Twelfth Night
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Enter Sir Toby, and Sir Andrew.Enter Sir Toby and Sir Andrew TN II.iii.1
To. SIR TOBY 
Approach Sir Andrew: not to bee a bedde afterApproach, Sir Andrew. Not to be abed after TN II.iii.1
midnight, is to be vp betimes, and Deliculo surgere, midnight, is to be up betimes, and diluculo surgere,betimes (adv.)early in the morning, at an early hourTN II.iii.2
diluculo...to rise at dawn
thou know'st.thou knowest –  TN II.iii.3
And. SIR ANDREW 
Nay by my troth I know not: but I know, Nay, by my troth, I know not; but I knowtroth, by myby my truth [exclamation emphasizing an assertion]TN II.iii.4
to be vp late, is to be vp late.to be up late is to be up late. TN II.iii.5
To. SIR TOBY 
A false conclusion: I hate it as an vnfill'd Canne.A false conclusion! I hate it as an unfilled can.false (adj.)wrong, mistakenTN II.iii.6
To be vp after midnight, and to go to bed then is early:To be up after midnight and to go to bed then is early; TN II.iii.7
so that to go to bed after midnight, is to goe to bed betimes. so that to go to bed after midnight is to go to bed betimes. TN II.iii.8
Does not our liues consist of the foure Elements? Does not our lives consist of the four elements?element (n.)(plural) substances from which all material things are made [believed to be earth, water, air, fire]TN II.iii.9
And. SIR ANDREW 
Faith so they say, but I thinke it rather consistsFaith, so they say; but I think it rather consists TN II.iii.10
of eating and drinking.of eating and drinking. TN II.iii.11
To. SIR TOBY 
Th'art a scholler; let vs therefore eate and Thou'rt a scholar. Let us therefore eat and TN II.iii.12
drinke. Marian I say, a stoope of wine. drink. Marian, I say! A stoup of wine!stoup (n.)
old form: stoope
cup, flagon, jug, tankard
TN II.iii.13
Enter Clowne.Enter Feste TN II.iii.14
And. SIR ANDREW 
Heere comes the foole yfaith.Here comes the fool, i'faith. TN II.iii.14
Clo. FESTE 
How now my harts: Did you neuer see the Picture How now, my hearts! Did you never see the picture TN II.iii.15
of we three?of We Three? TN II.iii.16
To. SIR TOBY 
Welcome asse, now let's haue a catch.Welcome, ass! Now let's have a catch.catch (n.)musical roundTN II.iii.17
And. SIR ANDREW 
By my troth the foole has an excellent breast. By my troth, the fool has an excellent breast.breast (n.)singing voice, pair of lungsTN II.iii.18
I had rather then forty shillings I had such a legge, and soI had rather than forty shillings I had such a leg, and soshilling (n.)coin valued at twelve old pence or one twentieth of a poundTN II.iii.19
leg (n.)
old form: legge
bending of a knee, genuflection, obeisance
sweet a breath to sing, as the foole has. Insooth thou sweet a breath to sing, as the fool has. In sooth, thousooth (n.)truth [in exclamations, emphasizing an assertion]TN II.iii.20
wast in very gracious fooling last night, when thou wast in very gracious fooling last night, when thougracious (adj.)pleasing, agreeable, inspiredTN II.iii.21
spok'st of Pigrogromitus, of the Vapians passing the spok'st of Pigrogromitus, of the Vapians passing thePigrogromitus (n.)[pron: pigroh'gromitus] mock-astrology jargonTN II.iii.22
Vapians (n.)[pron: 'vaypians] mock-astrology jargon
Equinoctial of Queubus: 'twas very good yfaith: I sent equinoctial of Queubus. 'Twas very good, i'faith. I sentQueubus (n.)pron: kway'oobus] mock-astrology jargonTN II.iii.23
equinoctial (n.)celestial equator
thee sixe pence for thy Lemon, hadst it?thee sixpence for thy leman, hadst it?leman (n.)
old form: Lemon
lover, paramour, sweetheart
TN II.iii.24
Clo. FESTE 
I did impeticos thy gratillity: for Maluolios noseI did impetticoat thy gratillity; for Malvolio's noseimpetticoat, impeticos (v.)pocket upTN II.iii.25
gratillity (n.)humorous version of ‘gratuity’
is no Whip-stocke. My Lady has a white hand, and theis no whipstock, my lady has a white hand, and thewhipstock (n.)
old form: Whip-stocke
whip-handle
TN II.iii.26
Mermidons are no bottle-ale houses.Myrmidons are no bottle-ale houses.Myrmidons (n.)[pron: 'mermidonz] band of warriors from Thessaly who went to the Trojan War with AchillesTN II.iii.27
bottle-ale (adj.)dissolute, degenerate, low
An. SIR ANDREW 
Excellent: Why this is the best fooling, Excellent! Why, this is the best fooling, TN II.iii.28
when all is done. Now a song.when all is done. Now, a song! TN II.iii.29
To. SIR TOBY 
Come on, there is sixe pence for you. Let's haue a Come on, there is sixpence for you. Let's have a TN II.iii.30
song.song. TN II.iii.31
An. SIR ANDREW 
There's a testrill of me too: if one knight There's a testril of me, too. If one knighttester, testril (n.)
old form: testrill
sixpenny piece
TN II.iii.32
giue agive a –  TN II.iii.33
Clo. FESTE 
Would you haue a loue-song, or a song of good life?Would you have a love song, or a song of good life?song of good lifedrinking songTN II.iii.34
To. SIR TOBY 
A loue song, a loue song.A love song! A love song! TN II.iii.35
An. SIR ANDREW 
I, I. I care not for good life.Ay, ay, I care not for good life. TN II.iii.36
FESTE  
Clowne sings.(sings) TN I.iii.37
O Mistris mine where are you roming:O mistress mine! Where are you roaming? TN II.iii.37
O stay and heare, your true loues coming,O, stay and hear: your true love's coming, TN II.iii.38
That can sing both high and low.That can sing both high and low. TN II.iii.39
Trip no further prettie sweeting.Trip no further, pretty sweeting;sweeting (n.)sweetheart, darling, dearestTN II.iii.40
Iourneys end in louers meeting,Journeys end in lovers meeting, TN II.iii.41
Euery wise mans sonne doth know.Every wise man's son doth know. TN II.iii.42
An. SIR ANDREW 
Excellent good, ifaith.Excellent good, i'faith. TN II.iii.43
To. SIR TOBY 
Good, good.Good, good. TN II.iii.44
Clo.FESTE  
(sings) TN I.iii.45
What is loue, tis not heereafter,What is love? 'Tis not hereafter; TN II.iii.45
Present mirth, hath present laughter:Present mirth hath present laughter, TN II.iii.46
What's to come, is still vnsure.What's to come is still unsure.still (adv.)constantly, always, continuallyTN II.iii.47
In delay there lies no plentie,In delay there lies no plenty –  TN II.iii.48
Then come kisse me sweet and twentie:Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty,twenty, and
old form: twentie
[ballad catch phrase, used as an intensifer] and many more
TN II.iii.49
Youths a stuffe will not endure.Youth's a stuff will not endure. TN II.iii.50
An. SIR ANDREW 
A mellifluous voyce, as I am true knight.A mellifluous voice, as I am true knight. TN II.iii.51
To. SIR TOBY 
A contagious breath.A contagious breath.breath (n.)voice, song, soundTN II.iii.52
contagious (adj.)infectious, catchy
An. SIR ANDREW 
Very sweet, and contagious ifaith.Very sweet and contagious, i'faith. TN II.iii.53
To. SIR TOBY 
To heare by the nose, it is dulcet in contagion.To hear by the nose, it is dulcet in contagion.dulcet (adj.)sweet, mild, pleasant, agreeableTN II.iii.54
contagion (n.)contagious quality, infecting influence
But shall we make the Welkin dance indeed? Shall weeBut shall we make the welkin dance indeed? Shall wewelkin (n.)sky, firmament, heavensTN II.iii.55
rowze the night-Owle in a Catch, that will drawe three soules rouse the night-owl in a catch that will draw three soulscatch (n.)musical roundTN II.iii.56
soul (n.)
old form: soules
driving force, animating principle
out of one Weauer? Shall we do that?out of one weaver? Shall we do that? TN II.iii.57
And. SIR ANDREW 
And you loue me, let's doo't: I am dogge at aAn you love me, let's do't. I am dog at adog at, be a
old form: dogge
be adept at, be experienced in
TN II.iii.58
and, an (conj.)if, whether
Catch.catch.catch (n.)musical roundTN II.iii.59
Clo. FESTE 
Byrlady sir, and some dogs will catch well.By'r lady, sir, and some dogs will catch well. TN II.iii.60
An. SIR ANDREW 
Most certaine: Let our Catch be, Thou Most certain. Let our catch be ‘ Thou TN II.iii.61
Knaue.knave.’knave (n.)
old form: Knaue
scoundrel, rascal, rogue
TN II.iii.62
Clo. FESTE 
Hold thy peace, thou Knaue knight. I shall be ‘ Hold thy peace, thou knave,’ knight? I shall be TN II.iii.63
constrain'd in't, to call thee knaue, Knight.constrained in't to call thee knave, knight. TN II.iii.64
An.SIR ANDREW 
'Tis not the first time I haue constrained 'Tis not the first time I have constrained TN II.iii.65
one to call me knaue. Begin foole: it begins, one to call me knave. Begin, fool; it begins (he sings) TN II.iii.66
Hold thy peace.‘ Hold thy peace – ’ TN II.iii.67
Clo. FESTE 
I shall neuer begin if I hold my peace.I shall never begin if I hold my peace. TN II.iii.68
An. SIR ANDREW 
Good ifaith: Come begin. Good, i'faith. Come, begin! TN II.iii.69
Catch sung / Enter Maria.Catch sung. Enter Maria TN II.iii.70
MARIA 
What a catterwalling doe you keepe heere? If my Ladie What a caterwauling do you keep here! If my lady TN II.iii.70
haue not call'd vp her Steward Maluolio, and bid him have not called up her steward Malvolio and bid him TN II.iii.71
turne you out of doores, neuer trust me.turn you out of doors, never trust me. TN II.iii.72
To, SIR TOBY 
My Lady's a Catayan, we are politicians, My lady's a – Cataian; we are – politicians;Cataian, Cathayan (n.)
old form: Catayan
[from Cathay = China] scoundrel, rogue, villain
TN II.iii.73
politician (n.)schemer, intriguer, plotter
Maluolios a Peg-a-ramsie, and Malvolio's a – Peg-a-Ramsey; and (he sings)Peg-a-Ramsey (n.)
old form: Peg-a-ramsie
[dance tune] name of a spying wife in a contemporary ballad
TN II.iii.74
Three merry men be wee. Three merry men be we! TN II.iii.75
Am not I consanguinious? Am I not of her blood: Am not I consanguineous? Am I not of her blood?consanguineous (adj.)
old form: consanguinious
related in blood, of the same family
TN II.iii.76
tilly vally. Ladie, Tilly-vally! ‘ Lady ’! (He sings)tilly-fally, tilly-vally (int.)
old form: tilly vally
nonsense, fiddlesticks
TN II.iii.77
There dwelt a man in Babylon, Lady, Lady.There dwelt a man in Babylon, lady, lady –  TN II.iii.78
Clo. FESTE 
Beshrew me, the knights in admirable fooling.Beshrew me, the knight's in admirable fooling.beshrew, 'shrew (v.)curse, devil take, evil befallTN II.iii.79
An. SIR ANDREW 
I, he do's well enough if he be dispos'd, Ay, he does well enough if he be disposed,disposed (adj.)
old form: dispos'd
inclined to be merry, feeling playful
TN II.iii.80
and so do I too: he does it with a better grace, but I do and so do I too. He does it with a better grace, but I do TN II.iii.81
it more naturall.it more natural.natural (adv.)
old form: naturall
like a half-wit, idiotically
TN II.iii.82
To. SIR TOBY  
(sings) TN I.iii.83
O the twelfe day of December.O' the twelfth day of December –  TN II.iii.83
Mar. MARIA 
For the loue o'God peace.For the love o' God, peace! TN II.iii.84
Enter Maluolio.Enter Malvolio TN II.iii.85
Mal. MALVOLIO 
My masters are you mad? Or what are you?My masters, are you mad? Or what are you? TN II.iii.85
Haue you no wit, manners, nor honestie, but to gabbleHave you no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabblewit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityTN II.iii.86
honesty (n.)
old form: honestie
decency, decorum, good manners
like Tinkers at this time of night? Do yee make an Alehouse like tinkers at this time of night? Do ye make an ale-house TN II.iii.87
of my Ladies house, that ye squeak out your of my lady's house, that ye squeak out your TN II.iii.88
Coziers Catches without any mitigation or remorse of coziers' catches without any mitigation or remorse ofcozier (n.)cobblerTN II.iii.89
catch (n.)musical round
remorse (n.)consideration, thoughtfulness for others
mitigation (n.)lowering, softening, quietening
voice? Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time in voice? Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time in TN II.iii.90
you?you? TN II.iii.91
To. SIR TOBY 
We did keepe time sir in our Catches. Snecke vp.We did keep time, sir, in our catches. Sneck up!catch (n.)musical roundTN II.iii.92
sneck up (v.)
old form: Snecke vp
buzz off, go hang
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My LadySir Toby, I must be round with you. My ladyround (adj.)blunt, forthright, straight, plain-spokenTN II.iii.93
bad me tell you, that though she harbors you as her bade me tell you that, though she harbours you as herbid (v.), past form bade
old form: bad
command, order, enjoin, tell
TN II.iii.94
kinsman, she's nothing ally'd to your disorders. If you kinsman, she's nothing allied to your disorders. If you TN II.iii.95
can separate your selfe and your misdemeanors, you are can separate yourself and your misdemeanours, you are TN II.iii.96
welcome to the house: if not, and it would please you to welcome to the house. If not, an it would please you toand, an (conj.)if, whetherTN II.iii.97
take leaue of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell.take leave of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell. TN II.iii.98
To. SIR TOBY  
(sings) TN I.iii.99
Farewell deere heart, since I must needs be gone.Farewell, dear heart, since I must needs be gone –  TN II.iii.99
Mar. MARIA 
Nay good Sir Toby.Nay, good Sir Toby! TN II.iii.100
Clo. FESTE  
(sings) TN I.iii.101
His eyes do shew his dayes are almost done.His eyes do show his days are almost done –  TN II.iii.101
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Is't euen so?Is't even so! TN II.iii.102
To. SIR TOBY  
(sings) TN I.iii.103
But I will neuer dye.But I will never die –  TN II.iii.103
Clo. FESTE  
(sings) TN I.iii.104
Sir Toby there you lye.Sir Toby, there you lie –  TN II.iii.104
Mal. MALVOLIO 
This is much credit to you.This is much credit to you! TN II.iii.105
To. SIR TOBY  
(sings) TN I.iii.106
Shall I bid him go.Shall I bid him go? TN II.iii.106
Clo. FESTE  
(sings) TN I.iii.107
What and if you do?What an if you do?an if (conj.)ifTN II.iii.107
To. SIR TOBY  
(sings) TN I.iii.108
Shall I bid him go, and spare not?Shall I bid him go and spare not? TN II.iii.108
Clo. FESTE  
(sings) TN I.iii.109
O no, no, no, no, you dare not.O no, no, no, no, you dare not!  TN II.iii.109
To. SIR TOBY 
Out o'tune sir, ye lye: Art any Out o' tune, sir, ye lie. (To Malvolio) Art any TN II.iii.110
more then a Steward? Dost thou thinke because thou art more than a steward? Dost thou think, because thou art TN II.iii.111
vertuous, there shall be no more Cakes and Ale?virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale? TN II.iii.112
Clo. FESTE 
Yes by S. Anne, and Ginger shall bee hotte y'thYes, by Saint Anne, and ginger shall be hot i'the TN II.iii.113
mouth too.mouth, too. TN II.iii.114
To. SIR TOBY 
Th'art i'th right. Goe sir, rub Th' art i'the right. (To Malvolio) Go, sir, rub  TN II.iii.115
your Chaine with crums. A stope of Wine Maria.your chain with crumbs. A stoup of wine, Maria!chain (n.)
old form: Chaine
chain of office
TN II.iii.116
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Mistris Mary, if you priz'd my Ladies fauourMistress Mary, if you prized my lady's favour TN II.iii.117
at any thing more then contempt, you would not giueat anything more than contempt, you would not give TN II.iii.118
meanes for this vnciuill rule; she shall know of it by thismeans for this uncivil rule. She shall know of it, by this TN II.iii.119
hand. hand! TN II.iii.120
ExitExit TN II.iii.120
Mar. MARIA 
Go shake your eares.Go, shake your ears. TN II.iii.121
An. SIR ANDREW 
'Twere as good a deede as to drink when a 'Twere as good a deed as to drink when a TN II.iii.122
mans a hungrie, to challenge him the field, and then to man's a-hungry, to challenge him the field and then tofield (n.)duelling placeTN II.iii.123
breake promise with him, and make a foole of him.break promise with him and make a fool of him. TN II.iii.124
To. SIR TOBY 
Doo't knight, Ile write thee a Challenge: or IleDo't, knight, I'll write thee a challenge; or I'll TN II.iii.125
deliuer thy indignation to him by word of mouth.deliver thy indignation to him by word of mouth. TN II.iii.126
Mar. MARIA 
Sweet Sir Toby be patient for to night: Since the Sweet Sir Toby, be patient for tonight. Since the TN II.iii.127
youth of the Counts was to day with my Lady, she isyouth of the Count's was today with my lady, she is TN II.iii.128
much out of quiet. For Monsieur Maluolio, let me alonemuch out of quiet. For Monsieur Malvolio, let me alone TN II.iii.129
with him: If I do not gull him into an ayword, and makewith him. If I do not gull him into a nayword, and makenayword, nay-word (n.)
old form: ayword
byword, proverb
TN II.iii.130
gull (v.)deceive, dupe, trick
him a common recreation, do not thinke I haue witte him a common recreation, do not think I have witwit (n.)
old form: witte
intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental ability
TN II.iii.131
recreation (n.)source of amusement, figure of fun
enough to lye straight in my bed: I know I can do it.enough to lie straight in my bed. I know I can do it. TN II.iii.132
To. SIR TOBY 
Possesse vs, possesse vs, tell vs something of him.Possess us, possess us, tell us something of him.possess (v.)
old form: possesse
notify, inform, acquaint
TN II.iii.133
Mar. MARIA 
Marrie sir, sometimes he is a kinde of Puritane.Marry, sir, sometimes he is a kind of puritan – marry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryTN II.iii.134
An. SIR ANDREW 
O, if I thought that, Ide beate him like a dogge.O, if I thought that, I'd beat him like a dog. TN II.iii.135
To. SIR TOBY 
What for being a Puritan, thy exquisite reason,What, for being a puritan? Thy exquisite reason,exquisite (adj.)ingenious, abstruse, far-fetchedTN II.iii.136
deere knight.dear knight? TN II.iii.137
An. SIR ANDREW 
I haue no exquisite reason for't, but I haue I have no exquisite reason for't, but I have TN II.iii.138
reason good enough.reason good enough. TN II.iii.139
Mar. MARIA 
The diu'll a Puritane that hee is, or any thing constantly The devil a puritan that he is, or anything, constantly,constantly (adv.)resolutely, steadfastly, steadilyTN II.iii.140
but a time-pleaser, an affection'd Asse, that cons but a time-pleaser, an affectioned ass that conscon (v.)learn by heart, commit to memoryTN II.iii.141
affectioned (adj.)
old form: affection'd
affected, pretentious, self-willed
time-pleaser (n.)time-server, follower of fashion
State without booke, and vtters it by great swarths. The state without book and utters it by great swathes; the book, without
old form: booke
off by heart, by rote
TN II.iii.142
state (n.)stately phrasing, high-flown expressions
swarth (n.)swathe, strip, chunk
best perswaded of himselfe: so cram'd (as he thinkes) best persuaded of himself, so crammed, as he thinks, TN II.iii.143
with excellencies, that it is his grounds of faith, that allwith excellencies, that it is his grounds of faith that all TN II.iii.144
that looke on him, loue him: and on that vice in him, willthat look on him love him – and on that vice in him will TN II.iii.145
my reuenge finde notable cause to worke.my revenge find notable cause to work. TN II.iii.146
To. SIR TOBY 
What wilt thou do?What wilt thou do? TN II.iii.147
Mar. MARIA 
I will drop in his way some obscure Epistles ofI will drop in his way some obscure epistles of TN II.iii.148
loue, wherein by the colour of his beard, the shape of love; wherein, by the colour of his beard, the shape of TN II.iii.149
his legge, the manner of his gate, the expressure of his eye,his leg, the manner of his gait, the expressure of his eye,expressure (n.)expression, attitude, lookTN II.iii.150
gait (n.)
old form: gate
manner of walking, bearing, movement
forehead, and complection, he shall finde himselfe mostforehead, and complexion, he shall find himself most TN II.iii.151
feelingly personated. I can write very like my Ladie your feelingly personated. I can write very like my lady, yourpersonate (v.)describe, represent, delineateTN II.iii.152
feelingly (adv.)pertinently, aptly, to the point
Neece, on a forgotten matter wee can hardly makeniece; on a forgotten matter we can hardly make TN II.iii.153
distinction of our hands.distinction of our hands. TN II.iii.154
To. SIR TOBY 
Excellent, I smell a deuice.Excellent! I smell a device.device (n.)
old form: deuice
plot, stratagem, trick
TN II.iii.155
An. SIR ANDREW 
I hau't in my nose too.I have't in my nose too. TN II.iii.156
To. SIR TOBY 
He shall thinke by the Letters that thou wilt He shall think by the letters that thou wilt TN II.iii.157
drop that they come from my Neece, and that shee's in drop that they come from my niece, and that she's in TN II.iii.158
loue with him.love with him. TN II.iii.159
Mar. MARIA 
My purpose is indeed a horse of that colour.My purpose is indeed a horse of that colour.purpose (n.)intention, aim, planTN II.iii.160
An. SIR ANDREW 
And your horse now would make him an And your horse now would make him an TN II.iii.161
Asse.ass. TN II.iii.162
Mar. MARIA 
Asse, I doubt not.Ass, I doubt not. TN II.iii.163
An. SIR ANDREW 
O twill be admirable.O, 'twill be admirable! TN II.iii.164
Mar. MARIA 
Sport royall I warrant you: I know my Physicke will Sport royal, I warrant you. I know my physic willwarrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmTN II.iii.165
physic (n.)
old form: Physicke
medicine, healing, treatment
sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainment
worke with him, I will plant you two, and let the Foole work with him. I will plant you two, and let the fool TN II.iii.166
make a third, where he shall finde the Letter: obserue his make a third, where he shall find the letter. Observe his TN II.iii.167
construction of it: For this night to bed, and dreame on construction of it. For this night, to bed, and dream onconstruction (n.)interpretation, reading, explanationTN II.iii.168
the euent: Farewell. the event. Farewell.event (n.)
old form: euent
outcome, issue, consequence
TN II.iii.169
ExitExit TN II.iii.169
To. SIR TOBY 
Good night Penthisilea.Good night, Penthesilea.Penthesilea (n.)[pron: penthesi'laya] Amazonian queen, who helped Priam at TroyTN II.iii.170
An. SIR ANDREW 
Before me she's a good wench.Before me, she's a good wench.wench (n.)girl, lassTN II.iii.171
To. SIR TOBY 
She's a beagle true bred, and one that adores She's a beagle true bred, and one that adores TN II.iii.172
me: what o'that?me – what o' that? TN II.iii.173
An. SIR ANDREW 
I was ador'd once too.I was adored once, too. TN II.iii.174
To. SIR TOBY 
Let's to bed knight: Thou hadst neede send forLet's to bed, knight. Thou hadst need send for TN II.iii.175
more money.more money. TN II.iii.176
An. SIR ANDREW 
If I cannot recouer your Neece, I am a foule If I cannot recover your niece, I am a foulrecover (v.)
old form: recouer
get hold of, obtain, get
TN II.iii.177
way out.way out.out (adv.)out of pocketTN II.iii.178
To. SIR TOBY 
Send for money knight, if thou hast her not Send for money, knight. If thou hast her not TN II.iii.179
i'th end, call me Cut.i'the end, call me cut.cut (n.)work-horse, nagTN II.iii.180
An. SIR ANDREW 
If I do not, neuer trust me, take it how you If I do not, never trust me, take it how you TN II.iii.181
will.will. TN II.iii.182
To. SIR TOBY 
Come, come, Ile go burne some Sacke, tis too Come, come, I'll go burn some sack, 'tis tooburn (v.)
old form: burne
warm up, spice up
TN II.iii.183
sack (n.)
old form: Sacke
[type of] white wine
late to go to bed now: Come knight, come knight. late to go to bed now. Come, knight; come, knight. TN II.iii.184
ExeuntExeunt TN II.iii.184
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