BIANCA
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'Saue you (Friend Cassio.)'Save you, friend Cassio.Oth III.iv.165.1
And I was going to your Lodging, Cassio.And I was going to your lodging, Cassio.Oth III.iv.168
What? keepe a weeke away? Seuen dayes, and Nights?What! Keep a week away? Seven days and nights?Oth III.iv.169
Eight score eight houres? And Louers absent howresEight score eight hours? And lovers' absent hoursOth III.iv.170
More tedious then the Diall, eight score times?More tedious than the dial eight score times!Oth III.iv.171
Oh weary reck'ning.O weary reckoning!Oth III.iv.172.1
Oh Cassio, whence came this?O Cassio, whence came this?Oth III.iv.176.2
This is some Token from a newer Friend,This is some token from a newer friend.Oth III.iv.177
To the felt-Absence: now I feele a Cause:To the felt absence now I feel a cause.Oth III.iv.178
Is't come to this? Well, well.Is't come to this? Well, well.Oth III.iv.179.1
Why, who's is it?Why, whose is it?Oth III.iv.183.2
Leaue you? Wherefore?Leave you! Wherefore?Oth III.iv.188
Why, I ptay you?Why, I pray you?Oth III.iv.191.2
But that you do not loue me.But that you do not love me.Oth III.iv.192.2
I pray you bring me on the way a little,I pray you, bring me on the way a little,Oth III.iv.193
And say, if I shall see you soone at night?And say if I shall see you soon at night.Oth III.iv.194
'Tis very good: I must be circumstanc'd.'Tis very good: I must be circumstanced.Oth III.iv.197
Let the diuell, and his dam haunt you: what didLet the devil and his dam haunt you! What didOth IV.i.148
you meane by that same Handkerchiefe, you gaue me euenyou mean by that same handkerchief you gave me evenOth IV.i.149
now? I was a fine Foole to take it: I must take out thenow? I was a fine fool to take it. I must take out theOth IV.i.150
worke? A likely piece of worke, that you should finde it inwork! A likely piece of work, that you should find it inOth IV.i.151
your Chamber, and know not who left it there. This is your chamber, and not know who left it there! This isOth IV.i.152
some Minxes token, & I must take out the worke?some minx's token, and I must take out the work?Oth IV.i.153
There, giue it your Hobbey-horse, wheresoeuer you hadThere, give it your hobby-horse, wheresoever you hadOth IV.i.154
it, Ile take out no worke on't.it. I'll take out no work on't.Oth IV.i.155
If you'le come to supper to night you may, if youIf you'll come to supper tonight, you may. If youOth IV.i.159
will not, come when you are next prepar'd for. will not, come when you are next prepared for.Oth IV.i.160
What is the matter hoa? Who is't that cry'd?What is the matter, ho? Who is't that cried?Oth V.i.74
Oh my deere Cassio, / My sweet Cassio: O, my dear Cassio, my sweet Cassio,Oth V.i.76
Oh Cassio, Cassio, Cassio.O Cassio, Cassio, Cassio!Oth V.i.77
Alas he faints.Alas, he faints!Oth V.i.83.2
Oh Cassio, Cassio, Cassio.O Cassio, Cassio, Cassio!Oth V.i.84
He supt at my house, but I therefore shake not.He supped at my house, but I therefore shake not.Oth V.i.119
I am no Strumpet, but of life as honest,I am no strumpet, but of life as honestOth V.i.122
As you that thus abuse me.As you that thus abuse me.Oth V.i.123.1
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