Much Ado About Nothing
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Enter Prince, Claudio, Benedicke, and Leonato.Enter Don Pedro, Claudio, Benedick, and Leonato MA III.ii.1
Prince. DON PEDRO 
I doe but stay till your marriage be consummate, I do but stay till your marriage be consummate, MA III.ii.1
and then go I toward Arragon.and then go I toward Arragon. MA III.ii.2
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Ile bring you thither my Lord, if you'l vouchsafe I'll bring you thither, my lord, if you'll vouchsafevouchsafe (v.)allow, permit, grantMA III.ii.3
bring (v.)accompany, conduct, escort
me.me. MA III.ii.4
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Nay, that would be as great a soyle in the newNay, that would be as great a soil in the newsoil (n.)
old form: soyle
blemish, stain, tarnish
MA III.ii.5
glosse of your marriage, as to shew a childe his new coatgloss of your marriage as to show a child his new coat MA III.ii.6
and forbid him to weare it, I will onely bee bold with Benedicke and forbid him to wear it. I will only be bold with Benedickbold, be / makepresume, venture, take the libertyMA III.ii.7
for his companie, for from the crowne of his head, for his company; for, from the crown of his head MA III.ii.8
to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth, he hath twice or to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth; he hath twice or MA III.ii.9
thrice cut Cupids bow-string, and the little hang-manthrice cut Cupid's bow-string and the little hangmanhangman (n.)
old form: hang-man
rascal, rogue, reprobate
MA III.ii.10
Cupid (n.)[pron: 'kyoopid] Roman god of love, son of Venus and Mercury; a winged, blindfolded boy with curved bow and arrows
dare not shoot at him, he hath a heart as sound as a dare not shoot at him. He hath a heart as sound as a MA III.ii.11
bell, and his tongue is the clapper, for what his heart bell and his tongue is the clapper, for what his heart MA III.ii.12
thinkes, his tongue speakes.thinks his tongue speaks. MA III.ii.13
Bene. BENEDICK 
Gallants, I am not as I haue bin.Gallants, I am not as I have been.gallant (n.)fine gentleman, man of fashionMA III.ii.14
Leo. LEONATO 
So say I, methinkes you are sadder.So say I; methinks you are sadder.methinks(t), methought(s) (v.)
old form: methinkes
it seems / seemed to me
MA III.ii.15
sad (adj.)serious, grave, solemn
Claud. CLAUDIO 
I hope he be in loue.I hope he be in love. MA III.ii.16
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Hang him truant, there's no true drop of Hang him, truant! There's no true drop oftruant (n.)rogue, knave, rascalMA III.ii.17
bloud in him to be truly toucht with loue, if he be sad, blood in him to be truly touched with love; if he be sad,sad (adj.)serious, grave, solemnMA III.ii.18
he wants money.he wants money.want (v.)fall short [of], be deficient [in]MA III.ii.19
Bene. BENEDICK 
I haue the tooth-ach.I have the toothache. MA III.ii.20
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Draw it.Draw it. MA III.ii.21
Bene. BENEDICK 
Hang it.Hang it! MA III.ii.22
Claud. CLAUDIO 
You must hang it first, and draw it afterwards.You must hang it first, and draw it afterwards. MA III.ii.23
Prin. DON PEDRO 
What? sigh for the tooth-ach.What! Sigh for the toothache? MA III.ii.24
Leon. LEONATO 
Where is but a humour or a worme.Where is but a humour or a worm.humour (n.)secretion, fluid, juiceMA III.ii.25
worm (n.)
old form: worme
germ, microbe, bug
Bene. BENEDICK 
Well, euery one cannot master a griefe, but hee that Well, everyone can master a grief but he thatgrief (n.)
old form: griefe
pain, torment, distress
MA III.ii.26
has it.has it. MA III.ii.27
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Yet say I, he is in loue.Yet say I, he is in love. MA III.ii.28
Prin. DON PEDRO 
There is no appearance of fancie in him, vnlesseThere is no appearance of fancy in him, unlessfancy (n.)
old form: fancie
love, amorousness, infatuation
MA III.ii.29
it be a fancy that he hath to strange disguises, as to it be a fancy that he hath to strange disguises; as tofancy (n.)whim, inclination, capriceMA III.ii.30
bee a Dutchman to day, a Frenchman to morrow: be a Dutchman today, a Frenchman tomorrow, or in the MA III.ii.31
shape of two countries at once, as, a German from the MA III.ii.32
waist downward, all slops, and a Spaniard from the hipslop, slops (n.)large loose breeches, baggy trousersMA III.ii.33
vnlesse hee haue a fancy to this upward, no doublet. Unless he have a fancy to thisfancy (n.)whim, inclination, capriceMA III.ii.34
doubletman's close-fitting jacket with short skirt
foolery, as it appeares hee hath, hee is no foole for fancy, as foolery, as it appears he hath, he is no fool for fancy, asfancy (n.)love, amorousness, infatuationMA III.ii.35
you would haue it to appeare he is.you would have it appear he is. MA III.ii.36
Clau. CLAUDIO 
If he be not in loue vvith some woman, there is If he be not in love with some woman, there is MA III.ii.37
no beleeuing old signes, a brushes his hat a mornings,no believing old signs. 'A brushes his hat o' mornings; MA III.ii.38
What should that bode?what should that bode?bode (v.)forebode, portend, predict, augurMA III.ii.39
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Hath any man seene him at the Barbers?Hath any man seen him at the barber's? MA III.ii.40
Clau. CLAUDIO 
No, but the Barbers man hath beene seen withNo, but the barber's man hath been seen with MA III.ii.41
him, and the olde ornament of his cheeke hath alreadiehim and the old ornament of his cheek hath already MA III.ii.42
stuft tennis balls.stuffed tennis-balls. MA III.ii.43
Leon. LEONATO 
Indeed he lookes yonger than hee did, by theIndeed, he looks younger than he did, by the MA III.ii.44
losse of a beard.loss of a beard. MA III.ii.45
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Nay a rubs himselfe with Ciuit, can you smellNay, 'a rubs himself with civet; can you smellcivet (n.)
old form: Ciuit
type of musky perfume [obtained form the civet cat]
MA III.ii.46
him out by that?him out by that? MA III.ii.47
Clau. CLAUDIO 
That's as much as to say, the sweet youth's inThat's as much as to say, the sweet youth's in MA III.ii.48
loue.love. MA III.ii.49
Prin. DON PEDRO 
The greatest note of it is his melancholy.The greatest note of it is his melancholy. MA III.ii.50
Clau. CLAUDIO 
And when was he wont to wash his face?And when was he wont to wash his face?wont (v.)be accustomed, used [to], be in the habit ofMA III.ii.51
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Yea, or to paint himselfe? for the which I heareYea, or to paint himself? For the which, I hear MA III.ii.52
what they say of him.what they say of him. MA III.ii.53
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Nay, but his iesting spirit, which is now creptNay, but his jesting spirit, which is now crept MA III.ii.54
into a lute-string, and now gouern'd by stops.into a lute-string and now governed by stops.stop (n.)means of closing a finger-hole in a wind instrumentMA III.ii.55
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Indeed that tels a heauy tale for him: conclude,Indeed, that tells a heavy tale for him; conclude,heavy (adj.)
old form: heauy
sorrowful, sad, gloomy
MA III.ii.56
he is in loue.conclude he is in love. MA III.ii.57
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Nay, but I know who loues him.Nay, but I know who loves him. MA III.ii.58
Prince. DON PEDRO 
That would I know too, I warrant one thatThat would I know too; I warrant, one thatwarrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmMA III.ii.59
knowes him not.knows him not. MA III.ii.60
Cla. CLAUDIO 
Yes, and his ill conditions, and in despight of all,Yes, and his ill conditions; and, in despite of all,ill (adj.)bad, adverse, unfavourableMA III.ii.61
condition (n.)quality, behaviour, attribute, habit
dies for him.dies for him.die (v.)suffer pain, go through agonyMA III.ii.62
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Shee shall be buried with her face vpwards.She shall be buried with her face upwards. MA III.ii.63
Bene. BENEDICK 
Yet is this no charme for the tooth-ake, old Yet is this no charm for the toothache. Old MA III.ii.64
signior, walke aside with mee, I haue studied eight or ninesignor, walk aside with me; I have studied eight or nine MA III.ii.65
wise words to speake to you, which these hobby-horseswise words to speak to you, which these hobby-horseshobby-horse (n.)buffoon, clown, jokerMA III.ii.66
must not heare.must not hear. MA III.ii.67
Exeunt Benedick and Leonato MA III.ii.67
Prin. DON PEDRO 
For my life to breake with him about Beatrice.For my life, to break with him about Beatrice.break (v.)
old form: breake
broach a matter, speak
MA III.ii.68
Clau. CLAUDIO 
'Tis euen so, Hero and Margaret haue by this'Tis even so. Hero and Margaret have by thisthis, byby this timeMA III.ii.69
played their parts with Beatrice, and then the two Bearesplayed their parts with Beatrice, and then the two bears MA III.ii.70
will not bite one another when they meete.will not bite one another when they meet. MA III.ii.71
Enter Iohn the Bastard.Enter Don John MA III.ii.71
Bast. DON JOHN 
My Lord and brother, God saue you.My lord and brother, God save you! MA III.ii.72
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Good den brother.Good-e'en, brother. MA III.ii.73
Bast. DON JOHN 
If your leisure seru'd, I would speake with you.If your leisure served, I would speak with you. MA III.ii.74
Prince. DON PEDRO 
In priuate?In private? MA III.ii.75
Bast. DON JOHN 
If it please you, yet Count Claudio may heare,If it please you; yet Count Claudio may hear, MA III.ii.76
for what I would speake of, concernes him.for what I would speak of concerns him. MA III.ii.77
Prin. DON PEDRO 
What's the matter?What's the matter? MA III.ii.78
Basta. DON JOHN  
(to Claudio) MA III.ii.79
Meanes your Lordship to be Means your lordship to be MA III.ii.79
married to morrow?married tomorrow? MA III.ii.80
Prin. DON PEDRO 
You know he does.You know he does. MA III.ii.81
Bast. DON JOHN 
I know not that when he knowes what I know.I know not that, when he knows what I know. MA III.ii.82
Clau. CLAUDIO 
If there be any impediment, I pray you discouer If there be any impediment, I pray you discoverdiscover (v.)
old form: discouer
reveal, show, make known
MA III.ii.83
it.it. MA III.ii.84
Bast. DON JOHN 
You may thinke I loue you not, let that appeareYou may think I love you not; let that appear MA III.ii.85
hereafter, and ayme better at me by that I now will hereafter, and aim better at me by that I now willaim at (v.)
old form: ayme
judge, consider, rate
MA III.ii.86
manifest, for my brother (I thinke, he holds you well, manifest. For my brother, I think he holds you well,hold (v.)consider, regard, esteem, value [as]MA III.ii.87
and in dearenesse of heart) hath holpe to effect your ensuingand in dearness of heart hath holp to effect your ensuingdearness (n.)
old form: dearenesse
affection, fondness, warmth
MA III.ii.88
marriage: surely sute ill spent, and labour ill bestowed.marriage – surely suit ill spent, and labour ill bestowed!ill (adv.)badly, adversely, unfavourablyMA III.ii.89
suit (n.)
old form: sute
wooing, courtship
Prin. DON PEDRO 
Why, what's the matter?Why, what's the matter? MA III.ii.90
Bastard. DON JOHN 
I came hither to tell you, and circumstancesI came hither to tell you; and, circumstancescircumstance (n.)detail(s), particular(s), specificsMA III.ii.91
shortned, (for she hath beene too long a talking of) theshortened, for she has been too long a talking of, theshorten (v.)
old form: shortned
omit, ignore, leave out
MA III.ii.92
Lady is disloyall.lady is disloyal.disloyal (adj.)
old form: disloyall
unfaithful, adulterous, two-timing
MA III.ii.93
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Who Hero?Who, Hero? MA III.ii.94
Bast. DON PEDRO 
Euen shee, Leonatoes Hero, your Hero, eueryEven she – Leonato's Hero, your Hero, every MA III.ii.95
mans Hero.man's Hero. MA III.ii.96
Clau. CLAUDIO 
Disloyall?Disloyal? MA III.ii.97
Bast. DON JOHN 
The word is too good to paint out her wickednesse, The word is too good to paint out her wickedness.paint out (v.)display, depict fully, portrayMA III.ii.98
I could say she were worse, thinke you of a worseI could say she were worse; think you of a worse MA III.ii.99
title, and I will fit her to it: wonder not till further title, and I will fit her to it. Wonder not till furtherwonder (v.)marvel [at], be astonished [at]MA III.ii.100
warrant: goe but with mee to night, you shal see her warrant. Go but with me tonight, you shall see herwarrant (n.)token, sign, evidence, proofMA III.ii.101
chamber window entred, euen the night before her chamber-window entered, even the night before her MA III.ii.102
wedding day, if you loue her, then to morrow wed her: wedding-day. If you love her then, tomorrow wed her; MA III.ii.103
But it would better fit your honour to change your minde.but it would better fit your honour to change your mind. MA III.ii.104
Claud. CLAUDIO 
May this be so?May this be so? MA III.ii.105
Princ. DON PEDRO 
I will not thinke it.I will not think it. MA III.ii.106
Bast. DON JOHN 
If you dare not trust that you see, confesse notIf you dare not trust that you see, confess not MA III.ii.107
that you know: if you will follow mee, I will shew youthat you know. If you will follow me, I will show you MA III.ii.108
enough, and when you haue seene more, & heard more,enough; and when you have seen more and heard more, MA III.ii.109
proceed accordingly.proceed accordingly. MA III.ii.110
Clau. CLAUDIO 
If I see any thing to night, why I should notIf I see any thing tonight why I should not MA III.ii.111
marry her to morrow in the congregation, where I marry her, tomorrow in the congregation, where I MA III.ii.112
shold wedde, there will I shame her.should wed, there will I shame her. MA III.ii.113
Prin. DON PEDRO 
And as I wooed for thee to obtaine her, I willAnd, as I wooed for thee to obtain her, I will MA III.ii.114
ioyne with thee to disgrace her.join with thee to disgrace her. MA III.ii.115
Bast. DON JOHN 
I will disparage her no farther, till you are myI will disparage her no farther till you are my MA III.ii.116
witnesses, beare it coldly but till night, and let the witness; bear it coldly but till midnight, and let thecoldly (adv.)calmly, coolly, objectively, rationallyMA III.ii.117
issue shew it selfe.issue show itself.issue (n.)outcome, result, consequence(s)MA III.ii.118
Prin. DON PEDRO 
O day vntowardly turned!O day untowardly turned!turn (v.)change, transform, alterMA III.ii.119
untowardly (adv.)
old form: vntowardly
unluckily, unfavourably, wretchedly
Claud. CLAUDIO 
O mischiefe strangelie thwarting!O mischief strangely thwarting!strangely (adv.)
old form: strangelie
unaccountably, surprisingly, unusually
MA III.ii.120
Bastard. DON JOHN 
O plague right well preuented! so will you say, O plague right well prevented! So will you say MA III.ii.121
when you haue seene the sequele. when you have seen the sequel. MA III.ii.122
Exit.Exeunt MA III.ii.123
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