JESSICA
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I am sorry thou wilt leaue my Father so,I am sorry thou wilt leave my father so.MV II.iii.1
Our house is hell, and thou a merrie diuellOur house is hell, and thou a merry devilMV II.iii.2
Did'st rob it of some taste of tediousnesse;Didst rob it of some taste of tediousness.MV II.iii.3
But far thee well, there is a ducat for thee,But fare thee well, there is a ducat for thee.MV II.iii.4
And Lancelet, soone at supper shalt thou seeAnd, Launcelot, soon at supper shalt thou seeMV II.iii.5
Lorenzo, who is thy new Maisters guest,Lorenzo, who is thy new master's guest.MV II.iii.6
Giue him this Letter, doe it secretly,Give him this letter; do it secretly.MV II.iii.7
And so farwell: I would not haue my FatherAnd so farewell; I would not have my fatherMV II.iii.8
See me talke with thee.See me in talk with thee.MV II.iii.9
Farewell good Lancelet.Farewell, good Launcelot.MV II.iii.15
Alacke, what hainous sinne is it in meAlack, what heinous sin is it in meMV II.iii.16
To be ashamed to be my Fathers childe,To be ashamed to be my father's child.MV II.iii.17
But though I am a daughter to his blood,But though I am a daughter to his blood,MV II.iii.18
I am not to his manners: O Lorenzo,I am not to his manners. O Lorenzo,MV II.iii.19
If thou keepe promise I shall end this strife,If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife,MV II.iii.20
Become a Christian, and thy louing wife. Become a Christian and thy loving wife.MV II.iii.21
Call you? what is your will?Call you? What is your will?MV II.v.10
His words were farewell mistris, nothing else.His words were ‘ Farewell mistress ’, nothing else.MV II.v.43
Farewell, and if my fortune be not crost,Farewell; and if my fortune be not crost,MV II.v.54
I haue a Father, you a daughter lost. I have a father, you a daughter, lost.MV II.v.55
Who are you? tell me for more certainty,Who are you? Tell me for more certainty,MV II.vi.26
Albeit Ile sweare that I do know your tongue.Albeit I'll swear that I do know your tongue.MV II.vi.27
Lorenzo certaine, and my loue indeed,Lorenzo certain, and my love indeed,MV II.vi.29
For who loue I so much? and now who knowesFor who love I so much? And now who knowsMV II.vi.30
But you Lorenzo, whether I am yours?But you, Lorenzo, whether I am yours?MV II.vi.31
Heere, catch this casket, it is worth the paines,Here, catch this casket; it is worth the pains.MV II.vi.33
I am glad 'tis night, you do not looke on me,I am glad 'tis night, you do not look on me,MV II.vi.34
For I am much asham'd of my exchange:For I am much ashamed of my exchange.MV II.vi.35
But loue is blinde, and louers cannot seeBut love is blind, and lovers cannot seeMV II.vi.36
The pretty follies that themselues commit,The pretty follies that themselves commit;MV II.vi.37
For if they could, Cupid himselfe would blushFor if they could, Cupid himself would blushMV II.vi.38
To see me thus transformed to a boy.To see me thus transformed to a boy.MV II.vi.39
What, must I hold a Candle to my shames?What, must I hold a candle to my shames?MV II.vi.41
They in themselues goodsooth are too too light.They in themselves, good sooth, are too too light.MV II.vi.42
Why, 'tis an office of discouery Loue,Why, 'tis an office of discovery, love,MV II.vi.43
And I should be obscur'd.And I should be obscured.MV II.vi.44.1
I will make fast the doores and guild my selfeI will make fast the doors, and gild myselfMV II.vi.49
With some more ducats, and be with you straight.With some more ducats, and be with you straight.MV II.vi.50
When I was with him, I haue heard him sweareWhen I was with him, I have heard him swearMV III.ii.284
To Tuball and to Chus, his Countri-men,To Tubal and to Chus, his countrymen,MV III.ii.285
That he would rather haue Anthonio's flesh,That he would rather have Antonio's fleshMV III.ii.286
Then twenty times the value of the summeThan twenty times the value of the sumMV III.ii.287
That he did owe him: and I know my Lord,That he did owe him, and I know, my lord,MV III.ii.288
If law, authoritie, and power denie not,If law, authority, and power deny not,MV III.ii.289
It will goe hard with poore Anthonio.It will go hard with poor Antonio.MV III.ii.290
I wish your Ladiship all hearts content.I wish your ladyship all heart's content.MV III.iv.42
And what hope is that I pray thee?And what hope is that, I pray thee?MV III.v.8
That were a kinde of bastard hope indeed, so theThat were a kind of bastard hope indeed! So theMV III.v.11
sins of my mother should be visited vpon me.sins of my mother should be visited upon me.MV III.v.12
I shall be sau'd by my husband, he hath made I shall be saved by my husband. He hath madeMV III.v.17
me a Christian.me a Christian.MV III.v.18
Ile tell my husband Lancelet what you say, I'll tell my husband, Launcelot, what you say.MV III.v.24
heere he comes.Here he comes.MV III.v.25
Nay, you need not feare vs Lorenzo, LaunceletNay, you need not fear us, Lorenzo. LauncelotMV III.v.28
and I are out, he tells me flatly there is no mercy for meeand I are out. He tells me flatly there is no mercy for meMV III.v.29
in heauen, because I am a Iewes daughter: and hee saies you in heaven because I am a Jew's daughter, and he says youMV III.v.30
are no good member of the common wealth, for in conuerting are no good member of the commonwealth, for in convertingMV III.v.31
Iewes to Christians, you raise the price of Porke.Jews to Christians you raise the price of pork.MV III.v.32
Past all expressing, it is very meetePast all expressing. It is very meetMV III.v.68
The Lord Bassanio liue an vpright lifeThe Lord Bassanio live an upright life,MV III.v.69
For hauing such a blessing in his Lady,For having such a blessing in his lady,MV III.v.70
He findes the ioyes of heauen heere on earth,He finds the joys of heaven here on earth,MV III.v.71
And if on earth he doe not meane it, itAnd if on earth he do not merit it,MV III.v.72
Is reason he should neuer come to heauen?In reason he should never come to heaven.MV III.v.73
Why, if two gods should play some heauenly match,Why, if two gods should play some heavenly matchMV III.v.74
And on the wager lay two earthly women,And on the wager lay two earthly women,MV III.v.75
And Portia one: there must be something elseAnd Portia one, there must be something elseMV III.v.76
Paund with the other, for the poore rude worldPawned with the other, for the poor rude worldMV III.v.77
Hath not her fellow.Hath not her fellow.MV III.v.78.1
Nay, but aske my opinion to of that?Nay, but ask my opinion too of that!MV III.v.80
Nay, let me praise you while I haue a stomacke?Nay, let me praise you while I have a stomach.MV III.v.82
Well, Ile set you forth. Well, I'll set you forth.MV III.v.85.2
In such a nightIn such a nightMV V.i.6.2
Did Thisbie fearefully ore-trip the dewe,Did Thisbe fearfully o'ertrip the dew,MV V.i.7
And saw the Lyons shadow ere himselfe,And saw the lion's shadow ere himself,MV V.i.8
And ranne dismayed away.And ran dismayed away.MV V.i.9.1
In such a nightIn such a nightMV V.i.12.2
Medea gathered the inchanted hearbsMedea gathered the enchanted herbsMV V.i.13
That did renew old Eson.That did renew old Aeson.MV V.i.14.1
In such a nightIn such a nightMV V.i.17.2
Did young Lorenzo sweare he lou'd her well,Did young Lorenzo swear he loved her well,MV V.i.18
Stealing her soule with many vowes of faith,Stealing her soul with many vows of faith,MV V.i.19
And nere a true one.And ne'er a true one.MV V.i.20.1
I would out-night you did no body come:I would out-night you, did nobody come;MV V.i.23
But harke, I heare the footing of a man.But hark, I hear the footing of a man.MV V.i.24
I am neuer merry when I heare sweet musique.I am never merry when I hear sweet music.MV V.i.69
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