King Lear
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Enter Kent, and Gloucester.Enter Kent and Gloucester KL III.vi.1
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Heere is better then the open ayre,t ake itHere is better than the open air. Take it KL III.vi.1
thankfully: I will peece out the comfort with whatthankfully; I will piece out the comfort with whatpiece out (v.)
old form: peece
augment, increase, supplement
KL III.vi.2
addition I can: I will not be long from you. addition I can. I will not be long from you. KL III.vi.3
Kent. KENT 
All the powre of his wits, haue giuen way to his impatience: All the power of his wits have given way to his impatience.wits, also five witsfaculties of the mind (common wit, imagination, fantasy, estimation, memory) or body (the five senses)KL III.vi.4
the Gods reward your kindnesse.The gods reward your kindness! KL III.vi.5
ExitExit Gloucester KL III.vi.5
Enter Lear, Edgar, and Foole.Enter Lear, Edgar, and the Fool KL III.vi.6.1
Edg. EDGAR 
Fraterretto cals me, and tells me Nero is an AnglerFraterretto calls me and tells me Nero is an anglerNero (n.)[pron: 'neeroh] Roman emperor, 1st-c, who slew his mother, Agrippina; said to have played on his lute while watching Rome burn; considered a model of crueltyKL III.vi.6
Frateretto, Fraterretto (n.)[pron: frate'retoh] in Christian tradition, the name of a devil
in the Lake of Darknesse: pray Innocent, and beware thein the lake of darkness. Pray, innocent, and beware the KL III.vi.7
foule Fiend.foul fiend. KL III.vi.8
Foole. FOOL 
Prythee Nunkle tell me, whether a madman be aPrithee, nuncle, tell me whether a madman be a KL III.vi.9
Gentleman, or a Yeoman.gentleman or a yeoman.yeoman (n.)man who owns property but is not a gentleman; land-holding farmerKL III.vi.10
Lear. LEAR 
A King, a King.A king, a king! KL III.vi.11
Foole. FOOL 
No, he's a Yeoman, that ha's a Gentleman to his Sonne:No! He's a yeoman that has a gentleman to his son; KL III.vi.12
for hee's a mad Yeoman that sees his Sonne a Gentlemanfor he's a mad yeoman that sees his son a gentleman KL III.vi.13
before him.before him. KL III.vi.14
Lear. LEAR 
To haue a thousand with red burning spitsTo have a thousand with red burning spits KL III.vi.15
Come hizzing in vpon 'em.Come hissing in upon 'em! KL III.vi.16
EDGAR 
The foul fiend bites my back. KL III.vi.17
FOOL 
He's mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a KL III.vi.18
horse's health, a boy's love, or a whore's oath. KL III.vi.19
LEAR 
It shall be done; I will arraign them straight.arraign (v.)put on trial, indictKL III.vi.20
straight (adv.)straightaway, immediately, at once
(To Edgar) KL III.vi.21.1
Come, sit thou here, most learned justicer.justicer (n.)judgeKL III.vi.21
(To the Fool) KL III.vi.22.1
Thou sapient sir, sit here. No, you she-foxes – sapient (adj.)wise, learned, eruditeKL III.vi.22
EDGAR 
Look where he stands and glares! Want'st thouwant (v.)lack, need, be withoutKL III.vi.23
eyes at trial, madam? KL III.vi.24
(sings) KL III.vi.25
Come o'er the burn, Bessy, to me. KL III.vi.25
FOOL  
(sings) KL III.vi.26
Her boat hath a leak KL III.vi.26
And she must not speak KL III.vi.27
Why she dares not come over to thee. KL III.vi.28
EDGAR 
The foul fiend haunts Poor Tom in the voice of a KL III.vi.29
nightingale. Hoppedance cries in Tom's belly for two KL III.vi.30
white herring. Croak not, black angel! I have no food forcroak (v.)rumble, growlKL III.vi.31
white (adj.)fresh, unsmoked
thee. KL III.vi.32
KENT 
How do you, sir? Stand you not so amazed.amazed (adj.)dumbfounded, stunned, thunderstruck, overwhelmedKL III.vi.33
Will you lie down and rest upon the cushings?cushing (n.)cushionKL III.vi.34
LEAR 
I'll see their trial first; bring in their evidence.evidence (n.)evidence against someone, witnesses for the prosecutionKL III.vi.35
(To Edgar) KL III.vi.36
Thou robed man of justice, take thy place. KL III.vi.36
(To the Fool) KL III.vi.37.1
And thou, his yokefellow of equity,equity (n.)justice, impartiality, fairnessKL III.vi.37
yoke-fellow (n.)fellow-worker, comrade, partner
Bench by his side. (To Kent) You are o'the commission;bench (v.)take a seat on the benchKL III.vi.38
commission (n.)formal body comprising justices of the peace
Sit you too. KL III.vi.39
EDGAR 
Let us deal justly. KL III.vi.40
Sleepest or wakest thou, jolly shepherd? KL III.vi.41
Thy sheep be in the corn, KL III.vi.42
And for one blast of thy minikin mouthminikin (adj.)shrill; or: dainty, tinyKL III.vi.43
Thy sheep shall take no harm. KL III.vi.44
Pur, the cat is gray. KL III.vi.45
LEAR 
Arraign her first. 'Tis Gonerill! I here take my oatharraign (v.)put on trial, indictKL III.vi.46
before this honourable assembly she kicked the poor KL III.vi.47
King her father. KL III.vi.48
FOOL 
Come hither, mistress. Is your name Gonerill? KL III.vi.49
LEAR 
She cannot deny it. KL III.vi.50
FOOL 
Cry you mercy, I took you for a joint-stool.joint-stool, join-stool, joined-stool (n.)well-made stool [by a joiner] [also used in phrases of ridicule]KL III.vi.51
LEAR 
And here's another whose warped looks proclaimwarped (adj.)twisted, distortedKL III.vi.52
What store her heart is made on. Stop her there!make on (v.)make of, compose, formKL III.vi.53
store (n.)abundance, plenty, surplus, quantity
Arms, arms, sword, fire! Corruption in the place! KL III.vi.54
False justicer, why hast thou let her 'scape?scape, 'scape (v.)escape, avoidKL III.vi.55
justicer (n.)judge
false (adj.)treacherous, traitorous, perfidious
Edg. EDGAR 
Blesse thy fiue wits.Bless thy five wits!wits, also five wits
old form: fiue
faculties of the mind (common wit, imagination, fantasy, estimation, memory) or body (the five senses)
KL III.vi.56
Kent. KENT 
O pitty: Sir, where is the patience nowO pity! Sir, where is the patience now KL III.vi.57
That you so oft haue boasted to retaine?That you so oft have boasted to retain?oft (adv.)oftenKL III.vi.58
Edg. EDGAR  
(aside) KL III.vi.59
My teares begin to take his part so much,My tears begin to take his part so much KL III.vi.59
They marre my counterfetting.They mar my counterfeiting. KL III.vi.60
Lear. LEAR 
The little dogges, and all;The little dogs and all –  KL III.vi.61
Trey, Blanch, and Sweet-heart: see, they barke at me. Trey, Blanch, and Sweetheart – see, they bark at me. KL III.vi.62
Edg. EDGAR 
Tom, will throw his head at them: Auaunt youTom will throw his head at them. Avaunt, youavaunt (int.)
old form: Auaunt
begone, go away, be off
KL III.vi.63
Curres,curs! KL III.vi.64
be thy mouth or blacke or white:Be thy mouth or black or white, KL III.vi.65
Tooth that poysons if it bite:Tooth that poisons if it bite, KL III.vi.66
Mastiffe, Grey-hound, Mongrill, Grim,Mastiff, greyhound, mongrel grim, KL III.vi.67
Hound or Spaniell, Brache, or Hym:Hound or spaniel, brach or lym,brach (n.)
old form: Brache
hound [which hunts by scent], bitch
KL III.vi.68
lym (n.)
old form: Hym
[doubtful reading] bloodhound
Or Bobtaile tight, or Troudle taile,Or bobtail tike, or trundle-tail,bobtail (adj.)
old form: Bobtaile
with a docked tail
KL III.vi.69
tike (n.)cur, mongrel
trundle-tail (n.)
old form: Troudle taile
dog with a trailing tail, curly-tailed dog
Tom will make him weepe and waile,Tom will make him weep and wail; KL III.vi.70
For with throwing thus my head;For, with throwing thus my head, KL III.vi.71
Dogs leapt the hatch, and all are fled.Dogs leapt the hatch and all are fled.hatch (n.)lower part of a door, half-door, gateKL III.vi.72
Do, de, de, de: sese: Come, march to Wakes and Fayres,Do de, de, de. Sese! Come, march to wakes and fairswake (n.)festival, revel, feteKL III.vi.73
sessa, sesey, sese (int.)[cry of encouragement used in hunting, fencing] be off, off you go
And Market Townes: poore Tom thy horne is dry,and market-towns. Poor Tom, thy horn is dry.horn (n.)
old form: horne
drinking-horn
KL III.vi.74
Lear. LEAR 
Then let them Anatomize Regan: See what breedsThen let them anatomize Regan, see what breedsanatomize, annothanize (v.)dissect, reveal, lay openKL III.vi.75
about her heart. Is there any cause in Nature that makeabout her heart. Is there any cause in nature that makesnature (n.)human natureKL III.vi.76
these hard-hearts. You sir, I entertaine for one of my hundred; these hard hearts? You, sir, I entertain for one of my hundred.entertain (v.)
old form: entertaine
hire, employ, maintain, take into service
KL III.vi.77
only, I do not like the fashion of your garments.Only I do not like the fashion of your garments. KL III.vi.78
You will say they are Persian; but let them bee chang'd.You will say they are Persian; but let them be changed. KL III.vi.79
Kent. KENT 
Now good my Lord, lye heere, and rest awhile.Now, good my lord, lie here and rest awhile. KL III.vi.80
Lear. LEAR 
Make no noise, make no noise, draw the Curtaines: Make no noise, make no noise; draw the curtains. KL III.vi.81
so, so, wee'l go to Supper i'th'morning.So, so. We'll to supper i'the morning. KL III.vi.82
Foole. FOOL 
And Ile go to bed at noone.And I'll go to bed at noon. KL III.vi.83
Enter Gloster.Enter Gloucester KL III.vi.84
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Come hither Friend: / Where is the King my Master?Come hither, friend. Where is the King my master? KL III.vi.84
Kent. KENT 
Here Sir, but trouble him not, his wits are gon.Here, sir; but trouble him not; his wits are gone.wits, also five witsfaculties of the mind (common wit, imagination, fantasy, estimation, memory) or body (the five senses)KL III.vi.85
Glou. GLOUCESTER 
Good friend, I prythee take him in thy armes;Good friend, I prithee, take him in thy arms; KL III.vi.86
I haue ore-heard a plot of death vpon him:I have o'erheard a plot of death upon him. KL III.vi.87
There is a Litter ready, lay him in't,There is a litter ready; lay him in'tlitter (n.)[transportable] bed, couchKL III.vi.88
And driue toward Douer friend, where thou shalt meeteAnd drive toward Dover, friend, where thou shalt meetdrive (v.)
old form: driue
hasten, fly, move off quickly
KL III.vi.89
Both welcome, and protection. Take vp thy Master,Both welcome and protection. Take up thy master; KL III.vi.90
If thou should'st dally halfe an houre, his lifeIf thou shouldst dally half an hour, his life,dally (v.)delay, linger, loiterKL III.vi.91
With thine, and all that offer to defend him,With thine and all that offer to defend him, KL III.vi.92
Stand in assured losse. Take vp, take vp,Stand in assured loss. Take up, take up,assured (adj.)certain, definite, sureKL III.vi.93
stand (v.)continue, remain, wait, stay put
loss (n.)
old form: losse
perdition, destruction
And follow me, that will to some prouisionAnd follow me, that will to some provisionprovision (n.)
old form: prouision
supply of necessities
KL III.vi.94
Giue thee quicke conduct. Come, come, away. Give thee quick conduct.conduct (n.)guidance, directionKL III.vi.95.1
ExeuntKENT 
Oppressed nature sleeps. KL III.vi.95.2
This rest might yet have balmed thy broken sinewsbalm (v.)soothe, relieve, healKL III.vi.96
sinew (n.)nerve
Which, if convenience will not allow,convenience (n.)opportunity, occasion, suitable momentKL III.vi.97
Stand in hard cure. (To the Fool) Come, help to bear thy master.cure (n.)state of health, condition, soundnessKL III.vi.98
stand (v.)continue, remain, wait, stay put
hard (adj.)difficult, not easy [to obtain]
Thou must not stay behind. KL III.vi.99.1
GLOUCESTER 
Come, come, away! KL III.vi.99.2
Exeunt Kent, Gloucester, and the Fool, KL III.vi.99.1
bearing off the King KL III.vi.99.2
EDGAR 
When we our betters see bearing our woes, KL III.vi.100
We scarcely think our miseries our foes. KL III.vi.101
Who alone suffers, suffers most i'the mind, KL III.vi.102
Leaving free things and happy shows behind;show (n.)spectacle, display, ceremonyKL III.vi.103
free (adj.)free of worry, untroubled, carefree
But then the mind much sufferance doth o'erskipoverskip (v.)pass over without noticing, jump lightly overKL III.vi.104
sufferance (n.)distress, suffering, hardship
When grief hath mates, and bearing fellowship.bearing (n.)carrying of hardships, enduring of woesKL III.vi.105
mate (n.)companion, associate, comrade
How light and portable my pain seems now,portable (adj.)bearable, supportable, endurableKL III.vi.106
When that which makes me bend makes the King bow –  KL III.vi.107
He childed as I fathered. Tom, away!child (v.)be dealt with by childrenKL III.vi.108
father (v.)be dealt with by a father
Mark the high noises, and thyself bewraybewray (v.)show, unmask, make knownKL III.vi.109
noise (n.)report, rumour, news
mark (v.)note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]
high (adj.)important, major, special
When false opinion, whose wrong thoughts defile thee,opinion (n.)public opinion, popular judgementKL III.vi.110
false (adj.)wrong, mistaken
In thy just proof repeals and reconciles thee.proof (n.)making good, showing to be loyalKL III.vi.111
repeal (v.)recall, call back [from exile]
What will hap more tonight, safe 'scape the King!scape, 'scape (v.)escape, avoidKL III.vi.112
hap (v.)happen, take place, come to pass
Lurk, lurk!lurk (v.)keep hidden, stay out of sightKL III.vi.113
Exit KL III.vi.113
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