JOHN
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Is my name Talbot? and am I your Sonne?Is my name Talbot, and am I your son?1H6 IV.v.12
And shall I flye? O, if you loue my Mother,And shall I fly? O, if you love my mother,1H6 IV.v.13
Dishonor not her Honorable Name,Dishonour not her honourable name1H6 IV.v.14
To make a Bastard, and a Slaue of me:To make a bastard and a slave of me.1H6 IV.v.15
The World will say, he is not Talbots blood,The world will say he is not Talbot's blood1H6 IV.v.16
That basely fled, when Noble Talbot stood.That basely fled when noble Talbot stood.1H6 IV.v.17
He that flyes so, will ne're returne againe.He that flies so will ne'er return again.1H6 IV.v.19
Then let me stay, and Father doe you flye:Then let me stay, and, father, do you fly.1H6 IV.v.21
Your losse is great, so your regard should be;Your loss is great, so your regard should be;1H6 IV.v.22
My worth vnknowne, no losse is knowne in me.My worth unknown, no loss is known in me.1H6 IV.v.23
Vpon my death, the French can little boast;Upon my death the French can little boast;1H6 IV.v.24
In yours they will, in you all hopes are lost.In yours they will; in you all hopes are lost.1H6 IV.v.25
Flight cannot stayne the Honor you haue wonne,Flight cannot stain the honour you have won;1H6 IV.v.26
But mine it will, that no Exploit haue done.But mine it will, that no exploit have done.1H6 IV.v.27
You fled for Vantage, euery one will sweare:You fled for vantage, everyone will swear;1H6 IV.v.28
But if I bow, they'le say it was for feare.But if I bow, they'll say it was for fear.1H6 IV.v.29
There is no hope that euer I will stay,There is no hope that ever I will stay1H6 IV.v.30
If the first howre I shrinke and run away:If the first hour I shrink and run away.1H6 IV.v.31
Here on my knee I begge Mortalitie,Here on my knee I beg mortality1H6 IV.v.32
Rather then Life, preseru'd with Infamie.Rather than life preserved with infamy.1H6 IV.v.33
I, rather then Ile shame my Mothers Wombe.Ay, rather than I'll shame my mother's womb.1H6 IV.v.35
To fight I will, but not to flye the Foe.To fight I will, but not to fly the foe.1H6 IV.v.37
No part of him, but will be shame in mee.No part of him but will be shame in me.1H6 IV.v.39
Yes, your renowned Name: shall flight abuse it?Yes, your renowned name; shall flight abuse it?1H6 IV.v.41
You cannot witnesse for me, being slaine.You cannot witness for me being slain.1H6 IV.v.43
If Death be so apparant, then both flye.If death be so apparent, then both fly.1H6 IV.v.44
And shall my Youth be guiltie of such blame?And shall my youth be guilty of such blame?1H6 IV.v.47
No more can I be seuered from your side,No more can I be severed from your side1H6 IV.v.48
Then can your selfe, your selfe in twaine diuide:Than can yourself yourself in twain divide.1H6 IV.v.49
Stay, goe, doe what you will,the like doe I;Stay, go, do what you will – the like do I;1H6 IV.v.50
For liue I will not, if my Father dye.For live I will not if my father die.1H6 IV.v.51
O twice my Father, twice am I thy Sonne:O twice my father, twice am I thy son!1H6 IV.vi.6
The Life thou gau'st me first, was lost and done,The life thou gavest me first was lost and done1H6 IV.vi.7
Till with thy Warlike Sword,despight of Fate,Till with thy warlike sword, despite of fate,1H6 IV.vi.8
To my determin'd time thou gau'st new date.To my determined time thou gavest new date.1H6 IV.vi.9
The Sword of Orleance hath not made me smart,The sword of Orleans hath not made me smart;1H6 IV.vi.42
These words of yours draw Life-blood from my Heart.These words of yours draw lifeblood from my heart.1H6 IV.vi.43
On that aduantage, bought with such a shame,On that advantage, bought with such a shame,1H6 IV.vi.44
To saue a paltry Life, and slay bright Fame,To save a paltry life and slay bright fame,1H6 IV.vi.45
Before young Talbot from old Talbot flye,Before young Talbot from old Talbot fly,1H6 IV.vi.46
The Coward Horse that beares me, fall and dye:The coward horse that bears me fall and die!1H6 IV.vi.47
And like me to the pesant Boyes of France,And like me to the peasant boys of France,1H6 IV.vi.48
To be Shames scorne, and subiect of Mischance.To be shame's scorn and subject of mischance!1H6 IV.vi.49
Surely, by all the Glorie you haue wonne,Surely, by all the glory you have won,1H6 IV.vi.50
And if I flye, I am not Talbots Sonne.An if I fly, I am not Talbot's son;1H6 IV.vi.51
Then talke no more of flight, it is no boot,Then talk no more of flight; it is no boot;1H6 IV.vi.52
If Sonne to Talbot, dye at Talbots foot.If son to Talbot, die at Talbot's foot.1H6 IV.vi.53
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL