HIPPOLYTA
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Foure daies wil quickly steep thẽselues in nightsFour days will quickly steep themselves in night;MND I.i.7
Foure nights wil quickly dreame away the time:Four nights will quickly dream away the time:MND I.i.8
And then the Moone, like to a siluer bow,And then the moon – like to a silver bowMND I.i.9
Now bent in heauen, shal behold the nightNew-bent in heaven – shall behold the nightMND I.i.10
Of our solemnities.Of our solemnities.MND I.i.11.1
I was with Hercules and Cadmus once.I was with Hercules and Cadmus once,MND IV.i.111
When in a wood of Creete they bayed the BeareWhen in a wood of Crete they bayed the bearMND IV.i.112
With hounds of Sparta; neuer did I heareWith hounds of Sparta. Never did I hearMND IV.i.113
Such gallant chiding. For besides the groues,Such gallant chiding, for besides the groves,MND IV.i.114
The skies, the fountaines, euery region neere,The skies, the fountains, every region nearMND IV.i.115
Seeme all one mutuall cry. I neuer heardSeemed all one mutual cry. I never heardMND IV.i.116
So musicall a discord, such sweet thunder.So musical a discord, such sweet thunder.MND IV.i.117
'Tis strange my Theseus, yt these louers speake of.'Tis strange, my Theseus, that these lovers speak of.MND V.i.1
But all the storie of the night told ouer,But all the story of the night told over,MND V.i.23
And all their minds transfigur'd so together,And all their minds transfigured so together,MND V.i.24
More witnesseth than fancies images,More witnesseth than fancy's images,MND V.i.25
And growes to something of great constancie;And grows to something of great constancy;MND V.i.26
But howsoeuer, strange, and admirable.But, howsoever, strange and admirable.MND V.i.27
I loue not to see wretchednesse orecharged;I love not to see wretchedness o'ercharged,MND V.i.85
And duty in his seruice perishing.And duty in his service perishing.MND V.i.86
He saies, they can doe nothing in this kinde.He says they can do nothing in this kind.MND V.i.88
Indeed hee hath plaid on his Prologue, like aIndeed, he hath played on his prologue like aMND V.i.122
childe on a Recorder, a sound, but not in gouernment.child on a recorder – a sound, but not in government.MND V.i.123
This is the silliest stuffe that ere I heard.This is the silliest stuff that ever I heard.MND V.i.207
It must be your imagination then, & notIt must be your imagination then, and notMND V.i.210
theirs.theirs.MND V.i.211
I am wearie of this Moone; would he would change.I am aweary of this moon. Would he would change.MND V.i.244

Well shone Moone. / Truly the Moone shinesWell shone, Moon! Truly, the moon shinesMND V.i.259
with a good grace.with a good grace.MND V.i.260
Beshrew my heart, but I pittie the man.Beshrew my heart, but I pity the man.MND V.i.282
How chance Moone-shine is gone before?How chance Moonshine is gone beforeMND V.i.304
Thisby comes backe, and findes her Louer.Thisbe comes back and finds her lover?MND V.i.305
Me thinkes shee should not vse a long one forMethinks she should not use a long one forMND V.i.308
such a Piramus: I hope she will be breefe.such a Pyramus. I hope she will be brief.MND V.i.309
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL