MALVOLIO
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Yes, and shall do, till the pangs of death shakeYes, and shall do, till the pangs of death shakeTN I.v.70
him: Infirmity that decaies the wise, doth euer make thehim. Infirmity, that decays the wise, doth ever make theTN I.v.71
better foole.better fool.TN I.v.72
I maruell your Ladyship takes delight in such a I marvel your ladyship takes delight in such aTN I.v.78
barren rascall: I saw him put down the other day, with an barren rascal. I saw him put down the other day with anTN I.v.79
ordinary foole, that has no more braine then a stone. Looke ordinary fool that has no more brain than a stone. LookTN I.v.80
you now, he's out of his gard already: vnles you laugh you now, he's out of his guard already; unless you laughTN I.v.81
and minister occasion to him, he is gag'd. I protest I and minister occasion to him, he is gagged. I protest ITN I.v.82
take these Wisemen, that crow so at these set kinde oftake these wise men, that crow so at these set kind ofTN I.v.83
fooles, no better then the fooles Zanies.fools, no better than the fools' zanies.TN I.v.84
Madam, yond young fellow sweares hee willMadam, yond young fellow swears he willTN I.v.134
speake with you. I told him you were sicke, he takes onspeak with you. I told him you were sick; he takes onTN I.v.135
him to vnderstand so much, and therefore comes to him to understand so much, and therefore comes toTN I.v.136
speak with you. I told him you were asleepe, he seems to speak with you. I told him you were asleep; he seems toTN I.v.137
haue a fore knowledge of that too, and therefore comes have a foreknowledge of that too, and therefore comesTN I.v.138
to speake with you. What is to be said to him Ladie, hee'sto speak with you. What is to be said to him, lady? He'sTN I.v.139
fortified against any deniall.fortified against any denial.TN I.v.140
Ha's beene told so: and hee sayes hee'l stand atHe's been told so; and he says he'll stand atTN I.v.142
your doore like a Sheriffes post, and be the supporter to a your door like a sheriff's post and be the supporter to aTN I.v.143
bench, but hee'l speake with you.bench, but he'll speak with you.TN I.v.144
Why of mankinde.Why, of mankind.TN I.v.146
Of verie ill manner: hee'l speake with you, willOf very ill manner; he'll speak with you, willTN I.v.148
you, or no.you or no.TN I.v.149
Not yet old enough for a man, nor yong Not yet old enough for a man, nor youngTN I.v.151
enough for a boy: as a squash is before tis a pescod, or enough for a boy; as a squash is before 'tis a peascod, orTN I.v.152
a Codling when tis almost an Apple: Tis with him in a codling when 'tis almost an apple. 'Tis with him inTN I.v.153
standing water, betweene boy and man. He is verie well-fauour'd,standing water between boy and man. He is very well-favoured,TN I.v.154
and he speakes verie shrewishly: One would and he speaks very shrewishly. One wouldTN I.v.155
thinke his mothers milke were scarse out of him.think his mother's milk were scarce out of him.TN I.v.156
Gentlewoman, my Lady calles. Gentlewoman, my lady calls.TN I.v.158
Heere Madam, at your seruice.Here, madam, at your service.TN I.v.289
Madam, I will. Madam, I will.TN I.v.297
Were not you eu'n now, with the Countesse Were not you even now with the CountessTN II.ii.1
Oliuia?Olivia?TN II.ii.2
She returnes this Ring to you (sir) you mightShe returns this ring to you, sir. You mightTN II.ii.5
haue saued mee my paines, to haue taken it away your selfe. have saved me my pains, to have taken it away yourself.TN II.ii.6
She adds moreouer, that you should put your Lord into She adds, moreover, that you should put your lord intoTN II.ii.7
a desperate assurance, she will none of him. And onea desperate assurance she will none of him; and oneTN II.ii.8
thing more, that you be neuer so hardie to come againe in thing more, that you be never so hardy to come again inTN II.ii.9
his affaires, vnlesse it bee to report your Lords taking of his affairs – unless it be to report your lord's taking ofTN II.ii.10
this: receiue it so.this. Receive it so.TN II.ii.11
Come sir, you peeuishly threw it to her: andCome, sir, you peevishly threw it to her, andTN II.ii.13
her will is, it should be so return'd: If it bee worth stooping her will is it should be so returned. If it be worth stoopingTN II.ii.14
for, there it lies, in your eye: if not, bee it his that findes for, there it lies in your eye; if not, be it his that findsTN II.ii.15
it. it.TN II.ii.16
My masters are you mad? Or what are you?My masters, are you mad? Or what are you?TN II.iii.85
Haue you no wit, manners, nor honestie, but to gabbleHave you no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabbleTN II.iii.86
like Tinkers at this time of night? Do yee make an Alehouse like tinkers at this time of night? Do ye make an ale-houseTN II.iii.87
of my Ladies house, that ye squeak out your of my lady's house, that ye squeak out yourTN II.iii.88
Coziers Catches without any mitigation or remorse of coziers' catches without any mitigation or remorse ofTN II.iii.89
voice? Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time in voice? Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time inTN II.iii.90
you?you?TN II.iii.91
Sir Toby, I must be round with you. My LadySir Toby, I must be round with you. My ladyTN II.iii.93
bad me tell you, that though she harbors you as her bade me tell you that, though she harbours you as herTN II.iii.94
kinsman, she's nothing ally'd to your disorders. If you kinsman, she's nothing allied to your disorders. If youTN II.iii.95
can separate your selfe and your misdemeanors, you are can separate yourself and your misdemeanours, you areTN II.iii.96
welcome to the house: if not, and it would please you to welcome to the house. If not, an it would please you toTN II.iii.97
take leaue of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell.take leave of her, she is very willing to bid you farewell.TN II.iii.98
Is't euen so?Is't even so!TN II.iii.102
This is much credit to you.This is much credit to you!TN II.iii.105
Mistris Mary, if you priz'd my Ladies fauourMistress Mary, if you prized my lady's favourTN II.iii.117
at any thing more then contempt, you would not giueat anything more than contempt, you would not giveTN II.iii.118
meanes for this vnciuill rule; she shall know of it by thismeans for this uncivil rule. She shall know of it, by thisTN II.iii.119
hand. hand!TN II.iii.120
'Tis but Fortune, all is fortune. Maria once'Tis but fortune, all is fortune. Maria onceTN II.v.23
told me she did affect me, and I haue heard her self told me she did affect me; and I have heard herselfTN II.v.24
come thus neere, that should shee fancie, it should bee one come thus near, that should she fancy, it should be oneTN II.v.25
of my complection. Besides she vses me with a more of my complexion. Besides, she uses me with a moreTN II.v.26
exalted respect, then any one else that followes her. Whatexalted respect than anyone else that follows her. WhatTN II.v.27
should I thinke on't?should I think on't?TN II.v.28
To be Count Maluolio.To be Count Malvolio . . .TN II.v.34
There is example for't: The Lady of the There is example for't. The lady of theTN II.v.38
Strachy, married the yeoman of the wardrobe.Strachy married the yeoman of the wardrobe.TN II.v.39
Hauing beene three moneths married to her,Having been three months married to her,TN II.v.43
sitting in my state.sitting in my state . . .TN II.v.44
Calling my Officers about me, in my branch'dCalling my officers about me, in my branchedTN II.v.46
Veluet gowne: hauing come from a day bedde, where I haue velvet gown, having come from a day-bed, where I haveTN II.v.47
left Oliuia sleeping.left Olivia sleeping . . .TN II.v.48
And then to haue the humor of state: and And then to have the humour of state; andTN II.v.51
after a demure trauaile of regard: telling them I knowe myafter a demure travel of regard – telling them I know myTN II.v.52
place, as I would they should doe theirs: to aske for myplace, as I would they should do theirs – to ask for myTN II.v.53
kinsman Toby.kinsman Toby.TN II.v.54
Seauen of my people with an obedient start,Seven of my people, with an obedient start,TN II.v.57
make out for him: I frowne the while, and perchancemake out for him. I frown the while, and perchanceTN II.v.58
winde vp my watch, or play with my wind up my watch, or play with my (fingering hisTN II.v.59
some rich Iewell: Toby steward's chain of office) – some rich jewel. TobyTN II.v.60
approaches; curtsies there to me.approaches, curtsies there to me . . .TN II.v.61
I extend my hand to him thus: quenching I extend my hand to him thus – quenchingTN II.v.65
my familiar smile with an austere regard of controll.my familiar smile with an austere regard of control . . .TN II.v.66
Saying, Cosine Toby, my Fortunes hauing Saying, Cousin Toby, my fortunes havingTN II.v.69
cast me on your Neece, giue me this prerogatiue of cast me on your niece give me this prerogative ofTN II.v.70
speech.speech . . .TN II.v.71
You must amend your drunkennesse.You must amend your drunkenness.TN II.v.73
Besides you waste the treasure of your time,Besides, you waste the treasure of your timeTN II.v.76
with a foolish knight.with a foolish knight . . .TN II.v.77
One sir Andrew.One Sir Andrew.TN II.v.79
What employment haueWhat employment haveTN II.v.81
we heere?we here?TN II.v.82
By my life this is my Ladies hand: these bee By my life, this is my lady's hand. These beTN II.v.86
her very C's, her V's, and her T's, and thus makes shee her very C's, her U's and her T's; and thus makes sheTN II.v.87
her great P's. It is in contempt of question her hand.her great P's. It is, in contempt of question, her hand.TN II.v.88
To the vnknowne belou'd, this, and my good Wishes:To the unknown beloved this, and my good wishes.TN II.v.90
Her very Phrases: By your leaue wax. Soft, and the Her very phrases! By your leave, wax. Soft! and theTN II.v.91
impressure her Lucrece, with which she vses to seale: impressure her Lucrece, with which she uses to seal.TN II.v.92
tis my Lady: To whom should this be?'Tis my lady! To whom should this be?TN II.v.93
Ioue knowes I loue, Jove knows I love;TN II.v.95
but who, But who?TN II.v.96
Lips do not mooue, Lips, do not move;TN II.v.97
no man must know. No man must know.TN II.v.98
No man must know. What followes? The numbers ‘ No man must know ’! What follows? The numbersTN II.v.99
alter'd: No man must know, If this should be thee altered! ‘ No man must know ’! If this should be thee,TN II.v.100
Maluolio?Malvolio!TN II.v.101
I may command where I adore, I may command where I adore;TN II.v.103
but silence like a Lucresse knife:But silence, like a Lucrece' knife,TN II.v.104
With bloodlesse stroke my heart doth gore, With bloodless stroke my heart doth gore;TN II.v.105
M.O.A.I. doth sway my life.M.O.A.I. doth sway my life.TN II.v.106
M.O.A.I. doth sway my life. Nay but first‘ M.O.A.I. doth sway my life.’ Nay, but firstTN II.v.109
let me see, let me see, let me see.let me see, let me see, let me see. . . .TN II.v.110
I may command, where I adore: Why shee ‘ I may command where I adore.’ Why, sheTN II.v.113
may command me: I serue her, she is my Ladie. Why may command me. I serve her, she is my lady. Why,TN II.v.114
this is euident to any formall capacitie. There is no this is evident to any formal capacity. There is noTN II.v.115
obstruction in this, and the end: What should that Alphabeticall obstruction in this. And the end: what should that alphabeticalTN II.v.116
position portend, if I could make that resemble position portend? If I could make that resembleTN II.v.117
something in me? Softly, M.O.A.I.something in me. . . . Softly, ‘ M.O.A.I.’ . . .TN II.v.118
M. Maluolio, M. why that begins my M . . . Malvolio! M! Why, that begins myTN II.v.122
name.name!TN II.v.123
M. But then there is no consonancy in the M! But then there is no consonancy in theTN II.v.126
sequell that suffers vnder probation: A. should follow, sequel that suffers under probation. A should follow,TN II.v.127
but O. does.but O does.TN II.v.128
And then I. comes behind.And then I comes behind.TN II.v.131
M,O,A,I. This simulation is not as the M.O.A.I. This simulation is not as theTN II.v.135
former: and yet to crush this a little, it would bow to former. And yet, to crush this a little, it would bow toTN II.v.136
mee, for euery one of these Letters are in my name. Soft, me, for every one of these letters are in my name. Soft!TN II.v.137
here followes prose:Here follows prose.TN II.v.138
If this fall into thy hand, reuolue. In my stars I am aboue If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my stars I am aboveTN II.v.139
thee, but be not affraid of greatnesse: Some are become great, thee, but be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great,TN II.v.140
some atcheeues greatnesse, and some haue greatnesse thrust some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrustTN II.v.141
vppon em. Thy fates open theyr hands, let thy blood and upon 'em. Thy fates open their hands, let thy blood andTN II.v.142
spirit embrace them, and to invre thy selfe to what thou art spirit embrace them; and to inure thyself to what thou artTN II.v.143
like to be: cast thy humble slough, and appeare fresh. Be like to be, cast thy humble slough and appear fresh. BeTN II.v.144
opposite with a kinsman, surly with seruants: Let thy opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants. Let thyTN II.v.145
tongue tang arguments of state; put thy selfe into the tricke of tongue tang arguments of state. Put thyself into the trick ofTN II.v.146
singularitie. Shee thus aduises thee, that sighes for thee. singularity. She thus advises thee that sighs for thee.TN II.v.147
Remember who commended thy yellow stockings, and wish'd Remember who commended thy yellow stockings and wishedTN II.v.148
to see thee euer crosse garter'd: I say remember, goe too, thou to see thee ever cross-gartered. I say, remember. Go to, thouTN II.v.149
art made if thou desir'st to be so: If not, let me see thee a art made if thou desirest to be so. If not, let me see thee aTN II.v.150
steward still, the fellow of seruants, and not woorthie tosteward still, the fellow of servants, and not worthy toTN II.v.151
touch Fortunes fingers Farewell, Shee that would altertouch Fortune's fingers. Farewell. She that would alterTN II.v.152
seruices with thee, tht fortunate vnhappy services with thee, The Fortunate Unhappy.TN II.v.153
daylight and champian discouers not more: This is Daylight and champain discovers not more! This isTN II.v.154
open, I will bee proud, I will reade politicke Authours, I will open. I will be proud, I will read politic authors, I willTN II.v.155
baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off grosse acquaintance, I baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off gross acquaintance, ITN II.v.156
will be point deuise, the very man. I do not now foole will be point-devise the very man. I do not now foolTN II.v.157
my selfe, to let imagination iade mee; for euery reason myself, to let imagination jade me; for every reasonTN II.v.158
excites to this, that my Lady loues me. She did commend excites to this, that my lady loves me. She did commendTN II.v.159
my yellow stockings of late, shee did praise my legge being my yellow stockings of late, she did praise my leg beingTN II.v.160
crosse-garter'd, and in this she manifests her selfe to my cross-gartered; and in this she manifests herself to myTN II.v.161
loue, & with a kinde of iniunction driues mee to these love and with a kind of injunction drives me to theseTN II.v.162
habites of her liking. I thanke my starres, I am happy: I habits of her liking. I thank my stars, I am happy! ITN II.v.163
will bee strange, stout, in yellow stockings, and crosse Garter'd,will be strange, stout, in yellow stockings and cross-gartered,TN II.v.164
euen with the swiftnesse of putting on. Ioue, and even with the swiftness of putting on. Jove andTN II.v.165
my starres be praised. Heere is yet a postscript. my stars be praised! Here is yet a postscript.TN II.v.166
Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou entertainst Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou entertainestTN II.v.167
my loue, let it appeare in thy smiling, thy smiles my love, let it appear in thy smiling, thy smilesTN II.v.168
become thee well. Therefore in my presence still smile, deerobecome thee well. Therefore in my presence still smile, dearTN II.v.169
my sweete, I prethee.my sweet, I prithee.TN II.v.170
Ioue I thanke thee, I will smile, I wil do euery thing that Jove, I thank thee! I will smile. I will do everything thatTN II.v.171
thou wilt haue me. thou wilt have me!TN II.v.172
Sweet Lady, ho, ho.Sweet lady! Ho! Ho!TN III.iv.17
Sad Lady, I could be sad: / This does make Sad, lady? I could be sad; this does makeTN III.iv.19
some obstruction in the blood: / This crosse-gartering, but some obstruction in the blood, this cross-gartering – butTN III.iv.20
what of that? / If it please the eye of one, it is with me as what of that? If it please the eye of one, it is with me asTN III.iv.21
the very true / Sonnet is: Please one, and please all.the very true sonnet is: ‘Please one and please all'.TN III.iv.22
Not blacke in my minde, though yellow in myNot black in my mind, though yellow in myTN III.iv.25
legges: It did come to his hands, and Commaunds shall be legs. It did come to his hands; and commands shall beTN III.iv.26
executed. I thinke we doe know the sweet Romane hand.executed. I think we do know the sweet Roman hand.TN III.iv.27
To bed? I sweet heart, and Ile come to To bed! ‘ Ay, sweetheart, and I'll come toTN III.iv.29
thee.thee!’TN III.iv.30
At your request: / Yes Nightingales answere At your request? Yes; nightingales answerTN III.iv.34
Dawes.daws.TN III.iv.35
Be not afraid of greatnesse: 'twas well writ.‘ Be not afraid of greatness.’ 'Twas well writ.TN III.iv.38
Some are borne great.‘ Some are born great – ’TN III.iv.40
Some atcheeue greatnesse.‘ Some achieve greatness – ’TN III.iv.42
And some haue greatnesse thrust vpon‘ And some have greatness thrust uponTN III.iv.44
them.them.’TN III.iv.45
Remember who commended thy yellow ‘ Remember who commended thy yellowTN III.iv.47
stockings.stockings – ’TN III.iv.48
And wish'd to see thee crosse garter'd.‘ – and wished to see thee cross-gartered.’TN III.iv.50
Go too, thou art made, if thou desir'st to be ‘ Go to, thou art made if thou desir'st to beTN III.iv.52
so.so.’TN III.iv.53
If not, ler me see thee a seruant still.‘ If not, let me see thee a servant still.’TN III.iv.55
Oh ho, do you come neere me now: no worseO ho! Do you come near me now? No worseTN III.iv.65
man then sir Toby to looke to me. This concurres directly man than Sir Toby to look to me! This concurs directlyTN III.iv.66
with the Letter, she sends him on purpose, that I maywith the letter. She sends him on purpose, that I mayTN III.iv.67
appeare stubborne to him: for she incites me to that inappear stubborn to him; for she incites me to that inTN III.iv.68
the Letter. Cast thy humble slough sayes she: be the letter. ‘ Cast thy humble slough,’ says she. ‘ BeTN III.iv.69
opposite with a Kinsman, surly with seruants, let thy opposite with a kinsman, surly with servants, let thyTN III.iv.70
tongue langer with arguments of state, put thy selfe into thetongue tang with arguments of state, put thyself into theTN III.iv.71
tricke of singularity: and consequently setts downe thetrick of singularity ’ – and consequently sets down theTN III.iv.72
manner how: as a sad face, a reuerend carriage, a slowmanner how: as, a sad face, a reverend carriage, a slowTN III.iv.73
tongue, in the habite of some Sir of note, and so foorth. I tongue, in the habit of some sir of note, and so forth. ITN III.iv.74
haue lymde her, but it is Ioues doing, and Ioue make mehave limed her! But it is Jove's doing, and Jove make meTN III.iv.75
thankefull. And when she went away now, let this Fellow thankful! And when she went away now – ‘ let this fellowTN III.iv.76
be look'd too: Fellow? not Maluolio, nor after mybe looked to.’ Fellow! Not ‘ Malvolio,’ nor after myTN III.iv.77
degree, but Fellow. Why euery thing adheres togither,degree, but ‘ fellow ’! Why, everything adheres together,TN III.iv.78
that no dramme of a scruple, no scruple of a scruple, nothat no dram of a scruple, no scruple of a scruple, noTN III.iv.79
obstacle, no incredulous or vnsafe circumstance: Whatobstacle, no incredulous or unsafe circumstance – whatTN III.iv.80
can be saide? Nothing that can be, can come betweenecan be said? – nothing that can be, can come betweenTN III.iv.81
me, and the full prospect of my hopes. Well Ioue, not I,me and the full prospect of my hopes. Well, Jove, not I,TN III.iv.82
is the doer of this, and he is to be thanked.is the doer of this, and he is to be thanked.TN III.iv.83
Go off, I discard you: let me enioy my priuate:Go off, I discard you. Let me enjoy my private.TN III.iv.89
go off.Go off.TN III.iv.90
Ah ha, does she so?Ah ha! Does she so!TN III.iv.94
Do you know what you say?Do you know what you say?TN III.iv.99
How now mistris?How now, mistress?TN III.iv.106
Sir.Sir!TN III.iv.114
My prayers Minx.My prayers, minx!TN III.iv.120
Go hang your selues all: you are ydle shalloweGo, hang yourselves all. You are idle, shallowTN III.iv.122
things, I am not of your element, you shall knowe morethings; I am not of your element. You shall know moreTN III.iv.123
heereafter. hereafter.TN III.iv.124
Who cals there?Who calls there?TN IV.ii.20
Sir Topas, sir Topas, good sir Topas goe to Sir Topas, Sir Topas, good Sir Topas, go toTN IV.ii.23
my Ladie.my lady – TN IV.ii.24
Sir Topas, neuer was man thus wronged, Sir Topas, never was man thus wronged.TN IV.ii.28
good sir Topas do not thinke I am mad: they haue layde Good Sir Topas, do not think I am mad. They have laidTN IV.ii.29
mee heere in hideous darknesse.me here in hideous darkness – TN IV.ii.30
As hell sir Topas.As hell, Sir Topas.TN IV.ii.35
I am not mad sir Topas, I say to you this I am not mad, Sir Topas. I say to you, thisTN IV.ii.40
house is darke.house is dark.TN IV.ii.41
I say this house is as darke as Ignorance, I say this house is as dark as ignorance,TN IV.ii.45
thogh Ignorance were as darke as hell; and I say there though ignorance were as dark as hell. And I say thereTN IV.ii.46
was neuer man thus abus'd, I am no more madde then you was never man thus abused. I am no more mad than youTN IV.ii.47
are, make the triall of it in any constant question.are – make the trial of it in any constant question.TN IV.ii.48
That the soule of our grandam, might happilyThat the soul of our grandam might haplyTN IV.ii.51
inhabite a bird.inhabit a bird.TN IV.ii.52
I thinke nobly of the soule, and no way aproueI think nobly of the soul, and no way approveTN IV.ii.54
his opinion.his opinion.TN IV.ii.55
Sir Topas, sir Topas.Sir Topas, Sir Topas!TN IV.ii.60
Foole.Fool!TN IV.ii.73
Foole.Fool!TN IV.ii.75
Foole, I say.Fool, I say!TN IV.ii.77
Good foole, as euer thou wilt deserue well atGood fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well atTN IV.ii.80
my hand, helpe me to a Candle, and pen, inke, and paper:my hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink, and paper.TN IV.ii.81
as I am a Gentleman, I will liue to bee thankefull to theeAs I am a gentleman, I will live to be thankful to theeTN IV.ii.82
for't.for't.TN IV.ii.83
I good Foole.Ay, good fool.TN IV.ii.85
Foole, there was neuer man so notoriouslie Fool, there was never man so notoriouslyTN IV.ii.87
abus'd: I am as well in my wits (foole) as thou art.abused. I am as well in my wits, fool, as thou art.TN IV.ii.88
They haue heere propertied me: keepe mee inThey have here propertied me; keep me inTN IV.ii.91
darkenesse, send Ministers to me, Asses, and doe all theydarkness, send ministers to me – asses! – and do all theyTN IV.ii.92
can to face me out of my wits.can to face me out of my wits.TN IV.ii.93
Sir Topas.Sir Topas!TN IV.ii.98
Foole, foole, foole I say.Fool! Fool! Fool, I say!TN IV.ii.103
Good foole, helpe me to some light, and someGood fool, help me to some light and someTN IV.ii.106
paper, I tell thee I am as well in my wittes, as any man inpaper. I tell thee, I am as well in my wits as any man inTN IV.ii.107
Illyria.Illyria.TN IV.ii.108
By this hand I am: good foole, some inke, By this hand, I am! Good fool, some ink,TN IV.ii.110
paper, and light: and conuey what I will set downe to mypaper, and light; and convey what I will set down to myTN IV.ii.111
Lady: it shall aduantage thee more, then euer the bearing lady. It shall advantage thee more than ever the bearingTN IV.ii.112
of Letter did.of letter did.TN IV.ii.113
Beleeue me I am not, I tell thee true.Believe me, I am not. I tell thee true.TN IV.ii.116
Foole, Ile requite it in the highest degree: I Fool, I'll requite it in the highest degree. ITN IV.ii.119
prethee be goue.prithee, be gone.TN IV.ii.120
Madam, you haue done me wrong,Madam, you have done me wrong;TN V.i.326
Notorious wrong.Notorious wrong.TN V.i.327.1
Lady you haue, pray you peruse that Letter.Lady, you have; pray you, peruse that letter.TN V.i.328
You must not now denie it is your hand,You must not now deny it is your hand.TN V.i.329
Write from it if you can, in hand, or phrase,Write from it if you can, in hand or phrase,TN V.i.330
Or say, tis not your seale, not your inuention:Or say 'tis not your seal, nor your invention;TN V.i.331
You can say none of this. Well, grant it then,You can say none of this. Well, grant it then,TN V.i.332
And tell me in the modestie of honor,And tell me in the modesty of honour,TN V.i.333
Why you haue giuen me such cleare lights of fauour,Why you have given me such clear lights of favour?TN V.i.334
Bad me come smiling, and crosse-garter'd to you,Bade me come smiling and cross-gartered to you,TN V.i.335
To put on yellow stockings, and to frowneTo put on yellow stockings, and to frownTN V.i.336
Vpon sir Toby, and the lighter people:Upon Sir Toby and the lighter people?TN V.i.337
And acting this in an obedient hope,And, acting this in an obedient hope,TN V.i.338
Why haue you suffer'd me to be imprison'd,Why have you suffered me to be imprisoned,TN V.i.339
Kept in a darke house, visited by the Priest,Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest,TN V.i.340
And made the most notorious gecke and gull,And made the most notorious geck and gullTN V.i.341
That ere inuention plaid on? Tell me why?That e'er invention played on? Tell me why?TN V.i.342
Ile be reueng'd on the whole packe of you?I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you!TN V.i.375
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL