DOGBERRY
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Are you good men and true?Are you good men and true?MA III.iii.1
Nay, that were a punishment too good forNay, that were a punishment too good forMA III.iii.4
them, if they should haue any allegiance in them, beingthem, if they should have any allegiance in them, beingMA III.iii.5
chosen for the Princes watch.chosen for the Prince's watch.MA III.iii.6
First, who thinke you the most desartlesse manFirst, who think you the most desartless manMA III.iii.9
to be Constable?to be constable?MA III.iii.10
Come hither neighbour Sea-coale, God hathCome hither, neighbour Seacoal. God hathMA III.iii.13
blest you with a good name: to be a wel-fauoured man,blessed you with a good name. To be a well-favouredMA III.iii.14
is the gift of Fortune, but to write and reade, comes man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comesMA III.iii.15
by Nature.by nature.MA III.iii.16
You haue: I knew it would be your answere:You have; I knew it would be your answer.MA III.iii.18
well, for your fauour sir, why giue God thankes, & Well, for your favour, sir, why, give God thanks, andMA III.iii.19
make no boast of it, and for your writing and reading, make no boast of it; and for your writing and reading,MA III.iii.20
let that appeare when there is no need of such vanity, you let that appear when there is no need of such vanity. YouMA III.iii.21
are thought heere to be the most senslesse and fit man are thought here to be the most senseless and fit manMA III.iii.22
for the Constable of the watch: therefore beare you the for the constable of the watch; therefore bear you theMA III.iii.23
lanthorne: this is your charge: You shall comprehend alllantern. This is your charge: you shall comprehend allMA III.iii.24
vagrom men, you are to bid any man stand in the vagrom men; you are to bid any man stand, in theMA III.iii.25
Princes name.Prince's name.MA III.iii.26
Why then take no note of him, but let him go,Why, then, take no note of him, but let him go;MA III.iii.28
and presently call the rest of the Watch together, andand presently call the rest of the watch together andMA III.iii.29
thanke God you are ridde of a knaue.thank God you are rid of a knave.MA III.iii.30
True, and they are to meddle with none but the True, and they are to meddle with none but theMA III.iii.33
Princes subiects: you shall also make no noise in thePrince's subjects. You shall also make no noise in theMA III.iii.34
streetes: for, for the Watch to babble and talke, is moststreets; for for the watch to babble and to talk is mostMA III.iii.35
tollerable, and not to be indured.tolerable and not to be endured.MA III.iii.36
Why you speake like an ancient and most quietWhy, you speak like an ancient and most quietMA III.iii.39
watchman, for I cannot see how sleeping should offend:watchman, for I cannot see how sleeping should offend;MA III.iii.40
only haue a care that your bills be not stolne: well, youonly, have a care that your bills be not stolen. Well, youMA III.iii.41
are to call at all the Alehouses, and bid them that areare to call at all the ale-houses, and bid those that areMA III.iii.42
drunke get them to bed.drunk get them to bed.MA III.iii.43
Why then let them alone till they are sober, Why, then, let them alone till they are sober;MA III.iii.45
if they make you not then the better answere, you may if they make you not then the better answer, you mayMA III.iii.46
say, they are not the men you tooke them for.say they are not the men you took them for.MA III.iii.47
If you meet a theefe, you may suspect him, byIf you meet a thief, you may suspect him, byMA III.iii.49
vertue of your office, to be no true man: and for suchvirtue of your office, to be no true man; and, for suchMA III.iii.50
kinde of men, the lesse you meddle or make with them,kind of men, the less you meddle or make with them,MA III.iii.51
why the more is for your honesty.why, the more is for your honesty.MA III.iii.52
Truly by your office you may, but I think Truly, by your office, you may, but I thinkMA III.iii.55
they that touch pitch will be defil'd: the most peaceable they that touch pitch will be defiled. The most peaceableMA III.iii.56
way for you, if you doe take a theefe, is, to let him way for you, if you do take a thief, is to let himMA III.iii.57
shew himselfe what he is, and steale out of your company.show himself what he is and steal out of your company.MA III.iii.58
Truely I would not hang a dog by my will, Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will,MA III.iii.61
much more a man who hath anie honestie in him.much more a man who hath any honesty in him.MA III.iii.62
Why then depart in peace, and let the childeWhy, then, depart in peace, and let the childMA III.iii.67
wake her with crying, for the ewe that will not heare her wake her with crying; for the ewe that will not hear herMA III.iii.68
Lambe when it baes, will neuer answere a calfe when he lamb when it baes will never answer a calf when heMA III.iii.69
bleates.bleats.MA III.iii.70
This is the end of the charge: you constableThis is the end of the charge: you, constable,MA III.iii.72
are to present the Princes owne person, if you meete theare to present the Prince's own person; if you meet theMA III.iii.73
Prince in the night, you may staie him.Prince in the night, you may stay him.MA III.iii.74
Fiue shillings to one on't with anie man thatFive shillings to one on't, with any man thatMA III.iii.76
knowes the Statutes, he may staie him, marrie not without knows the statutes, he may stay him; marry, not withoutMA III.iii.77
the prince be willing, for indeed the watch ought tothe Prince be willing; for, indeed, the watch ought toMA III.iii.78
offend no man, and it is an offence to stay a man againstoffend no man, and it is an offence to stay a man againstMA III.iii.79
his will.his will.MA III.iii.80
Ha, ah ha, well masters good night, and Ha, ah ha! Well, masters, good night; anMA III.iii.82
there be anie matter of weight chances, call vp me, keepe there be any matter of weight chances, call up me. KeepMA III.iii.83
your fellowes counsailes, and your owne, and good night,your fellows' counsels and your own, and good night.MA III.iii.84
come neighbour.Come, neighbour.MA III.iii.85
One word more, honest neighbors. I pray One word more, honest neighbours. I prayMA III.iii.89
you watch about signior Leonatoes doore, for the wedding you, watch about Signor Leonato's door, for the weddingMA III.iii.90
being there to morrow, there is a great coyle to night,being there tomorrow, there is a great coil to-night.MA III.iii.91
adiew, be vigitant I beseech you. Adieu; be vigitant, I beseech you.MA III.iii.92
Mary sir I would haue some confidence with Marry, sir, I would have some confidence withMA III.v.2
you, that decernes you nearely.you that decerns you nearly.MA III.v.3
Mary this it is sir.Marry, this it is, sir.MA III.v.6
Goodman Verges sir speakes a little of theGoodman Verges, sir, speaks a little off theMA III.v.9
matter, an old man sir, and his wits are not so blunt, asmatter – an old man, sir, and his wits are not so blunt as,MA III.v.10
God helpe I would desire they were, but infaith honestGod help, I would desire they were; but, in faith, honestMA III.v.11
as the skin betweene his browes.as the skin between his brows.MA III.v.12
Comparisons are odorous, palabras, neighbour Comparisons are odorous; palabras, neighbourMA III.v.15
Verges.Verges.MA III.v.16
It pleases your worship to say so, but we areIt pleases your worship to say so, but we areMA III.v.18
the poore Dukes officers, but truely for mine owne part, if the poor Duke's officers; but truly, for mine own part, ifMA III.v.19
I were as tedious as a King I could finde in my heart toI were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart toMA III.v.20
bestow it all of your worship.bestow it all of your worship.MA III.v.21
Yea, and 'twere a thousand times more than Yea, an't 'twere a thousand pound more thanMA III.v.23
'tis, for I heare as good exclamation on your Worship as 'tis, for I hear as good exclamation on your worship asMA III.v.24
of any man in the Citie, and though I bee but a poore man, of any man in the city; and though I be but a poor man,MA III.v.25
I am glad to heare it.I am glad to hear it.MA III.v.26
A good old man sir, hee will be talking as they A good old man, sir, he will be talking; as theyMA III.v.32
say, when the age is in the wit is out, God helpe vs, it is say, ‘ When the age is in, the wit is out.’ God help us, it isMA III.v.33
a world to see: well said yfaith neighbour Verges,a world to see! Well said, i'faith, neighbour Verges;MA III.v.34
well, God's a good man, and two men ride of a horse, one well, God's a good man; an two men ride of a horse, oneMA III.v.35
must ride behinde, an honest soule yfaith sir, by mymust ride behind. An honest soul, i'faith, sir; by myMA III.v.36
troth he is, as euer broke bread, but God is to bee worshipt, troth he is, as ever broke bread. But God is to be worshipped;MA III.v.37
all men are not alike, alas good neighbour.all men are not alike. Alas, good neighbour!MA III.v.38
Gifts that God giues.Gifts that God gives.MA III.v.40
One word sir, our watch sir haue indeedeOne word, sir: our watch, sir, have indeedMA III.v.42
comprehended two aspitious persons, & we would comprehended two aspicious persons, and we wouldMA III.v.43
haue them this morning examined before your worship.have them this morning examined before your worship.MA III.v.44
It shall be suffigance. It shall be suffigance.MA III.v.47
Goe good partner, goe get you to Francis Seacoale, Go, good partner, go, get you to Francis Seacoal;MA III.v.52
bid him bring his pen and inkehorne to the Gaole:bid him bring his pen and inkhorn to the gaol.MA III.v.53
we are now to examine those men.We are now to examination these men.MA III.v.54
Wee will spare for no witte I warrant you: heere's We will spare for no wit, I warrant you. Here'sMA III.v.56
that shall driue some of them to a non-come, only get that shall drive some of them to a non-come; only getMA III.v.57
the learned writer to set downe our excommunication, the learned writer to set down our excommunication,MA III.v.58
and meet me at the Iaile. and meet me at the gaol.MA III.v.59
Is our whole dissembly appeard?Is our whole dissembly appeared?MA IV.ii.1
Marry that am I, and my partner.Marry, that am I and my partner.MA IV.ii.4
Yea marry, let them come before mee, what isYea, marry, let them come before me. What isMA IV.ii.9
your name, friend?your name, friend?MA IV.ii.10
Pray write downe Borachio. Yours sirra.Pray, write down, Borachio. Yours, sirrah?MA IV.ii.12
Write downe Master gentleman Conrade: Write down Master Gentleman Conrade.MA IV.ii.15
maisters, doe you serue God: Masters, do you serve God?MA IV.ii.16
Write down, that they hope they serve God –MA IV.ii.18
and write God first, for God defend but God should goMA IV.ii.19
maisters, it is proued alreadie that before such villains! Masters, it is proved already thatMA IV.ii.20
you are little better than false knaues, and it will goe neere you are little better than false knaves, and it will go nearMA IV.ii.21
to be thought so shortly, how answer you for to be thought so shortly. How answer you forMA IV.ii.22
your selues?yourselves?MA IV.ii.23
A maruellous witty fellow I assure you, but A marvellous witty fellow, I assure you; butMA IV.ii.25
I will goe about with him: come you hither sirra, a I will go about with him. Come you hither, sirrah; aMA IV.ii.26
word in your eare sir, I say to you, it is thought you are word in your ear. Sir, I say to you, it is thought you areMA IV.ii.27
false knaues.false knaves.MA IV.ii.28
Well, stand aside, 'fore God they are both inWell, stand aside. 'Fore God, they are both inMA IV.ii.30
a tale: haue you writ downe that they are none?a tale. Have you writ down, that they are none?MA IV.ii.31
Yea marry, that's the eftest way, let the watchYea, marry, that's the eftest way; let the watchMA IV.ii.34
come forth: masters, I charge you in the Princes name,come forth. Masters, I charge you in the Prince's name,MA IV.ii.35
accuse these men.accuse these men.MA IV.ii.36
Write down, Prince Iohn a villaine: why this is Write down Prince John a villain. Why, this isMA IV.ii.39
flat periurie, to call a Princes brother villaine.flat perjury, to call a Prince's brother villain.MA IV.ii.40
Pray thee fellow peace, I do not like thy Pray thee, fellow, peace; I do not like thyMA IV.ii.42
looke I promise thee.look, I promise thee.MA IV.ii.43
Flat Burglarie as euer was committed.Flat burglary as ever was committed.MA IV.ii.48
O villaine! thou wilt be condemn'd into euerlasting O villain! Thou wilt be condemned into everlastingMA IV.ii.54
redemption for this.redemption for this.MA IV.ii.55
Come, let them be opinion'd.Come, let them be opinioned.MA IV.ii.65
Gods my life, where's the Sexton? let him God's my life, where's the Sexton? Let himMA IV.ii.68
write downe the Princes Officer Coxcombe: come, binde write down the Prince's officer coxcomb. Come, bindMA IV.ii.69
them thou naughty varlet.them. Thou naughty varlet!MA IV.ii.70
Dost thou not suspect my place? dost thou Dost thou not suspect my place? Dost thouMA IV.ii.72
not suspect my yeeres? O that hee were heere to write meenot suspect my years? O that he were here to write meMA IV.ii.73
downe an asse! but masters, remember that I am an asse:down an ass! But, masters, remember that I am an ass;MA IV.ii.74
though it be not written down, yet forget not yt I am though it be not written down, yet forget not that I amMA IV.ii.75
an asse: No thou villaine, yu art full of piety as shall be an ass. No, thou villain, thou art full of piety, as shall beMA IV.ii.76
prou'd vpon thee by good witnesse, I am a wise fellow, proved upon thee by good witness. I am a wise fellow,MA IV.ii.77
and which is more, an officer, and which is more, a and, which is more, an officer; and, which is more, aMA IV.ii.78
houshoulder, and which is more, as pretty a peece of householder; and, which is more, as pretty a piece ofMA IV.ii.79
flesh as any in Messina, and one that knowes the Law, flesh as any is in Messina, and one that knows the law,MA IV.ii.80
goe to, & a rich fellow enough, goe to, and a fellow that go to; and a rich fellow enough, go to; and a fellow thatMA IV.ii.81
hath had losses, and one that hath two gownes, and euery thing hath had losses; and one that hath two gowns and everythingMA IV.ii.82
handsome about him: bring him away: O that handsome about him. Bring him away. O thatMA IV.ii.83
I had been writ downe an asse! I had been writ down an ass!MA IV.ii.84
Come you sir, if iustice cannot tame you, sheeCome, you, sir; if justice cannot tame you, sheMA V.i.198
shall nere weigh more reasons in her ballance, nay, andshall ne'er weigh more reasons in her balance. Nay, anMA V.i.199
you be a cursing hypocrite once, you must be lookt to.you be a cursing hypocrite once, you must be looked to.MA V.i.200
Marrie sir, they haue committed false report,Marry, sir, they have committed false report;MA V.i.205
moreouer they haue spoken vntruths, secondarily theymoreover they have spoken untruths; secondarily, theyMA V.i.206
are slanders, sixt and lastly, they haue belyed a Ladie,are slanders; sixth and lastly, they have belied a lady;MA V.i.207
thirdly, they haue verified vniust things, and to concludethirdly, they have verified unjust things; and, to conclude,MA V.i.208
they are lying knaues.they are lying knaves.MA V.i.209
Come, bring away the plaintiffes, by this timeCome, bring away the plaintiffs; by this timeMA V.i.240
our Sexton hath reformed Signior Leonato of the matter:our Sexton hath reformed Signor Leonato of the matter.MA V.i.241
and masters, do not forget to specifie when time & And, masters, do not forget to specify, when time andMA V.i.242
place shall serue, that I am an Asse.place shall serve, that I am an ass.MA V.i.243
Moreouer sir, which indeede is not vnder Moreover, sir, which indeed is not underMA V.i.291
white and black, this plaintiffe here, the offendour did call white and black, this plaintiff here, the offender, did callMA V.i.292
mee asse, I beseech you let it be remembred in his me ass; I beseech you, let it be remembered in hisMA V.i.293
punishment, and also the watch heard them talke of one punishment. And also, the watch heard them talk of oneMA V.i.294
Deformed, they say he weares a key in his eare and a lock Deformed; they say he wears a key in his ear and a lockMA V.i.295
hanging by it, and borrowes monie in Gods name, the hanging by it, and borrows money in God's name, theMA V.i.296
which he hath vs'd so long, and neuer paied, that now which he hath used so long and never paid, that nowMA V.i.297
men grow hard-harted and will lend nothing for Gods men grow hard-hearted and will lend nothing for God'sMA V.i.298
sake: praie you examine him vpon that point. sake. Pray you, examine him upon that point.MA V.i.299
Your worship speakes like a most thankefull and Your worship speaks like a most thankful andMA V.i.301
reuerend youth, and I praise God for you.reverend youth, and I praise God for you.MA V.i.302
God saue the foundation.God save the foundation!MA V.i.304
I leaue an arrant knaue with your worship,I leave an arrant knave with your worship;MA V.i.307
which I beseech your worship to correct your selfe, for the which I beseech your worship to correct yourself, for theMA V.i.308
example of others: God keepe your worship, I wish your example of others. God keep your worship! I wish yourMA V.i.309
worship well, God restore you to health, I humblie giue worship well; God restore you to health! I humbly giveMA V.i.310
you leaue to depart, and if a merrie meeting may be you leave to depart; and if a merry meeting may beMA V.i.311
wisht, God prohibite it: come neighbour. wished, God prohibit it! Come, neighbour.MA V.i.312
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