CHARLES
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Good morrow to your worship.Good morrow to your worship.AYL I.i.90
There's no newes at the Court Sir, but the oldeThere's no news at the court, sir, but the oldAYL I.i.93
newes: that is, the old Duke is banished by his yongernews: that is, the old Duke is banished by his youngerAYL I.i.94
brother the new Duke, and three or foure louing Lordsbrother the new Duke, and three or four loving lordsAYL I.i.95
haue put themselues into voluntary exile with him,have put themselves into voluntary exile with him,AYL I.i.96
whose lands and reuenues enrich the new Duke, thereforewhose lands and revenues enrich the new Duke; thereforeAYL I.i.97
he giues them good leaue to wander.he gives them good leave to wander.AYL I.i.98
O no; for the Dukes daughter her Cosen soO, no; for the Duke's daughter, her cousin, soAYL I.i.101
loues her, being euer from their Cradles bred together,loves her, being ever from their cradles bred together,AYL I.i.102
that hee would haue followed her exile, or haue died tothat she would have followed her exile, or have died toAYL I.i.103
stay behind her; she is at the Court, and no lesse belouedstay behind her; she is at the court, and no less belovedAYL I.i.104
of her Vncle, then his owne daughter, and neuer two Ladiesof her uncle than his own daughter, and never two ladiesAYL I.i.105
loued as they doe.loved as they do.AYL I.i.106
They say hee is already in the Forrest of Arden,They say he is already in the Forest of Arden,AYL I.i.108
and a many merry men with him; and there they liueand a many merry men with him; and there they liveAYL I.i.109
like the old Robin Hood of England: they say manylike the old Robin Hood of England: they say manyAYL I.i.110
yong Gentlemen flocke to him euery day, and fleet theyoung gentlemen flock to him every day, and fleet theAYL I.i.111
time carelesly as they did in the golden world.time carelessly as they did in the golden world.AYL I.i.112
Marry doe I sir: and I came to acquaint youMarry do I, sir; and I came to acquaint youAYL I.i.115
with a matter: I am giuen sir secretly to vnderstand,with a matter. I am given, sir, secretly to understandAYL I.i.116
that your yonger brother Orlando hath a dispositionthat your younger brother, Orlando, hath a dispositionAYL I.i.117
to come in disguis'd against mee to try a fall: to morrow to come in disguised against me to try a fall. Tomorrow,AYL I.i.118
sir I wrastle for my credit, and hee that escapes mesir, I wrestle for my credit, and he that escapes meAYL I.i.119
without some broken limbe, shall acquit him well: yourwithout some broken limb shall acquit him well. YourAYL I.i.120
brother is but young and tender, and for your loue Ibrother is but young and tender, and for your love IAYL I.i.121
would bee loth to foyle him, as I must for my owne honourwould be loath to foil him, as I must for my own honourAYL I.i.122
if hee come in: therefore out of my loue to you, I cameif he come in. Therefore, out of my love to you, I cameAYL I.i.123
hither to acquaint you withall, that either you might hither to acquaint you withal, that either you mightAYL I.i.124
stay him from his intendment, or brooke such disgracestay him from his intendment, or brook such disgraceAYL I.i.125
well as he shall runne into, in that it is a thing of his owne well as he shall run into, in that it is a thing of his ownAYL I.i.126
search, and altogether against my will.search, and altogether against my will.AYL I.i.127
I am heartily glad I came hither to you: if heeI am heartily glad I came hither to you. If heAYL I.i.148
come to morrow, Ile giue him his payment: if euer hee goecome tomorrow, I'll give him his payment: if ever he goAYL I.i.149
alone againe, Ile neuer wrastle for prize more: and soalone again, I'll never wrestle for prize more. And soAYL I.i.150
God keepe your worship. God keep your worship!AYL I.i.151
Come, where is this yong gallant, that is soCome, where is this young gallant that is soAYL I.ii.187
desirous to lie with his mother earth?desirous to lie with his mother earth?AYL I.ii.188
No, I warrant your Grace you shall not entreatNo, I warrant your grace, you shall not entreatAYL I.ii.192
him to a second, that haue so mightilie perswaded himhim to a second, that have so mightily persuaded himAYL I.ii.193
from a first.from a first.AYL I.ii.194
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