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Good morrow Lieutenant Bardolfe. Good morrow, Lieutenant Bardolph.H5 II.i.2
For my part, I care not: I say little: but when time For my part, I care not. I say little; but when timeH5 II.i.4
shall serue, there shall be smiles, but that shall be as it shall serve, there shall be smiles – but that shall be as itH5 II.i.5
may. I dare not fight, but I will winke and holde out mine may. I dare not fight, but I will wink and hold out mineH5 II.i.6
yron: it is a simple one, but what though? It will toste iron. It is a simple one, but what though? it will toastH5 II.i.7
Cheese, and it will endure cold, as another mans sword cheese, and it will endure cold as another man's swordH5 II.i.8
will: and there's an end. will – and there's an end.H5 II.i.9
Faith, I will liue so long as I may, that's the certaine Faith, I will live so long as I may, that's the certainH5 II.i.13
of it: and when I cannot liue any longer, I will doe as I of it; and when I cannot live any longer, I will do as IH5 II.i.14
may: That is my rest, that is the rendeuous of it. may. That is my rest, that is the rendezvous of it.H5 II.i.15
I cannot tell, Things must be as they may: men may I cannot tell; things must be as they may. Men mayH5 II.i.19
sleepe, and they may haue their throats about them at sleep, and they may have their throats about them atH5 II.i.20
that time, and some say, kniues haue edges: It must be as that time, and some say knives have edges: it must be asH5 II.i.21
it may, though patience be a tyred name, yet shee will it may – though patience be a tired mare, yet she willH5 II.i.22
plodde, there must be Conclusions, well, I cannot tell. plod – there must be conclusions – well, I cannot tell.H5 II.i.23
How now mine Hoaste Pistoll? How now, mine host Pistol?H5 II.i.26
Pish. Pish!H5 II.i.38
Will you shogge off? I would haue you solus. Will you shog off? I would have you solus.H5 II.i.42
I am not Barbason, you cannot coniure mee: I haue I am not Barbason; you cannot conjure me. I haveH5 II.i.51
an humor to knocke you indifferently well: If you grow an humour to knock you indifferently well. If you growH5 II.i.52
fowle with me Pistoll, I will scoure you with my Rapier, foul with me, Pistol, I will scour you with my rapier,H5 II.i.53
as I may, in fayre tearmes. If you would walke off, I would as I may, in fair terms. If you would walk off, I wouldH5 II.i.54
pricke your guts a little in good tearmes, as I may, and prick your guts a little, in good terms, as I may, andH5 II.i.55
that's the humor of it. that's the humour of it.H5 II.i.56
I will cut thy throate one time or other in faire termes, I will cut thy throat one time or other, in fair terms,H5 II.i.66
that is the humor of it. that is the humour of it.H5 II.i.67
You'l pay me the eight shillings I won of you at You'll pay me the eight shillings I won of you atH5 II.i.90
That now I wil haue: that's the humor of it. That now I will have; that's the humour of it.H5 II.i.93
I shall have my eight shillings I won of you at betting?H5 II.i.101
I shall haue my Noble? I shall have my noble?H5 II.i.109
Well, then that the humor of't. Well then, that's the humour of't.H5 II.i.111
The King hath run bad humors on the Knight, that's The King hath run bad humours on the knight, that'sH5 II.i.116
the euen of it. the even of it.H5 II.i.117
The King is a good King, but it must bee as it may: he The King is a good king, but it must be as it may: heH5 II.i.120
passes some humors, and carreeres. passes some humours and careers.H5 II.i.121
They say he cryed out of Sack. They say he cried out of sack.H5 II.iii.26
Shall wee shogg? the King will be gone from Shall we shog? The King will be gone fromH5 II.iii.42
Southampton. Southampton.H5 II.iii.43
I cannot kisse, that is the humor of it: but adieu. I cannot kiss, that is the humour of it; but adieu.H5 II.iii.57
'Pray thee Corporall stay, the Knocks are too hot: Pray thee, corporal, stay – the knocks are too hot,H5 III.ii.3
and for mine owne part, I haue not a Case of Liues: the and, for mine own part, I have not a case of lives. TheH5 III.ii.4
humor of it is too hot, that is the very plaine-Song of it. humour of it is too hot, that is the very plainsong of it.H5 III.ii.5
These be good humors: your Honor wins bad These be good humours! Your honour wins badH5 III.ii.26
humors.humours.H5 III.ii.27
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL