LEWIS THE DAUPHIN
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I do my Lord, and in her eie I findI do, my lord. And in her eye I findKJ II.i.496
A wonder, or a wondrous miracle,A wonder, or a wondrous miracle,KJ II.i.497
The shadow of my selfe form'd in her eye,The shadow of myself formed in her eye;KJ II.i.498
Which being but the shadow of your sonne,Which, being but the shadow of your son,KJ II.i.499
Becomes a sonne and makes your sonne a shadow:Becomes a sun and makes your son a shadow.KJ II.i.500
I do protest I neuer lou'd my selfeI do protest I never loved myselfKJ II.i.501
Till now, infixed I beheld my selfe,Till now infixed I beheld myselfKJ II.i.502
Drawne in the flattering table of her eie.Drawn in the flattering table of her eye.KJ II.i.503
Nay aske me if I can refraine from loue,Nay, ask me if I can refrain from love;KJ II.i.525
For I doe loue her most vnfainedly.For I do love her most unfeignedly.KJ II.i.526
She is sad and passionate at your highnes Tent.She is sad and passionate at your highness' tent.KJ II.i.544
Bethinke you father, for the differenceBethink you, father, for the differenceKJ III.i.204
Is purchase of a heauy curse from Rome,Is purchase of a heavy curse from Rome,KJ III.i.205
Or the light losse of England, for a friend:Or the light loss of England for a friend.KJ III.i.206
Forgoe the easier.Forgo the easier.KJ III.i.207.1
Father, to Armes.Father, to arms!KJ III.i.300.1
I muse your Maiesty doth seeme so cold,I muse your majesty doth seem so cold,KJ III.i.317
When such profound respects doe pull you on?When such profound respects do pull you on!KJ III.i.318
Lady, with me, with me thy fortune lies.Lady, with me, with me thy fortune lies.KJ III.i.337
What he hath won, that hath he fortified:What he hath won, that hath he fortified.KJ III.iv.10
So hot a speed, with such aduice dispos'd,So hot a speed, with such advice disposed,KJ III.iv.11
Such temperate order in so fierce a cause,Such temperate order in so fierce a cause,KJ III.iv.12
Doth want example: who hath read, or heardDoth want example. Who hath read or heardKJ III.iv.13
Of any kindred-action like to this?Of any kindred action like to this?KJ III.iv.14
There's nothing in this world can make me ioy,There's nothing in this world can make me joy.KJ III.iv.107
Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale,Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale,KJ III.iv.108
Vexing the dull eare of a drowsie man;Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man,KJ III.iv.109
And bitter shame hath spoyl'd the sweet words taste,And bitter shame hath spoiled the sweet world's taste,KJ III.iv.110
That it yeelds nought but shame and bitternesse.That it yields naught but shame and bitterness.KJ III.iv.111
All daies of glory, ioy, and happinesse.All days of glory, joy, and happiness.KJ III.iv.117
As heartily as he is glad he hath him.As heartily as he is glad he hath him.KJ III.iv.124
But what shall I gaine by yong Arthurs fall?But what shall I gain by young Arthur's fall?KJ III.iv.141
And loose it, life and all, as Arthur did.And lose it, life and all, as Arthur did.KJ III.iv.144
May be he will not touch yong Arthurs life,Maybe he will not touch young Arthur's life,KJ III.iv.160
But hold himselfe safe in his prisonment.But hold himself safe in his prisonment.KJ III.iv.161
Strong reasons makes strange actions: let vs go,Strong reasons makes strong actions! Let us go:KJ III.iv.182
If you say I, the King will not say no. If you say ay, the King will not say no.KJ III.iv.183
My Lord Melloone, let this be coppied out,My Lord Melun, let this be copied out,KJ V.ii.1
And keepe it safe for our remembrance:And keep it safe for our remembrance.KJ V.ii.2
Returne the president to these Lords againe,Return the precedent to these lords again,KJ V.ii.3
That hauing our faire order written downe,That, having our fair order written down,KJ V.ii.4
Both they and we, perusing ore these notesBoth they and we, perusing o'er these notes,KJ V.ii.5
May know wherefore we tooke the Sacrament,May know wherefore we took the sacrament,KJ V.ii.6
And keepe our faithes firme and inuiolable.And keep our faiths firm and inviolable.KJ V.ii.7
A noble temper dost thou shew in this,A noble temper dost thou show in this,KJ V.ii.40
And great affections wrastling in thy bosomeAnd great affections wrestling in thy bosomKJ V.ii.41
Doth make an earth-quake of Nobility:Doth make an earthquake of nobility.KJ V.ii.42
Oh, what a noble combat hast foughtO, what a noble combat hast thou foughtKJ V.ii.43
Between compulsion, and a braue respect:Between compulsion and a brave respect!KJ V.ii.44
Let me wipe off this honourable dewe,Let me wipe off this honourable dewKJ V.ii.45
That siluerly doth progresse on thy cheekes:That silverly doth progress on thy cheeks.KJ V.ii.46
My heart hath melted at a Ladies teares,My heart hath melted at a lady's tears,KJ V.ii.47
Being an ordinary Inundation:Being an ordinary inundation,KJ V.ii.48
But this effusion of such manly drops,But this effusion of such manly drops,KJ V.ii.49
This showre, blowne vp by tempest of the soule,This shower, blown up by tempest of the soul,KJ V.ii.50
Startles mine eyes, and makes me more amaz'dStartles mine eyes, and makes me more amazedKJ V.ii.51
Then had I seene the vaultie top of heauenThan had I seen the vaulty top of heavenKJ V.ii.52
Figur'd quite ore with burning Meteors.Figured quite o'er with burning meteors.KJ V.ii.53
Lift vp thy brow (renowned Salisburie)Lift up thy brow, renowned Salisbury,KJ V.ii.54
And with a great heart heaue away this storme:And with a great heart heave away this storm.KJ V.ii.55
Commend these waters to those baby-eyesCommend these waters to those baby eyesKJ V.ii.56
That neuer saw the giant-world enrag'd,That never saw the giant world enraged,KJ V.ii.57
Nor met with Fortune, other then at feasts,Nor met with fortune other than at feasts,KJ V.ii.58
Full warm of blood, of mirth, of gossipping:Full warm of blood, of mirth, of gossiping.KJ V.ii.59
Come,come; for thou shalt thrust thy hand as deepeCome, come; for thou shalt thrust thy hand as deepKJ V.ii.60
Into the purse of rich prosperityInto the purse of rich prosperityKJ V.ii.61
As Lewis himselfe: so (Nobles) shall you all,As Lewis himself. So, nobles, shall you all,KJ V.ii.62
That knit your sinewes to the strength of mine.That knit your sinews to the strength of mine.KJ V.ii.63
And euen there, methinkes an Angell spake,And even there, methinks, an angel spake.KJ V.ii.64
Looke where the holy Legate comes apace,Look where the holy legate comes apace,KJ V.ii.65
To giue vs warrant from the hand of heauen,To give us warrant from the hand of heaven,KJ V.ii.66
And on our actions set the name of rightAnd on our actions set the name of rightKJ V.ii.67
With holy breath.With holy breath.KJ V.ii.68.1
Your Grace shall pardon me, I will not backe:Your grace shall pardon me, I will not back.KJ V.ii.78
I am too high-borne to be proportiedI am too high-born to be propertied,KJ V.ii.79
To be a secondary at controll,To be a secondary at control,KJ V.ii.80
Or vsefull seruing-man, and InstrumentOr useful servingman and instrumentKJ V.ii.81
To any Soueraigne State throughout the world.To any sovereign state throughout the world.KJ V.ii.82
Your breath first kindled the dead coale of warres,Your breath first kindled the dead coal of warsKJ V.ii.83
Betweene this chastiz'd kingdome and my selfe,Between this chastised kingdom and myself,KJ V.ii.84
And brought in matter that should feed this fire;And brought in matter that should feed this fire;KJ V.ii.85
And now 'tis farre too huge to be blowne outAnd now 'tis far too huge to be blown outKJ V.ii.86
With that same weake winde, which enkindled it:With that same weak wind which enkindled it.KJ V.ii.87
You taught me how to know the face of right,You taught me how to know the face of right,KJ V.ii.88
Acquainted me with interest to this Land,Acquainted me with interest to this land,KJ V.ii.89
Yea, thrust this enterprize into my heart,Yea, thrust this enterprise into my heart;KJ V.ii.90
And come ye now to tell me Iohn hath madeAnd come ye now to tell me John hath madeKJ V.ii.91
His peace with Rome? what is that peace to me?His peace with Rome? What is that peace to me?KJ V.ii.92
I (by the honour of my marriage bed)I, by the honour of my marriage-bed,KJ V.ii.93
After yong Arthur, claime this Land for mine,After young Arthur, claim this land for mine;KJ V.ii.94
And now it is halfe conquer'd, must I backe,And, now it is half conquered must I backKJ V.ii.95
Because that Iohn hath made his peace with Rome?Because that John hath made his peace with Rome?KJ V.ii.96
Am I Romes slaue? What penny hath Rome borne?Am I Rome's slave? What penny hath Rome borne,KJ V.ii.97
What men prouided? What munition sentWhat men provided, what munition sent,KJ V.ii.98
To vnder-prop this Action? Is't not ITo underprop this action? Is't not IKJ V.ii.99
That vnder-goe this charge? Who else but I,That undergo this charge? Who else but I,KJ V.ii.100
And such as to my claime are liable,And such as to my claim are liable,KJ V.ii.101
Sweat in this businesse, and maintaine this warre?Sweat in this business and maintain this war?KJ V.ii.102
Haue I not heard these Islanders shout outHave I not heard these islanders shout outKJ V.ii.103
Viue le Roy, as I haue bank'd their Townes?‘Vive le roi!' as I have banked their towns?KJ V.ii.104
Haue I not heere the best Cards for the gameHave I not here the best cards for the gameKJ V.ii.105
To winne this easie match, plaid for a Crowne?To win this easy match played for a crown?KJ V.ii.106
And shall I now giue ore the yeelded Set?And shall I now give o'er the yielded set?KJ V.ii.107
No, no, on my soule it neuer shall be said.No! No, on my soul, it never shall be said!KJ V.ii.108
Out-side or in-side, I will not returneOutside or inside, I will not returnKJ V.ii.110
Till my attempt so much be glorified,Till my attempt so much be glorifiedKJ V.ii.111
As to my ample hope was promised,As to my ample hope was promisedKJ V.ii.112
Before I drew this gallant head of warre,Before I drew this gallant head of war,KJ V.ii.113
And cull'd these fiery spirits from the worldAnd culled these fiery spirits from the worldKJ V.ii.114
To out-looke Conquest, and to winne renowneTo outlook conquest and to win renownKJ V.ii.115
Euen in the iawes of danger, and of death:Even in the jaws of danger and of death.KJ V.ii.116
What lusty Trumpet thus doth summon vs?What lusty trumpet thus doth summon us?KJ V.ii.117
There end thy braue, and turn thy face in peace,There end thy brave, and turn thy face in peace.KJ V.ii.159
We grant thou canst out-scold vs: Far thee well,We grant thou canst outscold us. Fare thee well!KJ V.ii.160
We hold our time too precious to be spentWe hold our time too precious to be spentKJ V.ii.161
with such a brabler.With such a brabbler.KJ V.ii.162.1
We will attend to neyther:We will attend to neither.KJ V.ii.163.2
Strike vp the drummes, and let the tongue of warreStrike up the drums, and let the tongue of warKJ V.ii.164
Pleade for our interest, and our being heere.Plead for our interest and our being here.KJ V.ii.165
Strike vp our drummes, to finde this danger out.Strike up our drums to find this danger out.KJ V.ii.179
The Sun of heauen (me thought) was loth to set;The sun of heaven, methought, was loath to set,KJ V.v.1
But staid, and made the Westerne Welkin blush,But stayed and made the western welkin blush,KJ V.v.2
When English measure backward their owne groundWhen English measured backward their own groundKJ V.v.3
In faint Retire: Oh brauely came we off,In faint retire! O, bravely came we off,KJ V.v.4
When with a volley of our needlesse shot,When with a volley of our needless shot,KJ V.v.5
After such bloody toile, we bid good night,After such bloody toil, we bid good night,KJ V.v.6
And woon'd our tott'ring colours clearly vp,And wound our tottering colours clearly up,KJ V.v.7
Last in the field, and almost Lords of it.Last in the field, and almost lords of it.KJ V.v.8
Heere: what newes?Here. What news?KJ V.v.9.2
Ah fowle, shrew'd newes. Beshrew thy very hart:Ah, foul, shrewd news! Beshrew thy very heart!KJ V.v.14
I did not thinke to be so sad to nightI did not think to be so sad tonightKJ V.v.15
As this hath made me. Who was he that saidAs this hath made me. Who was he that saidKJ V.v.16
King Iohn did flie an houre or two beforeKing John did fly an hour or two beforeKJ V.v.17
The stumbling night did part our wearie powres?The stumbling night did part our weary powers?KJ V.v.18
Well: keepe good quarter, & good care to night,Well, keep good quarter and good care tonight!KJ V.v.20
The day shall not be vp so soone as I,The day shall not be up so soon as IKJ V.v.21
To try the faire aduenture of to morrow. To try the fair adventure of tomorrow.KJ V.v.22
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