Troilus and Cressida
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Enter Cressid and her man.Enter Cressida and her man Alexander TC I.ii.1
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Who were those went by?Who were those went by? TC I.ii.1.1
Man. ALEXANDER 
Queene Hecuba, and Hellen.Queen Hecuba and Helen.Hecuba (n.)wife of Priam, King of Troy, and mother of 18 children; after the Greeks took Troy, she saw her sons and her husband killed, and was sent into slavery.TC I.ii.1.2
Cre. CRESSIDA 
And whether go they?And whither go they? TC I.ii.2.1
Man. ALEXANDER 
Vp to the Easterne Tower,Up to the eastern tower, TC I.ii.2.2
Whose height commands as subiect all the vaile,Whose height commands as subject all the vale, TC I.ii.3
To see the battell: Hector whose pacience,To see the battle. Hector, whose patience TC I.ii.4
Is as a Vertue fixt, to day was mou'd:Is as a virtue fixed, today was moved:moved (adj.)
old form: mou'd
in a bad temper, angered, exasperated
TC I.ii.5
He chides Andromache and strooke his Armorer,He chid Andromache, and struck his armourer;chide (v.), past form chidscold, rebuke, reproveTC I.ii.6
And like as there were husbandry in WarreAnd, like as there were husbandry in war,husbandry (n.)thrift, good economy, careful managementTC I.ii.7
like as (conj.)just as
Before the Sunne rose, hee was harnest lyte,Before the sun rose he was harnessed light,harness (v.)
old form: harnest
dress in armour, arm, equip
TC I.ii.8
light (adv.)
old form: lyte
lightly, without heavy equipment
And to the field goe's he; where euery flowerAnd to the field goes he; where every flowerfield (n.)field of battle, battleground, field of combatTC I.ii.9
Did as a Prophet weepe what it forsaw,Did as a prophet weep what it foresaw TC I.ii.10
In Hectors wrath.In Hector's wrath. TC I.ii.11.1
Cre. CRESSIDA 
What was his cause of anger?What was his cause of anger? TC I.ii.11.2
Man. ALEXANDER 
The noise goe's this; / There is among the Greekes,The noise goes, this: there is among the Greeksnoise (n.)report, rumour, newsTC I.ii.12
A Lord of Troian blood, Nephew to Hector,A lord of Trojan blood, nephew to Hector; TC I.ii.13
They call him Aiax.They call him Ajax.Ajax (n.)[pron: 'ayjaks, OP also a'jayks] son of Telemon, king of Salamis (also called Ajax Telemonius); fought against Troy; proverbial for his size and strengthTC I.ii.14.1
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Good; and what of him?Good, and what of him? TC I.ii.14.2
Man. ALEXANDER 
They say he is a very man per se They say he is a very man per se,per seby himselfTC I.ii.15
very (adj.)[intensifying] thorough-going, absolute
and stands alone.And stands alone.alone (adj.)unique, matchless, having no equalTC I.ii.16
Cre. CRESSIDA 
So do all men, vnlesse they are drunke, sicke, orSo do all men, unless they are drunk, sick, or TC I.ii.17
haue no legges.have no legs. TC I.ii.18
Man. ALEXANDER 
This man Lady, hath rob'd many beastsThis man, lady, hath robbed many beasts TC I.ii.19
of their particular additions, he is as valiant as the Lyon,of their particular additions: he is as valiant as the lion,addition (n.)attribute, mark of honour, distinction [as if added to a coat of arms]TC I.ii.20
churlish as the Beare, slow as the Elephant: a man intochurlish as the bear, slow as the elephant; a man intochurlish (adj.)violent, rough, harshTC I.ii.21
whom nature hath so crowded humors, that his valourwhom nature hath so crowded humours that his valourhumour (n.)
old form: humors
mood, disposition, frame of mind, temperament [as determined by bodily fluids]
TC I.ii.22
is crusht into folly, his folly sauced with discretion:is crushed into folly, his folly sauced with discretion.sauce (v.)spice, season, flavourTC I.ii.23
there is no man hath a vertue, that he hath not aThere is no man hath a virtue that he hath not a TC I.ii.24
glimpse of, nor any man an attaint, but he carries some glimpse of, nor any man an attaint but he carries someattaint (n.)disgrace, dishonour, corruptionTC I.ii.25
glimpse (n.)trace, tinge, pinch
staine of it. He is melancholy without cause, and merrystain of it. He is melancholy without cause, and merrystain (n.)
old form: staine
hint, tinge, dash
TC I.ii.26
against the haire, hee hath the ioynts of euery thing, butagainst the hair; he hath the joints of everything, buthair, against the
old form: haire
against the grain, contrary to inclination
TC I.ii.27
euery thing so out ot ioynt, that hee is a gowtie Briareus, everything so out of joint that he is a gouty Briareus,Briareus (n.)[bri'arius] son of Uranus and Gaea; legendary monster with 100 arms and 50 heads who fought and defeated the Titans for ZeusTC I.ii.28
many hands and no vse; or purblinded Argus, all eyesmany hands and no use, or purblind Argus, all eyesArgus (n.)hundred-eyed guard of Io, a heifer; Hermes killed him to rescue Io, and Hera then transferred his many eyes to the peacock’s tailTC I.ii.29
purblind (adj.)half-blind, dim-sighted
and no sight.and no sight. TC I.ii.30
Cre. CRESSIDA 
But how should this man that makes me But how should this man, that makes me TC I.ii.31
smile, make Hector angry?smile, make Hector angry? TC I.ii.32
Man. ALEXANDER 
They say he yesterday cop'd Hector in theThey say he yesterday coped Hector in thecope, cope with (v.)
old form: cop'd
encounter, face, have to do [with], come into contact [with]
TC I.ii.33
battell and stroke him downe, the disdaind & shamebattle and struck him down, the disdain and shamedisdain (n.)
old form: disdaind
vexation, frustration, wounded feeling
TC I.ii.34
whereof, hath euer since kept Hector fasting andwhereof hath ever since kept Hector fasting andwaking (adj.)awake, wakefulTC I.ii.35
waking.waking. TC I.ii.36
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Who comes here?Who comes here? TC I.ii.37
Man. ALEXANDER 
Madam your Vncle Pandarus.Madam, your uncle Pandarus. TC I.ii.38
Enter Pandarus.Enter Pandarus TC I.ii.39
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Hectors a gallant man.Hector's a gallant man. TC I.ii.39
Man. ALEXANDER 
As may be in the world Lady.As may be in the world, lady. TC I.ii.40
Pan. PANDARUS 
What's that? what's that?What's that? What's that? TC I.ii.41
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Good morrow Vncle Pandarus.Good morrow, uncle Pandarus.morrow (n.)morningTC I.ii.42
Pan. PANDARUS 
Good morrow Cozen Cressid: what do youGood morrow, cousin Cressid. What do you TC I.ii.43
talke of? good morrow Alexander: how do youtalk of? – Good morrow, Alexander. – How do you, TC I.ii.44
Cozen? when were you at Illium?cousin? When were you at Ilium?Ilion, Ilium (n.)poetic names for the city of TroyTC I.ii.45
Cre. CRESSIDA 
This morning Vncle.This morning, uncle. TC I.ii.46
Pan. PANDARUS 
What were you talking of when I came? WasWhat were you talking of when I came? Was TC I.ii.47
Hector arm'd and gon ere yea came to Illium? Hellen Hector armed and gone ere ye came to Ilium? Helen TC I.ii.48
was not vp? was she?was not up, was she? TC I.ii.49
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Hector was gone but Hellen was not vp?Hector was gone, but Helen was not up. TC I.ii.50
Pan. PANDARUS 
E'ene so; Hector was stirring early.E'en so, Hector was stirring early. TC I.ii.51
Cre. CRESSIDA 
That were we talking of, and of his anger.That were we talking of, and of his anger. TC I.ii.52
Pan. PANDARUS 
Was he angry?Was he angry? TC I.ii.53
Cre. CRESSIDA 
So he saies here.So he says here. TC I.ii.54
Exit Alexander TC I.ii.54
Pan. PANDARUS 
True he was so; I know the cause too, heeleTrue, he was so. I know the cause too. He'll TC I.ii.55
lay about him to day I can tell them that, and there's lay about him today, I can tell them that, and there'slay about (v.)strike out, fight hardTC I.ii.56
Troylus will not come farre behind him, let them takeTroilus will not come far behind him; let them take TC I.ii.57
heede of Troylus; I can tell them that too.heed of Troilus, I can tell them that too. TC I.ii.58
Cre. CRESSIDA 
What is he angry too?What is he angry too? TC I.ii.59
Pan. PANDARUS 
Who Troylus? / Troylus is the better man ofWho, Troilus? Troilus is the better man of TC I.ii.60
the two.the two. TC I.ii.61
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Oh Iupiter; there's no comparison.O Jupiter, there's no comparison.Jupiter, Jove (n.)Roman supreme god; associated with the heavens and the weather, especially thunder and lightning; husband of JunoTC I.ii.62
Pan. PANDARUS 
What not betweene Troylus and Hector? doWhat, not between Troilus and Hector? Do TC I.ii.63
you know a man if you see him?you know a man if you see him? TC I.ii.64
Cre. CRESSIDA 
I, if I euer saw him before and knew him.Ay, if I ever saw him before and knew him. TC I.ii.65
Pan. PANDARUS 
Well I say Troylus is Troylus.Well, I say Troilus is Troilus. TC I.ii.66
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Then you say as I say, / For I am sure he is not Then you say as I say, for I am sure he is not TC I.ii.67
Hector.Hector. TC I.ii.68
Pan. PANDARUS 
No not Hector is not Troylus in someNo, nor Hector is not Troilus in some TC I.ii.69
degrees.degrees.degree (n.)respect, way, mannerTC I.ii.70
Cre. CRESSIDA 
'Tis iust, to each of them he is himselfe.'Tis just to each of them; he is himself. TC I.ii.71
Pan. PANDARUS 
Himselfe? alas poore Troylus I would heHimself! Alas, poor Troilus, I would he TC I.ii.72
were.were. TC I.ii.73
Cre. CRESSIDA 
So he is.So he is. TC I.ii.74
Pan. PANDARUS 
Condition I had gone bare-foote to India.Condition, I had gone barefoot to India.condition (n.)provision, stipulation, provisoTC I.ii.75
Cre. CRESSIDA 
He is not Hector.He is not Hector. TC I.ii.76
Pan. PANDARUS 
Himselfe? no? hee's not himselfe, would aHimself? No, he's not himself, would 'a TC I.ii.77
were himselfe: well, the Gods are aboue, time must were himself! Well, the gods are above; time must TC I.ii.78
friend or end: well Troylus well, I would my heartfriend or end. Well, Troilus, well, I would my heartfriend (v.)befriend, sustain, assistTC I.ii.79
were in her body; no, Hector is not a better man then were in her body. No, Hector is not a better man than TC I.ii.80
Troylus.Troilus. TC I.ii.81
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Excuse me.Excuse me. TC I.ii.82
Pan. PANDARUS 
He is elder.He is elder. TC I.ii.83
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Pardon me, pardon me.Pardon me, pardon me. TC I.ii.84
Pan. PANDARUS 
Th'others not come too't, you shall tell meTh' other's not come to't; you shall tell me TC I.ii.85
another tale when th'others come too't: Hector shallanother tale when th' other's come to't. Hector shall TC I.ii.86
not haue his will this yeare.not have his wit this year.wit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityTC I.ii.87
Cre. CRESSIDA 
He shall not neede it if he haue his owne.He shall not need it, if he have his own. TC I.ii.88
Pan. PANDARUS 
Nor his qualities.Nor his qualities. TC I.ii.89
Cre. CRESSIDA 
No matter.No matter. TC I.ii.90
Pan. PANDARUS 
Nor his beautie.Nor his beauty. TC I.ii.91
Cre. CRESSIDA 
'Twould not become him, his own's better.'Twould not become him; his own's better.become (v.)put a good front on, give a pleasing appearance toTC I.ii.92
Pan. PANDARUS 
You haue no iudgement Neece; Hellen her selfeYou have no judgement, niece. Helen herself TC I.ii.93
swore th'other day, that Troylus for a browne fauourswore th' other day that Troilus, for a brown favourbrown (adj.)
old form: browne
of dark complexion, sunburnt, burnished
TC I.ii.94
favour (n.)
old form: fauour
[facial] appearance, countenance, features, looks
(for so 'tis I must confesse) not browne neither. – for so 'tis, I must confess – not brown neither –  TC I.ii.95
Cre. CRESSIDA 
No, but browne.No, but brown. TC I.ii.96
Pan. PANDARUS 
Faith to say truth, browne and not browne.Faith, to say truth, brown and not brown. TC I.ii.97
Cre. CRESSIDA 
To say the truth, true and not true.To say the truth, true and not true. TC I.ii.98
Pan. PANDARUS 
She prais'd his complexion aboue Paris.She praised his complexion above Paris. TC I.ii.99
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Why Paris hath colour inough.Why, Paris hath colour enough. TC I.ii.100
Pan. PANDARUS 
So he has.So he has. TC I.ii.101
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Then Troylus should haue too much, if sheThen Troilus should have too much. If she TC I.ii.102
prasi'd him aboue, his complexion is higher then his,praised him above, his complexion is higher than his; TC I.ii.103
he hauing colour enough, and the other higher, is too he having colour enough, and the other higher, is too TC I.ii.104
flaming a praise for a good complexion, I had as lieue flaming a praise for a good complexion. I had as lieflief, had as
old form: lieue
should like just as much
TC I.ii.105
flaming (adj.)extravagant, high-flown, vividly elaborate
Hellens golden tongue had commended Troylus for aHelen's golden tongue had commended Troilus for acommend (v.)praise, admire, extolTC I.ii.106
copper nose.copper nose.copper (adj.)copper-colouredTC I.ii.107
Pan. PANDARUS 
I sweare to you, / I thinke Hellen loues him betterI swear to you, I think Helen loves him better TC I.ii.108
then Paris.than Paris. TC I.ii.109
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Then shee's a merry Greeke indeed.Then she's a merry Greek indeed.Greek, foolish / merry
old form: Greeke
buffoon, merry person, silly joker
TC I.ii.110
Pan. PANDARUS 
Nay I am sure she does, she came to himNay, I am sure she does. She came to him TC I.ii.111
th'other day into the compast window, and youth' other day into the compassed window – and youcompassed (adj.)
old form: compast
curved, rounded, arched
TC I.ii.112
know he has not past three or foure haires on his chinne.know he has not past three or four hairs on his chin –  TC I.ii.113
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Indeed a Tapsters Arithmetique may soone bringIndeed, a tapster's arithmetic may soon bringtapster (n.)inn waiter, drawer of aleTC I.ii.114
his particulars therein, to a totall.his particulars therein to a total. TC I.ii.115
Pand. PANDARUS 
Why he is very yong, and yet will he withinWhy, he is very young, and yet will he within TC I.ii.116
three pound lift as much as his brother Hector.three pound lift as much as his brother Hector. TC I.ii.117
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Is he is so young a man, and so old a lifter?Is he so young a man, and so old a lifter?lifter (n.)thiefTC I.ii.118
Pan. PANDARUS 
But to prooue to you that Hellen loues him, sheBut to prove to you that Helen loves him, she TC I.ii.119
came and puts me her white hand to his clouen chin.came and puts me her white hand to his cloven chin –  TC I.ii.120
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Iuno haue mercy, how came it clouen?Juno have mercy, how came it cloven?Juno (n.)Roman supreme goddess, wife of Jupiter, associated with the Moon, childbirth, marriage, and female identityTC I.ii.121
Pan. PANDARUS 
Why, you know 'tis dimpled, / I thinke his Why, you know 'tis dimpled – I think his TC I.ii.122
smyling becomes him better then any man in allsmiling becomes him better than any man in allbecome (v.)put a good front on, give a pleasing appearance toTC I.ii.123
Phrigia.Phrygia.Phrygia (n.)[pron: 'frijia] central plateau area of Asia Minor where Troy was situatedTC I.ii.124
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Oh he smiles valiantly.O, he smiles valiantly. TC I.ii.125
Pan. PANDARUS 
Dooes hee not?Does he not? TC I.ii.126
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Oh yes, and 'twere a clow'd in Autumne.O, yes, an 'twere a cloud in autumn.and, an (conj.)as ifTC I.ii.127
Pan. PANDARUS 
Why go to then, but to proue to you that Why, go to, then: but to prove to you that TC I.ii.128
Hellen loues Troylus.Helen loves Troilus –  TC I.ii.129
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Troylus wil stand to thee / Proofe, if youle prooueTroilus will stand to the proof, if you'll proveproof (n.)
old form: Proofe
test, trial
TC I.ii.130
stand to (v.)maintain, uphold, be steadfast in
it so.it so. TC I.ii.131
Pan. PANDARUS 
Troylus? why he esteemes her no more thenTroilus? Why, he esteems her no more than TC I.ii.132
I esteeme an addle egge.I esteem an addle egg.addle (adj.)addled, rotten, putridTC I.ii.133
Cre. CRESSIDA 
If you loue an addle egge as well as you loue anIf you love an addle egg as well as you love an TC I.ii.134
idle head, you would eate chickens i'th' shell.idle head you would eat chickens i'th' shell. TC I.ii.135
Pan. PANDARUS 
I cannot chuse but laugh to thinke how sheI cannot choose but laugh, to think how she TC I.ii.136
tickled his chin, indeed shee has a maruel's whitetickled his chin – indeed, she has a marvellous white TC I.ii.137
hand I must needs confesse.hand, I must needs confess – marvellous (adv.)
old form: maruel's
very, extremely, exceedingly
TC I.ii.138
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Without the racke.Without the rack.rack (n.)
old form: racke
machine of torture which stretches the limbs
TC I.ii.139
Pan. PANDARUS 
And shee takes vpon her to spie a white haire onAnd she takes upon her to spy a white hair ontake upon (v.)
old form: vpon
profess, pretend, affect [oneself]
TC I.ii.140
his chinne.his chin. TC I.ii.141
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Alas poore chin? many a wart is richer.Alas, poor chin, many a wart is richer. TC I.ii.142
Pand. PANDARUS 
But there was such laughing, Queene HecubaBut there was such laughing – Queen Hecuba TC I.ii.143
laught that her eyes ran ore.laughed that her eyes ran o'er –  TC I.ii.144
Cre. CRESSIDA 
With Milstones.With millstones. TC I.ii.145
Pan. PANDARUS 
And Cassandra laught.And Cassandra laughed –  TC I.ii.146
Cre. CRESSIDA 
But there was more temperate fire vnder theBut there was more temperate fire under thetemperate (adj.)calm, moderate, composedTC I.ii.147
pot of her eyes: did her eyes run ore too?pot of her eyes; did her eyes run o'er too? TC I.ii.148
Pan. PANDARUS 
And Hector laught.And Hector laughed. TC I.ii.149
Cre. CRESSIDA 
At what was all this laughing?At what was all this laughing? TC I.ii.150
Pand. PANDARUS 
Marry at the white haire that Hellen spied onMarry, at the white hair that Helen spied onmarry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryTC I.ii.151
Troylus chin.Troilus' chin. TC I.ii.152
Cres. CRESSIDA 
And t'had beene a greene haire, I should haueAn't had been a green hair I should have TC I.ii.153
laught too.laughed too. TC I.ii.154
Pand. PANDARUS 
They laught not so much at the haire, as atThey laughed not so much at the hair as at TC I.ii.155
his pretty answere.his pretty answer.pretty (adj.)clever, ingenious, artfulTC I.ii.156
Cre. CRESSIDA 
What was his answere?What was his answer? TC I.ii.157
Pan. PANDARUS 
Quoth shee, heere's but two and fifty haires onQuoth she: ‘ Here's but two and fifty hairs onquoth (v.)saidTC I.ii.158
your chinne; and one of them is white.your chin, and one of them is white.’ TC I.ii.159
Cre. CRESSIDA 
This is her question.This is her question. TC I.ii.160
Pand PANDARUS 
That's true, make no question of that, twoThat's true, make no question of that. ‘ Two TC I.ii.161
and fiftie haires quoth hee, and one white, that whiteand fifty hairs,’ quoth he, ‘ and one white: that white TC I.ii.162
haire is my Father, and all the rest are his Sonnes. Iupiter hair is my father, and all the rest are his sons.’ ‘ Jupiter,’ TC I.ii.163
quoth she, which of these haires is Paris my husband?quoth she, ‘ which of these hairs is Paris, my husband?’ TC I.ii.164
The forked one quoth he, pluckt out and giue it‘ The forked one,’ quoth he; ‘ pluck't out, and give itforked (adj.)two-hornedTC I.ii.165
him: but there was such laughing, and Hellen sohim.’ But there was such laughing, and Helen so TC I.ii.166
blusht, and Paris so chaft, and all the rest soblushed, and Paris so chafed, and all the rest sochafe (v.)
old form: chaft
enrage, irritate, anger
TC I.ii.167
laught, that it past.laughed, that it passed.pass (v.)
old form: past
surpass, go beyond, outdo
TC I.ii.168
Cre. CRESSIDA 
So let it now, / For is has beene a grcat whileSo let it now; for it has been a great while TC I.ii.169
going by.going by. TC I.ii.170
Pan. PANDARUS 
Well Cozen, / I told you a thing yesterday,Well, cousin, I told you a thing yesterday; TC I.ii.171
think on't.think on't. TC I.ii.172
Cre. CRESSIDA 
So I does.So I do. TC I.ii.173
Pand. PANDARUS 
Ile be sworne 'tis true, he will weepe you anI'll be sworn 'tis true; he will weep you an TC I.ii.174
'twere a man borne in Aprill. Sound a retreate.'twere a man born in April. TC I.ii.175
Cres. CRESSIDA 
And Ile spring vp in his teares , an'twere aAnd I'll spring up in his tears, an 'twere aand, an (conj.)as ifTC I.ii.176
nettle against May.nettle against May. TC I.ii.177

Sound a retreatfield (n.)field of battle, battleground, field of combatTC I.ii.178
Pan. PANDARUS 
Harke they are comming from the field, shalHark, they are coming from the field. Shall TC I.ii.178
we stand vp here and see them, as they passe towardwe stand up here, and see them as they pass toward TC I.ii.179
Illium, good Neece do, sweet Neece Cressida.Ilium? Good niece, do, sweet niece Cressida. TC I.ii.180
Cre. CRESSIDA 
At your pleasure.At your pleasure. TC I.ii.181
Pan. PANDARUS 
Heere, heere, here's an excellent place, heereHere, here, here's an excellent place; here TC I.ii.182
we may see most brauely, Ile tel you them all by theirwe may see most bravely. I'll tell you them all by theirbravely (adv.)
old form: brauely
splendidly, worthily, excellently
TC I.ii.183
names, as they passe by, but marke Troylus aboue the rest. Enter Aneas.names as they pass by, but mark Troilus above the rest.mark (v.)
old form: marke
note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]
TC I.ii.184
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Speake not so low'd.Speak not so loud. TC I.ii.185
Aeneas passes across the stagebrave (adj.)
old form: braue
noble, worthy, excellent
TC I.ii.186
Pan. PANDARUS 
That's Aneas, is not that a braue man, hee'sThat's Aeneas; is not that a brave man? He's TC I.ii.186
one of the flowers of Troy I can you, but marke one of the flowers of Troy, I can tell you, but mark TC I.ii.187
Troylus, you shal see anon.Troilus; you shall see anon.anon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyTC I.ii.188
Enter Antenor.Antenor passes across the stage TC I.ii.189
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Who's that?Who's that? TC I.ii.189
Pan. PANDARUS 
That's Antenor, he has a shrow'd wit I canThat's Antenor. He has a shrewd wit, I canwit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityTC I.ii.190
tell you, and hee's a man good inough, hee's onetell you, and he's a man good enough; he's one TC I.ii.191
o'th soundest iudgement in Troy whosoeuer, and ao'th' soundest judgements in Troy whosoever, and ajudgement (n.)
old form: iudgement
expert, critic, judge
TC I.ii.192
proper man of person: when comes Troylus? Ile shewproper man of person. When comes Troilus? I'll showproper (adj.)good-looking, handsome, comelyTC I.ii.193
person (n.)physical appearance, bodily figure
you Troylus anon, if hee see me, you shall see him him nod atyou Troilus anon; if he see me, you shall see him nod atanon (adv.)soon, shortly, presentlyTC I.ii.194
me.me. TC I.ii.195
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Will he giue you the nod?Will he give you the nod?nod (n.)fool, simpleton, idiotTC I.ii.196
Pan. PANDARUS 
You shall see.You shall see. TC I.ii.197
Cre. CRESSIDA 
If he do, the rich shall haue, more.If he do, the rich shall have more. TC I.ii.198
Enter Hector.Hector passes across the stage TC I.ii.199
Pan. PANDARUS 
That's Hector, that, that, looke you, thatThat's Hector, that, that, look you, that; TC I.ii.199
there's a fellow. Goe thy way Hector, there's athere's a fellow! – Go thy way, Hector! – There's a TC I.ii.200
braue man Neece, O braue Hector! Looke how heebrave man, niece. – O brave Hector! Look how hebrave (adj.)
old form: braue
noble, worthy, excellent
TC I.ii.201
lookes? there's a countenance; ist not a braue man?looks! There's a countenance! Is't not a brave man? TC I.ii.202
Cre. CRESSIDA 
O braue man!O, a brave man! TC I.ii.203
Pan. PANDARUS 
Is a not? It dooes a mans heart good, lookeIs a' not? It does a man's heart good. Look TC I.ii.204
you what hacks are on his Helmet, looke you yonder, doyou what hacks are on his helmet, look you yonder, do TC I.ii.205
you see? Looke you there? There's no iesting,you see? Look you there, there's no jesting; there's TC I.ii.206
laying on, tak't off, who ill as they say, there belaying on, take't off who will, as they say; there belaying on (n.)vigorous attack, dealing of blowsTC I.ii.207
take off (v.)
old form: tak
reduce, diminish, lessen
hacks.hacks! TC I.ii.208
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Be those with Swords?Be those with swords? TC I.ii.209
Pan. PANDARUS 
Swords, any thing he cares not, and the diuellSwords, anything, he cares not; an the devil TC I.ii.210
come to him, it's all one, by Gods lid it dooes onescome to him, it's all one. By God's lid, it does one'slid (n.)eyelidTC I.ii.211
heart good. Yonder comes Paris, yonder comes Paris:heart good. Yonder comes Paris, yonder comes Paris! TC I.ii.212

Paris passes across the stage TC I.ii.213
looke yee yonder Neece, ist not a gallant man to, ist Look ye yonder, niece, is't not a gallant man too, is't TC I.ii.213
not? Why this is braue now: who said he came hurtnot? Why, this is brave now. Who said he came hurtbrave (adj.)noble, worthy, excellentTC I.ii.214
home to day? Hee's not hurt, why this will do Hellens home today? He's not hurt. Why, this will do Helen's TC I.ii.215
heart good now, ha? Would I could see Troylus now,heart good now, ha? Would I could see Troilus now. TC I.ii.216
you shall Troylus anon.You shall see Troilus anon. TC I.ii.217
Enter Hellenus.Helenus passes across the stage TC I.ii.218
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Whose that?Who's that? TC I.ii.218
Pan. PANDARUS 
That's Hellenus, I maruell where Troylus is,That's Helenus – I marvel where Troilus is TC I.ii.219
that's Helenus, I thinke he went not forth to day: – that's Helenus – I think he went not forth today –  TC I.ii.220
that's Hellenus.that's Helenus. TC I.ii.221
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Can Hellenus fight Vncle?Can Helenus fight, uncle? TC I.ii.222
Pan. PANDARUS 
Hellenus no: yes heele fight indifferent,Helenus? No – yes, he'll fight indifferentindifferent (adv.)moderately, tolerably, reasonablyTC I.ii.223
well, I maruell where Troylus is; harke, do you not haerewell – I marvel where Troilus is. Hark, do you not hear TC I.ii.224
the people crie Troylus? Hellenus is a Priest.the people cry ‘ Troilus ’? – Helenus is a priest. TC I.ii.225
Cre. CRESSIDA 
What sneaking fellow comes yonder?What sneaking fellow comes yonder? TC I.ii.226
Enter Trylus.Troilus passes across the stage TC I.ii.227
Pan. PANDARUS 
Where? Yonder? That's Dophobus.'Tis Where? Yonder? That's Deiphobus. – 'Tis TC I.ii.227
Troylus! Ther's a man Neece, hem? Braue Troylus Troilus! There's a man, niece, hem! – Brave Troilus,brave (adj.)
old form: braue
noble, worthy, excellent
TC I.ii.228
the Prince of Chiualrie.the prince of chivalry!chivalry (n.)
old form: Chiualrie
knighthood, knightly qualities
TC I.ii.229
Cre. CRESSIDA 
Peace, for shame peace.Peace, for shame, peace! TC I.ii.230
Pand. PANDARUS 
Marke him, not him: O braue Troylus: lookeMark him, note him. O brave Troilus! Lookmark (v.)
old form: Marke
note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]
TC I.ii.231
well vpon him Neece, looke you how his Sword iswell upon him, niece, look you how his sword is TC I.ii.232
bloudied, and his Helme more hackt then Hectors,bloodied, and his helm more hacked than Hector's,helm (n.)
old form: Helme
helmet
TC I.ii.233
and how he lookes, and how he goes. O admirableand how he looks, and how he goes! O admirable TC I.ii.234
youth! he ne're saw three and twenty. Go thy way youth! He ne'er saw three and twenty. – Go thy way, TC I.ii.235
Troylus, go thy way, had I a sister were a Grace, or aTroilus, go thy way! – Had I a sister were a grace, or agrace (n.)model of beauty, exquisite being [as one of the Three Graces]TC I.ii.236
daughter a Goddesse, hee should take his choice. Odaughter a goddess, he should take his choice. O TC I.ii.237
admirable man! Paris? Paris is durt to him, and Iadmirable man! Paris? – Paris is dirt to him, and I TC I.ii.238
warrant, Helen to change, would giue money to boot.warrant Helen, to change, would give an eye to boot.warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmTC I.ii.239
boot, toin addition, as well
change (v.)exchange, trade
Enter common Souldiers.Common soldiers pass across the stage TC I.ii.240
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Heere come more.Here come more. TC I.ii.240
Pan. PANDARUS 
Asses, fooles, dolts, chaffe and bran, chaffe andAsses, fools, dolts; chaff and bran, chaff and TC I.ii.241
bran; porredge after meat. I could liue and dye i'th'bran; porridge after meat! I could live and die i'the TC I.ii.242
eyes of Troylus. Ne're looke, ne're looke; the Eagles areeyes of Troilus. Ne'er look, ne'er look, the eagles are TC I.ii.243
gon, Crowes and Dawes, Crowes and Dawes: I had rathergone; crows and daws, crows and daws! – I had ratherdaw (n.)
old form: Dawes
jackdaw [as noted for its stupidity]; dolt, fool
TC I.ii.244
be such a man as Troylus, then Agamemnon, and allbe such a man as Troilus than Agamemnon and allAgamemnon (n.)[pron: aga'memnon] commander of the Greek forces at Troy, married to ClytemnestraTC I.ii.245
Greece.Greece. TC I.ii.246
Cres. CRESSIDA 
There is among the Greekes Achilles, a betterThere is among the Greeks Achilles, a betterAchilles (n.)[pron: a'kileez] son of Peleus and Thetis; only his spear could heal the wounds it madeTC I.ii.247
man then Troylus.man than Troilus. TC I.ii.248
Pan. PANDARUS 
Achilles? a Dray-man, a Porter, a very Camell.Achilles? A drayman, a porter, a very camel!drayman (n.)
old form: Dray-man
man who drives a cart without wheels [a dray]
TC I.ii.249
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Well, well.Well, well. TC I.ii.250
Pan. PANDARUS 
Well, well? Why haue you any discretion?Well, well! Why, have you any discretion? TC I.ii.251
haue you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is notHave you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not TC I.ii.252
birth, b auty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning,birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood, learning,discourse (n.)rationality, faculty of understandingTC I.ii.253
gentlenesse, vertue, youth, liberality, and so forth:gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and so forthgentleness (n.)
old form: gentlenesse
nobility, good breeding, courtesy
TC I.ii.254
the Spice, and salt that seasons a man?the spice and salt that season a man? TC I.ii.255
Cres. CRESSIDA 
I, a minc'd man, and then to be bak'd withAy, a minced man; and then to be baked withminced (adj.)
old form: minc'd
cut up into little pieces for baking
TC I.ii.256
no Date in the pye, for then the mans dates out.no date in the pie, for then the man's date is out. TC I.ii.257
Pan. PANDARUS 
You are such another woman, one knowesYou are such another woman! One knows TC I.ii.258
not at what ward you lye.not at what ward you lie.ward (n.)[fencing] defensive posture, parrying movementTC I.ii.259
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Vpon my backe, to defend my belly; vpon myUpon my back to defend my belly; upon my TC I.ii.260
wit, to defend my wiles; vppon my secrecy, to defendwit to defend my wiles; upon my secrecy to defendwit (n.)intelligence, wisdom, good sense, mental abilityTC I.ii.261
mine honesty; my Maske, to defend my beauty, and youmine honesty; my mask to defend my beauty, and youmask (n.)
old form: Maske
barrier worn to protect the complexion against the sun
TC I.ii.262
honesty (n.)virtue, chastity
to defend all these: and at all these wardes I lye at, at ato defend all these: and at all these wards I lie, at a TC I.ii.263
thousand watches.thousand watches.watch (n.)sleepless state, wakefulnessTC I.ii.264
Pan. PANDARUS 
Say one of your watches.Say one of your watches. TC I.ii.265
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Nay Ile watch you for that, and that's one ofNay, I'll watch you for that; and that's one of TC I.ii.266
the cheefest of them too: If I cannot ward what I wouldthe chiefest of them too. If I cannot ward what I wouldward (v.)protect, defend, guardTC I.ii.267
not haue hit, I can watch you for telling how I took thenot have hit, I can watch you for telling how I took the TC I.ii.268
blow, vnlesse it swell past hiding, and then it's past blow – unless it swell past hiding, and then it's past TC I.ii.269
watching.watching. TC I.ii.270
Pan. PANDARUS 
You are such another.You are such another! TC I.ii.271
Enter Boy.Enter Troilus's Boy TC I.ii.272
Boy. BOY 
Sir, my Lord would instantly speake with you.Sir, my lord would instantly speak with you. TC I.ii.272
Pan. PANDARUS 
Where?Where? TC I.ii.273
Boy. BOY 
At your owne house.At your own house; there he unarms him.unarm (v.)disarm, remove armourTC I.ii.274
Pan. PANDARUS 
Good Boy tell him I come,Good boy, tell him I come. TC I.ii.275
Exit Boy TC I.ii.275
I doubt he bee hurt. / Fare ye well good Neece.I doubt he be hurt. Fare you well, good niece.doubt (v.)fear, be afraid [for], feel anxious [for]TC I.ii.276
fare ... well (int.)goodbye [to an individual]
Cres. CRESSIDA 
Adieu Vnkle.Adieu, uncle. TC I.ii.277
Pan. PANDARUS 
Ile be with you Neece by and by.I'll be with you, niece, by and by.by and by (adv.)shortly, soon, before longTC I.ii.278
Cres. CRESSIDA 
To bring Vnkle.To bring, uncle? TC I.ii.279
Pan. PANDARUS 
I, a token from Troylus.Ay, a token from Troilus.token (n.)keepsake, present, mementoTC I.ii.280
Exit Pand.Exit TC I.ii.280
Cres. CRESSIDA 
By the same token, you are a Bawd. By the same token you are a bawd.bawd (n.)pimp, procurer, pander, go-betweenTC I.ii.281
Words, vowes, gifts, teares, & loues full sacrifice,Words, vows, gifts, tears, and love's full sacrifice TC I.ii.282
He offers in anothers enterprise:He offers in another's enterprise; TC I.ii.283
But more in Troylus thousand fold I see,But more in Troilus thousandfold I see TC I.ii.284
Then in the glasse of Pandar's praise may be;Than in the glass of Pandar's praise may be.glass (n.)
old form: glasse
mirror, looking-glass
TC I.ii.285
Yet hold I off. Women are Angels wooing,Yet hold I off. Women are angels, wooing; TC I.ii.286
Things won are done, ioyes soule lyes in the dooing:Things won are done; joy's soul lies in the doing. TC I.ii.287
That she belou'd, knowes nought, that knowes not this;That she beloved knows naught that knows not this: TC I.ii.288
Men prize the thing vngain'd, more then it is.Men prize the thing ungained more than it is. TC I.ii.289
That she was neuer yet, that euer knewThat she was never yet that ever knew TC I.ii.290
Loue got so sweet, as when desire did sue:Love got so sweet as when desire did sue; TC I.ii.291
Therefore this maxime out of loue I teach;Therefore this maxim out of love I teach: TC I.ii.292
"Atchieuement, is command; vngain'd, beseech.‘ Achievement is command; ungained, beseech.’achievement (n.)
old form: Atchieuement
feat, accomplishment, successful action
TC I.ii.293
beseech (n.)beseeching, entreaty, petition
That though my hearts Contents firme loue doth beare,Then, though my heart's content firm love doth bear,content (n.)pleasure, satisfaction, happinessTC I.ii.294
Nothing of that shall from mine eyes appeare. Nothing of that shall from mine eyes appear. TC I.ii.295
Exit.Exit TC I.ii.295
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