IDEN
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Lord, who would liue turmoyled in the Court,Lord, who would live turmoiled in the court,2H6 IV.x.15
And may enioy such quiet walkes as these?And may enjoy such quiet walks as these?2H6 IV.x.16
This small inheritance my Father left me,This small inheritance my father left me2H6 IV.x.17
Contenteth me, and worth a Monarchy.Contenteth me, and worth a monarchy.2H6 IV.x.18
I seeke not to waxe great by others warning,I seek not to wax great by others' waning,2H6 IV.x.19
Or gather wealth I care not with what enuy:Or gather wealth I care not with what envy;2H6 IV.x.20
Sufficeth, that I haue maintaines my state,Sufficeth that I have maintains my state,2H6 IV.x.21
And sends the poore well pleased from my gate.And sends the poor well pleased from my gate.2H6 IV.x.22
Why rude Companion, whatsoere thou be,Why, rude companion, whatsoe'er thou be,2H6 IV.x.29
I know thee not, why then should I betray thee?I know thee not; why then should I betray thee?2H6 IV.x.30
Is't not enough to breake into my Garden,Is't not enough to break into my garden,2H6 IV.x.31
And like a Theefe to come to rob my grounds:And like a thief to come to rob my grounds,2H6 IV.x.32
Climbing my walles inspight of me the Owner,Climbing my walls in spite of me the owner,2H6 IV.x.33
But thou wilt braue me with these sawcie termes?But thou wilt brave me with these saucy terms?2H6 IV.x.34
Nay, it shall nere be said, while England stands,Nay, it shall ne'er be said, while England stands,2H6 IV.x.40
That Alexander Iden an Esquire of Kent,That Alexander Iden, an esquire of Kent,2H6 IV.x.41
Tooke oddes to combate a poore famisht man.Took odds to combat a poor famished man.2H6 IV.x.42
Oppose thy stedfast gazing eyes to mine,Oppose thy steadfast gazing eyes to mine,2H6 IV.x.43
See if thou canst out-face me with thy lookes:See if thou canst outface me with thy looks;2H6 IV.x.44
Set limbe to limbe, and thou art farre the lesser:Set limb to limb, and thou art far the lesser;2H6 IV.x.45
Thy hand is but a finger to my fist,Thy hand is but a finger to my fist;2H6 IV.x.46
Thy legge a sticke compared with this Truncheon,Thy leg a stick compared with this truncheon;2H6 IV.x.47
My foote shall fight with all the strength thou hast,My foot shall fight with all the strength thou hast;2H6 IV.x.48
And if mine arme be heaued in the Ayre,And if mine arm be heaved in the air,2H6 IV.x.49
Thy graue is digg'd already in the earth:Thy grave is digged already in the earth.2H6 IV.x.50
As for words, whose greatnesse answer's words,As for words, whose greatness answers words,2H6 IV.x.51
Let this my sword report what speech forbeares.Let this my sword report what speech forbears.2H6 IV.x.52
Is't Cade that I haue slain, that monstrous traitor?Is't Cade that I have slain, that monstrous traitor?2H6 IV.x.64
Sword, I will hallow thee for this thy deede,Sword, I will hallow thee for this thy deed,2H6 IV.x.65
And hang thee o're my Tombe, when I am dead.And hang thee o'er my tomb when I am dead;2H6 IV.x.66
Ne're shall this blood be wiped from thy point,Ne'er shall this blood be wiped from thy point,2H6 IV.x.67
But thou shalt weare it as a Heralds coate,But thou shalt wear it as a herald's coat,2H6 IV.x.68
To emblaze the Honor that thy Master got.To emblaze the honour that thy master got.2H6 IV.x.69
How much thou wrong'st me, heauen be my iudge;How much thou wrongest me, heaven be my judge.2H6 IV.x.74
Die damned Wretch, the curse of her that bare thee:Die, damned wretch, the curse of her that bare thee;2H6 IV.x.75
And as I thrust thy body in with my sword,And as I thrust thy body in with my sword,2H6 IV.x.76
So wish I, I might thrust thy soule to hell.So wish I I might thrust thy soul to hell.2H6 IV.x.77
Hence will I dragge thee headlong by the heelesHence will I drag thee headlong by the heels2H6 IV.x.78
Vnto a dunghill, which shall be thy graue,Unto a dunghill, which shall be thy grave,2H6 IV.x.79
And there cut off thy most vngracious head,And there cut off thy most ungracious head;2H6 IV.x.80
Which I will beare in triumph to the King,Which I will bear in triumph to the King,2H6 IV.x.81
Leauing thy trunke for Crowes to feed vpon. Leaving thy trunk for crows to feed upon.2H6 IV.x.82
If one so rude, and of so meane conditionIf one so rude and of so mean condition2H6 V.i.64
May passe into the presence of a King:May pass into the presence of a king,2H6 V.i.65
Loe, I present your Grace a Traitors head,Lo, I present your grace a traitor's head,2H6 V.i.66
The head of Cade, whom I in combat slew.The head of Cade, whom I in combat slew.2H6 V.i.67
I was, an't like your Maiesty.I was, an't like your majesty.2H6 V.i.72
Alexander Iden, that's my name,Alexander Iden, that's my name,2H6 V.i.74
A poore Esquire of Kent, that loues his King.A poor esquire of Kent, that loves his king.2H6 V.i.75
May Iden liue to merit such a bountie,May Iden live to merit such a bounty,2H6 V.i.81
And neuer liue but true vnto his Liege. And never live but true unto his liege.2H6 V.i.82
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