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He said sir, the water it selfe was a good healthy He said, sir, the water itself was a good healthy2H4 I.ii.3
water: but for the party that ow'd it, he might haue water; but, for the party that owed it, he might have2H4 I.ii.4
more diseases then he knew for. more diseases than he knew for.2H4 I.ii.5
He said sir, you should procure him better Assurance, He said, sir, you should procure him better assur-2H4 I.ii.30
then Bardolfe: he wold not take his Bond & ance than Bardolph. He would not take his bond and2H4 I.ii.31
yours, he lik'd not the Security. yours; he liked not the security.2H4 I.ii.32
He's gone into Smithfield to buy your worship a He's gone in Smithfield to buy your worship a2H4 I.ii.48
horse. horse.2H4 I.ii.49
Sir, heere comes the Nobleman that committed the Sir, here comes the nobleman that committed the2H4 I.ii.53
Prince for striking him, about Bardolfe. Prince for striking him about Bardolph.2H4 I.ii.54
You must speake lowder, my Master is deafe. You must speak louder; my master is deaf.2H4 I.ii.67
Sir. Sir?2H4 I.ii.235
Seuen groats, and two pence. Seven groats and two pence.2H4 I.ii.237
Away you Scullion, you Rampallian, you Fustillirian: Away, you scullion! You rampallian! You fustilarian!2H4 II.i.57
Ile tucke your Catastrophe. I'll tickle your catastrophe!2H4 II.i.58
He call'd me euen now (my Lord) through a red Lattice, 'A calls me e'en now, my lord, through a red lattice,2H4 II.ii.75
and I could discerne no part of his face from the window: and I could discern no part of his face from the window.2H4 II.ii.76
at last I spy'd his eyes, and me thought he had made At last I spied his eyes, and methought he had made2H4 II.ii.77
two holes in the Ale-wiues new Petticoat, & peeped two holes in the ale-wife's petticoat, and so peeped2H4 II.ii.78
through. through.2H4 II.ii.79
Away, you rascally Altheas dreame, away. Away, you rascally Althaea's dream, away!2H4 II.ii.82
Marry (my Lord) Althea dream'd, she was deliuer'd Marry, my lord, Althaea dreamt she was delivered2H4 II.ii.84
of a Firebrand, and therefore I call him hir dream. of a firebrand; and therefore I call him her dream.2H4 II.ii.85
Ephesians my Lord, of the old Church. Ephesians, my lord, of the old church.2H4 II.ii.143
None my Lord, but old Mistris Quickly, and None, my lord, but old Mistress Quickly, and2H4 II.ii.145
M. Doll Teare-sheet. Mistress Doll Tearsheet.2H4 II.ii.146
A proper Gentlewoman, Sir, and a Kinswoman of my A proper gentlewoman, sir, and a kinswoman of my2H4 II.ii.148
Masters. master's.2H4 II.ii.149
And for mine Sir, I will gouerne it. And for mine, sir, I will govern it.2H4 II.ii.158
'Pray thee goe downe. Pray thee go down.2H4 II.iv.151
The Musique is come, Sir. The music is come, sir.2H4 II.iv.221
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