GLOUCESTER
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I thinke hee's gone to hunt (my Lord) at Windsor. I think he's gone to hunt, my lord, at Windsor.2H4 IV.iv.14
I doe not know (my Lord.) I do not know, my lord.2H4 IV.iv.15.2
No (my good Lord) hee is in presence heere. No, my good lord, he is in presence here.2H4 IV.iv.17
Comfort your Maiestie. Comfort, your majesty!2H4 IV.iv.112.1
The people feare me: for they doe obserue The people fear me, for they do observe2H4 IV.iv.121
Vnfather'd Heires, and loathly Births of Nature: Unfathered heirs and loathly births of nature.2H4 IV.iv.122
The Seasons change their manners, as the Yeere The seasons change their manners, as the year2H4 IV.iv.123
Had found some Moneths asleepe, and leap'd them ouer. Had found some months asleep and leaped them over.2H4 IV.iv.124
This Apoplexie will (certaine) be his end. This apoplexy will certain be his end.2H4 IV.iv.130
Exceeding ill. Exceeding ill.2H4 IV.v.12
Hee alter'd much, vpon the hearing it. He altered much upon hearing it.2H4 IV.v.14
Hee came not through the Chamber where wee stayd. He came not through the chamber where we stayed.2H4 IV.v.57
Glou. Cla.GLOUCESTER and CLARENCE
Good morrow, Cosin. Good morrow, cousin.2H4 V.ii.21
O, good my Lord, you haue lost a friend indeed: O, good my lord, you have lost a friend indeed,2H4 V.ii.27
And I dare sweare, you borrow not that face And I dare swear you borrow not that face2H4 V.ii.28
Of seeming sorrow, it is sure your owne. Of seeming sorrow – it is sure your own.2H4 V.ii.29
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL