BORACHIO
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I came yonder from a great supper, the PrinceI came yonder from a great supper. The PrinceMA I.iii.39
your brother is royally entertained by Leonato, and I canyour brother is royally entertained by Leonato; and I canMA I.iii.40
giue you intelligence of an intended marriage.give you intelligence of an intended marriage.MA I.iii.41
Mary it is your brothers right hand.Marry, it is your brother's right hand.MA I.iii.45
Euen he.Even he.MA I.iii.47
Mary on Hero, the daughter and Heire of Marry, on Hero, the daughter and heir ofMA I.iii.50
Leonato. Leonato.MA I.iii.51
Being entertain'd for a perfumer, as I was Being entertained for a perfumer, as I wasMA I.iii.54
smoaking a musty roome, comes me the Prince and smoking a musty room, comes me the Prince andMA I.iii.55
Claudio, hand in hand in sad conference: I whipt Claudio, hand in hand, in sad conference. I whipt meMA I.iii.56
behind the Arras, and there heard it agreed vpon, that behind the arras, and there heard it agreed upon thatMA I.iii.57
the Prince should wooe Hero for himselfe, and hauing the Prince should woo Hero for himself, and havingMA I.iii.58
obtain'd her, giue her to Count Claudio.obtained her, give her to Count Claudio.MA I.iii.59
Wee'll wait vpon your Lordship. We'll wait upon your lordship.MA I.iii.69
And that is Claudio, I know him by his And that is Claudio; I know him by hisMA II.i.144
bearing. bearing.MA II.i.145
So did I too, and he swore he would marrie herSo did I too, and he swore he would marry herMA II.i.154
to night.tonight.MA II.i.155
Yea my Lord, but I can crosse it.Yea, my lord, but I can cross it.MA II.ii.3
Not honestly my Lord, but so couertly, that Not honestly, my lord; but so covertly thatMA II.ii.8
no dishonesty shall appeare in me.no dishonesty shall appear in me.MA II.ii.9
I thinke I told your Lordship a yeere since, howI think I told your lordship a year since, howMA II.ii.11
much I am in the fauour of Margaret, the much I am in the favour of Margaret, theMA II.ii.12
waiting gentle-woman to Hero.waiting-gentlewoman to Hero.MA II.ii.13
I can at any vnseasonable instant of the night,I can, at any unseasonable instant of the night,MA II.ii.15
appoint her to look out at her Ladies chamber window.appoint her to look out at her lady's chamber-window.MA II.ii.16
The poyson of that lies in you to temper, goeThe poison of that lies in you to temper. GoMA II.ii.19
you to the Prince your brother, spare not to tell him, you to the Prince your brother; spare not to tell himMA II.ii.20
that hee hath wronged his Honor in marrying the renownedthat he hath wronged his honour in marrying the renownedMA II.ii.21
Claudio, whose estimation do you mightily Claudio – whose estimation do you mightilyMA II.ii.22
hold vp, to a contaminated stale, such a one as Hero.hold up – to a contaminated stale, such a one as Hero.MA II.ii.23
Proofe enough, to misuse the Prince, to vexeProof enough to misuse the Prince, to vexMA II.ii.25
Claudio, to vndoe Hero, and kill Leonato, looke you for Claudio, to undo Hero and kill Leonato. Look you forMA II.ii.26
any other issue?any other issue?MA II.ii.27
Goe then, finde me a meete howre, to draw onGo, then; find me a meet hour to draw DonMA II.ii.30
Pedro and the Count Claudio alone, tell them that Pedro and the Count Claudio alone. Tell them thatMA II.ii.31
you know that Hero loues me, intend a kinde of zeale bothyou know that Hero loves me; intend a kind of zeal bothMA II.ii.32
to the Prince and Claudio (as in a loue of your brothersto the Prince and Claudio – as in love of your brother'sMA II.ii.33
honor who hath made this match) and his friends honour, who hath made this match, and his friend'sMA II.ii.34
reputation, who is thus like to be cosen'd with the semblancereputation, who is thus like to be cozened with the semblanceMA II.ii.35
of a maid, that you haue discouer'd thus: they of a maid – that you have discovered thus. TheyMA II.ii.36
will scarcely beleeue this without triall: offer them will scarcely believe this without trial; offer themMA II.ii.37
instances which shall beare no lesse likelihood, than to instances, which shall bear no less likelihood than toMA II.ii.38
see mee at her chamber window, heare me call Margaret, see me at her chamber window, hear me call MargaretMA II.ii.39
Hero; heare Margaret terme me Claudio, and bring them Hero, hear Margaret term me Claudio; and bring themMA II.ii.40
to see this the very night before the intended wedding, to see this the very night before the intended wedding –MA II.ii.41
for in the meane time, I will so fashion the matter, that for in the meantime I will so fashion the matter thatMA II.ii.42
Hero shall be absent, and there shall appeare such seeming Hero shall be absent – and there shall appear such seemingMA II.ii.43
truths of Heroes disloyaltie, that iealousie shall be cal'd truth of Hero's disloyalty that jealousy shall be calledMA II.ii.44
assurance, and all the preparation ouerthrowne.assurance, and all the preparation overthrown.MA II.ii.45
Be thou constant in the accusation, and my Be you constant in the accusation, and myMA II.ii.49
cunning shall not shame me.cunning shall not shame me.MA II.ii.50
What, Conrade?What, Conrade!MA III.iii.93
Conrade I say.Conrade, I say!MA III.iii.95
Mas and my elbow itcht, I thought there Mass, and my elbow itched; I thought thereMA III.iii.97
would a scabbe follow.would a scab follow.MA III.iii.98
Stand thee close then vnder this penthouse, Stand thee close then under this pent-house,MA III.iii.101
for it drissels raine, and I will, like a true drunkard, for it drizzles rain; and I will, like a true drunkard,MA III.iii.102
vtter all to thee.utter all to thee.MA III.iii.103
Therefore know, I haue earned of Don Iohn aTherefore know I have earned of Don John aMA III.iii.106
thousand Ducates.thousand ducats.MA III.iii.107
Thou should'st rather aske if it were possible Thou shouldst rather ask if it were possibleMA III.iii.109
anie villanie should be so rich? for when rich villains any villainy should be so rich; for when rich villainsMA III.iii.110
haue neede of poore ones, poore ones may make what pricehave need of poor ones, poor ones may make what priceMA III.iii.111
they will.they will.MA III.iii.112
That shewes thou art vnconfirm'd, thou That shows thou art unconfirmed. ThouMA III.iii.114
knowest that the fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or a knowest that the fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or aMA III.iii.115
cloake, is nothing to a man.cloak, is nothing to a man.MA III.iii.116
I meane the fashion.I mean, the fashion.MA III.iii.118
Tush, I may as well say the foole's the foole, butTush! I may as well say the fool's the fool. ButMA III.iii.120
seest thou not what a deformed theefe this fashion is?seest thou not what a deformed thief this fashion is?MA III.iii.121
Did'st thou not heare some bodie?Didst thou not hear somebody?MA III.iii.125
Seest thou not (I say) what a deformed thiefeSeest thou not, I say, what a deformed thiefMA III.iii.127
this fashion is, how giddily a turnes about all the this fashion is, how giddily 'a turns about all the hotMA III.iii.128
Hotblouds, betweene foureteene & fiue & thirtie, sometimesbloods between fourteen and five-and-thirty, sometimesMA III.iii.129
fashioning them like Pharaoes souldiours in the fashioning them like Pharaoh's soldiers in theMA III.iii.130
rechie painting, sometime like god Bels priests in the reechy painting, sometime like god Bel's priests in theMA III.iii.131
old Church window, sometime like the shauen Hercules old church-window, sometime like the shaven HerculesMA III.iii.132
in the smircht worm eaten tapestrie, where his cod-peecein the smirched worm-eaten tapestry, where his codpieceMA III.iii.133
seemes as massie as his club.seems as massy as his club?MA III.iii.134
Not so neither, but know that I haue to nightNot so, neither: but know that I have tonightMA III.iii.139
wooed Margaret the Lady Heroes gentle-woman, by thewooed Margaret, the Lady Hero's gentlewoman, by theMA III.iii.140
name of Hero, she leanes me out at her mistris name of Hero; she leans me out at her mistress'MA III.iii.141
chamber-window, bids me a thousand times chamber-window, bids me a thousand timesMA III.iii.142
good night: I tell this tale vildly. I should first tell thee how good-night – I tell this tale vilely – I should first tell thee howMA III.iii.143
the Prince Claudio and my Master planted, and the Prince, Claudio, and my master, planted, andMA III.iii.144
placed, and possessed by my Master Don Iohn, saw a far placed, and possessed, by my master Don John, saw afarMA III.iii.145
off in the Orchard this amiable incounter.off in the orchard this amiable encounter.MA III.iii.146
Two of them did, the Prince and Claudio, but Two of them did, the Prince and Claudio; butMA III.iii.148
the diuell my Master knew she was Margaret and partly the devil my master knew she was Margaret; and partlyMA III.iii.149
by his oathes, which first possest them, partly by the by his oaths, which first possessed them, partly by theMA III.iii.150
darke night which did deceiue them, but chiefely, by my dark night, which did deceive them, but chiefly by myMA III.iii.151
villanie, which did confirme any slander that Don Iohn villainy, which did confirm any slander that Don JohnMA III.iii.152
had made, away went Claudio enraged, swore hee wouldhad made, away went Claudio enraged; swore he wouldMA III.iii.153
meete her as he was apointed next morning at the meet her, as he was appointed, next morning at theMA III.iii.154
Temple, and there, before the whole congregation shame temple, and there, before the whole congregation, shameMA III.iii.155
her with what he saw o're night, and send her home her with what he saw o'er night, and send her homeMA III.iii.156
againe without a husband.again without a husband.MA III.iii.157
We are like to proue a goodly commoditie, We are like to prove a goodly commodity,MA III.iii.171
being taken vp of these mens bils.being taken up of these men's bills.MA III.iii.172
Borachio.Borachio.MA IV.ii.11
CONRADE and BORACHIO
Yea, sir, we hope.MA IV.ii.17
Sir, I say to you, we are none.Sir, I say to you we are none.MA IV.ii.29
Master Constable.Master Constable –MA IV.ii.41
Sweete Prince, let me go no farther to mine Sweet Prince, let me go no farther to mineMA V.i.219
answere: do you heare me, and let this Count kill mee: Ianswer; do you hear me, and let this Count kill me. IMA V.i.220
haue deceiued euen your verie eies: what your wisedomes have deceived even your very eyes: what your wisdomsMA V.i.221
could not discouer, these shallow fooles haue brought to could not discover, these shallow fools have brought toMA V.i.222
light, who in the night ouerheard me confessing to this light; who in the night overheard me confessing to thisMA V.i.223
man, how Don Iohn your brother incensed me to slander to this man how Don John your brother incensed me to slanderMA V.i.224
the Ladie Hero, how you were brought into the Orchard, the Lady Hero; how you were brought into the orchardMA V.i.225
and saw me court Margaret in Heroes garments, how and saw me court Margaret in Hero's garments; howMA V.i.226
you disgrac'd her when you should marrie her: my villanie you disgraced her, when you should marry her. My villainyMA V.i.227
they haue vpon record, which I had rather seale they have upon record, which I had rather sealMA V.i.228
with my death, then repeate ouer to my shame: the Ladie with my death than repeat over to my shame. The ladyMA V.i.229
is dead vpon mine and my masters false accusation: and is dead upon mine and my master's false accusation; and,MA V.i.230
briefelie, I desire nothing but the reward of a villaine. briefly, I desire nothing but the reward of a villain.MA V.i.231
Yea, and paid me richly for the practise of it.Yea, and paid me richly for the practice of it.MA V.i.235
If you would know your wronger, looke on me.If you would know your wronger, look on me.MA V.i.249
Yea, euen I alone.Yea, even I alone.MA V.i.251.2
No by my soule she was not,No, by my soul, she was not,MA V.i.287.2
Nor knew not what she did when she spoke to me,Nor knew not what she did when she spoke to me,MA V.i.288
But alwaies hath bin iust and vertuous,But always hath been just and virtuousMA V.i.289
In anie thing that I do know by her. In anything that I do know by her.MA V.i.290
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