All's Well That Ends Well
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Enter Count Rossillion and the Frenchmen, as at first.Enter Bertram and the two French Lords AW III.vi.1.1
Cap. E.FIRST LORD 
Nay good my Lord put him too't: let himNay, good my lord, put him to't; let himput to it
old form: too
put to the proof, make trial of
AW III.vi.1
haue his way.have his way.way (n.)opportunity, scopeAW III.vi.2
Cap. G. SECOND LORD 
If your Lordshippe finde him not a Hilding,If your lordship find him not a hilding,hilding (n.)good-for-nothing, worthless individualAW III.vi.3
hold me no more in your respect.hold me no more in your respect. AW III.vi.4
Cap. E. FIRST LORD 
On my life my Lord, a bubble.On my life, my lord, a bubble.bubble (n.)empty thing, pretty sham, deceptive showAW III.vi.5
Ber. BERTRAM 
Do you thinke I am so farre / Deceiued in him.Do you think I am so far deceived in him? AW III.vi.6
Cap. E. FIRST LORD 
Beleeue it my Lord, in mine owne directBelieve it, my lord, in mine own direct AW III.vi.7
knowledge, without any malice, but to speake of him asknowledge, without any malice, but to speak of him as AW III.vi.8
my kinsman, hee's a most notable Coward, an infinite andmy kinsman, he's a most notable coward, an infinite and AW III.vi.9
endlesse Lyar, an hourely promise-breaker, the owner of noendless liar, an hourly promise-breaker, the owner of no AW III.vi.10
one good qualitie, worthy your Lordships entertainment.one good quality worthy your lordship's entertainment.entertainment (n.)treatment, hospitality, receptionAW III.vi.11
Cap. G.SECOND LORD 
It were fit you knew him, least reposingIt were fit you knew him; lest, reposingrepose (v.)confidently settle, happily relyAW III.vi.12
know (v.)see through, find out about
fit (adj.)suited, fitting, appropriate
too farre in his vertue which he hath not, he might at sometoo far in his virtue which he hath not, he might at some AW III.vi.13
great and trustie businesse, in a maine daunger, fayle you.great and trusty business in a main danger fail you. AW III.vi.14
Ber.BERTRAM 
I would I knew in what particular action to tryI would I knew in what particular action to try AW III.vi.15
him.him. AW III.vi.16
Cap. G.SECOND LORD 
None better then to let him fetch off hisNone better than to let him fetch off hisfetch off (v.)rescue, get back, retrieveAW III.vi.17
drumme, which you heare him so confidently vndertake todrum, which you hear him so confidently undertake to AW III.vi.18
do.do. AW III.vi.19
C. E.FIRST LORD 
I with a troop of Florentines wil sodainly I, with a troop of Florentines, will suddenlyFlorentine (n.)someone from Florence, ItalyAW III.vi.20
surprize him; such I will haue whom I am sure hesurprise him; such I will have whom I am sure he AW III.vi.21
knowes not from the enemie: wee will binde and hoodwinkeknows not from the enemy. We will bind and hoodwinkhoodwink (v.)
old form: hoodwinke
blindfold, cover one's eyes
AW III.vi.22
him so, that he shall suppose no other but that he ishim so, that he shall suppose no other but that he is AW III.vi.23
carried into the Leager of the aduersaries, when wecarried into the leaguer of the adversaries when weleaguer (n.)
old form: Leager
military camp
AW III.vi.24
bring him to our owne tents: be but your Lordship presentbring him to our own tents. Be but your lordship present AW III.vi.25
at his examination, if he do not for the promise of hisat his examination. If he do not for the promise of his AW III.vi.26
life, and in the highest compulsion of base feare, offer tolife, and in the highest compulsion of base fear, offer tobase (adj.)dishonourable, low, unworthyAW III.vi.27
betray you, and deliuer all the intelligence in his powerbetray you and deliver all the intelligence in his powerintelligence (n.)information, news, communicationAW III.vi.28
against you, and that with the diuine forfeite of his souleagainst you, and that with the divine forfeit of his soul AW III.vi.29
vpon oath, neuer trust my iudgement in anie thing.upon oath, never trust my judgement in anything. AW III.vi.30
Cap. G.SECOND LORD 
O for the loue of laughter, let him fetchO, for the love of laughter, let him fetch AW III.vi.31
his drumme, he sayes he has a stratagem for't: when yourhis drum; he says he has a stratagem for't.When yourstratagem (n.)scheme, device, cunning planAW III.vi.32
Lordship sees the bottome of this successe in't, and to whatlordship sees the bottom of his success in't, and to whatbottom (n.)
old form: bottome
lowest point, nadir
AW III.vi.33
mettle this counterfeyt lump of ours will be melted if youmetal this counterfeit lump of ore will be melted, if youcounterfeit (adj.)
old form: counterfeyt
pretended, feigned, sham
AW III.vi.34
giue him not Iohn drummes entertainement, your inclininggive him not John Drum's entertainment your incliningentertainment (n.)
old form: entertainement
treatment, hospitality, reception
AW III.vi.35
inclining (n.)favour, partiality, indulgence
cannot be remoued. Heere he comes.cannot be removed. Here he comes. AW III.vi.36
Enter ParrollesEnter Parolles AW III.vi.37
Cap. E.FIRST LORD 
O for the loue of laughter hinder not theO, for the love of laughter, hinder not the AW III.vi.37
honor of his designe, let him fetch off his drumme in anyhonour of his design; let him fetch off his drum in anyfetch off (v.)rescue, get back, retrieveAW III.vi.38
design (n.)
old form: designe
undertaking, purpose, enterprise
hand.hand.hand, at / in anyin any case, at any rateAW III.vi.39
Ber.BERTRAM 
How now Monsieur? This drumme sticks sorelyHow now, monsieur! This drum sticks sorelystick (v.)pierce, stab, woundAW III.vi.40
sorely (adv.)severely, intensely, very greatly
in your disposition.in your disposition.disposition (n.)composure, state of mind, temperamentAW III.vi.41
Cap. G. SECOND LORD 
A pox on't, let it go, 'tis but a drumme.A pox on't! Let it go, 'tis but a drum.pox (n.)venereal disease; also: plague, or any other disease displaying skin pustulesAW III.vi.42
Par.PAROLLES 
But a drumme: Ist but a drumme? A drum so lost.But a drum! Is't but a drum? A drum so lost! AW III.vi.43
There was excellent command, to charge in with ourThere was excellent command: to charge in with our AW III.vi.44
horse vpon our owne wings, and to rend our owne souldiers.horse upon our own wings and to rend our own soldiers!rend (v.)tear apart, lay waste, devastateAW III.vi.45
Cap. G.SECOND LORD 
That was not to be blam'd in the commandThat was not to be blamed in the commandcommand (n.)orders, directionAW III.vi.46
of the seruice: it was a disaster of warre that Caesar of the service: it was a disaster of war that CaesarJulius Caesar[pron: 'seezer] Roman politician and general, 1st-c BCAW III.vi.47
service (n.)
old form: seruice
action, performance
him selfe could not haue preuented, if he had beene there tohimself could not have prevented if he had been there to AW III.vi.48
command.command. AW III.vi.49
Ber.BERTRAM 
Well, wee cannot greatly condemne our successe: Well, we cannot greatly condemn our success;success (n.)
old form: successe
result, outcome, issue
AW III.vi.50
some dishonor wee had in the losse of that drum, but it issome dishonour we had in the loss of that drum, but it is AW III.vi.51
not to be recouered.not to be recovered. AW III.vi.52
Par.PAROLLES 
It might haue beene recouered.It might have been recovered. AW III.vi.53
Ber BERTRAM 
It might, but it is not now.It might, but it is not now. AW III.vi.54
Par.PAROLLES 
It is to be recouered, but that the merit of It is to be recovered. But that the merit of AW III.vi.55
seruice is sildome attributed to the true and exact performer,service is seldom attributed to the true and exact performer,service (n.)
old form: seruice
action, performance
AW III.vi.56
I would haue that drumme or another, or hic iacet.I would have that drum or another, or hic jacet. AW III.vi.57
Ber.BERTRAM 
Why if you haue a stomacke, too't Monsieur: ifWhy, if you have a stomach, to't, monsieur! If stomach (n.)
old form: stomacke
spirit, courage, valour, will
AW III.vi.58
you thinke your mysterie in stratagem, can bring thisyou think your mystery in stratagem can bring thismystery (n.)
old form: mysterie
mastery, art, skill
AW III.vi.59
stratagem (n.)soldierly action, well commanded engagement
instrument of honour againe into his natiue quarter, beinstrument of honour again into his native quarter, bequarter (n.)quarters, lodging, residenceAW III.vi.60
magnanimious in the enterprize and go on, I wil gracemagnanimous in the enterprise and go on. I will gracemagnanimious (adj.)of great spirit, nobly valiantAW III.vi.61
grace (v.)favour, add merit to, do honour to
the attempt for a worthy exploit: if you speede well in it,the attempt for a worthy exploit. If you speed well in itspeed (v.)
old form: speede
meet with success, prosper, flourish
AW III.vi.62
the Duke shall both speake of it, and extend to you whatthe Duke shall both speak of it and extend to you what AW III.vi.63
further becomes his greatnesse, euen to the vtmostfurther becomes his greatness, even to the utmostbecome (v.)be fitting, befit, be appropriate toAW III.vi.64
syllable of your worthinesse.syllable of your worthiness. AW III.vi.65
Par.PAROLLES 
By the hand of a souldier I will vndertake it.By the hand of a soldier, I will undertake it. AW III.vi.66
Ber.BERTRAM 
But you must not now slumber in it.But you must not now slumber in it. AW III.vi.67
Par.PAROLLES 
Ile about it this euening, and I will presentlyI'll about it this evening, and I will presentlypresently (adv.)immediately, instantly, at onceAW III.vi.68
pen downe my dilemma's, encourage my selfe in my certaintie,pen down my dilemmas, encourage myself in my certainty,dilemma (n.)choice of action, alternative positionAW III.vi.69
put my selfe into my mortall preparation: and byput myself into my mortal preparation; and bymortal (adj.)
old form: mortall
fatal, deadly, lethal
AW III.vi.70
midnight looke to heare further from me.midnight look to hear further from me. AW III.vi.71
Ber.BERTRAM 
May I bee bold to acquaint his grace you areMay I be bold to acquaint his grace you are AW III.vi.72
gone about it.gone about it? AW III.vi.73
Par.PAROLLES 
I know not what the successe wil be my Lord,I know not what the success will be, my lord,success (n.)
old form: successe
result, outcome, issue
AW III.vi.74
but the attempt I vow.but the attempt I vow. AW III.vi.75
Ber.BERTRAM 
I know th'art valiant, / And to the possibility ofI know th'art valiant, and to the possibility ofpossibility (n.)capability, ability, competenceAW III.vi.76
thy souldiership, / Will subscribe for thee: Farewell.thy soldiership will subscribe for thee. Farewell.subscribe for (v.)vouch for, answer on behalf ofAW III.vi.77
Par.PAROLLES 
I loue not many words. I love not many words. AW III.vi.78
ExitExit AW III.vi.78
Cap. E.FIRST LORD 
No more then a fish loues water. Is not this a No more than a fish loves water. Is not this a AW III.vi.79
strange fellow my Lord, that so confidently seemes tostrange fellow, my lord, that so confidently seems to AW III.vi.80
vndertake this businesse, which he knowes is not to beundertake this business, which he knows is not to be AW III.vi.81
done, damnes himselfe to do, & dares better be damnddone, damns himself to do, and dares better be damned AW III.vi.82
then to doo't.than to do't. AW III.vi.83
Cap. G.SECOND LORD 
You do not know him my Lord as we doe,You do not know him, my lord, as we do. AW III.vi.84
certaine it is that he will steale himselfe into a mansCertain it is that he will steal himself into a man's AW III.vi.85
fauour, and for a weeke escape a great deale of discoueries,favour and for a week escape a great deal of discoveries, AW III.vi.86
but when you finde him out, you haue him euer after. but when you find him out you have him ever after. AW III.vi.87
Ber.BERTRAM 
Why do you thinke he will make no deede at allWhy, do you think he will make no deed at alldeed (n.)
old form: deede
performance, action
AW III.vi.88
of this that so seriouslie hee dooes addresse himselfe vnto?of this that so seriously he does address himself unto? AW III.vi.89
Cap. E.FIRST LORD 
None in the world, but returne with an inuention,None in the world, but return with an invention,invention (n.)
old form: inuention
fiction, fabrication, contrivance
AW III.vi.90
and clap vpon you two or three probable lies:and clap upon you two or three probable lies.probable (adj.)plausible, believable, likely soundingAW III.vi.91
but we haue almost imbost him, you shall see hisBut we have almost embossed him. You shall see hisemboss (v.)
old form: imbost
[hunting] run down, drive to exhaustion
AW III.vi.92
all to night; for indeede he is not for your Lordshippesfall tonight; for indeed he is not for your lordship's AW III.vi.93
respect. respect. AW III.vi.94
Cap. G.SECOND LORD 
Weele make you some sport with the FoxeWe'll make you some sport with the foxsport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainmentAW III.vi.95
ere we case him. He was first smoak'd by the old Lordere we case him. He was first smoked by the old Lordcase (v.)flay, skinAW III.vi.96
smoke (v.)
old form: smoak'd
expose, smoke out; suspect, scent
Lafew when his disguise and he is parted, tell me whatLafew. When his disguise and he is parted tell me what adisguise (n.)deception, pretenceAW III.vi.97
a sprat you shall finde him, which you shall see this veriesprat you shall find him; which you shall see this very AW III.vi.98
night.night. AW III.vi.99
Cap. E.FIRST LORD 
I must go looke my twigges, / He shall be caught.I must go look my twigs. He shall be caught.twig (n.)
old form: twigges
stratagem for entrapping
AW III.vi.100
Ber.BERTRAM 
Your brother he shall go along with me.Your brother, he shall go along with me. AW III.vi.101
Cap. G. FIRST LORD 
As't please your Lordship, Ile leaue you.As't please your lordship. I'll leave you. AW III.vi.102
Exit AW III.vi.102
Ber.BERTRAM 
Now wil I lead you to the house, and shew youNow will I lead you to the house and show you AW III.vi.193
The Lasse I spoke of.The lass I spoke of. AW III.vi.104.1
Cap. E. SECOND LORD 
But you say she's honest.But you say she's honest.honest (adj.)chaste, pure, virtuousAW III.vi.104.2
Ber.BERTRAM 
That's all the fault: I spoke with hir but once,That's all the fault. I spoke with her but once AW III.vi.105
And found her wondrous cold, but I sent to herAnd found her wondrous cold, but I sent to her AW III.vi.106
By this same Coxcombe that we haue i'th windeBy this same coxcomb that we have i'th' windwind, have in the
old form: winde
scent, detect
AW III.vi.107
coxcomb (n.)
old form: Coxcombe
fool's head, fool, simpleton
Tokens and Letters, which she did resend,Tokens and letters which she did re-send, AW III.vi.108
And this is all I haue done: She's a faire creature,And this is all I have done. She's a fair creature; AW III.vi.109
Will you go see her?Will you go see her? AW III.vi.110.1
Cap. E.SECOND LORD 
With all my heart my Lord. With all my heart, my lord. AW III.vi.110.2
ExeuntExeunt AW III.vi.110
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