Pericles
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Enter Bawdes 3.Enter the three Bawds Per IV.vi.1
Pand.PANDAR 
Well, I had rather then twice the worth of herWell, I had rather than twice the worth of her Per IV.vi.1
shee had nere come heere.she had ne'er come here. Per IV.vi.2
Bawd.BAWD 
Fye, fye, vpon her, shee's able to freze the godFie, fie upon her! She's able to freeze the god Per IV.vi.3
Priapus, and vndoe a whole generation, we must eitherPriapus and undo a whole generation. We must eitherPriapus (n.)[priy'aypus] Greek god of human and plant fertilityPer IV.vi.4
undo (v.)
old form: vndoe
ruin, destroy, wipe out
get her rauished, or be rid of her, when she shouldget her ravished or be rid of her. When she should Per IV.vi.5
doe for Clyents her fitment, and doe mee the kindenesse of ourdo for clients her fitment and do me the kindness of ourkindness (n.)
old form: kindenesse
kind act, fond display
Per IV.vi.6
fitment (n.)fitting action, duty, what is called for
profession, shee has me her quirks, her reasons, herprofession, she has me her quirks, her reasons, her Per IV.vi.7
master reasons, her prayers, her knees, that shee wouldmaster reasons, her prayers, her knees, that she would Per IV.vi.8
make a Puritaine of the diuell, if hee should cheapen a kissemake a puritan of the devil if he should cheapen a kisscheapen (v.)bargain for, bid for, settle the price ofPer IV.vi.9
of her.of her. Per IV.vi.10
Boult.BOULT 
Faith I must rauish her, or shee'le disfurnish vsFaith, I must ravish her, or she'll disfurnish usdisfurnish (v.)deprive, strip, dispossessPer IV.vi.11
of all our Caualereea, and make our swearers priests.of all our cavalleria and make our swearers priests.cavalleria (n.)
old form: Caualereea
body of fine gentlemen, society of knights
Per IV.vi.12
Pand.PANDAR 
Now the poxe vpon her greene sicknes for mee.Now, the pox upon her green-sickness for me!pox (n.)venereal disease; also: plague, or any other disease displaying skin pustulesPer IV.vi.13
green-sickness (n.)
old form: greene sicknes
sexual squeamishness, sickly naivety
Bawd.BAWD 
Faith ther's no way to be ridde on't but by the wayFaith, there's no way to be rid on't but by the way Per IV.vi.14
to the pox. Here comes the Lord Lysimachus disguised.to the pox. Here comes the Lord Lysimachus disguised. Per IV.vi.15
Boult.BOULT 
Wee should haue both Lorde and Lowne, if the peeuishWe should have both lord and lown if the peevishlown, loon (n.)
old form: Lowne
rogue, sluggard; worthless idiot
Per IV.vi.16
baggadge would but giue way to customers.baggage would but give way to customers. Per IV.vi.17
Enter Lysimachus.Enter Lysimachushow (adv.)how much?, at what rate?Per IV.vi.18
Lysim.LYSIMACHUS 
How now, how a douzen of virginities?How now, how a dozen of virginities? Per IV.vi.18
Bawd.BAWD 
Now the Gods to blesse your Honour.Now, the gods to bless your honour! Per IV.vi.19
Boult.BOULT 
I am glad to see your Honour in good health.I am glad to see your honour in good health. Per IV.vi.20
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
You may , so t'is the better for you thatYou may so; 'tis the better for you that Per IV.vi.21
your resorters stand vpon sound legges, how now? wholsomeyour resorters stand upon sound legs. How now, wholesomewholesome (adj.)
old form: wholsome
sound, firm, in good condition
Per IV.vi.22
resorter (n.)regular, frequenter, customer
iniquitie haue you, that a man may deale withall, andiniquity have you, that a man may deal withal anddeal (v.)
old form: deale
have dealings, have to do
Per IV.vi.23
iniquity (n.)
old form: iniquitie
piece of wickedness, little devil
defie the Surgion?defy the surgeon?defy (v.)
old form: defie
reject, despise, disdain, renounce
Per IV.vi.24
surgeon (n.)
old form: Surgion
doctor, physician
Bawd.BAWD 
Wee haue heere one Sir, if shee would, but thereWe have here one, sir, if she would – but there Per IV.vi.25
neuer came her like in Meteline.never came her like in Mytilene. Per IV.vi.26
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
If shee'd doe the deedes of darknes thouIf she'd do the deeds of darkness, thou Per IV.vi.27
wouldst say.wouldst say. Per IV.vi.28
Bawd.BAWD 
Your Honor knows what t'is to say wel enough.Your honour knows what 'tis to say well enough. Per IV.vi.29
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Well, call forth, call forth.Well, call forth, call forth. Per IV.vi.30
Boult.BOULT 
For flesh and bloud Sir, white and red, you shallFor flesh and blood, sir, white and red, you shall Per IV.vi.31
see a rose, and she were a rose indeed, if shee had but.see a rose. And she were a rose indeed, if she had but – Per IV.vi.32
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
What prithi?What, prithee? Per IV.vi.33
Boult.BOULT 
O Sir, I can be modest.O, sir, I can be modest. Per IV.vi.34
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
That dignities the renowne of a Bawde, noThat dignifies the renown of a bawd nobawd (n.)
old form: Bawde
pimp, procurer, pander, go-between
Per IV.vi.35
renown (n.)
old form: renowne
reputation, good name, honour
lesse then it giues a good report to a number to be chaste.less than it gives a good report to a number to be chaste. Per IV.vi.36
Exit Boult Per IV.vi.36
Bawd.BAWD 
Heere comes that which growes to the stalke, / NeuerHere comes that which grows to the stalk, never Per IV.vi.37
pluckt yet I can assure you.plucked yet, I can assure you. Per IV.vi.38
Enter Boult with Marina Per IV.vi.39
Is shee not a faire creature?Is she not a fair creature? Per IV.vi.39
Ly.LYSIMACHUS 
Faith shee would serue after a long voyageFaith she would serve after a long voyage Per IV.vi.40
at Sea, Well theres for you,at sea. Well, there's for you. Per IV.vi.41
He gives her money Per IV.vi.42
leaue vs.Leave us. Per IV.vi.42
Bawd.BAWD 
I beseeche your Honor giue me leaue a word, / AndI beseech your honour, give me leave a word, and Per IV.vi.43
Ile haue done presently.I'll have done presently.presently (adv.)immediately, instantly, at oncePer IV.vi.44
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
I beseech you doe.I beseech you, do. Per IV.vi.45
Bawd.BAWD  
(to Marina) Per IV.vi.46
First, I would haue you note, this is anFirst, I would have you note this is an Per IV.vi.46
Honorable man.honourable man. Per IV.vi.47
Mar.MARINA 
I desire to finde him so, that I may worthilie noteI desire to find him so, that I may worthily note Per IV.vi.48
him.him. Per IV.vi.49
Bawd.BAWD 
Next hees the Gouernor of this countrey, and a manNext, he's the governor of this country, and a man Per IV.vi.50
whom I am bound too.whom I am bound to. Per IV.vi.51
Ma.MARINA 
If he gouerne the countrey you are bound to himIf he govern the country, you are bound to him Per IV.vi.52
indeed, but how honorable hee is in that, I knowe not.indeed, but how honourable he is in that I know not. Per IV.vi.53
Bawd.BAWD 
Pray you without anie more virginall fencing, willPray you, without any more virginal fencing, willvirginal (adj.)
old form: virginall
typical of a virgin
Per IV.vi.54
you vse him kindly? he will lyne your apron with gold.you use him kindly? He will line your apron with gold. Per IV.vi.55
Ma.MARINA 
What hee will doe gratiously, I will thankfullyWhat he will do graciously, I will thankfullygraciously (adv.)
old form: gratiously
through divine grace, in all holiness
Per IV.vi.56
receiue.receive. Per IV.vi.57
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Ha you done?Ha' you done? Per IV.vi.58
Bawd.BAWD 
My Lord shees not pac'ste yet, you must take someMy lord, she's not paced yet; you must take somepace (v.)
old form: pac'ste
[horse-training] break in, teach one paces, properly train
Per IV.vi.59
paines to worke her to your mannage, come wee will leauepains to work her to your manage. Come, we will leavemanage (n.)
old form: mannage
management, handling, control [especially of a horse, as a result of training]
Per IV.vi.60
his Honor, and her together, goe thy wayes.his honour and her together. Go thy ways. Per IV.vi.61
Exeunt, Pandar, Bawd, and Boult Per IV.vi.61
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Now prittie one, how long haue you beeneNow, pretty one, how long have you been Per IV.vi.62
at this trade?at this trade? Per IV.vi.63
Ma.MARINA 
What trade Sir?What trade, sir? Per IV.vi.64
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Why, I cannot name but I shall offend.Why, I cannot name it but I shall offend. Per IV.vi.65
Ma.MARINA 
I cannot be offended with my trade, please youI cannot be offended with my trade. Please you Per IV.vi.66
to name it.to name it. Per IV.vi.67
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
How long haue you bene of this profession?How long have you been of this profession? Per IV.vi.68
Ma.MARINA 
Ere since I can remember.E'er since I can remember. Per IV.vi.69
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Did you goe too't so young, were you aDid you go to't so young? Were you ago to it
old form: goe too't
copulate, engage in sexual intercourse
Per IV.vi.70
gamester at fiue, or at seuen?gamester at five, or at seven?gamester (n.)one drawn to amorous sport, one who plays the game, prostitutePer IV.vi.71
Ma.MARINA 
Earlyer too Sir, if now I bee one.Earlier too, sir, if now I be one. Per IV.vi.72
Ly.LYSIMACHUS 
Why? the house you dwell in proclaimes youWhy, the house you dwell in proclaims you Per IV.vi.73
to be a Creature of sale.to be a creature of sale. Per IV.vi.74
Ma.MARINA 
Doe you knowe this house to be a place of suchDo you know this house to be a place of such Per IV.vi.75
resort, and will come intoo't? I heare say you're ofresort, and will come into't? I hear say you're ofresort (n.)visits, visitings, approachesPer IV.vi.76
honourable parts, and are the Gouernour of this place.honourable parts and are the governor of this place.part (n.)quality, attribute, gift, accomplishment [of mind or body]Per IV.vi.77
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Why, hath your principall made knowneWhy, hath your principal made knownprincipal (n.)
old form: principall
mistress, superior, manager
Per IV.vi.78
vnto you who I am?unto you who I am? Per IV.vi.79
Ma.MARINA 
Who is my principall?Who is my principal? Per IV.vi.80
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Why, your hearbe-woman, she that setsWhy, your herb-woman; she that setsherb-woman (n.)
old form: hearbe-woman
woman who sells herbs
Per IV.vi.81
seeds and rootes of shame and iniquitie. O you haueseeds and roots of shame and iniquity. O, you have Per IV.vi.82
heard something of my power, and so stand aloft forheard something of my power, and so stand aloof forsomething (adv.)a little, to some extentPer IV.vi.83
more serious wooing, but I protest to thee prettie one,more serious wooing. But I protest to thee, pretty one, Per IV.vi.84
my authoritie shall not see thee, or else looke friendlymy authority shall not see thee, or else look friendly Per IV.vi.85
vpon thee, come bring me to some priuate place:upon thee. Come, bring me to some private place. Per IV.vi.86
Come, come.Come, come. Per IV.vi.87
Ma.MARINA 
If you were borne to honour, shew it now,If you were born to honour, show it now; Per IV.vi.88
if put vpon you, make the iudgement good,If put upon you, make the judgement goodput (v.)bestow, grant, place officiallyPer IV.vi.89
that thought you worthie of it.That thought you worthy of it. Per IV.vi.90
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
How's this? how's this? some more, be sage.How's this? How's this? Some more. Be sage. Per IV.vi.91.1
Mar.MARINA 
For meFor me Per IV.vi.91.2
that am a maide, though most vngentle FortuneThat am a maid, though most ungentle fortune Per IV.vi.92
haue plac't mee in this Stie, where since I came,Have placed me in this sty, where since I came Per IV.vi.93
diseases haue beene solde deerer then Phisicke,Diseases have been sold dearer than physic –physic (n.)
old form: Phisicke
medicine, healing, treatment
Per IV.vi.94
that the godsThat the gods Per IV.vi.95
would set me free from this vnhalowed place,Would set me free from this unhallowed place, Per IV.vi.96
though they did chaunge mee to the meanest byrdThough they did change me to the meanest bird Per IV.vi.97
that flyes i'th purer ayre.That flies i'th' purer air! Per IV.vi.98
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
I did not thinke thou couldst haue spoke so well,I did not think thou couldst have spoke so well, Per IV.vi.99
nere dremp't thou could'st,Ne'er dreamt thou couldst. Per IV.vi.100
had I brought hither a corrupted minde,Had I brought hither a corrupted mind, Per IV.vi.101
thy speeche had altered it, holde, heeres golde for thee,Thy speech had altered it. Hold, here's gold for thee. Per IV.vi.102
perseuer in that cleare way thou goestPersever in that clear way thou goest,clear (adj.)
old form: cleare
innocent, blameless, free from fault, not guilty
Per IV.vi.103
persever (v.)
old form: perseuer
persevere, persist, keep at it
and the gods strengthen thee.And the gods strengthen thee. Per IV.vi.104
Ma.MARINA 
The good Gods preserue you.The good gods preserve you. Per IV.vi.105
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
For me be you thoughten,For me, be you thoughtenthoughten (adj.)assured, of a mind, thinkingPer IV.vi.106
that I came with no ill intent, for to meThat I came with no ill intent; for to meill (adj.)evil, wicked, immoralPer IV.vi.107
intent (n.)intention, purpose, aim
the very dores and windows sauor vilely,The very doors and windows savour vilely.savour (v.)
old form: sauor
smell, reek, stink
Per IV.vi.108
fare thee well, thou art a peece of vertue, &Fare thee well. Thou art a piece of virtue, andpiece (n.)
old form: peece
[of virtue] model, picture, paragon
Per IV.vi.109
fare ... well (int.)goodbye [to an individual]
I doubt not but thy training hath bene noble,I doubt not but thy training hath been noble. Per IV.vi.110
hold, heeres more golde for thee,Hold, here's more gold for thee. Per IV.vi.111
a curse vpon him, die he like a theefeA curse upon him, die he like a thief, Per IV.vi.112
that robs thee of thy goodnes, if thou doestThat robs thee of thy goodness! If thou dost Per IV.vi.113
heare from me it shalbe for thy good.Hear from me, it shall be for thy good. Per IV.vi.114
Enter Boult Per IV.vi.115
Boult.BOULT 
I beseeche your Honor one peece for me.I beseech your honour, one piece for me. Per IV.vi.115
Li.LYSIMACHUS 
Auaunt thou damned dore-keeper,Avaunt, thou damned door-keeper!door-keeper (n.)procurer, pander, whoremasterPer IV.vi.116
avaunt (int.)
old form: Auaunt
begone, go away, be off
your house but for this virgin that doeth prop it,Your house, but for this virgin that doth prop it, Per IV.vi.117
would sincke and ouerwhelme you. Away.Would sink and overwhelm you. Away!sink (v.)
old form: sincke
be ruined, give up, perish
Per IV.vi.118
Exit Per IV.vi.118
Boult.BOULT 
How's this? wee must take another course withHow's this? We must take another course withcourse (n.)course of action, way of proceedingPer IV.vi.119
you? if your peeuish chastitie, which is not worth ayou. If your peevish chastity, which is not worth apeevish (adj.)
old form: peeuish
obstinate, perverse, self-willed [contrast modern sense of ‘irritable, morose’]
Per IV.vi.120
breakefast in the cheapest countrey vnder the coap, shallbreakfast in the cheapest country under the cope, shallcope (n.)
old form: coap
sky, heavens, firmament
Per IV.vi.121
vndoe a whole houshold, let me be gelded like a spaniel,undo a whole household, let me be gelded like a spaniel. Per IV.vi.122
come your wayes.Come your ways. Per IV.vi.123
Ma.MARINA 
Whither would you haue mee?Whither would you have me? Per IV.vi.124
Boult.BOULT 
I must haue your mayden-head taken off, or theI must have your maidenhead taken off, or the Per IV.vi.125
comon hag-man shal execute it, come your way,common hangman shall execute it. Come your ways. Per IV.vi.126
weele haue no more Gentlemen driuen away, come yourWe'll have no more gentlemen driven away. Come your Per IV.vi.127
wayes I say.ways, I say. Per IV.vi.128
Enter Bawdes.Enter Pandar and Bawd Per IV.vi.129
Bawd.BAWD 
How now, whats the matter?How now, what's the matter? Per IV.vi.129
Boult.BOULT 
Worse and worse mistris, shee has heere spokenWorse and worse, mistress. She has here spoken Per IV.vi.130
holie words to the Lord Lisimachus.holy words to the Lord Lysimachus. Per IV.vi.131
Bawd.BAWD 
O abhominable.O, abominable! Per IV.vi.132
Boult.BOULT 
He makes our profession as it were to stincke aforeShe makes our profession as it were to stink afore Per IV.vi.133
the face of the gods.the face of the gods. Per IV.vi.134
Bawd. BAWD 
Marie hang her vp for euer.Marry, hang her up for ever!marry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryPer IV.vi.135
Boult.BOULT 
The Noble man would haue dealt with her like aThe nobleman would have dealt with her like a Per IV.vi.136
Noble man, and shee sent him away as colde as a Snoweball,nobleman, and she sent him away as cold as a snowball, Per IV.vi.137
saying his prayers too.saying his prayers too. Per IV.vi.138
Bawd.BAWD 
Boult take her away, vse her at thy pleasure,Boult, take her away. Use her at thy pleasure. Per IV.vi.139
crack the glasse of her virginitie, and make the restCrack the glass of her virginity, and make the rest Per IV.vi.140
maliable.malleable. Per IV.vi.141
Boult.BOULT 
And if shee were a thornyer peece of ground then sheeAn if she were a thornier piece of ground than shean if (conj.)ifPer IV.vi.142
is, shee shall be plowed.is, she shall be ploughed. Per IV.vi.143
Ma.MARINA 
Harke, harke you Gods.Hark, hark, you gods! Per IV.vi.144
Bawd.BAWD 
She coniures, away with her, would she had neuerShe conjures! Away with her! Would she had neverconjure (v.)
old form: coniures
engage in magic, cast spells, invoke supernatural aid
Per IV.vi.145
come within my doores, Marrie hang you: shees borne tocome within my doors! Marry, hang you! She's born to Per IV.vi.146
vndoe vs, will you not goe the way of wemen-kinde?undo us. Will you not go the way of womenkind?undo (v.)
old form: vndoe
ruin, destroy, wipe out
Per IV.vi.147
Marry come vp my dish of chastitie with rosemary &Marry come up, my dish of chastity with rosemary androsemary (n.)aromatic shrub, associated with rememberingPer IV.vi.148
baies.bays!bay (n.)
old form: baies
leaf of the bay-tree [used as a herb; symbol of triumph]
Per IV.vi.149
Exit Pandar and Bawd Per IV.vi.149
Boult.BOULT 
Come mistris, come your way with mee.Come, mistress, come your way with me. Per IV.vi.150
Ma.MARINA 
Whither wilt thou haue mee?Whither wilt thou have me? Per IV.vi.151
Boult.BOULT 
To take from you the Iewell you hold so deere.To take from you the jewel you hold so dear. Per IV.vi.152
Ma.MARINA 
Prithee tell mee one thing first.Prithee tell me one thing first. Per IV.vi.153
Boult.BOULT 
Come now your one thing.Come now, your one thing. Per IV.vi.154
Ma.MARINA 
What canst thou wish thine enemie to be.What canst thou wish thine enemy to be? Per IV.vi.155
Boult.BOULT 
Why, I could wish him to bee my master, or ratherWhy, I could wish him to be my master, or rather Per IV.vi.156
my mistris.my mistress. Per IV.vi.157
Ma.MARINA 
Neither of these are so bad as thou art,Neither of these are so bad as thou art, Per IV.vi.158
since they doe better thee in their command,Since they do better thee in their command.better (v.)excel, outstrip, have an advantage overPer IV.vi.159
command (n.)position of authority, superior role
thou hold'st a placeThou holdest a placeplace (n.)position, post, office, rankPer IV.vi.160
for which the painedst feende of hellFor which the pained'st fiend of hellpained (adj.)
old form: painedst
tormented, distressed, persecuted
Per IV.vi.161
would not in reputation change: Thou artWould not in reputation change. Thou artchange (v.)exchange, tradePer IV.vi.162
the damned doore-keeper to euery custerellThe damned doorkeeper to every custreldoor-keeper (n.)
old form: doore-keeper
procurer, pander, whoremaster
Per IV.vi.163
custrel (n.)
old form: custerell
scoundrel, rogue, low fellow
that comes enquiring for his Tib.That comes inquiring for his Tib.Tib (n.)[type name for] strumpet, harlot, whorePer IV.vi.164
To the cholerike fisting of euery rogue,To the choleric fisting of every roguecholeric (adj.)
old form: cholerike
irritable, angry, enraged
Per IV.vi.165
fisting (n.)punching, knock, boxing
thy eare is lyable, thy foode is suchThy ear is liable. Thy food is such Per IV.vi.166
as hath beene belch't on by infected lungs.As hath been belched on by infected lungs. Per IV.vi.167
Bo.BOULT 
What wold you haue me do? go to the wars,What would you have me do? go to the wars, Per IV.vi.168
wold you? wher a man may serue 7. yeers for thewould you? where a man may serve seven years for the Per IV.vi.169
losse of a leg, & haue not money enough in the end toloss of a leg, and have not money enough in the end to Per IV.vi.170
buy him a woodden one?buy him a wooden one? Per IV.vi.171
Ma.MARINA 
Doe any thing but thisDo anything but this Per IV.vi.172
thou doest, emptie olde receptacles,Thou doest. Empty old receptaclesreceptacle (n.)repository, storehouse, receiving-chamberPer IV.vi.173
or common-shores of filthe,Or common shores of filth;common (adj.)public, open, outdoorPer IV.vi.174
shore (n.)waterside dump, sewage channel
serue by indenture, to the common hang-man,Serve by indenture to the common hangman.indenture (n.)contract, agreementPer IV.vi.175
anie of these wayes are yet better then this:Any of these ways are yet better than this, Per IV.vi.176
for what thou professest, a Baboone could heFor what thou professest, a baboon, could he speak, Per IV.vi.177
speak, would owne a name too deere, that the godsWould own a name too dear. That the godsdear (adj.)
old form: deere
noble, honourable, worthy
Per IV.vi.178
name (n.)reputation, fame, renown
wold safely deliuer me from this place:Would safely deliver me from this place! Per IV.vi.179
here, heers gold for thee,Here, here's gold for thee. Per IV.vi.180
if that thy master would gaine by me,If that thy master would gain by me, Per IV.vi.181
proclaime that I can sing, weaue, sow, & dance,Proclaim that I can sing, weave, sew, and dance, Per IV.vi.182
with other vertues, which Ile keep from boast,With other virtues which I'll keep from boast, Per IV.vi.183
and will vndertake all these to teache.And I will undertake all these to teach. Per IV.vi.184
I doubt not but this populous Cittie willI doubt not but this populous city will Per IV.vi.185
yeelde manie schollers.Yield many scholars. Per IV.vi.186
Boult.BOULT 
But can you teache all this you speake of?But can you teach all this you speak of? Per IV.vi.187
Ma.MARINA 
Prooue that I cannot, take mee home againe,Prove that I cannot, take me home againprove (v.)
old form: Prooue
demonstrate, establish, show to be true
Per IV.vi.188
And prostitute mee to the basest groomeAnd prostitute me to the basest groomgroom (n.)
old form: groome
fellow, character, creature
Per IV.vi.189
that doeth frequent your house.That doth frequent your house.base (adj.)dishonourable, low, unworthyPer IV.vi.190
Boult.BOULT 
Well I will see what I can doe for thee: if I canWell, I will see what I can do for thee. If I can Per IV.vi.191
place thee I will.place thee, I will. Per IV.vi.192
Ma.MARINA 
But amongst honest woman.But amongst honest women. Per IV.vi.193
Boult.BOULT 
Faith my acquaintance lies little amongst them,Faith, my acquaintance lies little amongst them. Per IV.vi.194
But since my master and mistris hath bought you,But since my master and mistress hath bought you, Per IV.vi.195
theres no going but by their consent: therefore I willthere's no going but by their consent. Therefore I will Per IV.vi.196
make them acquainted with your purpose, and I doubtmake them acquainted with your purpose, and I doubtpurpose (n.)intention, aim, planPer IV.vi.197
not but I shall finde them tractable enough. Come, Ilenot but I shall find them tractable enough. Come, I'll Per IV.vi.198
doe for thee what I can, come your wayes.do for thee what I can. Come your ways. Per IV.vi.199
Exeunt.Exeunt Per IV.vi.199
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