RATCLIFFE
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Dispatch, the limit of your Liues is out.Dispatch! The limit of your lives is out.R3 III.iii.7
Make haste, the houre of death is expiate.Make haste. The hour of death is expiate.R3 III.iii.23
Come, come, dispatch, the Duke would be at dinner:Come, come, dispatch! The Duke would be at dinner.R3 III.iv.94
Make a short Shrift, he longs to see your Head.Make a short shrift; he longs to see your head.R3 III.iv.95
My Lord.My lord – R3 IV.iii.44
Bad news my Lord, Mourton is fled to Richmond,Bad news, my lord. Morton is fled to Richmond,R3 IV.iii.46
And Buckingham backt with the hardy WelshmenAnd Buckingham, backed with the hardy Welshmen,R3 IV.iii.47
Is in the field, and still his power encreaseth.Is in the field, and still his power increaseth.R3 IV.iii.48
Most mightie Soueraigne, on the Westerne CoastMost mighty sovereign, on the western coastR3 IV.iv.433
Rideth a puissant Nauie: to our ShoresRideth a puissant navy; to our shoresR3 IV.iv.434
Throng many doubtfull hollow-hearted friends,Throng many doubtful, hollow-hearted friends,R3 IV.iv.435
Vnarm'd, and vnresolu'd to beat them backe.Unarmed, and unresolved to beat them back.R3 IV.iv.436
'Tis thought, that Richmond is their Admirall:'Tis thought that Richmond is their admiral;R3 IV.iv.437
And there they hull, expecting but the aideAnd there they hull, expecting but the aidR3 IV.iv.438
Of Buckingham, to welcome them ashore.Of Buckingham to welcome them ashore.R3 IV.iv.439
What, may it please you, shall I doe at Salisbury? What, may it please you, shall I do at Salisbury?R3 IV.iv.453
Your Highnesse told me I should poste before.Your highness told me I should post before.R3 IV.iv.455
My Lord.My lord?R3 V.iii.67
Thomas the Earle of Surrey, and himselfe,Thomas the Earl of Surrey and himself,R3 V.iii.69
Much about Cockshut time, from Troope to TroopeMuch about cockshut time, from troop to troopR3 V.iii.70
Went through the Army, chearing vp the Souldiers.Went through the army, cheering up the soldiers.R3 V.iii.71
It is my Lord.It is, my lord.R3 V.iii.76
My Lord.My lord!R3 V.iii.208
Ratcliffe my Lord, 'tis I: the early Village CockRatcliffe, my lord, 'tis I. The early village cockR3 V.iii.210
Hath twice done salutation to the Morne,Hath twice done salutation to the morn;R3 V.iii.211
Your Friends are vp, and buckle on their Armour.Your friends are up and buckle on their armour.R3 V.iii.212
No doubt, my lord.R3 V.iii.215.1
Nay good my Lord, be not affraid of Shadows.Nay, good my lord, be not afraid of shadows.R3 V.iii.216
That he was neuer trained vp in Armes.That he was never trained up in arms.R3 V.iii.273
He smil'd and said, the better for our purpose.He smiled and said, ‘ The better for our purpose.’R3 V.iii.275
N t I my Lord.Not I, my lord.R3 V.iii.278.2
My Lord.My lord?R3 V.iii.283.1
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