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You were best to call them generally, man byYou were best to call them generally, man by MND I.ii.2
man according to the scrip.man, according to the scrip.MND I.ii.3
First, good Peter Quince, say what the play treatsFirst, good Peter Quince, say what the play treatsMND I.ii.8
on: then read the names of the Actors: and so grow on to aon; then read the names of the actors; and so grow to aMND I.ii.9
point.point.MND I.ii.10
A very good peece of worke I assure you, and aA very good piece of work, I assure you, and aMND I.ii.13
merry. Now good Peter Quince, call forth your Actorsmerry. Now, good Peter Quince, call forth your actorsMND I.ii.14
by the scrowle. Masters spread your selues.by the scroll. Masters, spread yourselves.MND I.ii.15
Ready; name what part I am for, andReady! – Name what part I am for, andMND I.ii.17
proceed.proceed.MND I.ii.18
What is Pyramus, a louer, or a tyrant?What is Pyramus? – a lover or a tyrant?MND I.ii.20
That will aske some teares in the true performingThat will ask some tears in the true performingMND I.ii.22
of it: if I do it, let the audience looke to their eies: I willof it. If I do it, let the audience look to their eyes! I willMND I.ii.23
mooue stormes; I will condole in some measure. To themove storms. I will condole, in some measure. To theMND I.ii.24
rest yet, my chiefe humour is for a tyrant. I could play rest. – Yet my chief humour is for a tyrant. I could playMND I.ii.25
Ercles rarely, or a part to teare a Cat in, to make all splitErcles rarely, or a part to tear a cat in, to make all split:MND I.ii.26
the raging Rocks;The raging rocksMND I.ii.27
and shiuering shocks And shivering shocksMND I.ii.28
shall break the locksShall break the locksMND I.ii.29
of prison gates,Of prison gates,MND I.ii.30
and Phibbus carre And Phibbus' carMND I.ii.31
shall shine from farre,Shall shine from farMND I.ii.32
and make and marreAnd make and marMND I.ii.33
the foolish Fates.The foolish Fates.MND I.ii.34
This was lofty. Now name the rest of the Players.This was lofty! – Now name the rest of the players. – MND I.ii.35
This is Ercles vaine, a tyrants vaine: a louer is moreThis is Ercles' vein, a tyrant's vein. A lover is moreMND I.ii.36
condoling. condoling.MND I.ii.37
And I may hide my face, let me play Thisbie too:An I may hide my face, let me play Thisbe too.MND I.ii.47
Ile speake in a monstrous little voyce; Thisne, Thisne,I'll speak in a monstrous little voice: ‘ Thisne, Thisne!’MND I.ii.48
ah Pyramus my louer deare, thy Thisbie deare, and Lady‘ Ah, Pyramus, my lover dear; thy Thisbe dear, and ladyMND I.ii.49
deare.dear.’MND I.ii.50
Well, proceed.Well, proceed.MND I.ii.53
Let mee play the Lyon too, I will roare that I willLet me play the lion too. I will roar that I willMND I.ii.66
doe any mans heart good to heare me. I will roare, that Ido any man's heart good to hear me. I will roar that IMND I.ii.67
will make the Duke say, Let him roare againe, let himwill make the Duke say ‘ Let him roar again; let himMND I.ii.68
roare againe.roar again!’MND I.ii.69
I graunt you friends, if that you should fright theI grant you, friends, if that you should fright theMND I.ii.74
Ladies out of their Wittes, they would haue no more discretionladies out of their wits they would have no more discretionMND I.ii.75
but to hang vs: but I will aggrauate my voyce so,but to hang us. But I will aggravate my voice soMND I.ii.76
that I will roare you as gently as any sucking Doue; I willthat I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove. I will MND I.ii.77
roare and 'twere any Nightingale. roar you an 'twere any nightingale.MND I.ii.78
Well, I will vndertake it. What beard were IWell, I will undertake it. What beard were IMND I.ii.83
best to play it in?best to play it in?MND I.ii.84
I will discharge it, in either your straw-colourI will discharge it in either your straw-colourMND I.ii.86
beard, your orange tawnie beard, your purple in grainebeard, your orange-tawny beard, your purple-in-grainMND I.ii.87
beard, or your French-crowne colour'd beard, your perfect beard, or your French-crown-colour beard, your perfectMND I.ii.88
yellow.yellow.MND I.ii.89
We will meete, and there we may rehearse moreWe will meet, and there we may rehearse mostMND I.ii.99
obscenely and couragiously. Take paines, be perfect,obscenely and courageously. Take pains; be perfect.MND I.ii.100
adieu.Adieu!MND I.ii.101
Enough, hold or cut bow-strings.Enough; hold, or cut bowstrings.MND I.ii.103
Are we all met?Are we all met?MND III.i.1
Peter quince?Peter Quince!MND III.i.6
There are things in this Comedy of Piramus andThere are things in this comedy of Pyramus andMND III.i.8
Thisby, that will neuer please. First, Piramus must drawThisbe that will never please. First, Pyramus must drawMND III.i.9
a sword to kill himselfe; which the Ladies cannot abide.a sword to kill himself, which the ladies cannot abide.MND III.i.10
How answere you that?How answer you that?MND III.i.11
Not a whit, I haue a deuice to make all well.Not a whit. I have a device to make all well.MND III.i.15
Write me a Prologue, and let the Prologue seeme to say,Write me a prologue, and let the prologue seem to sayMND III.i.16
we will do no harme with our swords, and that Pyramuswe will do no harm with our swords, and that PyramusMND III.i.17
is not kill'd indeede: and for the more better assurance,is not killed indeed; and for the more better assurance,MND III.i.18
tell them, that I Piramus am not Piramus, but Bottome tell them that I, Pyramus, am not Pyramus, but BottomMND III.i.19
the Weauer; this will put them out of feare.the weaver. This will put them out of fear.MND III.i.20
No, make it two more, let it be written in eightNo, make it two more: let it be written in eightMND III.i.23
and eight.and eight.MND III.i.24
Masters, you ought to consider with your selues, toMasters, you ought to consider with yourself, toMND III.i.27
bring in (God shield vs) a Lyon among Ladies, is a mostbring in – God shield us – a lion among ladies is a mostMND III.i.28
dreadfull thing. For there is not a more fearefull wilde fouledreadful thing; for there is not a more fearful wildfowlMND III.i.29
then your Lyon liuing: and wee ought to looke to it.than your lion living; and we ought look to't.MND III.i.30
Nay, you must name his name, and halfe his faceNay, you must name his name, and half his faceMND III.i.33
must be seene through the Lyons necke, and he himselfemust be seen through the lion's neck, and he himselfMND III.i.34
must speake through, saying thus, or to the same defect;must speak through, saying thus, or to the same defect:MND III.i.35
Ladies, or faire Ladies, I would wish you, or I would‘ Ladies ’, or ‘ Fair ladies – I would wish you ’, or ‘ I wouldMND III.i.36
request you, or I would entreat you, not to feare, not torequest you ’, or ‘ I would entreat you – not to fear, not toMND III.i.37
tremble: my life for yours. If you thinke I come hithertremble. My life for yours: if you think I come hitherMND III.i.38
as a Lyon, it were pitty of my life. No, I am no such as a lion, it were pity of my life. No. I am no suchMND III.i.39
thing, I am a man as other men are; and there indeedthing. I am a man, as other men are ’ – and there indeed MND III.i.40
let / him name his name, and tell him plainly hee is Snug let him name his name, and tell them plainly he is SnugMND III.i.41
the ioyner.the joiner.MND III.i.42
A Calender, a Calender, looke in the Almanack,A calendar, a calendar! Look in the almanac – MND III.i.47
finde out Moone-shine, finde out Moone-shine. Enter Pucke.find out moonshine, find out moonshine!MND III.i.48
Why then may you leaue a casement of theWhy, then, may you leave a casement of theMND III.i.50
great chamber window (where we play) open, andGreat Chamber window – where we play – open, andMND III.i.51
the Moone may shine in at the casement.the moon may shine in at the casement.MND III.i.52
Some man or other must present wall, and letSome man or other must present Wall; and letMND III.i.61
him haue some Plaster, or some Lome, or some rough cast him have some plaster, or some loam, or some roughcastMND III.i.62
about him, to signifie wall; or let him hold his fingersabout him to signify Wall; and let him hold his fingersMND III.i.63
thus; and through that cranny shall Piramus and Thisby thus, and through that cranny shall Pyramus and ThisbeMND III.i.64
whisper.whisper.MND III.i.65
Thisby, the flowers of odious sauors sweete.Thisbe, the flowers of odious savours sweet – MND III.i.75
Odours sauors sweete,...odours savours sweet.MND III.i.77
So hath thy breath, my dearest Thisby deare.So hath thy breath, my dearest Thisbe dear.MND III.i.78
But harke, a voyce: stay thou but here a while,But hark, a voice. Stay thou but here awhile,MND III.i.79
And by and by I will to thee appeare. And by and by I will to thee appear.MND III.i.80
If I were faire, Thisby I were onely thine.If I were fair, fair Thisbe, I were only thine.MND III.i.97
Why do they run away? This is a knauery ofWhy do they run away? This is a knavery ofMND III.i.106
them to make me afeard. them to make me afeard.MND III.i.107
What do you see? You see an Asse-head of yourWhat do you see? You see an ass head of yourMND III.i.110
owne, do you?own, do you?MND III.i.111
I see their knauery; this is to make an asse of me,I see their knavery! This is to make an ass of me,MND III.i.114
to fright me if they could; but I will not stirre from thisto fright me, if they could; but I will not stir from thisMND III.i.115
place, do what they can. I will walke vp and downe here,place, do what they can. I will walk up and down here,MND III.i.116
and I will sing that they shall heare I am not afraid. and I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid.MND III.i.117
The Woosell cocke, so blacke of hew,(sings) The ousel cock so black of hue,MND III.i.118
With Orenge-tawny bill.With orange-tawny bill,MND III.i.119
The Throstle, with his note so true,The throstle with his note so true,MND III.i.120
The Wren and little quill.The wren with little quill.MND III.i.121
The Finch, the Sparrow, and the Larke,The finch, the sparrow, and the lark,MND III.i.123
The plainsong Cuckow gray;The plainsong cuckoo grey,MND III.i.124
Whose note full many a man doth marke,Whose note full many a man doth markMND III.i.125
And dares not answere, nay.And dares not answer ‘ Nay ’MND III.i.126
For indeede, who would set his wit to so foolish a bird? – for, indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish a bird?MND III.i.127
Who would giue a bird the lye, though he cry Cuckow,Who would give a bird the lie, though he cry ‘ cuckoo ’MND III.i.128
neuer so?never so?MND III.i.129
Me-thinkes mistresse, you should haue little reasonMethinks, mistress, you should have little reasonMND III.i.135
for that: and yet to say the truth, reason and loue keepefor that. And yet, to say the truth, reason and love keepMND III.i.136
little company together, now-adayes. The more the pittie,little company together nowadays – the more the pityMND III.i.137
that some honest neighbours will not make them friends.that some honest neighbours will not make them friends.MND III.i.138
Nay, I can gleeke vpon occasion. – Nay, I can gleek upon occasion.MND III.i.139
Not so neither: but if I had wit enough to getNot so, neither; but if I had wit enough to getMND III.i.141
out of this wood, I haue enough to serue mine owne turne.out of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn.MND III.i.142
I cry your worships mercy hartily; I beseechI cry your worships mercy, heartily. I beseechMND III.i.174
your worships name.your worship's name.MND III.i.175
I shall desire you of more acquaintance, goodI shall desire you of more acquaintance, goodMND III.i.177
Master Cobweb: if I cut my finger, I shall make boldMaster Cobweb – if I cut my finger I shall make boldMND III.i.178
with you. Your name honest Gentleman?with you! – Your name, honest gentleman?MND III.i.179
I pray you commend mee to mistresse Squash,I pray you commend me to Mistress Squash,MND III.i.181
your mother, and to master Peascod your father. Goodyour mother, and to Master Peascod, your father. GoodMND III.i.182
master Pease-blossome, I shal desire of you more acquaintanceMaster Peaseblossom, I shall desire you of more acquaintance,MND III.i.183
Your name I beseech you sir?too. – Your name, I beseech you, sir?MND III.i.184
Good master Mustard seede, I know yourGood Master Mustardseed, I know yourMND III.i.186
patience well: that same cowardly gyant-like Oxe beefepatience well. That same cowardly, giantlike OxbeefMND III.i.187
hath deuoured many a gentleman of your house. Ihath devoured many a gentleman of your house. IMND III.i.188
promise you, your kindred hath made my eyes waterpromise you, your kindred hath made my eyes waterMND III.i.189
ere now. I desire you more acquaintance, good Masterere now. I desire your more acquaintance, good MasterMND III.i.190
Mustard-seede.Mustardseed.MND III.i.191
Where's Peaseblossome?Where's Peaseblossom?MND IV.i.5
Scratch my head, Pease-blossome. Wher'sScratch my head, Peaseblossom. Where'sMND IV.i.7
Mounsieuer Cobweb.Monsieur Cobweb?MND IV.i.8
Mounsieur Cobweb, good Mounsier get yourMonsieur Cobweb, good Monsieur, get you yourMND IV.i.10
weapons in your hand, & kill me a red hipt humble-weapons in your hand and kill me a red-hipped humbleMND IV.i.11
Bee, on the top of a thistle; and good Mounsieur bringbee on the top of a thistle; and, good mounsieur, bringMND IV.i.12
mee the hony bag. Doe not fret your selfe too much in theme the honey bag. Do not fret yourself too much in theMND IV.i.13
action, Mounsieur; and good Mounsieur haue a care theaction, Monsieur; and, good Monsieur, have a care theMND IV.i.14
hony bag breake not, I would be loth to haue yon ouer-flownehoney bag break not, I would be loath to have you overflownMND IV.i.15
with a hony-bag signiour. Where's Mounsieurwith a honey bag, signor. Where's MonsieurMND IV.i.16
Mustardseed?Mustardseed?MND IV.i.17
Giue me your neafe, Mounsieur Mustardseed.Give me your neaf, Monsieur Mustardseed.MND IV.i.19
Pray you leaue your courtesie good Mounsieur.Pray you, leave your courtesy, good Monsieur.MND IV.i.20
Nothing good Mounsieur, but to help CaualeryNothing, good Monsieur, but to help CavaleryMND IV.i.22
Cobweb to scratch. I must to the Barbers Mounsieur,Cobweb to scratch. I must to the barber's, Monsieur,MND IV.i.23
for me-thinkes I am maruellous hairy about the face. Andfor methinks I am marvellous hairy about the face. AndMND IV.i.24
I am such a tender asse, if my haire do but tickle me, II am such a tender ass, if my hair do but tickle me, IMND IV.i.25
must scratch.must scratch.MND IV.i.26
I haue a reasonable good eare in musicke. Let vs haueI have a reasonable good ear in music. Let's haveMND IV.i.28
the tongs and the bones. Musicke Tongs, Rurall Musicke.the tongs and the bones.MND IV.i.29
Truly a pecke of Prouender; I could munch yourTruly, a peck of provender. I could munch yourMND IV.i.31
good dry Oates. Me-thinkes I haue a great desire to a bottlegood dry oats. Methinks I have a great desire to a bottleMND IV.i.32
of hay: good hay, sweete hay hath no fellow. of hay. Good hay, sweet hay, hath no fellow.MND IV.i.33
I had rather haue a handfull or two of dried pease.I had rather have a handful or two of dried pease.MND IV.i.36
But I pray you let none of your people stirre me, I haueBut, I pray you, let none of your people stir me. I haveMND IV.i.37
an exposition of sleepe come vpon me.an exposition of sleep come upon me.MND IV.i.38
When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer.When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer.MND IV.i.199
My next is, most faire Piramus. Hey ho. Peter My next is ‘ Most fair Pyramus.’ Heigh ho! PeterMND IV.i.200
Quince? Flute the bellowes-mender? Snout the tinker? Quince! Flute the bellows-mender! Snout the tinker!MND IV.i.201
Starueling? Gods my life! Stolne hence, and left meStarveling! God's my life – stolen hence and left meMND IV.i.202
asleepe: I haue had a most rare vision. I had aasleep! – I have had a most rare vision. I have had aMND IV.i.203
dreame, past the wit of man, to say, what dreame it was. Mandream past the wit of man to say what dream it was. ManMND IV.i.204
is but an Asse, if he goe about to expound this dreame. Me-thoughtis but an ass if he go about to expound this dream. MethoughtMND IV.i.205
I was, there is no man can tell what. Me-thoughtI was – there is no man can tell what. MethoughtMND IV.i.206
I was, and me-thought I had. But man is but a patch'dI was – and methought I had – but man is but a patchedMND IV.i.207
foole, if he will offer to say, what me-thought I had. Thefool if he will offer to say what methought I had. TheMND IV.i.208
eye of man hath not heard, the eare of man hath not seen,eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen,MND IV.i.209
mans hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceiue,man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive,MND IV.i.210
nor his heart to report, what my dreame was. I will get nor his heart to report what my dream was! I will getMND IV.i.211
PeterQuince to write a ballet of this dreame, it shall bePeter Quince to write a ballad of this dream. It shall beMND IV.i.212
called Bottomes Dreame, because it hath no bottome; andcalled ‘ Bottom's Dream ’, because it hath no bottom; andMND IV.i.213
I will sing it in the latter end of a play, before the Duke.I will sing it in the latter end of a play before the Duke.MND IV.i.214
Peraduenture, to make it the more gracious, I shall singPeradventure, to make it the more gracious, I shall singMND IV.i.215
it at her death. it at her death.MND IV.i.216
Where are these Lads? Where are these hearts?Where are these lads? Where are these hearts?MND IV.ii.23
Masters, I am to discourse wonders; but ask meMasters, I am to discourse wonders – but askMND IV.ii.26
not what. For if I tell you, I am no true Athenian. Ime not what; for if I tell you, I am not true Athenian. – IMND IV.ii.27
will tell you euery thing as it fell out.will tell you everything, right as it fell out!MND IV.ii.28
Not a word of me: all that I will tell you, is, thatNot a word of me! All that I will tell you is – thatMND IV.ii.30
the Duke hath dined. Get your apparell together, goodthe Duke hath dined. Get your apparel together, goodMND IV.ii.31
strings to your beards, new ribbands to your pumps, strings to your beards, new ribbons to your pumps.MND IV.ii.32
meete presently at the Palace, euery man looke ore hisMeet presently at the palace. Every man look o'er hisMND IV.ii.33
part: for the short and the long is, our play is preferred:part. For the short and the long is, our play is preferred.MND IV.ii.34
In any case let Thisby haue cleane linnen: and let not himIn any case, let Thisbe have clean linen; and let not himMND IV.ii.35
that playes the Lion, paire his nailes, for they shall hang outthat plays the lion pare his nails, for they shall hang outMND IV.ii.36
for the Lions clawes. And most deare Actors, eate no Onions,for the lion's claws. And, most dear actors, eat no onionsMND IV.ii.37
nor Garlicke; for wee are to vtter sweete breath, and I doenor garlic; for we are to utter sweet breath, and I doMND IV.ii.38
not doubt but to heare them say, it is a sweet Comedy. Nonot doubt but to hear them say it is a sweet comedy. NoMND IV.ii.39
more words: away, go away.more words. Away – go, away!MND IV.ii.40
O grim lookt night, ô night with hue so blacke,O grim-looked night, O night with hue so black,MND V.i.167
O night, which euer art, when day is not:O night which ever art when day is not!MND V.i.168
O night, ô night, alacke, alacke, alacke,O night, O night, alack, alack, alack,MND V.i.169
I feare my Thisbies promise is forgot.I fear my Thisbe's promise is forgot.MND V.i.170
And thou ô wall, thou sweet and louely wall,And thou, O wall, O sweet, O lovely wall,MND V.i.171
That stands between her fathers ground and mine,That standest between her father's ground and mine,MND V.i.172
Thou wall, ô wall, o sweet and louely wall,Thou wall, O wall, O sweet and lovely wall,MND V.i.173
Shew me thy chinke, to blinke through with mine eine.Show me thy chink to blink through with mine eyne.MND V.i.174
Thankes courteous wall. Ioue shield thee well for this.Thanks, courteous wall; Jove shield thee well for this.MND V.i.175
But what see I? No Thisbie doe I see.But what see I? No Thisbe do I see.MND V.i.176
O wicked wall, through whom I see no blisse,O wicked wall, through whom I see no bliss:MND V.i.177
Curst be thy stones for thus deceiuing mee.Cursed be thy stones for thus deceiving me!MND V.i.178
No in truth sir, he should not. Deceiuing me, / Is No, in truth sir, he should not. ‘Deceiving me' isMND V.i.181
Thisbies cue; she is to enter, and I am to spy / HerThisbe's cue. She is to enter now, and I am to spy herMND V.i.182
through the wall. You shall see it will fall. / Pat as I toldthrough the wall. You shall see – it will fall pat as I toldMND V.i.183
you; yonder she comes.you. Yonder she comes.MND V.i.184
I see a voyce; now will I to the chinke,I see a voice. Now will I to the chinkMND V.i.189
To spy and I can heare my Thisbies face. To spy an I can hear my Thisbe's face.MND V.i.190
Thisbie?Thisbe!MND V.i.191.1
Thinke what thou wilt, I am thy Louers grace,Think what thou wilt, I am thy lover's grace,MND V.i.192
And like Limander am I trusty still.And like Limander am I trusty still.MND V.i.193
Not Shafalus to Procrus was so true.Not Shafalus to Procrus was so true.MND V.i.195
O kisse me through the hole of this vile wall.O kiss me through the hole of this vile wall!MND V.i.197
Wilt thou at Ninnies tombe meete me straight way?Wilt thou at Ninny's tomb meet me straight way?MND V.i.199
Sweet Moone, I thank thee for thy sunny beames,Sweet moon, I thank thee for thy sunny beams;MND V.i.264
I thanke thee Moone, for shining now so bright:I thank thee, moon, for shining now so bright;MND V.i.265
For by thy gracious, golden, glittering beames,For by thy gracious, golden, glittering beamsMND V.i.266
I trust to taste of truest Thisbies sight.I trust to take of truest Thisbe sight.MND V.i.267
But stay: O spight!But stay – O spite!MND V.i.268
but marke, poore Knight,But mark, poor Knight,MND V.i.269
What dreadful dole is heere?What dreadful dole is here?MND V.i.270
Eyes do you see!Eyes, do you see? – MND V.i.271
How can it be!How can it be?MND V.i.272
O dainty Ducke: O Deere!O dainty duck, O dear!MND V.i.273
Thy mantle good;Thy mantle good – MND V.i.274
what staind with blood!What, stained with blood!MND V.i.275
Approch you Furies fell:Approach, ye Furies fell.MND V.i.276
O Fates! come, come:O Fates, come, come,MND V.i.277
Cut thred and thrum,Cut thread and thrum,MND V.i.278
Quaile, crush, conclude, and quell.Quail, crush, conclude, and quell.MND V.i.279
O wherefore Nature, did'st thou Lions frame?O wherefore, nature, didst thou lions frame,MND V.i.283
Since Lion vilde hath heere deflour'd my deere:Since lion vile hath here deflowered my dear?MND V.i.284
Which is: no, no, which was the fairest DameWhich is – no, no, which was – the fairest dameMND V.i.285
That liu'd, that lou'd, that lik'd, that look'd with cheere.That lived, that loved, that liked, that looked with cheer.MND V.i.286
Come teares, confound:Come tears, confound;MND V.i.287
Out sword, and woundOut sword, and woundMND V.i.288
The pap of Piramus:The pap of Pyramus.MND V.i.289
I, that left pap,Ay, that left pap,MND V.i.290
where heart doth hop;Where heart doth hop.MND V.i.291
Thus dye I, thus, thus, thus.Thus die I – thus, thus, thus.MND V.i.292
Now am I dead,Now am I dead,MND V.i.293
now am I fled,Now am I fled;MND V.i.294
my soule is in the sky,My soul is in the sky;MND V.i.295
Tongue lose thy light,Tongue, lose thy light;MND V.i.296
Moone take thy flight,Moon, take thy flight;MND V.i.297
Now dye, dye, dye, dye, dye.Now die, die, die, die, die.MND V.i.298
No, I assure you, the wall is downe,No, I assure you, the wall is downMND V.i.342
that parted their Fathers. Will it please you to see thethat parted their fathers. Will it please you to see theMND V.i.343
Epilogue, or to heare a Bergomask dance, betweene two ofepilogue, or to hear a Bergomask dance between two ofMND V.i.344
our company? our company?MND V.i.345
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL