LORENZO
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My Lord Bassanio, since you haue found AnthonioMy Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio,MV I.i.69
We two will leaue you, but at dinner timeWe two will leave you; but at dinner-timeMV I.i.70
I pray you haue in minde where we must meete.I pray you have in mind where we must meet.MV I.i.71
Well, we will leaue you then till dinner time.Well, we will leave you then till dinner-time.MV I.i.105
I must be one of these same dumbe wise men,I must be one of these same dumb wise men,MV I.i.106
For Gratiano neuer let's me speake.For Gratiano never lets me speak.MV I.i.107
Nay, we will slinke away in supper time,Nay, we will slink away in supper-time,MV II.iv.1
Disguise vs at my lodging, and returne Disguise us at my lodging, and return,MV II.iv.2
all in an houre.All in an hour.MV II.iv.3
'Tis now but foure of clock, we haue two houres'Tis now but four of clock. We have two hoursMV II.iv.8
To furnish vs; To furnish us.MV II.iv.9.1
friend Lancelet what's the newes.Friend Launcelot, what's the news?MV II.iv.9.2
I know the hand, in faith 'tis a faire handI know the hand. In faith, 'tis a fair hand,MV II.iv.12
And whiter then the paper it writ on,And whiter than the paper it writ onMV II.iv.13
I the faire hand that writ.Is the fair hand that writ.MV II.iv.14.1
Whither goest thou?Whither goest thou?MV II.iv.16
Hold here, take this, tell gentle IessicaHold here, take this. Tell gentle JessicaMV II.iv.19
I will not faile her, speake it priuately:I will not fail her. Speak it privately.MV II.iv.20
Go Gentlemen, Go, gentlemen;MV II.iv.21
will you prepare you for this Maske to night,Will you prepare you for this masque tonight?MV II.iv.22
I am prouided of a Torch-bearer. I am provided of a torchbearer.MV II.iv.23
Meete me and Gratiano Meet me and GratianoMV II.iv.25.2
at Gratianos lodging / Some houre hence.At Gratiano's lodging some hour hence.MV II.iv.26
I must needes tell thee all, she hath directedI must needs tell thee all. She hath directedMV II.iv.29
How I shall take her from her Fathers house,How I shall take her from her father's house,MV II.iv.30
What gold and iewels she is furnisht with,What gold and jewels she is furnished with,MV II.iv.31
What Pages suite she hath in readinesse:What page's suit she hath in readiness.MV II.iv.32
If ere the Iew her Father come to heauen,If e'er the Jew her father come to heaven,MV II.iv.33
It will be for his gentle daughters sake;It will be for his gentle daughter's sake;MV II.iv.34
And neuer dare misfortune crosse her foote,And never dare misfortune cross her foot,MV II.iv.35
Vnlesse she doe it vnder this excuse,Unless she do it under this excuse,MV II.iv.36
That she is issue to a faithlesse Iew:That she is issue to a faithless Jew.MV II.iv.37
Come goe with me, pervse this as thou goest,Come, go with me; peruse this as thou goest.MV II.iv.38
Faire Iessica shall be my Torch-bearer. Fair Jessica shall be my torchbearer.MV II.iv.39
Sweete friends, your patience for my long abode, Sweet friends, your patience for my long abode.MV II.vi.21
Not I, but my affaires haue made you wait:Not I but my affairs have made you wait.MV II.vi.22
When you shall please to play the theeues for wiuesWhen you shall please to play the thieves for wives,MV II.vi.23
Ile watch as long for you then: approachI'll watch as long for you then. Approach.MV II.vi.24
Here dwels my father Iew. Hoa, who's within?Here dwells my father Jew! Ho! Who's within?MV II.vi.25
Lorenzo, and thy Loue.Lorenzo, and thy love.MV II.vi.28
Heauen and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.Heaven and thy thoughts are witness that thou art.MV II.vi.32
Descend, for you must be my torch-bearer.Descend, for you must be my torchbearer.MV II.vi.40
So you are sweet,So are you, sweet,MV II.vi.44.2
Euen in the louely garnish of a boy: Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.MV II.vi.45
but come at once,But come at once,MV II.vi.46
For the close night doth play the run-away,For the close night doth play the runaway,MV II.vi.47
And we are staid for at Bassanio's feast.And we are stayed for at Bassanio's feast.MV II.vi.48
Beshrew me but I loue her heartily.Beshrew me but I love her heartily!MV II.vi.52
For she is wise, if I can iudge of her,For she is wise, if I can judge of her,MV II.vi.53
And faire she is, if that mine eyes be true,And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,MV II.vi.54
And true she is, as she hath prou'd her selfe:And true she is, as she hath proved herself;MV II.vi.55
And therefore like her selfe, wise, faire, and true,And therefore, like herself, wise, fair, and true,MV II.vi.56
Shall she be placed in my constant soule.Shall she be placed in my constant soul.MV II.vi.57
What, art thou come? on gentlemen, away,What, art thou come? On, gentlemen, away!MV II.vi.58
Our masking mates by this time for vs stay. Our masquing mates by this time for us stay.MV II.vi.59
I thanke your honor; for my part my Lord,I thank your honour. For my part, my lord,MV III.ii.226
My purpose was not to haue seene you heere,My purpose was not to have seen you here,MV III.ii.227
But meeting with Salerio by the way,But meeting with Salerio by the way,MV III.ii.228
He did intreate mee past all saying nayHe did entreat me past all saying nayMV III.ii.229
To come with him along.To come with him along.MV III.ii.230.1
Madam, although I speake it in your presence,Madam, although I speak it in your presence,MV III.iv.1
You haue a noble and a true conceitYou have a noble and a true conceitMV III.iv.2
Of god-like amity, which appeares most stronglyOf godlike amity, which appears most stronglyMV III.iv.3
In bearing thus the absence of your Lord.In bearing thus the absence of your lord.MV III.iv.4
But if you knew to whom you shew this honour,But if you knew to whom you show this honour,MV III.iv.5
How true a Gentleman you send releefe,How true a gentleman you send relief,MV III.iv.6
How deere a louer of my Lord your husband,How dear a lover of my lord your husband,MV III.iv.7
I know you would be prouder of the workeI know you would be prouder of the workMV III.iv.8
Then customary bounty can enforce you.Than customary bounty can enforce you.MV III.iv.9
Madame, with all my heart,Madam, with all my heart,MV III.iv.35.2
I shall obey you in all faire commands.I shall obey you in all fair commands.MV III.iv.36
Faire thoughts & happy houres attend on you.Fair thoughts and happy hours attend on you!MV III.iv.41
I shall grow iealous of you shortly Lancelet,I shall grow jealous of you shortly, Launcelot,MV III.v.26
if you thus get my wife into corners?if you thus get my wife into corners.MV III.v.27
I shall answere that better to the I shall answer that better to theMV III.v.33
Commonwealth, than you can the getting vp of the commonwealth than you can the getting up of theMV III.v.34
Negroes bellie: the Moore is with childe by you Negro's belly. The Moor is with child by you,MV III.v.35
Launcelet?Launcelot.MV III.v.36
How euerie foole can play vpon the word, I thinke How every fool can play upon the word! I thinkMV III.v.40
the best grace of witte will shortly turne into silence, and the best grace of wit will shortly turn into silence, andMV III.v.41
discourse grow commendable in none onely but Parrats: discourse grow commendable in none only but parrots.MV III.v.42
goe in sirra, bid them prepare for dinner?Go in, sirrah, bid them prepare for dinner.MV III.v.43
Goodly Lord, what a witte-snapper are you,Goodly Lord, what a wit-snapper are you!MV III.v.45
then bid them prepare dinner.Then bid them prepare dinner.MV III.v.46
Will you couer than sir?Will you cover then, sir?MV III.v.49
Yet more quarrellng with occasion, wilt thouYet more quarrelling with occasion. Wilt thouMV III.v.51
shew the whole wealth of thy wit in an instant; I prayshow the whole wealth of thy wit in an instant? I prayMV III.v.52
thee vnderstand a plaine man in his plaine meaning: goethee understand a plain man in his plain meaning: goMV III.v.53
to thy fellowes, bid them couer the table, serue in theto thy fellows, bid them cover the table, serve in theMV III.v.54
meat, and we will come in to dinner.meat, and we will come in to dinner.MV III.v.55
O deare discretion, how his words are suted,O dear discretion, how his words are suited!MV III.v.60
The foole hath planted in his memoryThe fool hath planted in his memoryMV III.v.61
An Armie of good words, and I doe knowAn army of good words; and I do knowMV III.v.62
A many fooles that stand in better place,A many fools that stand in better place,MV III.v.63
Garnisht like him, that for a tricksie wordGarnished like him, that for a tricksy wordMV III.v.64
Defie the matter: how cheer'st thou Iessica,Defy the matter. How cheer'st thou, Jessica?MV III.v.65
And now good sweet say thy opinion,And now, good sweet, say thy opinion,MV III.v.66
How dost thou like the Lord Bassiano's wife?How dost thou like the Lord Bassanio's wife?MV III.v.67
Euen such a husbandEven such a husbandMV III.v.78.2
Hast thou of me, as she is for a wife.Hast thou of me as she is for a wife.MV III.v.79
I will anone, first let vs goe to dinner?I will anon. First let us go to dinner.MV III.v.81
No pray thee, let it serue for table talke,No, pray thee, let it serve for table-talk,MV III.v.83
Then how som ere thou speakst 'mong other things,Then, howsome'er thou speak'st, 'mong other thingsMV III.v.84
I shall digest it?I shall digest it.MV III.v.85.1
The moone shines bright. In such a night as this,The moon shines bright. In such a night as this,MV V.i.1
When the sweet winde did gently kisse the trees,When the sweet wind did gently kiss the treesMV V.i.2
And they did make no nnyse, in such a nightAnd they did make no noise, in such a nightMV V.i.3
Troylus me thinkes mounted the Troian walls,Troilus methinks mounted the Troyan walls,MV V.i.4
And sigh'd his soule toward the Grecian tentsAnd sighed his soul toward the Grecian tentsMV V.i.5
Where Cressed lay that night.Where Cressid lay that night.MV V.i.6.1
In such a nightIn such a nightMV V.i.9.2
Stood Dido with a Willow in her handStood Dido with a willow in her handMV V.i.10
Vpon the wilde sea bankes, and waft her LoueUpon the wild sea banks, and waft her loveMV V.i.11
To come againe to Carthage.To come again to Carthage.MV V.i.12.1
In such a nightIn such a nightMV V.i.14.2
Did Iessica steale from the wealthy Iewe,Did Jessica steal from the wealthy Jew,MV V.i.15
And with an Vnthrift Loue did runne from Venice,And with an unthrift love did run from VeniceMV V.i.16
As farre as Belmont.As far as Belmont.MV V.i.17.1
In such a nightIn such a nightMV V.i.20.2
Did pretty Iessica (like a little shrow)Did pretty Jessica, like a little shrew,MV V.i.21
Slander her Loue, and he forgaue it her.Slander her love, and he forgave it her.MV V.i.22
Who comes so fast in silence of the night?Who comes so fast in silence of the night?MV V.i.25
A friend, what friend? your name I pray you friend?A friend? What friend? Your name I pray you, friend.MV V.i.27
Who comes with her?Who comes with her?MV V.i.32.2
He is not, nor we haue not heard from him,He is not, nor we have not heard from him.MV V.i.35
But goe we in I pray thee Iessica,But go we in, I pray thee, Jessica,MV V.i.36
And ceremoniously let vs vs prepareAnd ceremoniously let us prepareMV V.i.37
Some welcome for the Mistresse of the house,Some welcome for the mistress of the house.MV V.i.38
Who calls?Who calls?MV V.i.40
Leaue hollowing man, heere.Leave holloaing, man! Here.MV V.i.43
Heere?Here!MV V.i.45
sweet soule / Let's in, and there expect their comming.Sweet soul, let's in, and there expect their coming.MV V.i.49
And yet no matter: why should we goe in?And yet no matter, why should we go in?MV V.i.50
My friend Stephen, signifie pray youMy friend Stephano, signify, I pray you,MV V.i.51
Within the house, your Mistresse is at hand,Within the house, your mistress is at hand,MV V.i.52
And bring your musique foorth into the ayre.And bring your music forth into the air.MV V.i.53
How sweet the moone-light sleepes vpon this banke,How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!MV V.i.54
Heere will we sit, and let the sounds of musickeHere will we sit and let the sounds of musicMV V.i.55
Creepe in our eares soft stilnes, and the nightCreep in our ears; soft stillness and the nightMV V.i.56
Become the tutches of sweet harmonie:Become the touches of sweet harmony.MV V.i.57
Sit Iessica, looke how the floore of heauenSit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heavenMV V.i.58
Is thicke inlayed with pattens of bright gold,Is thick inlaid with patens of bright gold.MV V.i.59
There's not the smallest orbe which thou beholdstThere's not the smallest orb which thou beholdestMV V.i.60
But in his motion like an Angell sings,But in his motion like an angel sings,MV V.i.61
Still quiring to the young eyed Cherubins;Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;MV V.i.62
Such harmonie is in immortall soules,Such harmony is in immortal souls,MV V.i.63
But whilst this muddy vesture of decayBut whilst this muddy vesture of decayMV V.i.64
Doth grosly close in it, we cannot heare it:Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.MV V.i.65
Come hoe, and wake Diana with a hymne,Come ho, and wake Diana with a hymn,MV V.i.66
With sweetest tutches pearce your Mistresse eare,With sweetest touches pierce your mistress' ear,MV V.i.67
And draw her home with musicke.And draw her home with music.MV V.i.68
The reason is, your spirits are attentiue:The reason is your spirits are attentive.MV V.i.70
For doe but note a wilde and wanton heardFor do but note a wild and wanton herdMV V.i.71
Or race of youthful and vnhandled colts,Or race of youthful and unhandled coltsMV V.i.72
Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud,Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud,MV V.i.73
Which is the hot condition of their bloud,Which is the hot condition of their blood,MV V.i.74
If they but heare perchance a trumpet sound,If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound,MV V.i.75
Or any ayre of musicke touch their eares,Or any air of music touch their ears,MV V.i.76
You shall perceiue them make a mutuall stand,You shall perceive them make a mutual stand,MV V.i.77
Their sauage eyes turn'd to a modest gaze,Their savage eyes turned to a modest gazeMV V.i.78
By the sweet power of musicke: therefore the PoetBy the sweet power of music. Therefore the poetMV V.i.79
Did faine that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods.Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods,MV V.i.80
Since naught so stockish, hard, and full of rage,Since naught so stockish, hard, and full of rageMV V.i.81
But musicke for time doth change his nature,But music for the time doth change his nature.MV V.i.82
The man that hath no musicke in himselfe,The man that hath no music in himself,MV V.i.83
Nor is not moued with concord of sweet sounds,Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,MV V.i.84
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoyles,Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils,MV V.i.85
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,The motions of his spirit are dull as night,MV V.i.86
And his affections darke as Erobus,And his affections dark as Erebus.MV V.i.87
Let no such man be trusted: marke the musicke.Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.MV V.i.88
That is the voice,That is the voice,MV V.i.110.2
Or I am much deceiu'd of Portia.Or I am much deceived, of Portia.MV V.i.111
Deere Lady welcome home?Dear lady, welcome home.MV V.i.113.2
Madam, they are not yet:Madam, they are not yet,MV V.i.116.2
But there is come a Messenger beforeBut there is come a messenger beforeMV V.i.117
To signifie their comming.To signify their coming.MV V.i.118.1
Your husband is at hand, I heare his Trumpet,Your husband is at hand, I hear his trumpet.MV V.i.122
We are no tell-tales Madam, feare you not.We are no tell-tales, madam; fear you not.MV V.i.123
Faire Ladies you drop Manna in the wayFair ladies, you drop manna in the wayMV V.i.294
Of starued people.Of starved people.MV V.i.295.1
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL