FIRST GAOLER
Show:
Original textModern textKey line
You shall not now be stolne, / You haue lockes vpon you:You shall not now be stol'n, you have locks upon you:Cym V.iv.1
So graze, as you finde Pasture.So graze, as you find pasture.Cym V.iv.2.1
Come Sir, are you ready for death?Come, sir, are you ready for death?Cym V.iv.152
Hanging is the word, Sir, if you bee readie forHanging is the word, sir: if you be ready forCym V.iv.154
that, you are well Cook'd.that, you are well cooked.Cym V.iv.155
A heauy reckoning for you Sir: But the comfortA heavy reckoning for you sir: But the comfortCym V.iv.158
is you shall be called to no more payments, fearis you shall be called to no more payments, fearCym V.iv.159
no more Tauerne Bils, which are often the sadnesse ofno more tavern-bills, which are often the sadness ofCym V.iv.160
parting, as the procuring of mirth: you come inparting, as the procuring of mirth: you come inCym V.iv.161
faint for want of meate, depart reeling with too muchfaint for want of meat, depart reeling with too muchCym V.iv.162
drinke: sorrie that you haue payed too much, and sorrydrink: sorry that you have paid too much, and sorryCym V.iv.163
that you are payed too much: Purse and Braine, boththat you are paid too much: purse and brain, bothCym V.iv.164
empty: the Brain the heauier, for being too light; theempty: the brain the heavier for being too light; theCym V.iv.165
Purse too light, being drawne of heauinesse. Oh, of thispurse too light, being drawn of heaviness. O, of thisCym V.iv.166
contradiction you shall now be quit: Oh the charitycontradiction you shall now be quit. O, the charityCym V.iv.167
of a penny Cord, it summes vp thousands in a trice: youof a penny cord! It sums up thousands in a trice: youCym V.iv.168
haue no true Debitor, and Creditor but it: of what'shave no true debitor and creditor but it: of what'sCym V.iv.169
past, is, and to come, the discharge: your necke (Sis)past, is, and to come, the discharge: your neck, sir,Cym V.iv.170
is Pen, Booke, and Counters; so the Acquittanceis pen, book, and counters; so the acquittanceCym V.iv.171
followes.follows.Cym V.iv.172
Indeed Sir, he that sleepes, feeles not the Tooth-Ache:Indeed sir, he that sleeps feels not the toothache:Cym V.iv.174
but a man that were to sleepe your sleepe, and abut a man that were to sleep your sleep, and aCym V.iv.175
Hangman to helpe him to bed, I think he wouldhangman to help him to bed, I think he wouldCym V.iv.176
change places with his Officer: for, look you Sir, youchange places with his officer: for, look you, sir, youCym V.iv.177
know not which way you shall go.know not which way you shall go.Cym V.iv.178
Your death has eyes in's head then: I haueYour death has eyes in's head then: I haveCym V.iv.180
not seene him so pictur'd: you must either beenot seen him so pictured: you must either beCym V.iv.181
directed by some that take vpon them to know, ordirected by some that take upon them to know, orCym V.iv.182
to take vpon your selfe that which I am sure you doto take upon yourself that which I am sure you doCym V.iv.183
not know: or iump the after-enquiry on your ownenot know, or jump the after-inquiry on your ownCym V.iv.184
perill: and how you shall speed in your iourniesperil: and how you shall speed in your journey'sCym V.iv.185
end, I thinke you'l neuer returne to tell one.end, I think you'll never return to tell on.Cym V.iv.186
What an infinite mocke is this, that a man What an infinite mock is this, that a manCym V.iv.190
shold haue the best vse of eyes, to see the way ofshould have the best use of eyes to see the way ofCym V.iv.191
blindnesse: I am sure hanging's the way of winking.blindness! I am sure hanging's the way of winking.Cym V.iv.192
Ile be hang'd then.I'll be hanged then.Cym V.iv.197
Vnlesse a man would marry a Gallowes, &Unless a man would marry a gallows, andCym V.iv.200
beget yong Gibbets, I neuer saw one so prone: yetbeget young gibbets, I never saw one so prone: yet,Cym V.iv.201
on my Conscience, there are verier Knaues desire toon my conscience, there are verier knaves desire toCym V.iv.202
liue, for all he be a Roman; and there be some oflive, for all he be a Roman; and there be some ofCym V.iv.203
them too that dye against their willes; so should I, ifthem too, that die against their wills; so should I, ifCym V.iv.204
I were one. I would we were all of one minde, andI were one. I would we were all of one mind, andCym V.iv.205
one minde good: O there were desolation of Gaolersone mind good: O, there were desolation of gaolersCym V.iv.206
and Galowses: I speake against my present profit,and gallowses! I speak against my present profit,Cym V.iv.207
but my wish hath a preferment in't.but my wish hath a preferment in't.Cym V.iv.208
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL