URSULA
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I know you well enough, you are Signior Anthonio. I know you well enough; you are Signor Antonio.MA II.i.100
I know you by the wagling of your head.I know you by the waggling of your head.MA II.i.102
You could neuer doe him so ill well, vnlesse you You could never do him so ill-well unless youMA II.i.104
were the very man: here's his dry hand vp & down,were the very man. Here's his dry hand up and down;MA II.i.105
you are he, you are he.you are he, you are he.MA II.i.106
Come, come, doe you thinke I doe not know you by Come, come, do you think I do not know you byMA II.i.108
your excellent wit? can vertue hide it selfe? goe to, mumme, your excellent wit? Can virtue hide itself? Go to, mum,MA II.i.109
you are he, graces will appeare, and there's an end.you are he; graces will appear, and there's an end.MA II.i.110
The pleasant'st angling is to see the fishThe pleasant'st angling is to see the fishMA III.i.26
Cut with her golden ores the siluer streame,Cut with her golden oars the silver stream,MA III.i.27
And greedily deuoure the treacherous baite:And greedily devour the treacherous bait;MA III.i.28
So angle we for Beatrice, who euen now,So angle we for Beatrice, who even nowMA III.i.29
Is couched in the wood-bine couerture,Is couched in the woodbine coverture.MA III.i.30
Feare you not my part of the Dialogue.Fear you not my part of the dialogue.MA III.i.31
But are you sure,But are you sureMA III.i.36.2
That Benedicke loues Beatrice so intirely?That Benedick loves Beatrice so entirely?MA III.i.37
And did they bid you tell her of it, Madam?And did they bid you tell her of it, madam?MA III.i.39
Why did you so, doth not the GentlemanWhy did you so? Doth not the gentlemanMA III.i.44
Deserue as full as fortunate a bed,Deserve as full as fortunate a bedMA III.i.45
As euer Beatrice shall couch vpon?As ever Beatrice shall couch upon?MA III.i.46
Sure I thinke so,Sure, I think so;MA III.i.56.2
And therefore certainely it were not goodAnd therefore, certainly, it were not goodMA III.i.57
She knew his loue, lest she make sport at it.She knew his love, lest she make sport at it.MA III.i.58
Sure, sure, such carping is not commendable.Sure, sure, such carping is not commendable.MA III.i.71
Yet tell her of it, heare what shee will say.Yet tell her of it; hear what she will say.MA III.i.81
O doe not doe your cosin such a wrong,O, do not do your cousin such a wrong!MA III.i.87
She cannot be so much without true iudgement,She cannot be so much without true judgement –MA III.i.88
Hauing so swift and excellent a witHaving so swift and excellent a witMA III.i.89
As she is prisde to haue, as to refuseAs she is prized to have – as to refuseMA III.i.90
So rare a Gentleman as signior Benedicke.So rare a gentleman as Signor Benedick.MA III.i.91
I pray you be not angry with me, Madame,I pray you be not angry with me, madam,MA III.i.94
Speaking my fancy: Signior Benedicke,Speaking my fancy; Signor Benedick,MA III.i.95
For shape, for bearing argument and valour,For shape, for bearing, argument and valour,MA III.i.96
Goes formost in report through Italy.Goes foremost in report through Italy.MA III.i.97
His excellence did earne it ere he had it:His excellence did earn it ere he had it.MA III.i.99
When are you married Madame?When are you married, madam?MA III.i.100
Shee's tane I warrant you, / We haue caught her Madame?She's limed, I warrant you; we have caught her, madam.MA III.i.104
I will Lady.I will, lady.MA III.iv.3
Well.Well.MA III.iv.5
Madam, withdraw, the Prince, the Count, signior Madam, withdraw; the Prince, the Count, SignorMA III.iv.86
Benedicke, Don Iohn, and all the gallants of the towne are Benedick, Don John, and all the gallants of the town, areMA III.iv.87
come to fetch you to Church.come to fetch you to church.MA III.iv.88
Madam, you must come to your Vncle, yonders Madam, you must come to your uncle. Yonder'sMA V.ii.86
old coile at home, it is prooued my Ladie Hero hath bin old coil at home; it is proved my Lady Hero hath beenMA V.ii.87
falselie accusde, the Prince and Claudio mightilie abusde, falsely accused, the Prince and Claudio mightily abused,MA V.ii.88
and Don Iohn is the author of all, who is fled and gone: and Don John is the author of all, who is fled and gone.MA V.ii.89
will you come presentlie?Will you come presently?MA V.ii.90
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