Twelfth Night
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Enter Sir Toby, Sir Andrew, and Fabian.Enter Sir Toby, Sir Andrew, and Fabian TN II.v.1.1
To. SIR TOBY 
Come thy wayes Signior Fabian.Come thy ways, Signor Fabian.ways, come thy / yourcome alongTN II.v.1
Fab. FABIAN 
Nay Ile come: if I loose a scruple of this sport,Nay, I'll come. If I lose a scruple of this sport,scruple (n.)tiny amount, last ounceTN II.v.2
sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainment
let me be boyl'd to death with Melancholly.let me be boiled to death with melancholy. TN II.v.3
To. SIR TOBY 
Wouldst thou not be glad to haue the niggardly Wouldst thou not be glad to have the niggardly,niggardly (adj.)mean-minded, tight-fisted, miserlyTN II.v.4
Rascally sheepe-biter, come by some notable rascally sheep-biter come by some notablesheep-biter (n.)
old form: sheepe-biter
thievish fellow, shifty individual
TN II.v.5
shame?shame? TN II.v.6
Fa. FABIAN 
I would exult man: you know he brought me I would exult, man. You know he brought me TN II.v.7
out o'fauour with my Lady, about a Beare-baiting heere.out o' favour with my lady about a bear-baiting here. TN II.v.8
To. SIR TOBY 
To anger him wee'l haue the Beare againe, andTo anger him, we'll have the bear again, and TN II.v.9
we will foole him blacke and blew, shall we not sir we will fool him black and blue – shall we not, Sir TN II.v.10
Andrew? Andrew? TN II.v.11
An. SIR ANDREW 
And we do not, it is pittie of our liues.An we do not, it is pity of our lives.and, an (conj.)if, whetherTN II.v.12
Enter Maria.Enter Maria TN II.v.13.1
To. SIR TOBY 
Heere comes the little villaine: How now myHere comes the little villain. How now, myvillain (n.)scoundrel, rogue, rascalTN II.v.13
Mettle of India?metal of India?metal of India
old form: Mettle
pure gold
TN II.v.14
Mar. MARIA 
Get ye all three into the box tree: Maluolio'sGet ye all three into the box-tree. Malvolio'sbox-tree
old form: box tree
type of ornamental thick shrub
TN II.v.15
comming downe this walke, he has beene yonder i'the Sunne coming down this walk, he has been yonder i'the sun TN II.v.16
practising behauiour to his own shadow this halfe houre: practising behaviour to his own shadow this half-hour. TN II.v.17
obserue him for the loue of Mockerie: for I know this Observe him, for the love of mockery, for I know this TN II.v.18
Letter wil make a contemplatiue Ideot of him. Close in letter will make a contemplative idiot of him. Close, inclose (adv.)safely, secretly, out of sightTN II.v.19
contemplative (adj.)
old form: contemplatiue
vacant, vacuous, mindlessly gazing
the name of ieasting, the name of jesting! TN II.v.20
The men hide. Maria throws down a letter TN II.v.21
lye thou there: for heere comes the Trowt, that must be Lie thou there – for here comes the trout that must be TN II.v.21
caught with tickling. caught with tickling.tickling (n.)flattery, gratifying, pleasingTN II.v.22
ExitExit TN II.v.22
Enter Maluolio.Enter Malvolio TN II.v.23
Mal. MALVOLIO 
'Tis but Fortune, all is fortune. Maria once'Tis but fortune, all is fortune. Maria once TN II.v.23
told me she did affect me, and I haue heard her self told me she did affect me; and I have heard herselfaffect (v.)incline to, like, favour, be drawn toTN II.v.24
come thus neere, that should shee fancie, it should bee one come thus near, that should she fancy, it should be onefancy (v.)
old form: fancie
like, love, admire
TN II.v.25
of my complection. Besides she vses me with a more of my complexion. Besides, she uses me with a morecomplexion (n.)
old form: complection
appearance, look, colouring
TN II.v.26
use (v.)
old form: vses
treat, deal with, manage
exalted respect, then any one else that followes her. Whatexalted respect than anyone else that follows her. What TN II.v.27
should I thinke on't?should I think on't? TN II.v.28
To. SIR TOBY 
Heere's an ouer-weening rogue.Here's an overweening rogue!overweening (adj.)
old form: ouer-weening
arrogant, overambitious, high and mighty
TN II.v.29
Fa. FABIAN 
Oh peace: Contemplation makes a rare Turkey Cocke O, peace! Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock TN II.v.30
of him, how he iets vnder his aduanc'd plumes.of him; how he jets under his advanced plumes!advanced (adj.)
old form: aduanc'd
raised up, held high, uplifted
TN II.v.31
jet (v.)
old form: iets
strut, swagger, parade
And. SIR ANDREW 
Slight I could so beate the Rogue.'Slight, I could so beat the rogue! TN II.v.32
To. SIR TOBY 
Peace I say.Peace, I say! TN II.v.33
Mal. MALVOLIO 
To be Count Maluolio.To be Count Malvolio . . . TN II.v.34
To. SIR TOBY 
Ah Rogue.Ah, rogue! TN II.v.35
An. SIR ANDREW 
Pistoll him, pistoll him.Pistol him, pistol him!pistol (v.)
old form: pistoll
shoot with a pistol
TN II.v.36
To. SIR TOBY 
Peace, peace.Peace, peace! TN II.v.37
Mal. MALVOLIO 
There is example for't: The Lady of the There is example for't. The lady of theexample (n.)precedent, parallel caseTN II.v.38
Strachy, married the yeoman of the wardrobe.Strachy married the yeoman of the wardrobe.Strachy (n.)[unknown meaning] possibly a local house or institutionTN II.v.39
yeoman (n.)keeper of the wardrobe
An. SIR ANDREW 
Fie on him Iezabel.Fie on him! Jezebel!Jezebel (n.)in the Bible, the infamous wife of King AhabTN II.v.40
Fa. FABIAN 
O peace, now he's deepely in: looke how O, peace! Now he's deeply in. Look howdeeply (adv.)
old form: deepely
profoundly, thoroughly, sincerely
TN II.v.41
imagination blowes him.imagination blows him.blow (v.)
old form: blowes
puff up, swell, inflate
TN II.v.42
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Hauing beene three moneths married to her,Having been three months married to her, TN II.v.43
sitting in my state.sitting in my state . . .state (n.)throne, chair of stateTN II.v.44
To. SIR TOBY 
O for a stone-bow to hit him in the eye.O for a stone-bow to hit him in the eye!stone-bow (n.)type of cross-bow which shoots stones, catapultTN II.v.45
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Calling my Officers about me, in my branch'dCalling my officers about me, in my branchedbranched
old form: branch'd
embroidered, brocaded
TN II.v.46
Veluet gowne: hauing come from a day bedde, where I haue velvet gown, having come from a day-bed, where I haveday-bed (n.)
old form: day bedde
couch, sofa, divan
TN II.v.47
left Oliuia sleeping.left Olivia sleeping . . . TN II.v.48
To. SIR TOBY 
Fire and Brimstone.Fire and brimstone! TN II.v.49
Fa. FABIAN 
O peace, peace.O, peace, peace! TN II.v.50
Mal. MALVOLIO 
And then to haue the humor of state: and And then to have the humour of state; andstate (n.)status, rank, positionTN II.v.51
humour (n.)
old form: humor
style, method, way, fashion
after a demure trauaile of regard: telling them I knowe myafter a demure travel of regard – telling them I know mydemure (adj.)grave, serious, sober, solemnTN II.v.52
regard (n.)look, glance, gaze
travail, travel (n.)
old form: trauaile
movement, motion, passage
place, as I would they should doe theirs: to aske for myplace, as I would they should do theirs – to ask for my TN II.v.53
kinsman Toby.kinsman Toby. TN II.v.54
To. SIR TOBY 
Boltes and shackles.Bolts and shackles! TN II.v.55
Fa. FABIAN 
Oh peace, peace, peace, now, now.O, peace, peace, peace! Now, now! TN II.v.56
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Seauen of my people with an obedient start,Seven of my people, with an obedient start,start (n.)starting up, immediate reaction, sudden movementTN II.v.57
make out for him: I frowne the while, and perchancemake out for him. I frown the while, and perchancemake out (v.)go, go outTN II.v.58
perchance (adv.)perhaps, maybe
winde vp my watch, or play with my wind up my watch, or play with my (fingering his TN II.v.59
some rich Iewell: Toby steward's chain of office) – some rich jewel. Toby TN II.v.60
approaches; curtsies there to me.approaches, curtsies there to me . . .curtsy, curtsey (v.)bow low, do reverence, pay respectTN II.v.61
To. SIR TOBY 
Shall this fellow liue?Shall this fellow live? TN II.v.62
Fa. FABIAN 
Though our silence be drawne from vs with cars,Though our silence be drawn from us with cars,car (n.)carriage, cart, chariot [often of the sun god]TN II.v.63
yet peace.yet peace! TN II.v.64
Mal. MALVOLIO 
I extend my hand to him thus: quenching I extend my hand to him thus – quenching TN II.v.65
my familiar smile with an austere regard of controll.my familiar smile with an austere regard of control . . .regard (n.)look, glance, gazeTN II.v.66
To. SIR TOBY 
And do's not Toby take you a blow o'the lippes,And does not Toby take you a blow o'the lips TN II.v.67
then?then? TN II.v.68
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Saying, Cosine Toby, my Fortunes hauing Saying, Cousin Toby, my fortunes having TN II.v.69
cast me on your Neece, giue me this prerogatiue of cast me on your niece give me this prerogative of TN II.v.70
speech.speech . . . TN II.v.71
To. SIR TOBY 
What, what?What, what! TN II.v.72
Mal. MALVOLIO 
You must amend your drunkennesse.You must amend your drunkenness. TN II.v.73
To. SIR TOBY 
Out scab.Out, scab!scab (n.)scurvy fellow, scoundrel, villainTN II.v.74
Fab. FABIAN 
Nay patience, or we breake the sinewes of our plot?Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.sinew (n.)
old form: sinewes
mainstay, support, main strength
TN II.v.75
Mal. MALVOLIO 
Besides you waste the treasure of your time,Besides, you waste the treasure of your time TN II.v.76
with a foolish knight.with a foolish knight . . . TN II.v.77
And. SIR ANDREW 
That's mee I warrant you.That's me, I warrant you.warrant (v.)assure, promise, guarantee, confirmTN II.v.78
Mal. MALVOLIO 
One sir Andrew.One Sir Andrew. TN II.v.79
And. SIR ANDREW 
I knew 'twas I, for many do call mee foole.I knew 'twas I, for many do call me fool. TN II.v.80
Mal. MALVOLIO  
(picks up the letter) TN II.v.81.1
What employment haueWhat employment haveemployment (n.)matter, business, affairTN II.v.81
we heere?we here? TN II.v.82
Fa. FABIAN 
Now is the Woodcocke neere the gin.Now is the woodcock near the gin.woodcock (n.)
old form: Woodcocke
type of game bird, thought to be easily tricked or snared; simpleton
TN II.v.83
gin (n.)snare, trap
To. SIR TOBY 
Oh peace, and the spirit of humors intimate O, peace, and the spirit of humours intimatehumour (n.)
old form: humors
fancy, whim, inclination, caprice
TN II.v.84
reading aloud to him.reading aloud to him! TN II.v.85
Mal. MALVOLIO 
By my life this is my Ladies hand: these bee By my life, this is my lady's hand. These be TN II.v.86
her very C's, her V's, and her T's, and thus makes shee her very C's, her U's and her T's; and thus makes she TN II.v.87
her great P's. It is in contempt of question her hand.her great P's. It is, in contempt of question, her hand.question, in contempt ofwithout the shadow of a doubtTN II.v.88
An. SIR ANDREW 
Her C's, her V's, and her T's: why that?Her C's, her U's and her T's? Why that? TN II.v.89
Mal. MALVOLIO  
(reads) TN II.v.90
To the vnknowne belou'd, this, and my good Wishes:To the unknown beloved this, and my good wishes. TN II.v.90
Her very Phrases: By your leaue wax. Soft, and the Her very phrases! By your leave, wax. Soft! and thesoft (adv.)[used as a command] not so fast, wait a moment, be quietTN II.v.91
impressure her Lucrece, with which she vses to seale: impressure her Lucrece, with which she uses to seal.Lucrece, Lucretia (n.)[lu'krees] legendary Roman heroine, 6th-c BC, who killed herself after being raped by TarquinTN II.v.92
impressure (n.)imprint, impression, indentation, stamp
seal (v.)
old form: seale
mark by seal, put one's name to, agree
tis my Lady: To whom should this be?'Tis my lady! To whom should this be? TN II.v.93
Fab. FABIAN 
This winnes him, Liuer and all.This wins him, liver and all. TN II.v.94
Mal. MALVOLIO  
(reads) TN II.v.95
Ioue knowes I loue, Jove knows I love; TN II.v.95
but who, But who? TN II.v.96
Lips do not mooue, Lips, do not move; TN II.v.97
no man must know. No man must know. TN II.v.98
No man must know. What followes? The numbers ‘ No man must know ’! What follows? The numbersnumber (n.)(plural) metre, versificationTN II.v.99
alter'd: No man must know, If this should be thee altered! ‘ No man must know ’! If this should be thee, TN II.v.100
Maluolio?Malvolio! TN II.v.101
To. SIR TOBY 
Marrie hang thee brocke.Marry, hang thee, brock!marry (int.)[exclamation] by MaryTN II.v.102
brock (n.)
old form: brocke
badger; [contemptuous] stinker, dirty rat
Mal. MALVOLIO  
(reads) TN II.v.103
I may command where I adore, I may command where I adore; TN II.v.103
but silence like a Lucresse knife:But silence, like a Lucrece' knife, TN II.v.104
With bloodlesse stroke my heart doth gore, With bloodless stroke my heart doth gore; TN II.v.105
M.O.A.I. doth sway my life.M.O.A.I. doth sway my life. TN II.v.106
Fa. FABIAN 
A fustian riddle.A fustian riddle!fustian (adj.)high-flown, made up in a ridiculous wayTN II.v.107
To. SIR TOBY 
Excellent Wench, say I.Excellent wench, say I!wench (n.)girl, lassTN II.v.108
Mal. MALVOLIO 
M.O.A.I. doth sway my life. Nay but first‘ M.O.A.I. doth sway my life.’ Nay, but first TN II.v.109
let me see, let me see, let me see.let me see, let me see, let me see. . . . TN II.v.110
Fab. FABIAN 
What dish a poyson has she drest him?What dish o' poison has she dressed him! TN II.v.111
To. SIR TOBY 
And with what wing the stallion checkes at it?And with what wing the staniel checks at it!check at (v.)
old form: checkes
[falconry] swerve to pounce on, turn towards, swoop at
TN II.v.112
staniel (n.)inferior kind of hawk; kestrel
Mal. MALVOLIO 
I may command, where I adore: Why shee ‘ I may command where I adore.’ Why, she TN II.v.113
may command me: I serue her, she is my Ladie. Why may command me. I serve her, she is my lady. Why, TN II.v.114
this is euident to any formall capacitie. There is no this is evident to any formal capacity. There is nocapacity (n.)
old form: capacitie
intelligence, understanding, capability
TN II.v.115
formal (adj.)
old form: formall
normal, sane, rational
obstruction in this, and the end: What should that Alphabeticall obstruction in this. And the end: what should that alphabeticalobstruction (n.)obstacle, difficulty, hindranceTN II.v.116
position portend, if I could make that resemble position portend? If I could make that resembleportend (v.)mean, signify, importTN II.v.117
position (n.)arrangement, ordering, sequence
something in me? Softly, M.O.A.I.something in me. . . . Softly, ‘ M.O.A.I.’ . . .softly (adv.)slowly, gentlyTN II.v.118
To. SIR TOBY 
O I, make vp that, he is now at a cold sent.O, ay, make up that. He is now at a cold scent. TN II.v.119
Fab. FABIAN 
Sowter will cry vpon't for all this, though it bee as Sowter will cry upon't for all this, though it be ascry (v.)give tongue, cry outTN II.v.120
Sowter (n.)[shoemaker, cobbler] name of a stupid hound
ranke as a Fox.rank as a fox.rank (adj.)
old form: ranke
foul-smelling, stinking
TN II.v.121
Mal. MALVOLIO 
M. Maluolio, M. why that begins my M . . . Malvolio! M! Why, that begins my TN II.v.122
name.name! TN II.v.123
Fab. FABIAN 
Did not I say he would worke it out, the Curre is Did not I say he would work it out? The cur is TN II.v.124
excellent at faults.excellent at faults.fault (n.)[hunting] break in a line of scent, loss of scentTN II.v.125
Mal. MALVOLIO 
M. But then there is no consonancy in the M! But then there is no consonancy in theconsonancy (n.)consistency, correspondance, accordTN II.v.126
sequell that suffers vnder probation: A. should follow, sequel that suffers under probation. A should follow,probation (n.)investigation, examination, testingTN II.v.127
suffer (v.)hold up, stand up, remain valid
but O. does.but O does. TN II.v.128
Fa. FABIAN 
And O shall end, I hope.And O shall end, I hope. TN II.v.129
To. SIR TOBY 
I, or Ile cudgell him, and make him cry O.Ay, or I'll cudgel him and make him cry O. TN II.v.130
Mal. MALVOLIO 
And then I. comes behind.And then I comes behind. TN II.v.131
Fa. FABIAN 
I, and you had any eye behinde you, you mightAy, an you had any eye behind you, you mightand, an (conj.)if, whetherTN II.v.132
see more detraction at your heeles, then Fortunes beforesee more detraction at your heels than fortunes beforedetraction (n.)slander, calumny, defamation, disparagementTN II.v.133
you.you. TN II.v.1344
Mal. MALVOLIO 
M,O,A,I. This simulation is not as the M.O.A.I. This simulation is not as thesimulation (n.)dissimulation, concealment, disguised meaningTN II.v.135
former: and yet to crush this a little, it would bow to former. And yet, to crush this a little, it would bow tocrush (v.)force the sense of, strain a meaning fromTN II.v.136
mee, for euery one of these Letters are in my name. Soft, me, for every one of these letters are in my name. Soft!soft (adv.)[used as a command] not so fast, wait a moment, be quietTN II.v.137
here followes prose:Here follows prose. TN II.v.138
He reads TN II.v.139.1
If this fall into thy hand, reuolue. In my stars I am aboue If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my stars I am aboverevolve (v.)consider, ponder, meditateTN II.v.139
star (n.)sphere, fortune, rank
thee, but be not affraid of greatnesse: Some are become great, thee, but be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, TN II.v.140
some atcheeues greatnesse, and some haue greatnesse thrust some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust TN II.v.141
vppon em. Thy fates open theyr hands, let thy blood and upon 'em. Thy fates open their hands, let thy blood and TN II.v.142
spirit embrace them, and to invre thy selfe to what thou art spirit embrace them; and to inure thyself to what thou artembrace (v.)welcome, joyfully acceptTN II.v.143
enure, inure (v.)
old form: invre
accustom, habituate, adapt
like to be: cast thy humble slough, and appeare fresh. Be like to be, cast thy humble slough and appear fresh. Becast (v.)cast off, discard, dismiss, rejectTN II.v.144
slough (n.)outer skin
like (adv.)likely, probable / probably
opposite with a kinsman, surly with seruants: Let thy opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants. Let thyopposite (adj.)opposed, hostile, adverse, antagonistic [to]TN II.v.145
surly (adj.)imperious, haughty, arrogant
tongue tang arguments of state; put thy selfe into the tricke of tongue tang arguments of state. Put thyself into the trick ofargument (n.)subject of conversation, subject-matter, topicTN II.v.146
trick (n.)
old form: tricke
peculiarity, idiosyncrasy, distinguishing trait
tang (v.)ring out, utter resoundingly
singularitie. Shee thus aduises thee, that sighes for thee. singularity. She thus advises thee that sighs for thee.singularity (n.)
old form: singularitie
singular behaviour, odd conduct
TN II.v.147
Remember who commended thy yellow stockings, and wish'd Remember who commended thy yellow stockings and wishedcommend (v.)praise, admire, extolTN II.v.148
to see thee euer crosse garter'd: I say remember, goe too, thou to see thee ever cross-gartered. I say, remember. Go to, thoucross-gartered (adj.)
old form: crosse garter'd
with garters crossed along the legs
TN II.v.149
art made if thou desir'st to be so: If not, let me see thee a art made if thou desirest to be so. If not, let me see thee a TN II.v.150
steward still, the fellow of seruants, and not woorthie tosteward still, the fellow of servants, and not worthy tostill (adv.)constantly, always, continuallyTN II.v.151
touch Fortunes fingers Farewell, Shee that would altertouch Fortune's fingers. Farewell. She that would alterFortune (n.)Roman goddess, shown as a woman at a spinning wheel, or controlling a rudder, and as blindTN II.v.152
alter (v.)change, exchange
seruices with thee, tht fortunate vnhappy services with thee, The Fortunate Unhappy.service (n.)
old form: seruices
employment, situation as a servant
TN II.v.153
daylight and champian discouers not more: This is Daylight and champain discovers not more! This isdiscover (v.)
old form: discouers
reveal, show, make known
TN II.v.154
champain, champaign (n./adj.)
old form: champian
expanse of open countryside
open, I will bee proud, I will reade politicke Authours, I will open. I will be proud, I will read politic authors, I willpolitic (adj.)
old form: politicke
prudent, cautious, discreet, shrewd
TN II.v.155
baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off grosse acquaintance, I baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off gross acquaintance, Ibaffle (v.)[of a knight] publicly disgrace, treat with infamyTN II.v.156
gross (adj.)
old form: grosse
dull, obtuse, ignorant
will be point deuise, the very man. I do not now foole will be point-devise the very man. I do not now foolpoint-device, point-devise (adv.)
old form: point deuise
to the last detail, to the point of perfection
TN II.v.157
my selfe, to let imagination iade mee; for euery reason myself, to let imagination jade me; for every reasonjade (v.)
old form: iade
deceive, dupe, make a fool of
TN II.v.158
excites to this, that my Lady loues me. She did commend excites to this, that my lady loves me. She did commendcommend (v.)praise, admire, extolTN II.v.159
excite (v.)incite, stir up, move
my yellow stockings of late, shee did praise my legge being my yellow stockings of late, she did praise my leg being TN II.v.160
crosse-garter'd, and in this she manifests her selfe to my cross-gartered; and in this she manifests herself to my TN II.v.161
loue, & with a kinde of iniunction driues mee to these love and with a kind of injunction drives me to these TN II.v.162
habites of her liking. I thanke my starres, I am happy: I habits of her liking. I thank my stars, I am happy! Ihabit (n.)
old form: habites
dress, clothing, costume
TN II.v.163
will bee strange, stout, in yellow stockings, and crosse Garter'd,will be strange, stout, in yellow stockings and cross-gartered,stout (adj.)proud, haughty, arrogantTN II.v.164
strange (adj.)aloof, distant, reserved
euen with the swiftnesse of putting on. Ioue, and even with the swiftness of putting on. Jove and TN II.v.165
my starres be praised. Heere is yet a postscript. my stars be praised! Here is yet a postscript. TN II.v.166
He reads TN II.v.167
Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou entertainst Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou entertainest TN II.v.167
my loue, let it appeare in thy smiling, thy smiles my love, let it appear in thy smiling, thy smiles TN II.v.168
become thee well. Therefore in my presence still smile, deerobecome thee well. Therefore in my presence still smile, dearbecome (v.)grace, honour, dignifyTN II.v.169
still (adv.)constantly, always, continually
my sweete, I prethee.my sweet, I prithee. TN II.v.170
Ioue I thanke thee, I will smile, I wil do euery thing that Jove, I thank thee! I will smile. I will do everything that TN II.v.171
thou wilt haue me. thou wilt have me! TN II.v.172
ExitExit TN II.v.172
Fab. FABIAN 
I will not giue my part of this sport for a pension I will not give my part of this sport for a pensionsport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainmentTN II.v.173
of thousands to be paid from the Sophy.of thousands to be paid from the Sophy.Sophy (n.)[pron: 'sohfee] shah of Persia, possibly Abbas the Great, 16th-cTN II.v.174
To. SIR TOBY 
I could marry this wench for this deuice.I could marry this wench for this device.wench (n.)girl, lassTN II.v.175
An. SIR ANDREW 
So could I too.So could I too. TN II.v.176
To. SIR TOBY 
And aske no other dowry with her, but such another And ask no other dowry with her but such another TN II.v.177
iest.jest. TN II.v.178
An. SIR ANDREW 
Nor I neither.Nor I neither. TN II.v.179
Enter Maria.Enter Maria TN II.v.180.1
Fab. FABIAN 
Heere comes my noble gull catcher.Here comes my noble gull-catcher.gull-catcher (n.)fool-trapper, tricksterTN II.v.180
To. SIR TOBY 
Wilt thou set thy foote o'my necke.Wilt thou set thy foot o' my neck? TN II.v.181
An. SIR ANDREW 
Or o'mine either?Or o' mine either? TN II.v.182
To. SIR TOBY 
Shall I play my freedome at tray-trip, and becomShall I play my freedom at tray-trip and becomeplay (v.)play for, make bets aboutTN II.v.183
tray-trip (n.)type of dicing game [depending on the throw of a three]
thy bondslaue?thy bondslave?bondslave (n.)
old form: bondslaue
slave, bondsman, person in a condition of servitude
TN II.v.184
An. SIR ANDREW 
Ifaith, or I either?I'faith, or I either? TN II.v.185
Tob. SIR TOBY 
Why, thou hast put him in such a dreame, thatWhy, thou hast put him in such a dream, that TN II.v.186
when the image of it leaues him, he must run mad.when the image of it leaves him, he must run mad. TN II.v.187
Ma. MARIA 
Nay but say true, do's it worke vpon him?Nay, but say true: does it work upon him? TN II.v.188
To. SIR TOBY 
Like Aqua vite with a Midwife.Like aqua-vitae with a midwife.aqua-vitae (n.)
old form: Aqua vite
spirits, alcohol, strong drink, brandy
TN II.v.189
Mar. MARIA 
If you will then see the fruites of the sport, markIf you will then see the fruits of the sport, markmark (v.)note, pay attention [to], take notice [of]TN II.v.190
sport (n.)recreation, amusement, entertainment
his first approach before my Lady: hee will come to her in his first approach before my lady. He will come to her in TN II.v.191
yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhorres, and crosse garter'd, yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhors; and cross-gartered,abhor (v.)
old form: abhorres
loathe, abominate, regard with disgust
TN II.v.192
a fashion shee detests: and hee will smile vpon a fashion she detests; and he will smile upon TN II.v.193
her, which will now be so vnsuteable to her disposition, her, which will now be so unsuitable to her disposition –  TN II.v.194
being addicted to a melancholly, as shee is, that it cannot being addicted to a melancholy as she is – that it cannot TN II.v.195
but turn him into a notable contempt: if you wil see it but turn him into a notable contempt. If you will see it,contempt (n.)disgrace, dishonour, scandalTN II.v.196
notable (adj.)noted, notorious, conspicuous, infamous
follow me.follow me. TN II.v.197
To. SIR TOBY 
To the gates of Tartar, thou most excellent To the gates of Tartar, thou most excellentTartar (n.)Tartarus; underworld place of confinement for those who incurred the wrath of the godsTN II.v.198
wit (n.)mental sharpness, acumen, quickness, ingenuity
diuell of wit.devil of wit! TN II.v.199
And. SIR ANDREW 
Ile make one too. I'll make one too. TN II.v.200
Exeunt.Exeunt TN II.v.200
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