Richard III
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Enter Clarence and Keeper.Enter Clarence and Keeper R3 I.iv.1.1
Keep. KEEPER 
Why lookes your Grace so heauily to day.Why looks your grace so heavily today?heavily (adv.)sorrowfully, sadly, gloomilyR3 I.iv.1
Cla. CLARENCE 
O, I haue past a miserable night,O, I have passed a miserable night, R3 I.iv.2
So full of fearefull Dreames, of vgly sights,So full of fearful dreams, of ugly sights, R3 I.iv.3
That as I am a Christian faithfull man,That, as I am a Christian faithful man, R3 I.iv.4
I would not spend another such a nightI would not spend another such a night R3 I.iv.5
Though 'twere to buy a world of happy daies:Though 'twere to buy a world of happy days, R3 I.iv.6
So full of dismall terror was the time.So full of dismal terror was the time. R3 I.iv.7
Keep. KEEPER 
What was your dream my Lord, I pray you tel meWhat was your dream, my lord? I pray you tell me. R3 I.iv.8
Cla. CLARENCE 
Me thoughts that I had broken from the Tower,Methoughts that I had broken from the Towermethinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: Me thoughts
it seems / seemed to me
R3 I.iv.9
And was embark'd to crosse to Burgundy,And was embarked to cross to Burgundy R3 I.iv.10
And in my company my Brother Glouster,And in my company my brother Gloucester, R3 I.iv.11
Who from my Cabin tempted me to walke,Who from my cabin tempted me to walktempt (v.)persuade, entice, inviteR3 I.iv.12
Vpon the Hatches: There we look'd toward England,Upon the hatches; thence we looked toward Englandhatch (n.)(plural) movable deck planksR3 I.iv.13
And cited vp a thousand heauy times,And cited up a thousand heavy times,heavy (adj.)
old form: heauy
sorrowful, sad, gloomy
R3 I.iv.14
cite up (v.)
old form: vp
call to mind, make reference to
During the warres of Yorke and LancasterDuring the wars of York and Lancaster, R3 I.iv.15
That had befalne vs. As we pac'd alongThat had befallen us. As we paced alongbefall (v.), past forms befallen, befell
old form: befalne
happen to, come to
R3 I.iv.16
Vpon the giddy footing of the Hatches,Upon the giddy footing of the hatches,hatch (n.)(plural) movable deck planksR3 I.iv.17
giddy (adj.)swaying, quaking, dizzying
Me thought that Glouster stumbled, and in fallingMethought that Gloucester stumbled, and in fallingmethinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: Me thought
it seems / seemed to me
R3 I.iv.18
Strooke me (that thought to stay him) ouer-boord,Struck me, that thought to stay him, overboardstay (v.)stop, prevent, endR3 I.iv.19
Into the tumbling billowes of the maine.Into the tumbling billows of the main.main (n.)
old form: maine
open sea, ocean
R3 I.iv.20
O Lord, me thought what paine it was to drowne,O Lord! Methought what pain it was to drown! R3 I.iv.21
What dreadfull noise of water in mine eares,What dreadful noise of waters in mine ears! R3 I.iv.22
What sights of vgly death within mine eyes.What sights of ugly death within mine eyes! R3 I.iv.23
Me thoughts, I saw a thousand fearfull wrackes:Methoughts I saw a thousand fearful wracks;wrack (n.)
old form: wrackes
wreck, loss, shipwreck
R3 I.iv.24
A thousand men that Fishes gnaw'd vpon:A thousand men that fishes gnawed upon; R3 I.iv.25
Wedges of Gold, great Anchors, heapes of Pearle,Wedges of gold, great anchors, heaps of pearl,wedge (n.)ingotR3 I.iv.26
Inestimable Stones, vnvalewed Iewels,Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels,unvalued (adj.)
old form: vnvalewed
invaluable, of great worth
R3 I.iv.27
All scattred in the bottome of the Sea,All scattered in the bottom of the sea. R3 I.iv.28
Some lay in dead-mens Sculles, and in the holesSome lay in dead men's skulls, and in the holes R3 I.iv.29
Where eyes did once inhabit, there were creptWhere eyes did once inhabit, there were crept, R3 I.iv.30
(As 'twere in scorne of eyes) reflecting Gemmes,As 'twere in scorn of eyes, reflecting gems, R3 I.iv.31
That woo'd the slimy bottome of the deepe,That wooed the slimy bottom of the deep R3 I.iv.32
And mock'd the dead bones that lay scattred by.And mocked the dead bones that lay scattered by. R3 I.iv.33
Keep. KEEPER 
Had you such leysure in the time of deathHad you such leisure in the time of death, R3 I.iv.34
To gaze vpon these secrets of the deepe?To gaze upon the secrets of the deep? R3 I.iv.35
Cla. CLARENCE 
Me thought I had, and often did I striueMethought I had; and often did I strive R3 I.iv.36
To yeeld the Ghost: but still the enuious FloodTo yield the ghost; but still the envious floodstill (adv.)constantly, always, continuallyR3 I.iv.37
flood (n.)sea, deep, waves, rushing water
envious (adj.)malicious, spiteful, vindictive, full of enmity
Stop'd in my soule, and would not let it forthStopped in my soul, and would not let it forth R3 I.iv.38
To find the empty, vast, and wand'ring ayre:To find the empty, vast, and wandering air,vast (adj.)boundless, extensive, widespreadR3 I.iv.39
But smother'd it within my panting bulke,But smothered it within my panting bulk,bulk (n.)
old form: bulke
body, trunk, frame
R3 I.iv.40
Who almost burst, to belch it in the Sea.Which almost burst to belch it in the sea. R3 I.iv.41
Keep. KEEPER 
Awak'd you not in this sore Agony?Awaked you not with this sore agony?sore (adj.)severe, harsh, heavyR3 I.iv.42
agony (n.)anguish, great distress; or: death-struggle
Clar. CLARENCE 
No, no, my Dreame was lengthen'd after life.No, no, my dream was lengthened after life. R3 I.iv.43
O then, began the Tempest to my Soule.O then began the tempest to my soul! R3 I.iv.44
I past (me thought) the Melancholly Flood,I passed, methought, the melancholy flood,flood (n.)river, stream, rushing waterR3 I.iv.45
With that sowre Ferry-man which Poets write of,With that sour ferryman which poets write of, R3 I.iv.46
Vnto the Kingdome of perpetuall Night.Unto the kingdom of perpetual night. R3 I.iv.47
The first that there did greet my Stranger-soule,The first that there did greet my stranger soul R3 I.iv.48
Was my great Father-in-Law, renowned Warwicke,Was my great father-in-law, renowned Warwick, R3 I.iv.49
Who spake alowd: What scourge for Periurie,Who spake aloud, ‘ What scourge for perjury R3 I.iv.50
Can this darke Monarchy affoord false Clarence?Can this dark monarchy afford false Clarence?’false (adj.)treacherous, traitorous, perfidiousR3 I.iv.51
And so he vanish'd. Then came wand'ring by,And so he vanished. Then came wandering by R3 I.iv.52
A Shadow like an Angell, with bright hayreA shadow like an angel, with bright hairshadow (n.)spirit, phantom, spectre, ghostR3 I.iv.53
Dabbel'd in blood, and he shriek'd out alowdDabbled in blood, and he shrieked out aloud, R3 I.iv.54
Clarence is come, false, fle eting,periur'd Clarence,‘ Clarence is come – false, fleeting, perjured Clarence,fleeting (adj.)changeable, inconstant, fickleR3 I.iv.55
That stabb'd me in the field by Tewkesbury:That stabbed me in the field by Tewkesbury.field (n.)field of battle, battleground, field of combatR3 I.iv.56
Tewkesbury (n.)[pron: 'tyooksbree] town in Gloucestershire, a mustard-making centre; battle site (1471)
Seize on him Furies, take him vnto Torment.Seize on him, Furies, take him unto torment!’Furies (n.)three goddesses, spirits of vengeance, depicted as carrying torches and covered with snakesR3 I.iv.57
With that (me thought) a Legion of foule FiendsWith that, methoughts, a legion of foul fiends R3 I.iv.58
Inuiron'd me, and howled in mine earesEnvironed me, and howled in mine earsenviron (v.)surround, envelop, encircle, engulfR3 I.iv.59
Such hiddeous cries, that with the very Noise,Such hideous cries that with the very noise R3 I.iv.60
I (trembling) wak'd, and for a season after,I, trembling, waked, and for a season afterseason (n.)while, short period of timeR3 I.iv.61
Could not beleeue, but that I was in Hell,Could not believe but that I was in hell, R3 I.iv.62
Such terrible Impression made my Dreame.Such terrible impression made my dream. R3 I.iv.63
Keep. KEEPER 
No maruell Lord, though it affrighted you,No marvel, my lord, though it affrighted you;affright (v.)frighten, terrify, scareR3 I.iv.64
I am affraid (me thinkes) to heare you tell it.I am afraid, methinks, to hear you tell it.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: me thinkes
it seems / seemed to me
R3 I.iv.65
Cla. CLARENCE 
Ah Keeper, Keeper, I haue done these thingsAh, keeper, keeper, I have done these things, R3 I.iv.66
(That now giue euidence against my Soule)That now give evidence against my soul, R3 I.iv.67
For Edwards sake, and see how he requits mee.For Edward's sake, and see how he requits me!requite (v.), past forms requit, requited
old form: requits
reward, repay, recompense
R3 I.iv.68
O God! if my deepe prayres cannot appease thee,O God! If my deep prayers cannot appease Thee, R3 I.iv.69
But thou wilt be aueng'd on my misdeeds,But Thou wilt be avenged on my misdeeds, R3 I.iv.70
Yet execute thy wrath in me alone:Yet execute Thy wrath in me alone;execute (v.)carry out, fulfil, performR3 I.iv.71
O spare my guiltlesse Wife, and my poore children.O, spare my guiltless wife and my poor children! R3 I.iv.72
Keeper, I prythee sit by me a-while,Keeper, I pray thee, sit by me awhile. R3 I.iv.73
My Soule is heauy, and I faine would sleepe.My soul is heavy, and I fain would sleep.fain (adv.)
old form: faine
gladly, willingly
R3 I.iv.74
heavy (adj.)
old form: heauy
sorrowful, sad, gloomy
Keep. KEEPER 
I will my Lord, God giue your Grace good rest.I will, my lord. God give your grace good rest! R3 I.iv.75
Clarence sleeps R3 I.iv.76.1
Enter Brakenbury the Lieutenant.Enter Brakenbury, the Lieutenant R3 I.iv.76.2
Bra. BRAKENBURY 
Sorrow breakes Seasons, and reposing houres,Sorrow breaks seasons and reposing hours, R3 I.iv.76
Makes the Night Morning, and the Noon-tide night:Makes the night morning and the noontide night. R3 I.iv.77
Princes haue but their Titles for their Glories,Princes have but their titles for their glories, R3 I.iv.78
An outward Honor, for an inward Toyle,An outward honour for an inward toil; R3 I.iv.79
And for vnfelt ImaginationsAnd for unfelt imaginationsunfelt (adj.)
old form: vnfelt
not experienced
R3 I.iv.80
They often feele a world of restlesse Cares:They often feel a world of restless cares; R3 I.iv.81
So that betweene their Titles, and low Name,So that between their titles and low name R3 I.iv.82
There's nothing differs, but the outward fame.There's nothing differs but the outward fame. R3 I.iv.83
Enter two Murtherers.Enter two Murderers R3 I.iv.84
1. Mur. FIRST MURDERER 
Ho, who's heere?Ho! Who's here? R3 I.iv.84
Bra. BRAKENBURY 
What would'st thou Fellow? And how What wouldst thou, fellow? And how R3 I.iv.85
camm'st thou hither.cam'st thou hither? R3 I.iv.86
2. Mur. SECOND MURDERER 
I would speak with Clarence, and I I would speak with Clarence, and I R3 I.iv.87
came hither on my Legges.came hither on my legs. R3 I.iv.88
Bra. BRAKENBURY 
What so breefe?Yea, So brief? R3 I.iv.89
1. FIRST MURDERER 
'Tis better (Sir) then to be tedious:'Tis better, sir, than to be tedious. R3 I.iv.90
Let him see our Commission, and talke no more.Let him see our commission, and talk no more. R3 I.iv.91
ReadsBrakenbury reads it R3 I.iv.92
Bra. BRAKENBURY 
I am in this, commanded to deliuerI am in this commanded to deliver R3 I.iv.92
The Noble Duke of Clarence to your hands.The noble Duke of Clarence to your hands. R3 I.iv.93
I will not reason what is meant heereby,I will not reason what is meant hereby, R3 I.iv.94
Because I will be guiltlesse from the meaning.Because I will be guiltless from the meaning. R3 I.iv.95
There lies the Duke asleepe, and there the Keyes.There lies the Duke asleep, and there the keys. R3 I.iv.96
Ile to the King, and signifie to him,I'll to the King, and signify to him R3 I.iv.97
That thus I haue resign'd to you my charge. That thus I have resigned to you my charge. R3 I.iv.98
Exit.Exit Brakenbury with Keeper R3 I.iv.98
1 FIRST MURDERER 
You may sir, 'tis a point of wisedome:You may, sir; 'tis a point of wisdom. R3 I.iv.99
Far you well.Fare you well.fare ... well (int.)goodbye [to an individual]R3 I.iv.100
2 SECOND MURDERER 
What, shall we stab him as he sleepes.What? Shall I stab him as he sleeps? R3 I.iv.101
1 FIRST MURDERER 
No: hee'l say 'twas done cowardly, No. He'll say 'twas done cowardly R3 I.iv.102
when he wakeswhen he wakes. R3 I.iv.103
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Why he shall neuer wake, Why, he shall never wake until the R3 I.iv.104
vntill the great Iudgement day.great Judgement Day. R3 I.iv.105
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Why then hee'l say, we stab'd him Why, then he'll say we stabbed him R3 I.iv.106
sleeping.sleeping. R3 I.iv.107
2 SECOND MURDERER 
The vrging of that word Iudgement, The urging of that word judgementurging (n.)
old form: vrging
pressing on the attention, bringing forward
R3 I.iv.108
hath bred a kinde of remorse in me.hath bred a kind of remorse in me.remorse (n.)pity, compassion, tendernessR3 I.iv.109
1 FIRST MURDERER 
What? art thou affraid?What? Art thou afraid? R3 I.iv.110
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Not to kill him, hauing a Warrant,Not to kill him, having a warrant,warrant (n.)licence, sanction, authorizationR3 I.iv.111
But to be damn'd for killing him, from the which / No but to be damned for killing him, from the which no R3 I.iv.112
Warrant can defend me.warrant can defend me. R3 I.iv.113
1 FIRST MURDERER 
I thought thou had'st bin resolute.I thought thou hadst been resolute. R3 I.iv.114
2 SECOND MURDERER 
So I am, to let him liue.So I am – to let him live. R3 I.iv.115
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Ile backe to the Duke of Glouster, I'll back to the Duke of Gloucester R3 I.iv.116
and tell him so.and tell him so. R3 I.iv.117
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Nay, I prythee stay a little: / I hope Nay, I pray thee stay a little. I hope R3 I.iv.118
this passionate humor of mine, will change, / It was wont this passionate humour of mine will change. It was wontpassionate (adj.)compassionate, inclined to pity, tender-heartedR3 I.iv.119
humour (n.)
old form: humor
mood, disposition, frame of mind, temperament [as determined by bodily fluids]
wont (v.)be accustomed, used [to], be in the habit of
to hold me but while one tels twenty.to hold me but while one tells twenty.tell (v.)
old form: tels
count out, number, itemize
R3 I.iv.120
1 FIRST MURDERER 
How do'st thou feele thy selfe now?How dost thou feel thyself now? R3 I.iv.121
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Some certaine dregges of conscience Faith, some certain dregs of conscience R3 I.iv.122
are yet within mee.are yet within me.yet, as yet (adv.)stillR3 I.iv.123
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Remember our Reward, when the Remember our reward when the R3 I.iv.124
deed's done.deed's done. R3 I.iv.125
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Come, he dies: I had forgot the Zounds, he dies! I had forgot thezounds (int.)God's woundsR3 I.iv.126
Reward.reward. R3 I.iv.127
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Where's thy conscience now.Where's thy conscience now? R3 I.iv.128
2 SECOND MURDERER 
O, in the Duke of Glousters purse.O, in the Duke of Gloucester's R3 I.iv.129
purse. R3 I.iv.130
1 FIRST MURDERER 
When hee opens his purse to giue vs When he opens his purse to give us R3 I.iv.131
our Reward, / thy Conscience flyes out.our reward, thy conscience flies out. R3 I.iv.132
2 SECOND MURDERER 
'Tis no matter, let it goe: There's 'Tis no matter; let it go. There's R3 I.iv.133
few or none / will entertaine it.few or none will entertain it.entertain (v.)
old form: entertaine
welcome, receive kindly, treat well, show hospitality to
R3 I.iv.134
1 FIRST MURDERER 
What if it come to thee againe?What if it come to thee again? R3 I.iv.135
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Ile not meddle with it, it makes a I'll not meddle with it; it makes a R3 I.iv.136
man a Coward: A man cannot steale, but it accuseth him: man a coward. A man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; R3 I.iv.137
A man cannot Sweare, but it Checkes him: A man cannot lye a man cannot swear, but it checks him; a man cannot lie R3 I.iv.138
with his Neighbours Wife, but it detects him. 'Tis a with his neighbour's wife, but it detects him. 'Tis a R3 I.iv.139
blushing shamefac'd spirit, that mutinies in a mans blushing shamefaced spirit that mutinies in a man'sshame-faced, shamefast (adj.)
old form: shamefac'd
modest, retiring, shy
R3 I.iv.140
bosome: It filles a man full of Obstacles. It made me once bosom. It fills a man full of obstacles. It made me once R3 I.iv.141
restore a Pursse of Gold that (by chance) I found: It beggars restore a purse of gold that by chance I found. It beggarsbeggar (v.)reduce to beggary, impoverish, make destituteR3 I.iv.142
any man that keepes it: It is turn'd out of Townes and any man that keeps it. It is turned out of all towns and R3 I.iv.143
Citties for a dangerous thing, and euery man that means cities for a dangerous thing, and every man that means R3 I.iv.144
to liue well, endeuours to trust to himselfe, and liue to live well endeavours to trust to himself and to live R3 I.iv.145
without it.without it. R3 I.iv.146
1 FIRST MURDERER 
'Tis euen now at my elbow, Zounds, 'tis even now at my elbow,zounds (int.)God's woundsR3 I.iv.147
perswading me not to kill the Dkue.persuading me not to kill the Duke. R3 I.iv.148
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Take the diuell in thy minde, and Take the devil in thy mind – and R3 I.iv.149
beleeue him not: / He would insinuate with thee but to believe him not. He would insinuate with thee but toinsinuate (v.)curry favour, work subtly [on], ingratiate oneselfR3 I.iv.150
make thee sigh.make thee sigh. R3 I.iv.151
1 FIRST MURDERER 
I am strong fram'd, he cannot Tut, I am strong-framed; he cannot R3 I.iv.152
preuaile with me.prevail with me. R3 I.iv.153
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Spoke like a tall man, that respects Spoke like a tall man that respectstall (adj.)brave, valiant, boldR3 I.iv.154
respect (v.)pay attention to, heed
thy reputation. / Come, shall we fall to worke?thy reputation. Come, shall we fall to work? R3 I.iv.155
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Take him on the Costard, with the hiltes Take him on the costard with the hiltstake (v.)strike, hit, catchR3 I.iv.156
costard (n.)[jocular: large kind of apple] head
of thy Sword, and then throw him into the Malmesey-Butte of thy sword, and then throw him into the malmsey-buttmalmsey (n.)
old form: Malmesey
variety of strong sweet red wine
R3 I.iv.157
in the next roome.in the next room. R3 I.iv.158
2 SECOND MURDERER 
O excellent deuice; and make a sop O excellent device! And make a sopsop (n.)piece of bread or cake steeped in liquid [before being eaten]R3 I.iv.159
of him.of him. R3 I.iv.160
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Soft, he wakes.Soft! He wakes.soft (int.)[used as a command] not so fast, wait a moment, be quietR3 I.iv.161
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Strike.Strike! R3 I.iv.162
1 FIRST MURDERER 
No, wee'l reason with him.No, we'll reason with him.reason (v.)talk, speak, converseR3 I.iv.163
Cla. CLARENCE 
Where art thou Keeper? Giue me a cup of wine.Where art thou, keeper? Give me a cup of wine. R3 I.iv.164
2 SECOND MURDERER 
You shall haue Wine enough my Lord anon.You shall have wine enough, my lord, anon.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyR3 I.iv.165
Cla. CLARENCE 
In Gods name, what art thou?In God's name, what art thou? R3 I.iv.166
1 FIRST MURDERER 
A man, as you are.A man, as you are. R3 I.iv.167
Cla. CLARENCE 
But not as I am Royall.But not as I am, royal. R3 I.iv.168
1 SECOND MURDERER 
Nor you as we are, Loyall.Nor you as we are, loyal. R3 I.iv.169
Cla. CLARENCE 
Thy voice is Thunder, but thy looks are humble.Thy voice is thunder, but thy looks are humble. R3 I.iv.170
1 FIRST MURDERER 
My voice is now the Kings, my lookes mine owne.My voice is now the King's, my looks mine own. R3 I.iv.171
Cla. CLARENCE 
How darkly, and how deadly dost thou speake?How darkly and how deadly dost thou speak!darkly (adv.)frowningly, ominously; gloomilyR3 I.iv.172
Your eyes do menace me: why looke you pale?Your eyes do menace me. Why look you pale? R3 I.iv.173
Who sent you hither? Wherefore do you come?Who sent you hither? Wherefore do you come? R3 I.iv.174
2 SECOND MURDERER 
To, to, to---To, to, to –  R3 I.iv.175
Cla. CLARENCE 
To murther me?To murder me? R3 I.iv.176
Both. FIRST and SECOND MURDERER 
I, I.Ay, ay. R3 I.iv.177
Cla. CLARENCE 
You scarsely haue the hearts to tell me so,You scarcely have the hearts to tell me so, R3 I.iv.178
And therefore cannot haue the hearts to do it.And therefore cannot have the hearts to do it. R3 I.iv.179
Wherein my Friends haue I offended you?Wherein, my friends, have I offended you? R3 I.iv.180
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Offended vs you haue not, but the King.Offended us you have not, but the King. R3 I.iv.181
Cla. CLARENCE 
I shall be reconcil'd to him againe.I shall be reconciled to him again. R3 I.iv.182
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Neuer my Lord, therefore prepare to dye.Never, my lord; therefore prepare to die. R3 I.iv.183
Cla. CLARENCE 
Are you drawne forth among a world of menAre you drawn forth among a world of men R3 I.iv.184
To slay the innocent? What is my offence?To slay the innocent? What is my offence? R3 I.iv.185
Where is the Euidence that doth accuse me?Where are the evidence that doth accuse me?evidence (n.)
old form: Euidence
witness, testimony, avowal
R3 I.iv.186
What lawfull Quest haue giuen their Verdict vpWhat lawful quest have given their verdict upquest (n.)judicial inquiry, official investigationR3 I.iv.187
Vnto the frowning Iudge? Or who pronounc'dUnto the frowning judge? Or who pronounced R3 I.iv.188
The bitter sentence of poore Clarence death,The bitter sentence of poor Clarence' death R3 I.iv.189
Before I be conuict by course of Law?Before I be convict by course of law?convict (v.)
old form: conuict
prove guilty, condemn
R3 I.iv.190
course (n.)habit, custom, practise, normal procedure
To threaten me with death, is most vnlawfull.To threaten me with death is most unlawful. R3 I.iv.191
I charge you, as you hope for any goodnesse,I charge you, as you hope to have redemption R3 I.iv.192
By Christ's dear blood shed for our grievous sins, R3 I.iv.193
That you depart, and lay no hands on me:That you depart, and lay no hands on me R3 I.iv.194
The deed you vndertake is damnable.The deed you undertake is damnable. R3 I.iv.195
1 FIRST MURDERER 
What we will do, we do vpon command.What we will do, we do upon command. R3 I.iv.196
2 SECOND MURDERER 
And he that hath commanded, is our King.And he that hath commanded is our king. R3 I.iv.197
Cla. CLARENCE 
Erroneous Vassals, the great King of KingsErroneous vassals! The great King of kingserroneous (adj.)misguided, mistaken, deludedR3 I.iv.198
vassal (n.)wretch, creature, slave
Hath in the Table of his Law commandedHath in the table of His law commanded R3 I.iv.199
That thou shalt do no murther. Will you thenThat thou shalt do no murder. Will you then R3 I.iv.200
Spurne at his Edict, and fulfill a Mans?Spurn at His edict, and fulfil a man's?spurn (v.)
old form: Spurne
reject, scorn, despise, treat with contempt
R3 I.iv.201
Take heed: for he holds Vengeance in his hand,Take heed; for He holds vengeance in His hand R3 I.iv.202
To hurle vpon their heads that breake his Law.To hurl upon their heads that break His law. R3 I.iv.203
2 SECOND MURDERER 
And that same Vengeance doth he hurle on thee,And that same vengeance doth he hurl on thee R3 I.iv.204
For false Forswearing, and for murther too:For false forswearing and for murder too:false (adj.)treacherous, traitorous, perfidiousR3 I.iv.205
forswearing (n.)perjury, oath-breaking
Thou did'st receiue the Sacrament, to fightThou didst receive the sacrament to fight R3 I.iv.206
In quarrell of the House of Lancaster.In quarrel of the house of Lancaster.quarrel (n.)
old form: quarrell
cause of complaint, reason for hostility, difference, claim
R3 I.iv.207
1 FIRST MURDERER 
And like a Traitor to the name of God,And like a traitor to the name of God R3 I.iv.208
Did'st breake that Vow, and with thy treacherous blade,Didst break that vow, and with thy treacherous blade R3 I.iv.209
Vnrip'st the Bowels of thy Sou'raignes Sonne.Unrip'st the bowels of thy sovereign's son. R3 I.iv.210
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Whom thou was't sworne to cherish and defend.Whom thou wast sworn to cherish and defend. R3 I.iv.211
1 FIRST MURDERER 
How canst thou vrge Gods dreadfull Law to vs,How canst thou urge God's dreadful law to us R3 I.iv.212
When thou hast broke it in such deere degree?When thou hast broke it in such dear degree?dear (adj.)
old form: deere
important, major, significant
R3 I.iv.213
Cla. CLARENCE 
Alas! for whose sake did I that ill deede?Alas! For whose sake did I that ill deed?ill (adj.)evil, wicked, immoralR3 I.iv.214
For Edward, for my Brother, for his sake.For Edward, for my brother, for his sake. R3 I.iv.215
He sends you not to murther me for this:He sends you not to murder me for this, R3 I.iv.216
For in that sinne, he is as deepe as I.For in that sin he is as deep as I. R3 I.iv.217
If God will be auenged for the deed,If God will be avenged for the deed, R3 I.iv.218
O know you yet, he doth it publiquely,O, know you yet He doth it publicly! R3 I.iv.219
Take not the quarrell from his powrefull arme:Take not the quarrel from His powerful arm.quarrel (n.)
old form: quarrell
cause of complaint, reason for hostility, difference, claim
R3 I.iv.220
He needs no indirect, or lawlesse course,He needs no indirect or lawless courseindirect (adj.)roundabout, devious, obliqueR3 I.iv.221
course (n.)course of action, way of proceeding
To cut off those that haue offended him.To cut off those that have offended Him. R3 I.iv.222
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Who made thee then a bloudy minister,Who made thee then a bloody ministerminister (n.)messenger, agent, servantR3 I.iv.223
When gallant springing braue Plantagenet,When gallant-springing brave Plantagenet,gallant-springing (adj.)
old form: gallant springing
finely growing, developing well
R3 I.iv.224
brave (adj.)
old form: braue
noble, worthy, excellent
That Princely Nouice was strucke dead by thee?That princely novice, was struck dead by thee? R3 I.iv.225
Cla. CLARENCE 
My Brothers loue, the Diuell, and my Rage.My brother's love, the devil, and my rage. R3 I.iv.226
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Thy Brothers Loue, our Duty, and thy Faults,Thy brother's love, our duty, and thy fault R3 I.iv.227
Prouoke vs hither now, to slaughter thee.Provoke us hither now to slaughter thee. R3 I.iv.228
Cla. CLARENCE 
If you do loue my Brother, hate not me:If you do love my brother, hate not me; R3 I.iv.229
I am his Brother, and I loue him well.I am his brother, and I love him well. R3 I.iv.230
If you are hyr'd for meed, go backe againe,If you are hired for meed, go back again,meed (n.)reward, prize, recompenseR3 I.iv.231
And I will send you to my Brother Glouster:And I will send you to my brother Gloucester, R3 I.iv.232
Who shall reward you better for my life,Who shall reward you better for my life R3 I.iv.233
Then Edward will for tydings of my death.Than Edward will for tidings of my death. R3 I.iv.234
2 SECOND MURDERER 
You are deceiu'd, / Your Brother Glouster hates you.You are deceived. Your brother Gloucester hates you. R3 I.iv.235
Cla. CLARENCE 
Oh no, he loues me, and he holds me deere:O, no, he loves me and he holds me dear! R3 I.iv.236
Go you to him from me.Go you to him from me. R3 I.iv.237.1
1 FIRST MURDERER 
I so we will.Ay, so we will. R3 I.iv.237.2
Cla. CLARENCE 
Tell him, when that our Princely Father Yorke,Tell him, when that our princely father York R3 I.iv.238
Blest his three Sonnes with his victorious Arme,Blessed his three sons with his victorious arm R3 I.iv.239
And charged us from his soul to love each other, R3 I.iv.240
He little thought of this diuided Friendship:He little thought of this divided friendship; R3 I.iv.241
Bid Glouster thinke on this, and he will weepe.Bid Gloucester think of this, and he will weep. R3 I.iv.242
1 FIRST MURDERER 
I Milstones, as he lessoned vs to weepe.Ay, millstones, as he lessoned us to weep.lesson (v.)instruct, teach, adviseR3 I.iv.243
Cla. CLARENCE 
O do not slander him, for he is kinde.O, do not slander him, for he is kind. R3 I.iv.244
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Right, as Snow in Haruest: / Come, you deceiue your selfe,Right, as snow in harvest. Come, you deceive yourself; R3 I.iv.245
'Tis he that sends vs to destroy you heere.'Tis he that sends us to destroy you here. R3 I.iv.246
Cla. CLARENCE 
It cannot be, for he bewept my Fortune,It cannot be, for he bewept my fortune,beweep (v.)weep over, wet with tearsR3 I.iv.247
And hugg'd me in his armes, and swore with sobs,And hugged me in his arms, and swore with sobs R3 I.iv.248
That he would labour my deliuery.That he would labour my delivery.labour (v.)work hard for, try to bring about, urgeR3 I.iv.249
delivery (n.)
old form: deliuery
release, deliverance, freedom
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Why so he doth, when he deliuers youWhy, so he doth, when he delivers you R3 I.iv.250
From this earths thraldome, to the ioyes of heauen.From this earth's thraldom to the joys of heaven.thraldom (n.)
old form: thraldome
bondage, servitude, captivity
R3 I.iv.251
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Make peace with God, for you must die my Lord.Make peace with God, for you must die, my lord. R3 I.iv.252
Cla. CLARENCE 
Haue you that holy feeling in your soules,Have you that holy feeling in your souls R3 I.iv.253
To counsaile me to make my peace with God,To counsel me to make my peace with God, R3 I.iv.254
And are you yet to your owne soules so blinde,And art you yet to your own souls so blindblind (adj.)
old form: blinde
heedless, reckless, headstrong
R3 I.iv.255
That you will warre with God, by murd'ring me.That you will war with God by murdering me? R3 I.iv.256
O sirs consider, they that set you onO, sirs, consider, they that set you on R3 I.iv.257
To do this deede, will hate you for the deede.To do this deed will hate you for the deed. R3 I.iv.258
2 SECOND MURDERER 
What shall we do?What shall we do? R3 I.iv.259.1
Clar. CLARENCE 
Relent, and saue your soules:Relent, and save your souls. R3 I.iv.259.2
Which of you, if you were a Princes Sonne,Which of you, if you were a prince's son, R3 I.iv.260
Being pent from Liberty, as I am now,Being pent from liberty, as I am now,pent (adj.)imprisoned, closely confinedR3 I.iv.261
If two such murtherers as your selues came to you,If two such murderers as yourselves came to you, R3 I.iv.262
Would not intreat for life, as you would beggeWould not entreat for life? As you would beg R3 I.iv.263
Were you in my distresse.Were you in my distress –  R3 I.iv.264
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Relent? no: 'Tis cowardly and womanish.Relent? No: 'tis cowardly and womanish. R3 I.iv.265
Cla. CLARENCE 
Not to relent, is beastly, sauage, diuellish:Not to relent is beastly, savage, devilish! R3 I.iv.266
(To Second Murderer) R3 I.iv.267
My Friend, I spy some pitty in thy lookes:My friend, I spy some pity in thy looks. R3 I.iv.267
O, if thine eye be not a Flatterer,O, if thine eye be not a flatterer, R3 I.iv.268
Come thou on my side, and intreate for mee,Come thou on my side, and entreat for me! R3 I.iv.269
A begging Prince, what begger pitties not.A begging prince what beggar pities not? R3 I.iv.270
2 SECOND MURDERER 
Looke behinde you, my Lord.Look behind you, my lord! R3 I.iv.271
1 FIRST MURDERER 
Take that, and that, if all this will not do, Stabs him.Take that! And that! (Stabs him) If all this will not do, R3 I.iv.272
Ile drowne you in the Malmesey-But within. I'll drown you in the malmsey-butt within. R3 I.iv.273
Exit.Exit with the body R3 I.iv.273
2 SECOND MURDERER 
A bloody deed, and desperately dispatcht:A bloody deed, and desperately dispatched!dispatch, despatch (v.)
old form: dispatcht
deal with promptly, settle, get [something] done quickly
R3 I.iv.274
desperately (adv.)recklessly, disregarding all risks
How faine (like Pilate) would I wash my handsHow fain, like Pilate, would I wash my handsfain (adv.)
old form: faine
gladly, willingly
R3 I.iv.275
Pilate (n.)Pontius Pilate, Roman prefect of Judea, 1st-c
Of this most greeuous murther. Of this most grievous murder! R3 I.iv.276
Enter 1. MurthererEnter First Murderer R3 I.iv.277
1 FIRST MURDERER 
How now? what mean'st thou that thou help'st me not? How now? What mean'st thou that thou help'st me not? R3 I.iv.277
By Heauen the Duke shall know how slacke you haue beene.By heavens, the Duke shall know how slack you have been. R3 I.iv.278
2. Mur. SECOND MURDERER 
I would he knew that I had sau'd his brother,I would he knew that I had saved his brother! R3 I.iv.279
Take thou the Fee, and tell him what I say,Take thou the fee and tell him what I say, R3 I.iv.280
For I repent me that the Duke is slaine. For I repent me that the Duke is slain. R3 I.iv.281
Exit.Exit R3 I.iv.281
1. Mur. FIRST MURDERER 
So do not I: go Coward as thou art.So do not I. Go, coward as thou art. R3 I.iv.282
Well, Ile go hide the body in some hole,Well, I'll go hide the body in some hole R3 I.iv.283
Till that the Duke giue order for his buriall:Till that the Duke give order for his burial; R3 I.iv.284
And when I haue my meede, I will away,And when I have my meed, I will away,meed (n.)
old form: meede
reward, prize, recompense
R3 I.iv.285
For this will out, and then I must not stay. For this will out, and then I must not stay. R3 I.iv.286
ExitExit R3 I.iv.286
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