ROMAN
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I know you well sir, and you know mee: yourI know you well, sir, and you know me. YourCor IV.iii.1
name I thinke is Adrian.name, I think, is Adrian.Cor IV.iii.2
I am a Roman, and my Seruices are as you are,I am a Roman; and my services are, as you are,Cor IV.iii.4
against 'em. Know you me yet.against 'em. Know you me yet?Cor IV.iii.5
The same sir.The same, sir.Cor IV.iii.7
There hath beene in Rome straunge Insurrections:There hath been in Rome strange insurrections:Cor IV.iii.12
The people, against the Senatours, Patricians, and Nobles.the people against the senators, patricians, and nobles.Cor IV.iii.13
The maine blaze of it is past, but a small thingThe main blaze of it is past, but a small thingCor IV.iii.17
would make it flame againe. For the Nobles receyue so towould make it flame again. For the nobles receive so toCor IV.iii.18
heart, the Banishment of that worthy Coriolanus, thatheart the banishment of that worthy Coriolanus thatCor IV.iii.19
they are in a ripe aptnesse, to take al power from thethey are in a ripe aptness to take all power from theCor IV.iii.20
people, and to plucke from them their Tribunes for euer.people and to pluck from them their tribunes for ever.Cor IV.iii.21
This lyes glowing I can tell you, and is almost matureThis lies glowing, I can tell you, and is almost matureCor IV.iii.22
for the violent breaking out.for the violent breaking out.Cor IV.iii.23
Banish'd sir.Banished, sir.Cor IV.iii.25
The day serues well for them now. I haue heard it The day serves well for them now. I have heard itCor IV.iii.28
saide, the fittest time to corrupt a mans Wife, is when shee'ssaid the fittest time to corrupt a man's wife is when she'sCor IV.iii.29
falne out with her Husband. Your Noble Tullus Auffidius fallen out with her husband. Your noble Tullus AufidiusCor IV.iii.30
well appeare well in these Warres, his great Opposer Coriolanus will appear well in these wars, his great opposer, Coriolanus,Cor IV.iii.31
being now in no request of his countrey. being now in no request of his country.Cor IV.iii.32
I shall betweene this and Supper, tell you mostI shall between this and supper tell you mostCor IV.iii.36
strange things from Rome: all tending to the good ofstrange things from Rome, all tending to the good ofCor IV.iii.37
their Aduersaries. Haue you an Army ready say you?their adversaries. Have you an army ready, say you?Cor IV.iii.38
I am ioyfull to heare of their readinesse, and am theI am joyful to hear of their readiness, and am theCor IV.iii.42
man I thinke, that shall set them in present Action. Soman, I think, that shall set them in present action. So,Cor IV.iii.43
sir, heartily well met, and most glad of your Company.sir, heartily well met, and most glad of your company.Cor IV.iii.44
Well, let vs go together. Well, let us go together.Cor IV.iii.47
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