac IV.iii.190Lent us good Seyward and ten thousand men –Lent vs good Seyward, and ten thousand men,
MacbethMac V.iii.13.1There is ten thousandThere is ten thousand.
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.49To three thousand dolours a year.To three thousand Dollours a yeare.
Measure for MeasureMM I.ii.60arrested and carried to prison was worth five thousandarrested, and carried to prison, was worth fiue thousand
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.20For thou exists on many a thousand grainsFor thou exists on manie a thousand graines
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.40Lie hid more thousand deaths; yet death we fear,Lie hid moe thousand deaths; yet death we feare
Measure for MeasureMM III.i.149I'll pray a thousand prayers for thy death,Ile pray a thousand praiers for thy death,
Measure for MeasureMM III.ii.112bastards, he would have paid for the nursing a thousand.Bastards, he would haue paide for the Nursing a thousand.
Measure for MeasureMM IV.i.62Upon thy doings; thousand escapes of witVpon thy doings: thousand escapes of wit
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.1Three thousand ducats, well.Three thousand ducates, well.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.9Three thousand ducats for three months, andThree thousand ducats for three months, and
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.25notwithstanding, sufficient. Three thousand ducats; I thinknotwithstanding sufficient, three thousand ducats, I thinke
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.53Of full three thousand ducats. What of that?Of full three thousand ducats: what of that?
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.62.2Ay, ay, three thousand ducats.I, I, three thousand ducats.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.100Three thousand ducats, 'tis a good round sum.Three thousand ducats, 'tis a good round sum.
The Merchant of VeniceMV I.iii.119A cur can lend three thousand ducats?’ OrA curre should lend three thousand ducats? or
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.77cost me two thousand ducats in Frankfurt! The cursecost me two thousand ducats in Franckford, the curse
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.i.79now. Two thousand ducats in that, and other precious,now, two thousand ducats in that, and other precious,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.154A thousand times more fair, ten thousand timesA thousand times more faire, ten thousand times
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.213We'll play with them, the first boy for a thousandWeele play with them the first boy for a thousand
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.298.1For me, three thousand ducats.For me three thousand ducats.
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.299Pay him six thousand, and deface the bond.Pay him sixe thousand, and deface the bond:
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.ii.300Double six thousand and then treble that,Double sixe thousand, and then treble that,
The Merchant of VeniceMV III.iv.77A thousand raw tricks of these bragging Jacks,A thousand raw tricks of these bragging Iacks,
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.42Three thousand ducats. I'll not answer that,Three thousand Ducats? Ile not answer that:
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.45And I be pleased to give ten thousand ducatsAnd I be pleas'd to giue ten thousand Ducates
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.84For thy three thousand ducats here is six.For thy three thousand Ducates heere is six.
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.85If every ducat in six thousand ducatsIf euerie Ducat in sixe thousand Ducates
The Merchant of VeniceMV IV.i.408Three thousand ducats due unto the JewThree thousand Ducats due vnto the Iew
The Merchant of VeniceMV V.i.211Which did refuse three thousand ducats of meWhich did refuse three thousand Ducates of me,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.i.69I protest mine never shall. I warrant he hath a thousandI protest mine neuer shall: I warrant he hath a thousand
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.41Two thousand, fair woman, and I'll vouchsafeTwo thousand (faire woman) and ile vouchsafe
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.79letter, for the which she thanks you a thousand times,Letter: for the which she thankes you a thousand times;
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW II.ii.239and a thousand other her defences, which now are tooand a thousand other her defences, which now are too-
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.19And a thousand fragrant posies.and a thousand fragrant posies.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.i.24And a thousand vagram posies.and a thousand vagram Posies.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.115as his peril. I had rather than a thousand pound he wereas his perill. I had rather then a thousand pound he were
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW III.iii.208honest a 'omans as I will desires among five thousand,honest a o'mans, as I will desires among fiue thousand,
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW IV.iv.88Though twenty thousand worthier come to crave her.Though twenty thousand worthier come to craue her.
The Merry Wives of WindsorMW V.v.221A thousand irreligious cursed hoursA thousand irreligious cursed houres
A Midsummer Night's DreamMND II.i.160As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts;As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts,
Much Ado About NothingMA I.i.82have caught the Benedick, it will cost him a thousandhaue caught the Benedict, it will cost him a thousand
Much Ado About NothingMA II.ii.48thy fee is a thousand ducats.thy fee is a thousand ducates.
Much Ado About NothingMA II.iii.142O, she tore the letter into a thousand halfpence;O she tore the letter into a thousand halfpence,
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.107thousand ducats.thousand Ducates.
Much Ado About NothingMA III.iii.142chamber-window, bids me a thousand timeschamber-window, bids me a thousand times
Much Ado About NothingMA III.v.23Yea, an't 'twere a thousand pound more thanYea, and 'twere a thousand times more than
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.92A thousand times in secret.A thousand times in secret.
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.157A thousand blushing apparitionsA thousand blushing apparitions,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.i.158To start into her face, a thousand innocent shamesTo start into her face, a thousand innocent shames,
Much Ado About NothingMA IV.ii.46thousand ducats of Don John for accusing the Ladythousand Dukates of Don Iohn, for accusing the Lady
OthelloOth III.iii.439O, that the slave had forty thousand lives!O that the Slaue had forty thousand liues:
OthelloOth IV.i.191O, a thousand, thousand times! – And then ofOh, a thousand, a thousand times: / And then of
OthelloOth V.ii.211A thousand times committed. Cassio confessed it,A thousand times committed. Cassio confest it,
PericlesPer I.ii.97Musings into my mind, with thousand doubts,Musings into my mind, with thousand doubts
PericlesPer IV.ii.24Three or four thousand chequins were as prettyThree or foure thousande Checkins were as prettie
PericlesPer IV.ii.48I cannot be bated one doit of a thousand pieces.I cannot be bated one doit of a thousand peeces.
PericlesPer V.i.135If thine considered prove the thousandth partif thine considered proue the thousand part
Richard IIR2 I.i.88That Mowbray hath received eight thousand noblesThat Mowbray hath receiu'd eight thousandNobles,
Richard IIR2 II.i.100A thousand flatterers sit within thy crown,A thousand flatterers sit within thy Crowne,
Richard IIR2 II.i.205You pluck a thousand dangers on your head,You plucke a thousand dangers on your head,
Richard IIR2 II.i.206You lose a thousand well-disposed hearts,You loose a thousand well-disposed hearts,
Richard IIR2 II.i.286With eight tall ships, three thousand men of war,With eight tall ships, three thousand men of warre
Richard IIR2 II.ii.91Bid her send me presently a thousand pound – Bid her send me presently a thousand pound,
Richard IIR2 II.iii.101From forth the ranks of many thousand French,From forth the Rankes of many thousand French:
Richard IIR2 III.ii.70And thou shalt have twelve thousand fighting men.And thou shalt haue twelue thousand fighting men:
Richard IIR2 III.ii.76But now the blood of twenty thousand menBut now the blood of twentie thousand men
Richard IIR2 III.ii.85Is not the King's name twenty thousand names?Is not the Kings Name fortie thousand Names?
Richard IIR2 III.iii.96Ten thousand bloody crowns of mothers' sonsTen thousand bloody crownes of Mothers Sonnes
Richard IIR2 IV.i.16The offer of an hundred thousand crownsThe offer of an hundred thousand Crownes,
Richard IIR2 IV.i.58I have a thousand spirits in one breast
Richard IIR2 IV.i.59To answer twenty thousand such as you.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.171Found truth in all but one; I, in twelve thousand, none.Found truth in all, but one; I, in twelue thousand, none.
Richard IIR2 IV.i.282Did keep ten thousand men? Was this the faceDid keepe ten thousand men? Was this the Face,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.14And cited up a thousand heavy times,And cited vp a thousand heauy times,
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.24Methoughts I saw a thousand fearful wracks;Me thoughts, I saw a thousand fearfull wrackes:
Richard IIIR3 I.iv.25A thousand men that fishes gnawed upon;A thousand men that Fishes gnaw'd vpon:
Richard IIIR3 V.ii.17Every man's conscience is a thousand men,Euery mans Conscience is a thousand men,
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.10Six or seven thousand is their utmost power.Six or seuen thousand is their vtmost power.
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.194My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,My Conscience hath a thousand seuerall Tongues,
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.219Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiersThen can the substance of ten thousand Souldiers
Richard IIIR3 V.iii.348A thousand hearts are great within my bosom!A thousand hearts are great within my bosom.
Romeo and JulietRJ I.iii.47I warrant, an I should live a thousand years,I warrant, & I shall liue a thousand yeares,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.154A thousand times good night!A thousand times goodnight.
Romeo and JulietRJ II.ii.155A thousand times the worse, to want thy light!A thousand times the worse to want thy light,
Romeo and JulietRJ II.iv.209Ay, a thousand times. Peter!I a thousand times. Peter?
Romeo and JulietRJ III.ii.114Hath slain ten thousand Tybalts. Tybalt's deathHath slaine ten thousand Tibalts: Tibalts death
Romeo and JulietRJ III.iii.153With twenty hundred thousand times more joyWith twenty hundred thousand times more ioy
Romeo and JulietRJ III.v.240So many thousand times? Go, counsellor!So many thousand times? Go Counsellor,
The Taming of the ShrewTS induction.2.134Which bars a thousand harms and lengthens life.Which barres a thousand harmes, and lengthens life.
The Taming of the ShrewTS I.ii.241Fair Leda's daughter had a thousand wooers,Faire Ladaes daughter had a thousand wooers,
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.84A thousand thanks, Signor Gremio. Welcome,A thousand thankes signior Gremio: / Welcome
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.122And in possession twenty thousand crowns.And in possession twentie thousand Crownes.
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.362Besides two thousand ducats by the yearBesides, two thousand Duckets by the yeere
The Taming of the ShrewTS II.i.365Two thousand ducats by the year of land!Two thousand Duckets by the yeere of land,
The Taming of the ShrewTS III.ii.15He'll woo a thousand, 'point the day of marriage,Hee'll wooe a thousand, point the day of marriage,
The Taming of the ShrewTS V.ii.112Unto their losses twenty thousand crowns – Vnto their losses twentie thousand crownes,
The TempestTem I.i.61Now would I give a thousand furlongs of seaNow would I giue a thousand furlongs of Sea,
The TempestTem III.i.91.2A thousand, thousand!A thousand, thousand.
The TempestTem III.ii.138Sometimes a thousand twangling instrumentsSometimes a thousand twangling Instruments
Timon of AthensTim I.i.93A thousand moral paintings I can showA thousand morall Paintings I can shew,
Timon of AthensTim II.i.1And late five thousand. To Varro and to IsidoreAnd late fiue thousand: to Varro and to Isidore
Timon of AthensTim II.i.2He owes nine thousand, besides my former sum,He owes nine thousand, besides my former summe,
Timon of AthensTim II.ii.204.1A thousand talents to me.A thousand Talents to me.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.30Yes, mine's three thousand crowns. What's yours?Yes, mine's three thousand Crownes: / What's yours?
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.31Five thousand mine.Fiue thousand mine.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.96Five thousand crowns, my lord.Fiue thousand Crownes, my Lord.
Timon of AthensTim III.iv.97Five thousand drops pays that. What yours? And yours?Fiue thousand drops payes that. / What yours? and yours?
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.21A thousand pieces.A thousand Peeces.
Timon of AthensTim III.vi.22A thousand pieces?A thousand Peeces?
Titus AndronicusTit II.i.79.2Aaron, a thousand deathsAaron, a thousand deaths
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.100A thousand fiends, a thousand hissing snakes,A thousand Fiends, a thousand hissing Snakes,
Titus AndronicusTit II.iii.101Ten thousand swelling toads, as many urchins,Ten thousand swelling Toades, as many Vrchins,
Titus AndronicusTit III.i.194From thousand dangers. Bid him bury it;From thousand dangers: bid him bury it:
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.41I would we had a thousand Roman damesI would we had a thousand Romane Dames
Titus AndronicusTit IV.ii.45And that would she, for twenty thousand more.And that would she for twenty thousand more.
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.124Ay, that I had not done a thousand more.I, that I had not done a thousand more:
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.141But I have done a thousand dreadful thingsTut, I haue done a thousand dreadfull things
Titus AndronicusTit V.i.144But that I cannot do ten thousand more.But that I cannot doe ten thousand more.
Titus AndronicusTit V.ii.96Show me a thousand that hath done thee wrong,Shew me a thousand that haue done thee wrong,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.50And have a thousand times more cause than heAnd haue a thousand times more cause then he.
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.166How many thousand times hath these poor lips,Shed yet some small drops from thy tender Spring,
Titus AndronicusTit V.iii.186Ten thousand worse than ever yet I didTen thousand worse, then euer yet I did,
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.264thousand watches.thousand watches.
Troilus and CressidaTC I.ii.284But more in Troilus thousandfold I seeBut more in Troylus thousand fold I see,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.19Every tithe soul 'mongst many thousand dismesEuery tythe soule 'mongst many thousand dismes,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.83Whose price hath launched above a thousand ships,Whose price hath launch'd aboue a thousand Ships,
Troilus and CressidaTC II.ii.102Cry, Trojans, cry! Lend me ten thousand eyes,Cry Troyans cry; lend me ten thousand eyes,
Troilus and CressidaTC III.iii.156For emulation hath a thousand sons,For emulation hath a thousand Sonnes,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.i.28A thousand complete courses of the sun!A thousand compleate courses of the Sunne,
Troilus and CressidaTC IV.iv.38We two, that with so many thousand sighsWe two, that with so many thousand sighes
Troilus and CressidaTC V.v.19There is a thousand Hectors in the field;There is a thousand Hectors in the field:
Twelfth NightTN I.iii.20Why, he has three thousand ducats a year.Why he ha's three thousand ducates a yeare.
Twelfth NightTN II.iv.62A thousand thousand sighs to save,A thousand thousand sighes to saue,
Twelfth NightTN III.ii.52I have been dear to him, lad, some two thousandI haue beene deere to him lad, some two thousand
Twelfth NightTN V.i.131To do you rest, a thousand deaths would die.To do you rest, a thousand deaths would dye.
Twelfth NightTN V.i.264(To Viola) Boy, thou hast said to me a thousand timesBoy, thou hast saide to me a thousand times,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG I.iii.91And yet a thousand times it answers, ‘ No.’And yet a thousand times it answer's no.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.91Madam and mistress, a thousand goodMadam & Mistres, a thousand good-
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.95Sir Valentine and servant, to you two thousand.Sir Valentine, and seruant, to you two thousand.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.i.108Please you command, a thousand times as much;(Please you command) a thousand times as much:
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.v.9shalt have five thousand welcomes. But, sirrah, how didshalt haue fiue thousand welcomes: But sirha, how did
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vi.16With twenty thousand soul-confirming oaths!With twenty thousand soule-confirming oathes.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG II.vii.69A thousand oaths, an ocean of his tears,A thousand oathes, an Ocean of his teares,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iii.6Sir Eglamour, a thousand times good morrow.Sir Eglamore, a thousand times good morrow.
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG IV.iv.131For I have heard him say a thousand timesFor I haue heard him say a thousand times,
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iii.3A thousand more mischances than this oneA thousand more mischances then this one
The Two Gentlemen of VeronaTG V.iv.48Into a thousand oaths; and all those oathsInto a thousand oathes; and all those oathes,
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.iv.36But forty-thousandfold we had rather have 'emBut forty thousand fold, we had rather have 'em
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK I.v.14A thousand differing ways to one sure end.A thousand differing waies, to one sure end.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.85Loaden with kisses, armed with thousand Cupids,Loden with kisses, armd with thousand Cupids
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.148Or prayers to the gods; a thousand chances,Or praiers to the gods; a thousand chaunces
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK II.i.311If he be noble Arcite; thousand ways!If he be noble Arcite; thousand waies.
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK III.vi.243The straight young boughs that blush with thousand blossomsThe straight yong Bowes that blush with thousand Blossoms
The Two Noble KinsmenTNK IV.i.85Thousand fresh water flowers of several colours,Thousand fresh water flowers of severall cullors.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.93Slaughters a thousand waiting upon that.Slaughters a thousand, wayting vpon that.
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.95With one soft kiss a thousand furlongs ereWith one soft Kisse a thousand Furlongs, ere
The Winter's TaleWT I.ii.206With bag and baggage. Many thousand on'sWith bag and baggage: many thousand on's
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.208To nothing but despair. A thousand knees,To nothing but dispaire. A thousand knees,
The Winter's TaleWT III.ii.209Ten thousand years together, naked, fasting,Ten thousand yeares together, naked, fasting,
The Winter's TaleWT IV.iv.275forty thousand fathom above water, and sung this balladfortie thousand fadom aboue water, & sung this ballad
The Winter's TaleWT V.i.21You might have spoken a thousand things that wouldYou might haue spoken a thousand things, that would

Poems

 18 result(s).
PlayKey LineModern TextOriginal Text
A Lover's ComplaintLC.36 A thousand favours from a maund she drew, A thousand fauours from a maund she drew,
The Passionate PilgrimPP.17.24 Like a thousand vanquished men in bloody fight! Like a thousand vanquisht men in blodie fight.
The Passionate PilgrimPP.19.10 With a thousand fragrant posies, With a thousand fragrant poses,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.456 Wrapped and confounded in a thousand fears, Wrapt and confounded in a thousand feares,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.912 A thousand crosses keep them from thy aid; A thousand crosses keepe them from thy aide:
The Rape of LucreceLuc.963 Would purchase thee a thousand thousand friends, Would purchase thee a thousand thousand friends,
The Rape of LucreceLuc.1373 A thousand lamentable objects there A thousand lamentable obiects there,
SonnetsSonn.25.10 After a thousand victories once foiled, After a thousand victories once foild,
SonnetsSonn.131.10 A thousand groans, but thinking on thy face, A thousand grones but thinking on thy face,
SonnetsSonn.141.2 For they in thee a thousand errors note, For they in thee a thousand errors note,
Venus and AdonisVen.16 A thousand honey secrets shalt thou know. A thousand honie secrets shalt thou know:
Venus and AdonisVen.240 No dog shall rouse thee, though a thousand bark.’ No dog shal rowze thee, though a thousand bark.
Venus and AdonisVen.477 He chafes her lips, a thousand ways he seeks He chafes her lips, a thousand wayes he seekes,
Venus and AdonisVen.517 ‘ A thousand kisses buys my heart from me; A thousand kisses buyes my heart from me,
Venus and AdonisVen.682 He cranks and crosses with a thousand doubles. He crankes and crosses with a thousand doubles,
Venus and AdonisVen.775 ‘ If love have lent you twenty thousand tongues, If loue haue lent you twentie thousand tongues,
Venus and AdonisVen.907 A thousand spleens bear her a thousand ways; A thousand spleenes beare her a thousand wayes,
Venus and AdonisVen.1130 A thousand times, and now no more reflect, A thousand times, and now no more reflect,

Glossary

 0 result(s).

Thesaurus

 0 result(s).

Themes and Topics

 6 result(s).
Comparison... 51--5 [rosalind to silvius] you are a thousand times a properer man than she a woman ...
Here, there, and where... thereabouts aw iv iii 171 five or six thousand horse or thereabouts approximately ...
Hither, thither, and whither... iv i 92 the earl of westmoreland seven thousand strong / is marching hitherwards in thi...
Numbers...chery distance in yards] threescore thousand e3 iv iii 62 60 000 [army size] ...
French...d'angleterre > on my knees i give you a thousand thanks and i count myself fortunate tha...
Frequently Encountered Words (FEW)...ouse r3 i iv 16 [clarence to keeper] a thousand heavy times / that had befallen us ...

Words Families

 63 result(s).
Word FamilyWord Family GroupWords
FIFTEENHIGHERfifteen thousand adj
FIFTYHIGHERfifty thousand adj
FIVEHIGHERfive thousand adj
HUNDREDOVER A THOUSANDsix thousand and two hundred adj, eight thousand and four hundred n, hundred thousand adj, hundred thousand n, twenty hundred thousand adj
NINEHIGHERnine thousand n
SCOREBASICthreescore thousand adj
SEVENHIGHERseven thousand adj, seven thousand n
SIXBASICsix thousand n
TENHIGHERten thousand adj
THOUSANDBASICthousand dj, thousand n, thousandfold n, thousandth adj
THOUSANDHIGHER TO TENtwo thousand adj, two thousand n, three thousand adj, three or four thousand adj, five thousand adj, five or six thousand adj, five or six thousand n, six thousand n, six thousand and two hundred adj, six or seven thousand n, seven thousand adj, eight thousand n, eight thousand and four hundred n, nine thousand n, ten thousand adj, ten thousand n
THOUSANDHIGHER OVER TENtwelve thousand adj, fifteen thousand adj, twenty thousand adj, three and twenty thousand n, five-and-twenty thousand n, thirty thousand adj, twice fifteen thousand adj, forty thousand adj, forty-thousandfold adv, fifty thousand n, threescore thousand n, hundred thousand adj, thousand thousand adj, twenty hundred thousand adj, thousand millions n
THREEOVER A HUNDREDthree thousand adj, three or four thousand adj, thirty thousand adj, thirty thousand n, threescore thousand n
TWELVEHIGHERtwelve thousand adj
TWENTYABOVE THIRTYtwenty thousand adj, twenty thousand n, three-and-twenty thousand adj, five-and-twenty thousand adj, twenty hundred thousand adj
TWOOVER A HUNDREDtwo thousand adj, two thousand n, six thousand and two hundred adj

Snippets

 1 result(s).
Snippet
Aaron thousand more speech
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