GLENDOWER
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No, here it is: No, here it is.1H4 III.i.5.2
Sit Cousin Percy, sit good Cousin Hotspurre: Sit, cousin Percy, sit – good cousin Hotspur – 1H4 III.i.6
For by that Name, as oft as Lancaster doth speake of you, For by that name as oft as Lancaster doth speak of you1H4 III.i.7
His Cheekes looke pale, and with a rising sigh, His cheek looks pale, and with a rising sigh1H4 III.i.8
He wisheth you in Heauen. He wisheth you in heaven.1H4 III.i.9.1
I cannot blame him: At my Natiuitie, I cannot blame him. At my nativity1H4 III.i.11
The front of Heauen was full of fierie shapes, The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes,1H4 III.i.12
Of burning Cressets: and at my Birth, Of burning cressets, and at my birth1H4 III.i.13
The frame and foundation of the Earth The frame and huge foundation of the earth1H4 III.i.14
Shak'd like a Coward. Shaked like a coward.1H4 III.i.15.1
I say the Earth did shake when I was borne. I say the earth did shake when I was born.1H4 III.i.18
The heauens were all on fire, the Earth did tremble. The heavens were all on fire, the earth did tremble – 1H4 III.i.21
Cousin: of many men Cousin, of many men1H4 III.i.32.2
I doe not beare these Crossings: Giue me leaue I do not bear these crossings. Give me leave1H4 III.i.33
To tell you once againe, that at my Birth To tell you once again that at my birth1H4 III.i.34
The front of Heauen was full of fierie shapes, The front of heaven was full of fiery shapes,1H4 III.i.35
The Goates ranne from the Mountaines, and the Heards The goats ran from the mountains, and the herds1H4 III.i.36
Were strangely clamorous to the frighted fields: Were strangely clamorous to the frighted fields.1H4 III.i.37
These signes haue markt me extraordinarie, These signs have marked me extraordinary,1H4 III.i.38
And all the courses of my Life doe shew, And all the courses of my life do show1H4 III.i.39
I am not in the Roll of common men. I am not in the roll of common men.1H4 III.i.40
Where is the Liuing, clipt in with the Sea, Where is he living, clipped in with the sea1H4 III.i.41
That chides the Bankes of England, Scotland, and Wales, That chides the banks of England, Scotland, Wales,1H4 III.i.42
Which calls me Pupill, or hath read to me? Which calls me pupil or hath read to me?1H4 III.i.43
And bring him out, that is but Womans Sonne, And bring him out that is but woman's son1H4 III.i.44
Can trace me in the tedious wayes of Art, Can trace me in the tedious ways of art1H4 III.i.45
And hold me pace in deepe experiments. And hold me pace in deep experiments.1H4 III.i.46
I can call Spirits from the vastie Deepe. I can call spirits from the vasty deep.1H4 III.i.50
Why, I can teach thee, Cousin, to command the Deuill. Why, I can teach you, cousin, to command the devil.1H4 III.i.53
Three times hath Henry Bullingbrooke made head Three times hath Henry Bolingbroke made head1H4 III.i.60
Against my Power: thrice from the Banks of Wye, Against my power, thrice from the banks of Wye1H4 III.i.61
And sandy-bottom'd Seuerne, haue I hent him And sandy-bottomed Severn have I sent him1H4 III.i.62
Bootlesse home, and Weather-beaten backe. Bootless home, and weather-beaten back.1H4 III.i.63
Come, heere's the Mappe: / Shall wee diuide our Right, Come, here is the map, shall we divide our right1H4 III.i.66
According to our three-fold order ta'ne? According to our threefold order taken?1H4 III.i.67
A shorter time shall send me to you, Lords: A shorter time shall send me to you, lords,1H4 III.i.87
And in my Conduct shall your Ladies come, And in my conduct shall your ladies come,1H4 III.i.88
From whom you now must steale, and take no leaue, From whom you now must steal and take no leave,1H4 III.i.89
For there will be a World of Water shed, For there will be a world of water shed1H4 III.i.90
Vpon the parting of your Wiues and you. Upon the parting of your wives and you.1H4 III.i.91
Not winde? it shall, it must, you see it doth. Not wind? It shall, it must – you see it doth.1H4 III.i.102
Ile not haue it alter'd. I'll not have it altered.1H4 III.i.112.1
No, nor you shall not. No, nor you shall not.1H4 III.i.113.1
Why, that will I. Why, that will I.1H4 III.i.114
I can speake English, Lord, as well as you: I can speak English, lord, as well as you,1H4 III.i.116
For I was trayn'd vp in the English Court; For I was trained up in the English court,1H4 III.i.117
Where, being but young, I framed to the Harpe Where being but young I framed to the harp1H4 III.i.118
Many an English Dittie, louely well, Many an English ditty lovely well,1H4 III.i.119
And gaue the Tongue a helpefull Ornament; And gave the tongue a helpful ornament – 1H4 III.i.120
A Vertue that was neuer seene in you. A virtue that was never seen in you.1H4 III.i.121
Come, you shall haue Trent turn'd. Come, you shall have Trent turned.1H4 III.i.130
The Moone shines faire, / You may away by Night: The moon shines fair, you may away by night.1H4 III.i.136
Ile haste the Writer; and withall, I'll haste the writer, and withal1H4 III.i.137
Breake with your Wiues, of your departure hence: Break with your wives of your departure hence.1H4 III.i.138
I am afraid my Daughter will runne madde, I am afraid my daughter will run mad,1H4 III.i.139
So much she doteth on her Mortimer.So much she doteth on her Mortimer.1H4 III.i.140
My Daughter weepes, shee'le not part with you, My daughter weeps, she'll not part with you;1H4 III.i.188
Shee'le be a Souldier too, shee'le to the Warres. She'll be a soldier too, she'll to the wars.1H4 III.i.189
Shee is desperate heere: / A peeuish selfe-will'd She is desperate here, a peevish self-willed1H4 III.i.192
Harlotry, / One that no perswasion can doe good vpon. harlotry, one that no persuasion can do good upon.1H4 III.i.193
Nay, if thou melt, then will she runne madde. Nay, if you melt, then will she run mad.1H4 III.i.205
She bids you, She bids you on the wanton rushes lay you down,1H4 III.i.207
On the wanton Rushes lay you downe, And rest your gentle head upon her lap,1H4 III.i.208
And rest your gentle Head vpon her Lappe, And she will sing the song that pleaseth you,1H4 III.i.209
And she will sing the Song that pleaseth you, And on your Eye-lids Crowne the God of Sleepe, And on your eyelids crown the god of sleep,1H4 III.i.210
Charming your blood with pleasing heauinesse; Charming your blood with pleasing heaviness,1H4 III.i.211
Making such difference betwixt Wake and Sleepe, Making such difference 'twixt wake and sleep1H4 III.i.212
As is the difference betwixt Day and Night, As is the difference betwixt day and night,1H4 III.i.213
The houre before the Heauenly Harneis'd Teeme The hour before the heavenly-harnessed team1H4 III.i.214
Begins his Golden Progresse in the East. Begins his golden progress in the east.1H4 III.i.215
Doe so: / And those Musitians that shall play to you, Do so, and those musicians that shall play to you1H4 III.i.218
Hang in the Ayre a thousand Leagues from thence; Hang in the air a thousand leagues from hence,1H4 III.i.219
And straight they shall be here: sit, and attend. And straight they shall be here. Sit, and attend.1H4 III.i.220
Come, come, Lord Mortimer, you are as slow, Come, come, Lord Mortimer, you are as slow1H4 III.i.256
As hot Lord Percy is on fire to goe. As hot Lord Percy is on fire to go.1H4 III.i.257
By this our Booke is drawne: wee'le but seale, By this our book is drawn – we'll but seal,1H4 III.i.258
And then to Horse immediately. And then to horse immediately.1H4 III.i.259.1
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