LUCIANA
Show:
Original textModern textKey line
Perhaps some Merchant hath inuited him, Perhaps some merchant hath invited him,CE II.i.4
And from the Mart he's somewhere gone to dinner: And from the mart he's somewhere gone to dinner.CE II.i.5
Good Sister let vs dine, and neuer fret; Good sister, let us dine, and never fret.CE II.i.6
A man is Master of his libertie: A man is master of his liberty.CE II.i.7
Time is their Master, and when they see time, Time is their master, and when they see timeCE II.i.8
They'll goe or come; if so, be patient Sister. They'll go or come. If so, be patient, sister.CE II.i.9
Because their businesse still lies out a dore. Because their business still lies out o' door.CE II.i.11
Oh, know he is the bridle of your will. O, know he is the bridle of your will.CE II.i.13
Why, headstrong liberty is lasht with woe: Why, headstrong liberty is lashed with woe.CE II.i.15
There's nothing situate vnder heauens eye, There's nothing situate under heaven's eyeCE II.i.16
But hath his bound in earth, in sea, in skie. But hath his bound in earth, in sea, in sky.CE II.i.17
The beasts, the fishes, and the winged fowles The beasts, the fishes, and the winged fowls,CE II.i.18
Are their males subiects, and at their controules: Are their males' subjects and at their controls.CE II.i.19
Man more diuine, the Master of all these, Man, more divine, the master of all these,CE II.i.20
Lord of the wide world, and wilde watry seas, Lord of the wide world and wild watery seas,CE II.i.21
Indued with intellectuall sence and soules, Indued with intellectual sense and souls,CE II.i.22
Of more preheminence then fish and fowles, Of more pre-eminence than fish and fowls,CE II.i.23
Are masters to their females, and their Lords: Are masters to their females, and their lords.CE II.i.24
Then let your will attend on their accords. Then let your will attend on their accords.CE II.i.25
Not this, but troubles of the marriage bed. Not this, but troubles of the marriage-bed.CE II.i.27
Ere I learne loue, Ile practise to obey. Ere I learn love, I'll practise to obey.CE II.i.29
Till he come home againe, I would forbeare. Till he come home again I would forbear.CE II.i.31
Well, I will marry one day but to trie: Well, I will marry one day, but to try.CE II.i.42
Heere comes your man, now is your husband nie. Here comes your man. Now is your husband nigh.CE II.i.43
Spake hee so doubtfully, thou couldst not feele Spake he so doubtfully thou couldst not feelCE II.i.50
his meaning. his meaning?CE II.i.51
Quoth who? Quoth who?CE II.i.69
Fie how impatience lowreth in your face. Fie, how impatience loureth in your face.CE II.i.86
Selfe-harming Iealousie; fie beat it hence. Self-harming jealousy! Fie, beat it hence.CE II.i.102
How manie fond fooles serue mad Ielousie? How many fond fools serve mad jealousy!CE II.i.116
Fie brother, how the world is chang'd with you: Fie, brother, how the world is changed with you.CE II.ii.161
When were you wont to vse my sister thus? When were you wont to use my sister thus?CE II.ii.162
She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner. She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner.CE II.ii.163
Dromio, goe bid the seruants spred for dinner. Dromio, go bid the servants spread for dinner.CE II.ii.196
Why prat'st thou to thy selfe, and answer'st not? Why pratest thou to thyself, and answerest not?CE II.ii.202
Dromio, thou Dromio, thou snaile, thou slug, thou sot. Dromio, thou Dromio, thou snail, thou slug, thou sot.CE II.ii.203
If thou art chang'd to ought, 'tis to an Asse. If thou art changed to aught, 'tis to an ass.CE II.ii.209
Come, come, Antipholus, we dine to late.Come, come, Antipholus, we dine too late.CE II.ii.229
And may it be that you haue quite forgot And may it be that you have quite forgotCE III.ii.1
A husbands office? shall Antipholus A husband's office? Shall, Antipholus,CE III.ii.2
Euen in the spring of Loue, thy Loue-springs rot? Even in the spring of love thy love-springs rot?CE III.ii.3
Shall loue in buildings grow so ruinate? Shall love in building grow so ruinous?CE III.ii.4
If you did wed my sister for her wealth, If you did wed my sister for her wealth,CE III.ii.5
Then for her wealths-sake vse her with more kindnesse: Then for her wealth's sake use her with more kindness;CE III.ii.6
Or if you like else-where doe it by stealth, Or if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth – CE III.ii.7
Muffle your false loue with some shew of blindnesse: Muffle your false love with some show of blindness.CE III.ii.8
Let not my sister read it in your eye: Let not my sister read it in your eye.CE III.ii.9
Be not thy tongue thy owne shames Orator: Be not thy tongue thy own shame's orator.CE III.ii.10
Looke sweet, speake faire, become disloyaltie: Look sweet, speak fair, become disloyalty.CE III.ii.11
Apparell vice like vertues harbenger: Apparel vice like virtue's harbinger.CE III.ii.12
Beare a faire presence, though your heart be tainted, Bear a fair presence, though your heart be tainted;CE III.ii.13
Teach sinne the carriage of a holy Saint, Teach sin the carriage of a holy saint;CE III.ii.14
Be secret false: what need she be acquainted? Be secret-false – what need she be acquainted?CE III.ii.15
What simple thiefe brags of his owne attaine? What simple thief brags of his own attaint?CE III.ii.16
'Tis double wrong to truant with your bed, 'Tis double wrong to truant with your bedCE III.ii.17
And let her read it in thy lookes at boord: And let her read it in thy looks at board.CE III.ii.18
Shame hath a bastard fame, well managed, Shame hath a bastard fame, well managed;CE III.ii.19
Ill deeds is doubled with an euill word: Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word.CE III.ii.20
Alas poore women, make vs not beleeue Alas, poor women, make us but believe – CE III.ii.21
(Being compact of credit) that you loue vs, Being compact of credit – that you love us.CE III.ii.22
Though others haue the arme, shew vs the sleeue: Though others have the arm, show us the sleeve.CE III.ii.23
We in your motion turne, and you may moue vs. We in your motion turn, and you may move us.CE III.ii.24
Then gentle brother get you in againe; Then, gentle brother, get you in again.CE III.ii.25
Comfort my sister, cheere her, call her wise; Comfort my sister, cheer her, call her wife.CE III.ii.26
'Tis holy sport to be a little vaine, 'Tis holy sport to be a little vainCE III.ii.27
When the sweet breath of flatterie conquers strife. When the sweet breath of flattery conquers strife.CE III.ii.28
What are you mad, that you doe reason so? What, are you mad, that you do reason so?CE III.ii.53
It is a fault that springeth from your eie. It is a fault that springeth from your eye.CE III.ii.55
Gaze when you should, and that will cleere your sight. Gaze where you should, and that will clear your sight.CE III.ii.57
Why call you me loue? Call my sister so. Why call you me ‘ love ’? Call my sister so.CE III.ii.59
That's my sister. That's my sister.CE III.ii.60.2
All this my sister is, or else should be. All this my sister is, or else should be.CE III.ii.65
Oh soft sir, hold you still: O, soft, sir, hold you still.CE III.ii.69.2
Ile fetch my sister to get her good will.• Exit.I'll fetch my sister to get her good will.CE III.ii.70
First he deni'de you had in him no right. First, he denied you had in him no right.CE IV.ii.7
Then swore he that he was a stranger heere. Then swore he that he was a stranger here.CE IV.ii.9
Then pleaded I for you. Then pleaded I for you.CE IV.ii.11.1
That loue I begg'd for you, he begg'd of me. That love I begged for you, he begged of me.CE IV.ii.12
With words, that in an honest suit might moue. With words that in an honest suit might move.CE IV.ii.14
First, he did praise my beautie, then my speech. First he did praise my beauty, then my speech.CE IV.ii.15
Haue patience I beseech. Have patience, I beseech.CE IV.ii.16.2
Who would be iealous then of such a one? Who would be jealous, then, of such a one?CE IV.ii.23
No euill lost is wail'd, when it is gone. No evil lost is wailed when it is gone.CE IV.ii.24
How hast thou lost thy breath? How hast thou lost thy breath?CE IV.ii.30.1
Alas how fiery, and how sharpe he lookes. Alas, how fiery and how sharp he looks!CE IV.iv.48
And I am witnesse with her that she did: And I am witness with her that she did.CE IV.iv.87
Aye me poore man, how pale and wan he looks. Ay me, poor man, how pale and wan he looks.CE IV.iv.106
God helpe poore soules, how idlely doe they talke. God help, poor souls, how idly do they talk!CE IV.iv.127
God for thy mercy, they are loose againe. God, for thy mercy, they are loose again!CE IV.iv.142
She neuer reprehended him but mildely, She never reprehended him but mildly,CE V.i.87
When he demean'd himselfe, rough, rude, and wildly,When he demeaned himself rough, rude, and wildly.CE V.i.88
Why beare you these rebukes, and answer not? Why bear you these rebukes, and answer not?CE V.i.89
Complaine vnto the Duke of this indignity. Complain unto the Duke of this indignity.CE V.i.113
Kneele to the Duke before he passe the Abbey. Kneel to the Duke before he pass the abbey.CE V.i.129
Nere may I looke on day, nor sleepe on night, Ne'er may I look on day nor sleep on nightCE V.i.210
But she tels to your Highnesse simple truth. But she tells to your highness simple truth.CE V.i.211
SHAKESPEARE'S WORDS © 2018 DAVID CRYSTAL & BEN CRYSTAL